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brotheral
09-13-2007, 09:39
Hello Fellow Nature/Outdoor lovers !! I've done a good bit of backpacking, but not in the past few years. The last pack I had was a Dana Terraplane. Very comfortable, but I no longer have it.... I've been doing alot of camping and hiking, but really miss backpacking. Wish I could've spent the night at several spots I hiked to recently. I'm considering A Starlite pack and would appreciate some feedback on this.
Have you switched from a heavier pack to a Starlite or something comparable ?? What has your experience been ??:confused:
Thanks.......................BrotherAL

Frolicking Dinosaurs
09-13-2007, 09:53
This pack was recently discussed in this thread (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=27440)

brotheral
09-13-2007, 10:51
What I'm really wanting to know is: Is there someone out there that has switched from a very comfortable (for you) heavier pack (5-6+ lbs) to a 25-30 oz pack to lighten their load. Was it worth it ?? What, if anything, did you sacrifice for the weight savings ???
Thanks for your reply F Ds !!

ronmoak
09-13-2007, 13:10
What I'm really wanting to know is: Is there someone out there that has switched from a very comfortable (for you) heavier pack (5-6+ lbs) to a 25-30 oz pack to lighten their load. Was it worth it ?? What, if anything, did you sacrifice for the weight savings ???
Thanks for your reply F Ds !!

Switching from a heavier to lighter pack only makes sense once you’ve undergone the overall process of lightening your load. As I frequently tell people, “It’s easier to carry a light load in a heavy pack than a heavy load in a light pack.”

Lighter packs frequently have much less volume so the process of shedding pounds also entails a reduction in pack volume. Once you’ve gone through the processes to reduce your the weight and volume, you’re much better prepared to sort through the variety of packs that may suit your needs.

Ron

Footslogger
09-13-2007, 13:23
What I'm really wanting to know is: Is there someone out there that has switched from a very comfortable (for you) heavier pack (5-6+ lbs) to a 25-30 oz pack to lighten their load. Was it worth it ?? What, if anything, did you sacrifice for the weight savings ???
Thanks for your reply F Ds !!

==========================================

I did. Went from a Gregory Shasta to a Granite Gear Vapor Trail.

It was most definitely worth it. In reality I sacrificed NOTHING since in moving to the lighter, smaller pack I kept everything necessary for basic comfort/safety but switched to lighter weight alternatives.

Bottom line ...I carry pretty much everything I used to. Just lighter and more compact stuff and in some cases, fewer "multiples" of things that I realized I didn't need in the first place.

I can say with absolute confidence that I will NEVER again carry a pack that weighs more than 3 lbs empty and will NEVER again carry total loads over 30 lbs for any great distance - water scarcity being one of the exceptions.

'Slogger

PKH
09-13-2007, 18:12
I'm pretty much in agreement with Footslogger. I went from a 6 1/2 lb LL Bean pack to a ULA P2, and most recently to a Starlite, steadily lightening and refining my packload all the way. Today my typical three day load is 18 lbs. I can go lighter but this is where I seem to have settled in. As Footslogger says, with the exception of very dry hikes, or those rare 10 day trips without resupply, I can't see breaking 30 lbs again. When I think of what I used to carry . . . . .

I have everything I need; substantial shelter, comfortable pad and fine sleeping bag, raingear, extra clothes, good grub and a simple, efficient cooking system, and even can spare a lb or two for luxuries.

As Ron says; try to concentrate on lightening your load first before buying a very light pack.

Cheers,

PKH

toddhiker
09-13-2007, 19:58
Everything above is correct.

I started w/ a Gregory external, then Gregory internal, then a Golite Speed, now the Starlite. I'm very happy (albeit w/limited use).

I wouldn't have been happy without lightening my load 1st, as the others have all said. Although I must say that the Starlite's pack volume is huge by lightweight, durable pack standards.

saimyoji
10-22-2007, 13:00
Bump. I'm considering this pack to carry my newly reduced 16 lbs base weight. Any recent comments?

bigcranky
10-22-2007, 14:43
I wouldn't change any of my comments from last month (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=27440). I love this pack.

My Starlite 2005 is plenty large enough for my winter load here in the Southeast, and carries over 30 pounds well, though I only hit that with a full winter load with food and water.

The pad pocket carries my full-length Prolite 4 plus a 4-section Z-rest sit pad, plus my "office" -- maps, journal pages, etc., -- all with easy access when I stop for a break. I can reach a water bottle without taking off the pack. The outside mesh pockets carry a lot of stuff. The front mesh pocket easily holds my Waldies camp clogs, and I stuff my wind pants and rain cover inside the clogs. I also carry a sanitation kit and my mini tripod in the same pocket. The tall side pocket carries an extra water bottle, my wet tarp, aqua mira, and my umbrella. The short side pocket carries my main water bottle and a small bag of gorp or some such.

My WM Antelope 5-F down bag fits in a Granite Gear compression sack which easily fits in the bottom of the main compartment. A stuffed-full Ursack fits sideways on top. Then I still have room for plenty of clothing, and even a tent, if I were to carry one.

In warmer weather, it compresses reasonably well around a smaller kit. In any case, the pack is short and squat, so it doesn't loom over your head. I can wear a brimmed hat without the back bumping into the pack (which I *hate*.)

Hope this helps. Gotta run.