PDA

View Full Version : Need a Thru 08 partner



frankc
10-01-2007, 15:47
I am going to attempt a first time thru hike in 08. I am looking to leave march/april. I would consider myself an average hiker. I am looking for someone who has also done a lot of research on the trail, and would also be attempting their first thru iike of the AT. I dont mind going to fast or too slow, but I would like to be back before September for the Fall semester. If interested PM me or send me an mesage on AIM, my s/n is Sk8erSpanky.

Jim Adams
10-01-2007, 21:58
frankc,
just go!
you will have a good time. there will be alot of other hikers also starting out and you can find some one that you get along with and hike the same speed. trying to find the right person before your hike usually leads to the loss of a new friend.

geek

rafe
10-01-2007, 22:02
What geek said. You'll have plenty of company at the start. I know of few succesful "pre-arranged" trail partnerships -- except for folks connected by family, marriage, or true love...

Appalachian Tater
10-01-2007, 22:12
What they said. If you're worried about being alone on the trail, don't be. In fact, you may find yourself wanting a little solitude at times, especially on the south end.

frankc
10-04-2007, 14:09
Alright, I guess I can just head out there then, I may end up section hiking it, seeing how taking a semester off of college would put me back another year. The AT will still be there to thru hike when I graduate!

warraghiyagey
10-04-2007, 14:24
Alright, I guess I can just head out there then, I may end up section hiking it, seeing how taking a semester off of college would put me back another year. The AT will still be there to thru hike when I graduate!

College will also still be there at the end of your thru. And your college years are not the worst part of life that you may consider extending.
All the posts are right on the mark. It is doubtful that you know or have met anyone that you could leave Springer with and both end up at Katahdin. However it is very likely that in short order on the trail you will meet at least one person that you will summit Katahdin with a couple thousand miles later. Your hiking partner will be on the trail when you get there. And you naturally find each other.
Enjoy.:)

Johnny Thunder
10-04-2007, 14:31
College will also still be there at the end of your thru. And your college years are not the worst part of life that you may consider :)


...Here we go again.

ChinMusic
10-04-2007, 14:39
As a parent, I say "GRADUATE FIRST" and then "go see the world".

Jim Adams
10-04-2007, 14:42
As a parent, I say "GRADUATE FIRST" and then "go see the world".

go see the world...it will teach you how to graduate!:-?

geek

warraghiyagey
10-04-2007, 14:52
Anything you will do with yourlife will certainly be enhanced by the trail experience, most notably finding out exactly who you are and what you are made of.
Will certainly make the remainder of your college more fruitful and successful.

earthbound
10-04-2007, 15:03
I just graduated from college and I am glad I'm going hiking now. This way I do not have to worry about ending my hike by a certain time or have to return to society and school and deadlines and all of that crap. School is done and now I can just focus on my hike and see where it takes me next. After long hikes there is a readjustment period and going right back into school would be pretty tough, but I do have a friend who did that. Thru-hiked and then went right into school- he still loved his hike!

Johnny Thunder
10-04-2007, 15:04
Delaying college to go on a hike is like delaying a dental appointment to go on a hike.

Advising someone to do either is reprehensible.

wrongway_08
10-04-2007, 15:16
I put off college to go do my stuff, never ended up going. I am making more then some my buddies from school that went through college and I dont have any of that school debt to repay. I have also knocked a lot off of my THINGS TO DO LIST, while some of my buddies are just starting to try and figure out how to do the stuff they kept putting off and repay all that debt.
I am not sayn to not go to college but takn off a year to do the hike wont screw up anything.

What if you die in two years? Would you think:

1) Wow sure glad I got a least 2 years of college in :-?

OR

2) Wow I am glad to have seen the AT and learned all I did while in college for the year. :D

Either way college didnt happen all the way - at least you did get to do the trail ;) :D

ChinMusic
10-04-2007, 16:02
With some of these posts Judge Smails comes to mind.....

warraghiyagey
10-04-2007, 16:40
Advising someone to do either is reprehensible.

Wow, reprehensible. Really? I have two friends that took a year off between high school and college with nothing as grand as an AT hike on their agenda. Both went on to finish in four years and have had great careers. Anything reprehensible about the people around them, family that supported this decision?
Is it written in stone that one must finish college in 4 years straight or else their lives will not be fruitful. They're both happy and well adjusted.
Reprehensible. Really? I took a semester off in college too. Should I start feeling bad about that now? I hadn't before but gee, maybe you're right. I should start feeling awful about it right now.
Think I'll go curl up in a corner and rock back and forth for a few days. Oh the peril of it all.

Appalachian Tater
10-04-2007, 18:17
I think either way could be the right decision depending on several variables. It's probably best to just finish up college and get your degree if you're anywhere near finishing and then go hike. Once that degree is in your pocket, you've got it. The AT will still be there after graduation.

On the other hand, if you're a sophomore and just dropped your major and have no idea what you want to do with your life, and are just wasting time and money in school, hiking the AT is a good way to take a break, buy a little time, and have a little breathing room to think, while still doing accomplishing something. College will still be there after your thru-hike.

My perspective is from spending two years finishing a degree rather than starting from scratch so that I would have the degree. It has definitely proved useful later, both in work and further education, giving me opportunities I might not have had if I had dropped out. I did take a break from school by taking some "fun" classes at another institution for a quarter.

ChinMusic
10-04-2007, 20:01
As an employer, knowing that someone had the ability to plan out, stick to, and accomplish a thru-hike, could have an impact. This may not impress all employers but it would me.

Appalachian Tater
10-04-2007, 22:57
As an employer, knowing that someone had the ability to plan out, stick to, and accomplish a thru-hike, could have an impact. This may not impress all employers but it would me.

I have been on a job interview since my hike and we spent a good deal of time talking about my hike. It wasn't on my resume but of course they asked about the employment gap. I agree with that it would impress most employers, especially if you present it correctly, but a degree would be more useful than a hike IF it were an either/or choice.

Frosty
10-04-2007, 23:16
What if you die in two years? Would you think:

1) Wow sure glad I got a least 2 years of college in :-?

OR...This is a terrible way to plan your life, planning as if you were going to die in two years.

Under this idea, it would be foolish to save any money for anything, foolish to worry about long-term fitness or health, foolish to save for anything. It would be smart under the concept of planning as if you were going to die in two years to go as deeply into debt as possible:

If you die in two years, would you rather have traveled Europe on credits cards you now don't have to repay 'casue you're dead, or ... (do anything constructive)

This "plan" only works if you actually do die, not what ANYONE has in mind. If you make life decisions based on "what if I die in two years" and you don't die, your life will be a total mess.

Putting hiking first or college first is a personal decision. I went back to school in my late 20's. Everyone was 18-22 and believe me there is a huge difference between 18 and 28. My classmates saw me as an adult; I saw them as juvenile.

I got better grades in school, but I would never recommend anyone trade in going to college right after high school for hiking the trail.

The trail will be there after you graduate, and your trail experience will be basically the same (no different because you are a few years older) when you graduate.

College may also be there for you, but the experience will NOT be the same, and not necessarily in a good way.

Think hard before putting college off to hike. Put off working after college, hell yeah! As long as you can. But first get that degree.

Appalachian Tater
10-04-2007, 23:18
Course you always regret the things you didn't do and rarely those you did.

ChinMusic
10-05-2007, 00:01
Frosty - You are wise beyond my age........;)

jrwiesz
10-05-2007, 03:08
What if you die in two years? Would you think:



You're DEAD. You don't think after your dead.

wrongway_08
10-05-2007, 15:16
You're DEAD. You don't think after your dead.

Smart arse :D

Johnny Thunder
10-08-2007, 15:14
Wow, reprehensible. Really? I have two friends that took a year off between high school and college with nothing as grand as an AT hike on their agenda. Both went on to finish in four years and have had great careers. Anything reprehensible about the people around them, family that supported this decision?
Is it written in stone that one must finish college in 4 years straight or else their lives will not be fruitful. They're both happy and well adjusted.
Reprehensible. Really? I took a semester off in college too. Should I start feeling bad about that now? I hadn't before but gee, maybe you're right. I should start feeling awful about it right now.
Think I'll go curl up in a corner and rock back and forth for a few days. Oh the peril of it all.

Wow...when I lit this fire I half-expected it to burn through the weekend so's I'd have something fun to return to. Let's stir the ashes for a moment.

I'll reiterate that advising someone to delay education for a hike is the same as advising someone to skip a dental appointment to go on a hike.

Clearly you mis-read my post. When I said advising you read actually doing...

So, let me clarify...If you want to take your time and live your life to the beat of your own drum, well, that's your choice. But when you start using anecdotal information to back up your points that's where we have to draw the line.

Because, here's what it boils down to...there are just some things in this Amerkin life that you really should do to provide yourself a good foundation to best able to find hapiness in the future. One of those things you should do is to seek "education" when the opportunity presents itself. Another is to keep your teeth clean while you are young.

When currently enrolled in an institution of higher learning one has two options...finish or not finish. When one removes one's self from said institution the likelyhood of return and subsequent completion falls drastically.

You should never delay or quit education (or dental work) because it is booring, or painful, or just not fun. These are copouts and show that you're lazy.

But on the other hand, lots of people don't go to dentists because their religous convictions tell them not to. This I cannot help but agree with. Hell, Chiropractors are doctors and even they don't go to real doctors. However, you must remember that these people have made informed decisions as to why not participating in something that will help them is the right decision. Informed decisions.

So, since we're going to probably start lobbing mortars of anecdotes I'll add one...A few years ago I was enrolled in an institution of higher learning. At the time I was studying something that I found booring and drab and alltogether unenjoyable. There were times when I thought the best thing for me was to pack it in and go soul search.

But, you know what I did? I stuck with it. I finished it up. My friends who quit and I share similar lifestyles. Of course we do...we're still young and nobody makes that much money when they're young (at least not enough to notice a disparity between us). You know what the difference is?

No matter what happens to me I am instantly employable.

Also, as an employer I could care less what type of personal journey brought an applicant to my door. Who's to say that completing a hike is any different than surviving a parent with cancer or raising a child?

What I do care about is if someone completed education. Because before we even speak it says a few things. First, it says that the applicant is juiced about my area of business enough to study it for 4 years and still wants to work. Or, it says that the person realizes their future happiness is founded on taking a few licks and pushing through regardless of how enjoyable it might or might not be. It also shows that they were able to stick it out of 4 years of serious distractions and learn things. That means the small stuff I've got to teach them will pale in comparison.

Show me otherwise.

Blissful
10-08-2007, 16:03
Wow...when I lit this fire I half-expected it to burn through the weekend so's I'd have something fun to return to. Let's stir the ashes for a moment.

I'll reiterate that advising someone to delay education for a hike is the same as advising someone to skip a dental appointment to go on a hike.

Clearly you mis-read my post. When I said advising you read actually doing...

So, let me clarify...If you want to take your time and live your life to the beat of your own drum, well, that's your choice. But when you start using anecdotal information to back up your points that's where we have to draw the line.

Because, here's what it boils down to...there are just some things in this Amerkin life that you really should do to provide yourself a good foundation to best able to find hapiness in the future. One of those things you should do is to seek "education" when the opportunity presents itself. Another is to keep your teeth clean while you are young.

When currently enrolled in an institution of higher learning one has two options...finish or not finish. When one removes one's self from said institution the likelyhood of return and subsequent completion falls drastically.

You should never delay or quit education (or dental work) because it is booring, or painful, or just not fun. These are copouts and show that you're lazy.



Johnny, have you ever done a long distance hike? Like months on a trail like the AT?
I think you will see that doing it provides more of a learning experience than any institution made by man. Because hiking the AT is also boring, painful, and just not fun. It tests you beyond your limits. It tests your skill, your wit, your ability to problem solve, your focus on life, everything about you. It is a simple life, granted, but it is downright difficult. It is not a stroll through an amusement park (though a times the path is flat and graded). There is pain. Hunger. Cold. Heat. Fear. Boredom. Difficulty. And of course, joy, feeling of accomplishment, friends, good times, sights and sounds. It goes beyond what words can describe, really. It is all you described about higher education, really. It is the ultimate higher education in many ways. Maybe that's why few people complete it.

My son took off from college to do it. He was changed forever by it. He's now working a job as he missed getting back for the fall semester (he got the job less than a week after his hike) but will be ready to go back full time to college in the winter. He's thinking of Air Force ROTC.

I remember what one thru hiker said last year on WB after she did the trail then went on to college. "I can handle anything now." And that's the truth.

Johnny Thunder
10-08-2007, 16:45
Johnny, have you ever done a long distance hike? Like months on a trail like the AT?
I think you will see that doing it provides more of a learning experience than any institution made by man. Because hiking the AT is also boring, painful, and just not fun. It tests you beyond your limits. It tests your skill, your wit, your ability to problem solve, your focus on life, everything about you. It is a simple life, granted, but it is downright difficult. It is not a stroll through an amusement park (though a times the path is flat and graded). There is pain. Hunger. Cold. Heat. Fear. Boredom. Difficulty. And of course, joy, feeling of accomplishment, friends, good times, sights and sounds. It goes beyond what words can describe, really. It is all you described about higher education, really. It is the ultimate higher education in many ways. Maybe that's why few people complete it.

My son took off from college to do it. He was changed forever by it. He's now working a job as he missed getting back for the fall semester (he got the job less than a week after his hike) but will be ready to go back full time to college in the winter. He's thinking of Air Force ROTC.

I remember what one thru hiker said last year on WB after she did the trail then went on to college. "I can handle anything now." And that's the truth.


Awesome. So what happens if your son decides that after hiking that he doesn't want to go back to college?

Do you hop in the Delorean and go back to your first planning chat and say, "Paul, maybe we should wait until after you finish college"?

warraghiyagey
10-08-2007, 16:50
Awesome. So what happens if your son decides that after hiking that he doesn't want to go back to college?

Do you hop in the Delorean and go back to your first planning chat and say, "Paul, maybe we should wait until after you finish college"?

Apparently just wanting to disagree regardless. God forbid others should see things differently. Must make them wrong and him right and he'll fight to the death to make sure everyone knows it.

Johnny Thunder
10-08-2007, 16:56
Apparently just wanting to disagree regardless. God forbid others should see things differently. Must make them wrong and him right and he'll fight to the death to make sure everyone knows it.


Yeah, that Johnny Thunder character is a big jerk. He really is such a pain asking me to consider other things besides momentary pleasure when unwrapping my life. And what is that kid wearing moonboots for anyway?

warraghiyagey
10-08-2007, 17:11
Awesome. So what happens if your son decides that after hiking that he doesn't want to go back to college?

Do you hop in the Delorean and go back to your first planning chat and say, "Paul, maybe we should wait until after you finish college"?


Yeah, that Johnny Thunder character is a big jerk. He really is such a pain asking me to consider other things besides momentary pleasure when unwrapping my life. And what is that kid wearing moonboots for anyway?

You're not asking her to consider other things, you're being devisive.

Johnny Thunder
10-08-2007, 17:16
You're not asking her to consider other things, you're being devisive [sic].


Actually, I'm pretty sure that in my two posts I did ask her to consider other things. Like for one, the overall foundation that she was providing for her son by advising him to delay school to go on a hike. You're being divisive.

Johnny Thunder
10-08-2007, 17:29
You're not asking her to consider other things, you're being devisive.


I forgot to mention that last time I checked you were the one who cried like the child with the broken toy when I asserted that ADVISING someone to delay school to hike was reprehensible. And then when I went and gave an example of how one might make an INFORMED DECISION about delaying something that might otherwise stand to help them you clearly ignored that. Doesn't that make you sound like the one who just wants to argue? Did you forget that which you type out here on the internets is public record?

nonameyet
10-08-2007, 18:55
Sometimes in life you have to go and do something that others may find unacceptable in this culture.
Personally, for me, I'm (hopefully) thru-hiking next year before I graduate college. It's a deeply personal and emotional decision. It's something I need for my mental health. I'm in such a crossroads right now and in such a bad place emotionally and mentally that staying in college is not an option and would probably only serve to make things worse. I need to walk. I need to leave things behind for a while. If I come back to finish college then obviously it means something to me. If I don't, then obviously it doesn't mean all that much. If I am at the point that college isn't important, then I shouldn't do it. You don't need college to be a productive member society. Sure, it may help if you want to go into a certain field that requires it. If that's the case, then go to college if that field is something that will genuinely make you happy. But if that's really what you want to do, going on a hike now will not change your plans for later.
Everybody is different and you don't know what is going in a person's life. If someone needs to take a break from college for whatever reason, then chances are they have a reason other than just being bored.

Appalachian Tater
10-08-2007, 19:02
Well, since everybody is at a crossroads and dropping out of college, here's some advice I WISH someone had given me at 17:

Figure out some way to earn a decent living without too much suffering. There are some people who actually never find a career that is really satisfying so you might as well be able to earn a decent living. If you enjoy your work, that's even better, but if you work because you must, it might as well be well-paid and not too terribly awful.

Blissful
10-08-2007, 22:04
Awesome. So what happens if your son decides that after hiking that he doesn't want to go back to college?

Do you hop in the Delorean and go back to your first planning chat and say, "Paul, maybe we should wait until after you finish college"?


Well...he's finished his hike, he works now and he has plans to go back to school in January. So there isn't much more to say.

But on another note, I just want to take my hat off to those that did thru hike this year and made a fantastic effort to get back in time for college, grad school etc (those people were incredible, putting long hiking hours in to fulfill two dreams - a thru hike and their education). There were many that did so and made it for their August classes. Unfortunately we fell short due to injury but things are working out for the better.

Lyle
10-08-2007, 23:35
Totally disagree Frosty. Living as if you may die within two years means you look at what is important instead of what is customary.

I believe most students would benefit from taking a break between High School and College. So many students drift throught their first couple of years, can't even make a decision on a Major to declare. Taking some time to work, travel, experience the "real world" will more than likely result in making a better choice of what that individual would like to spend the rest of their life doing. As some have implied, maybe they will find their life calling does not even require a college degree. There are plenty of fulfilling, rewarding careers that are entered with just determination and on-the-job training.

Too many people go to school just because it was always assumed that that's what they would do and it was expected. This is a poor reason to commit to four, six, or eight years and hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. Figure out what you want, then go for it. Not everyone (I would venture, most) have not made this decision by the time they graduate High School.

You can still save, plan for the future, and keep options open, but there is nothing majical about going to college right after High School. For that matter, any time in your life, if you feel it would be benificial to take time for yourself, do it! As the saying goes, no one ever made the statement on their death bed that they wished they had spent more time at the office.

Cosmic Crusader
10-09-2007, 00:10
Too bad some folks just can't get away from that making money chain ... walking away from my dream of hiking the big 3 years ago made me a bad worker, husband and friend... but I could work over, buy flowers and pay for a few more rounds cause I made some nice $.

yeah regrets they can slap you at any point - funny thing is my only hiking regret is when I stopped
:-?

frankc
10-23-2007, 19:32
I have had some great laughs reading your responses! Thanks so much! Yall are great lol. So heres my plan. Im finishing up this semester. I am going to school for marine biology right now. I decided that I will not continue my degree torwards marine biology after this semester. Im also in the air force reserve and my commander is letting me reschedule my drills so I can hike the trail. When I get back, and I may have to cut it short if I dont make it back in time, I am going to go to school to become an RN. So i guess it works out for me either way. I cant go get my RN in the spring semester since the RN 1 (1st class u have to take through this college to get your RN degree) will not be offered until next fall anyways!

But, I must say, I am still nervous about just showing up on the trail by myself. Im 22, and i guess a beginner hiker. So im figureing theres something I will do wrong on the trail, either forget something (god forbid), have a haslle getting into town and such, I just think it would make it easier to be with someone I can plan it with, even if we dont stick together in the long run, maybe i can make it quite awile to get used to it all.

And in your honest opinions, "how much experience" should one have to hike the trail? Im physically fit, so I hope I can do it, and I have a great deal of persistance, and only small amounts of hiking experience. Am I capable of this?

Cabin Fever
10-23-2007, 21:50
How about we let him make the decision for hisself. What's that saying....hike your own hike.

mobileman
10-24-2007, 02:21
If you don't get a better offer before next March, then I would be willing to start out with you. I have hiking experience including in the smokies, but not much backpacking experience. Life experience, a pretty fair amount of that. Common sense, not too bad. Fear, not near enough. Perseverence, more than enough. We probably won't hike together too long, but enough to get the feel of the trail. The age difference is like grandfather-grandson. My present thoughts are starting on the approach trail at amiacola falls state park in Georgia about March 27, 2008. You can look up my profile here on whiteblaze and we can converse via E-mail if you wish. If you get a better offer, thats ok too.

squirrels33
12-24-2007, 13:22
Frank!
I think I emailed you on another forum, but I am very interested in hiking the AT this spring. Email me when you get the chance... braunc@gnnewspaper.com! Don't worry about college...it will be there when you get back. Do it now!!!! (with me) =)

Bogeara
01-02-2008, 19:03
I was concerned about the same thing. I've been planning for months and had no one to travel with except my dog. Everything I've research says the same thing, "Don't worry about it". Thiis is my first thru hike and I'm actually going to take the advice of the experienced hikers. Hopefully there will be plenty of folks that I can travel with along the way. I'm looking at this as two adventure in one; the hike itself and meeting my new friends. I hope this will help you in knowing that you aren't alone in your feeling.

Montego
01-02-2008, 21:06
Hey, welcome to WhiteBlaze Bogeara :welcome

Freedom
03-02-2008, 19:29
This will be my first thru-hike as well. I can't find anyone else who has enough time to take off from work or school to go with me. except my dog of course. I'm starting Sobo in May if anyone's interested.

ofthearth
05-05-2008, 11:43
Johnny, have you ever done a long distance hike? Like months on a trail like the AT?


I noticed in all the back and forth here that a question was asked and not answered. Just curious why. Seemed like a relevant question given the discussion. :-?

weary
05-05-2008, 12:55
I spent 12 years between my first college class at age 17 and a degree. Sadly, none of those years were spent on the AT, but they included a lot of walking.

That left just enough time for a useful life, before it all got boring to both me and my bosses, so I quit to do other things, like hiking the AT and protecting the AT.

Weary

WWW.matlt.org