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shades of blue
11-19-2003, 14:40
I've been reading a lot about hammocks and am seriously thinking about moving from a tent to the hammock. Here are my questions: Which do you think is better the Hennessey or the Speer hammock? Why? If I do most of my hiking on the AT in June and July, do I need to be concerned about pads and other means of keeping the hammock warm or can I just use my sleeping bag (summer weight) with the hammock? Any other thoughts about converting from a tent to a hammock would be appreciated.

brian
11-19-2003, 15:41
Yes!!! You should DEFINATLY covert to be a "pod person"

I think the Hennessy is better, due to the ridgeline and bottom entrance. If I were to get a spear, I would make my own. Also, you can get a clearance Hennessy Expedition 2.5 (their older phased out model) for $69 from hennessyhammock.com

I dont think you should be worried about a pad if you are hiking in those times of the year. As long as your bag is rated to at last 40deg, you should be ok. On very windy nights you can stuff your extra clothing underneath you. I hiked for 14 days on the AT in main this july\august, and never only needed my tiny little "butt-pad" more than once, and that was when it was a windstorm..

A great feature of hammocking is that you can sleep almost ANYWHERE!! Pick 2 trees ~10ft-14ft apart, and set up! No need for flat, dry barren ground. Ultimate leave no trace.

I can write more, but i will leave it up to other Whiteblaze members.

Brian
Future Thru Hiker 2013

2Ply
11-19-2003, 17:17
You should also take a look at the Clark hammocks as well as the others. Check out http://www.hammockcamping.com/. Ed has a link to most manufacturers and the newsletter has some interesting stuff too.

jlb2012
11-19-2003, 19:15
Which do you think is better the Hennessey or the Speer hammock? Why?

I personally went with a Hennessy but at the time it was the only hammock capable of handling my weight - these days there are more options. I have not used the Speer hammock but it looks to be a reasonable system if you include some sort of an under quilt like the Pea Pod. Without the under quilt I think the compression on the sides would possibly cause a broader range of cold spots than the Hennessy in the times of cooler weather. With the Hennessy a pad plus some extra clothing can permit the use of the hammock in some colder times. This also applies to the Speer hammock plus the Pea Pod. The bottom entry of the Hennessy causes some problems but it saves some weight by eliminating any zipper for the bug mesh on top and it allows the hammock to be hung somewhat higher than a top entry hammock thus allowing more sag during the night without hitting bottom. The problems with the bottom entry comes from the difficulty of crafting an under quilt and the problem of getting into and out of the hammock when using a full length pad in the hammock. The full length pad is mostly not needed during June or July but for colder months it is a good idea.


If I do most of my hiking on the AT in June and July, do I need to be concerned about pads and other means of keeping the hammock warm or can I just use my sleeping bag (summer weight) with the hammock?

Here it is a question as to how compressable the summer weight bag is - if part of your summer system is a fleece bag or blanket then you are probably going to be in good shape because the fleece is relatively incompressable. On the other hand if you are using a 45 degree down bag I would recommend using some sort of a pad because it will compress to almost nothing under your weight. Even in June you will get some cool nights up in the mtns. but if you are keeping to the low lands then you may be OK even with a highly compressable bag. Note on the use of a sleeping bag in a hammock - many people find it is easier by far to have a pad under ones back and then to just use the bag as a quilt with a large pouch for your feet and legs.

Crash
11-21-2003, 10:10
Each hammock has its own good points - each type of hammock has its own style of camping. So its a matter of your style that you want to go with. You have to make concessions and adapt to each hammock.
You won't go wrong with one of the major manufacturers. They are well made and thought out. You need to assess your style and how well you adapt to the change in camping style.

In the summer you wont need a pad. put your spare clothes & rain gear under you if it gets windy or chilly. The great part is hanging it up during a long lunch break - you use it as a seat & then tuck in for a great nap. Everyone gets jealous. I walk on rocks - I dont have to sleep on rocks to sleep like a rock!
:bse

kank
11-24-2003, 01:21
Deciding on a hammock is going to largely be a matter of personal preference, since there are many quality wilderness hammocks available now. You asked about Speer and Hennessey, so I will attempt to compare the two:

Setup:

Hennessey is fool-proof because integral ridgeline allows you to set it up right the first time, every time.

Still, I like the Speer, since "treehugger" straps are built-in to the hammock design and not extra items. However, Speer requires seperate setup for tarp (can be a benefit when taking down camp in rain), so it's still faster to fully set up a Hennessey than a Speer.

Versatility:

Hennessey can't be seperated from the bug net. Speer's design allows for open stargazing, better ventilation, and more resistance to condensation. On the other hand, Hennessey's design provides complete bug protection without user intervention and the wider opening above a staked Hennessey may provide enough ventilation even with the noseeum providing a partial wind and vapor barrier. And you have to admit that the Hennessey's attached bug net provides 100% protection, whereas Speers' net could let in a few nasties here and there if you didn't take care to attach it well.

The Hennessey bottom entry allows the hammock to be hung higher on difficult terrain and decreases the likelihood of losing your balance while entering and exiting. The downside is that the bottom opening is can be a real pain when using full-length sleeping pads. Speer's design is your typical top-entry, where the hammock needs to be hung low enough to allow easy entry/exit, but results in no difficulties with full-length pads.

Storm protection:

Hennessey's diamond fly offers easy setup (2 stakes holds hammock and fly) and good protection, but there have been cases of HH users getting wet in a severe storm because of the decreased fly coverage at the ends. Hennessey's fly is great for efficiency, but can be a little skimpy at times.

Speer's own fly consists of an 8x10 tarp, allowing for lots of setup versatility, depending on the weather. When stormy, the big tarp can be hung low enough to provide complete coverage in any storm, yet in more moderate rains can be hung high enough to create a stand-up shelter. Speer's "fly" is obviously somewhat heavier than Hennessey's and more difficult to pitch (at least 4 stakes required), but this results in improved protection and more versatility in setup. Considering how many hammock users choose poncho/tarps instead of their stock rainflys, this may be a moot point. Both Hennessey and Speer users often create their own fly systems using commercial or homemade solutions.

Cold weather:

Some cite Hennessey's staked-out sides for not only the more spacious hammock interior, but also for reducing your body's contact with the hammock material. This can result in fewer cold knees and elbows. The more spacious interior allows for more tent-like conditions inside the hammock (remember that the bug net is always attached). Personally, I like being able to sway the hammock a bit, which the Henneesey can't do with the sides staked out.

Despite the Speer's seeming handicap in cool weather, due to it's more cocoon-like body, it seems to have advantages over Hennessey in colder weather. Without the bug net and staked sides, the Speer allows the use of the PeaPod concept of wrapping the sleeping bag around the entire hammock to allow for full loft without bottom compression. You can't easily do this with a Hennessey, though many HH users do quite well in cold weather with a hammock underquilt along with their usual quilt/bag. In very cold weather, the Hennessey's weight seems likely to balloon higher than the Speer, because the Speer allows for better utilization of loft (less heated space around body) and because you leave the bug net at home. Feel free to disagree with me on this, as I have not actually tested both hammocks in cold weather.

General:

Some people are finding that they need seperate winter and summer hammocks, so think first about how you are using the hammock and go from there. Summertime on the AT is not likely to require cold-weather capabilities. Besides a cheap fleece sleeping bag, I would think that you might take a small "butt" or torso pad, just in case. That pad could serve as backpack padding and/or a sit pad as well. The pad might serve as some bottom rain protection in really nasty weather, making sure your backside doesn't get wet and cold from the rain and wind. A thin pad will do fine here, so consider a 1/4" or 3/8" pad if you can find one.

Lastly, I'll mention that while either of these hammocks, and others not mention, provide a very good return on their investment (what price do you put on a comfortable sleep?), the Speer has the extra advantage of being easy to make on your own. Ed Speer's book lists all the materials and tells you exactly how to make the hammock, but I would bet that you could figure it out just from looking at web sites like Risk's Ultralite Hiking (http://www.imrisk.com./hammock/ultraquarterweight.htm). His hammock design is not exactly like Speer's, but it does incorporate some of Speer's best features. The Speer design is very easy to make and seems to take many people about an hour, once they have the materials. Ordering all the materials yourself can easily cost the $99 that Speer sells his material kit for, so you might even consider buying the DIY kit from Speer. My only complain with Speer's kit is that he only carries a color or two of nylon or silnylon at any one time and it's not always a color I'd prefer. If you buy his kit (or the completed hammock), you get his book with the building (and usage) instructions, too.

Have fun hammocking!

deeddawg
11-24-2003, 09:07
Still, I like the Speer, since "treehugger" straps are built-in to the hammock design and not extra items.

Good comparison, just wanted to clarify one point. What do you mean by the treehugger straps being "extra items" on the Hennessy's? AFAIK (i.e. according to their website), only the Adventure Racer and Extreme Light Racer models do not include the straps; all other models have them as standard equipment.

Thanks.

brian
11-24-2003, 15:48
I think he meant that they are integrated into the hammock, so they cannot be lost and require no extra setup to use.

Brian

deeddawg
11-24-2003, 16:41
I think he meant that they are integrated into the hammock, so they cannot be lost and require no extra setup to use.

Brian

Okay, I gotcha.

Let me describe how they're set up on my Expedition 2.5, which I bought at an REI Scratch & Dent sale, so it is *possible* that what I have is not standard.

Each tree-hugger strap has a loop sewn into both ends, one loop narrow and the other wide. The hammock rope goes through the narrow loop and at the end of the rope is a double-overhand stopper knot such that the strap won't come off of the rope, yet the stopper knot will pass through the larger loop on the other end of the strap.

To set up the hammock I throw the strap around the tree, pass the end of the rope through the larger loop, pull it through as needed and secure the rope using the lashing sort of thing they show on Hennessey's website. It sounds complicated but really isn't once you've done it a couple times.

I guess to boil it down, the straps are "integrated" into the Hennessy (at least on mine) in such a way that they cannot be lost and require no extra setup to use, provided you don't do something like untie the stopper knot and remove the straps from the ropes.

Cheers.

brian
11-24-2003, 17:59
Just in case anyone is not clear, "tree huggers" are 2" by (?)48" nylon webbing with re-enforced loops on the ends, and are used to relieve pressure from the tree when sitting in it. The hennessy hammock has these seperate, while the speer has the support "ropes" made out of the same material.

I own a HH, and choose not to use them. Why? The first point is my weight. I only weigh 135 (im 16 and in good shape).
Second, I use a "knot" on the end that spreads the stress of the hammock through 3 lines, and I find that even if I have the hammock setup in the same place for 3 nights, there is never any lines in the trees, except for maybe a 1\32" line occasionally.
Third, I choose my trees with caution. I find that birches are the best to hang from, seconded by maples. Any coniferous tree tends to have soft bark which the ropes sink into as well as sap. Although I have been known to sleep under coniferous trees in storms, I use extra rope to spread the weight.

Footslogger
11-24-2003, 18:10
On this years thru hike I went from tent to hammock and back to tent again. I own a Hennesey and had used it several times before my hike on weekend trips. I found that I slept well in warm to moderate temperatures but not in the cold. I tried just about every one of the recommended adaptations to "winterize" my hammock and just could not get comfortable.

Another issue for me was what I call "organization". Hammock sleeping pretty much dicatates that when you crawl in you are ready to close your eyes and go to sleep. I found that I was more inclined to get in my tent and journal, something that I found next to impossible in my hammock.

Bottom line ...try it, you might like it. Only one suggestion ...borrow and use one under a lot of different conditions before you put all your cookies in that jar. Just my experience. Your mileage may vary.

shades of blue
11-24-2003, 18:12
Several people mentioned that mileage might vary.....how does the hammock affect this? Thanks

deeddawg
11-24-2003, 19:26
Several people mentioned that mileage might vary.....how does the hammock affect this? Thanks

Heh... "Your mileage may vary" == it may be different for you. Adaptation of the classic automobile adverts saying that the car gets xx miles to the gallon, your mileage may vary.

Never tried writing in a journal in my Hennessy, but reading works great. I use a Princeton Tec Aurora headlamp which swings down to whatever angle I need, and when done reading I just hang the book or magazine over the ridgeline and go to sleep. (I usually also hang the PT Aurora over the ridgeline too)

Crash
11-25-2003, 01:34
I found Kank's comments to be very representative of the hammocks. Get a hammock - it beats any tent. They all have their good points, just find the one that fits your style & needs. I have never had a bad nights sleep in my hammock.

I have never gotten wet in my HH. you can adjust the fly to seal out the rain. I would like a larger fly anyway. its all a matter of testing and adjusting to find what works for you.

jlb2012
11-25-2003, 08:28
ditto the Princeton Tec Aurora - a good lamp to use in a hammock. There are other head lamps out that would be as good but the key items to look for are wheter there is a hinge for adjusting the beam angle and whether it is comfortable when laying on your back with your head on a pillow (ie no rear buckle or rear battery pack).

flyfisher
11-25-2003, 16:41
Here are my questions: Which do you think is better hammock? Why? If I do most of my hiking on the AT in June and July, do I need to be concerned about pads and other means of keeping the hammock warm or can I just use my sleeping bag (summer weight) with the hammock?

I've already been quoted a little up this list, so let me just add a couple points. Hammock camping is not for everyone. If you are completely comfortable under a tarp, then hammock camping adds a pound or so ... However, a night or two in a hammock is likely to tell you if it is for you. Try it and find out. You can build a spartan Speer-like hammock for $30 and a half hour without a sewing machine as long as you do not need a bug net. It will teach you if want to give it a shot. I did that and I have not slept on the ground since.

Simple directions: Buy 10 feet of 40 inch wide "on sale" polyester or nylon at WalMart and 25 feet of 1 inch wide polypropyline webbing. Cut the webbing in half. Make an overhand knot at the two ends of the cloth. Make and a slip knot in the webbing and slip this over the knot in the fabric. Tie it to two trees 12 feet apart using one of the knots on my page: The speer 4 wrap knot or my modified speer knot. Put a pad in the hammock, and unzip your sleeping bag to be a quilt with a foot box. Go to sleep and see how you do. You should be able to sleep on your back or on your side.

I think it is wise to use a pad in almost all weather on the AT. If the night temperatures really stay above 80, then the hammock makes a great way to cool off, but if you want to be prepared for some 50 degree nights, the sleeping bag will not give you enough insulation. My favorite pad is the 27 inch wide Target Blue pad. It works great as a pack frame and can be used in a shelter as a pad if you decide not to use the hammock for a night.

If you want to read a bit more about hammock camping from my perspective, feel free to go to:

http://www.imrisk.com

and look around. Most of the hammock material is near the bottom of the page on the left. A group of us is doing work again this winter, trying to find the best solutions for hammock camping in the cold.

Risk

Granola Mamma
06-24-2006, 17:30
any suggestions on best hammock for us who "pack a bit of weight"?

Hana_Hanger
06-24-2006, 19:38
Here is just a few of the heavy duty ones....on each link you will find more options

http://www.mosquitohammock.com/

Jungle Hammock and Fly holds up to 350 lb


http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.htm#

Hennessy Explorer Deluxe hold up to 300 lbs

http://www.siamhammock.com/specs.php
Siam Hammock holds up to 275 lbs


Here is a link to all kinds of great hammocks and you can check each one out for yourself
http://www.hammockcamping.com/Links/Links.htm

Hammocks are just like tents in that each one has pros and cons.
hope you find something you like.

neo
06-24-2006, 19:43
I've been reading a lot about hammocks and am seriously thinking about moving from a tent to the hammock. Here are my questions: Which do you think is better the Hennessey or the Speer hammock? Why? If I do most of my hiking on the AT in June and July, do I need to be concerned about pads and other means of keeping the hammock warm or can I just use my sleeping bag (summer weight) with the hammock? Any other thoughts about converting from a tent to a hammock would be appreciated.

:D heck yeah go for it:cool: neo

Just Jeff
06-24-2006, 20:26
Speer has one that's good for 350 lbs, too.

www.speerhammocks.com (http://www.speerhammocks.com) (same guy how hosts the www.hammockcamping.com (http://www.hammockcamping.com) site and wrote the Hammock Camping book)

T-BACK
06-24-2006, 21:27
any suggestions on best hammock for us who "pack a bit of weight"?
I used a 1.9 oz per sq. yd nylon homemade hammock when I weighed in at 285 pounds last year. I've still got it and use it regularly. It has no signs of damage so far.

Brian
T-BACK

T-BACK
06-24-2006, 21:31
I used a 1.9 oz per sq. yd nylon homemade hammock when I weighed in at 285 pounds last year. I've still got it and use it regularly. It has no signs of damage so far.

Brian
T-BACK
Just to clarify...by "I still have it", I meant the hammock and not the 285 pounds. I now weigh 240.

Brian
T-BACK

Tinker
06-24-2006, 23:15
I have a Hennessy and a Byer el cheapo which I use inside a sleeping bag (a la Peapod) when there aren't any bugs. Lying diagonally in the Hennessy, I can sleep with my back straight or on my side. The ridgeline keeps the hammock body sagging a little to facilitate this. The Byer must be set up very tightly to keep my back straight, and it wraps around me tightly like a nylon burrito. No problem since the sleeping bag must fit tightly around my body to be most efficient. I tried to post a link, but I lost it somehow (new software).

Pictures of my gear and hikes can be found at Webshots by using the search word tinkerdan.

peanuts
06-24-2006, 23:31
ENO hammocks, rated to 400 lbs...

Stonewall
06-25-2006, 00:59
Ello All,

Since I am planning my thru hike tenetativly on Feb 1 2007 I currently have a Sierra Designs Hyperlight 3 AST (http://www.rei.com/product/47857314.htm) which i know is overkill and way too heavy for me to carry i was looking into the HH Hyperlight Backpacker Asym (http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.htm). I was wondering with the witer weather what would best suit me. I currnetly have the North Face Cat's Meow 3D long 15 degree sleeping bag weighing 57 ozs and a Pro lite 4 Thermorest Long (http://www.thermarest.com/product_detail.aspx?pID=41&cID=1). Now I know this isn't the best gear for the hammock. any suggestions.

nutlub
06-25-2006, 07:58
Here is my 2 cents:

I have the HH and I love it!

I use a pad under me and I have had no probs with condensation. Before using the hammock I worried about staying warm ó but in the end it has been no problem at all. I feel that sometimes on these boards things can be a bit over-analyzed....but hey, thatís also part of the fun. :p

I've never used a Speer hammock so take this with a grain of salt, but one thing I like that the basic Speer does not have are the tie-outs. I love to lounge in my HH and I think with the A-sym shape and the tie-outs its a bit more roomy then a Speer. Speers look to be a little more cocoon like.

Also a the HH were cheaper ($119 for a hammock is still kinda pricey to me but it was forth it). However if you make your own Speer type hammock from plans on the web it will be really cheep!
Remember, I've never been in anything but a HH so I could be total wrong.
But the one thing I know is that when camping without my wife in tow....I always do it in a hammock. Hammocks rock! :D

Just Jeff
06-25-2006, 12:54
I feel that sometimes on these boards things can be a bit over-analyzed....but hey, thatís also part of the fun.

Haha - so true. Sometimes we make things look more complicated than they need to be.

A pad and bag will work ok in a hammock if you can keep your shoulders and hips warm. Check out Speer's Segmented Pad Extender (http://speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm) for help with that. Or get an underquilt. It's not hard to stay warm in a hammock - it's just different than sleeping on the ground.

Tinker
06-25-2006, 22:13
Ello All,

Since I am planning my thru hike tenetativly on Feb 1 2007 I currently have a Sierra Designs Hyperlight 3 AST (http://www.rei.com/product/47857314.htm) which i know is overkill and way too heavy for me to carry i was looking into the HH Hyperlight Backpacker Asym (http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.htm). I was wondering with the witer weather what would best suit me. I currnetly have the North Face Cat's Meow 3D long 15 degree sleeping bag weighing 57 ozs and a Pro lite 4 Thermorest Long (http://www.thermarest.com/product_detail.aspx?pID=41&cID=1). Now I know this isn't the best gear for the hammock. any suggestions.

I think that Feb. 1, even in Georgia, will be too cold for a hammock. When I did Georgia in March, I was expecting cooler temps. so I brought my Hilleberg Akto tent (less than 3lb. without stakes). It was too warm some nights, the major exception being the first night (after the approach trail) on Springer, when temps were right around freezing. I might switch to the HH somewhere in Virginia, but I doubt I'd be comfortable every night in it in sleet and snow. I don't use an undercover. Pads are lighter, and you don't have to worry about rain getting closed cell foam wet - it doesn't soak in. It's enough work trying to keep your sleeping bag dry while getting it into your hammock in wind driven rain (with the standard HH tarp). I couldn't imagine trying to keep an undercover dry while trying to attach it. Besides, I like to have a pad to sit on occasionally.

Short answer: Go with a light tent until weather warms up. (My opinion).

The Akto is the all-round favorite all season solo tent of the folks at Backpacking Light.

Tinker
06-25-2006, 22:18
http://community.webshots.com/photo/237103382/1237104772059664855aiflPX

Here's an insulated hammock solution which I had some success with in temps down to 25 degrees.

Just Jeff
06-25-2006, 22:37
Tinker, you have some nice pics in those albums - thanks for sharing.

Predicably, I disagree that Georgia is "too cold for a hammock," but I guess it depends on what gear you're willing to carry.

Tinker
06-25-2006, 23:04
Tinker, you have some nice pics in those albums - thanks for sharing.

Predicably, I disagree that Georgia is "too cold for a hammock," but I guess it depends on what gear you're willing to carry.
Imo, it's just February in Georgia that could be too cold. Of course a hiker could carry a bunch of extra insulating stuff, but he may end up carrying as much or more weight than if he used a lightweight tent. A four season tent gives a nice dry footprint for your gear which you lose in a hammock if you have drifting snow, too. Other than in the case of snow or severely wind driven rain, I prefer the rest I get in a hammock over sleeping on the ground. (I actually managed to keep the pictured hammock dry under a cheap 10x12 poly poncho during the rains which plagued the last ALDHA Gathering in New Hampshire. (That's a little bigger tarp than I'd like to carry hiking solo).

Glad you enjoyed the pics. I had a lot of fun putting them up on the Webshots site.

funbun
07-05-2006, 00:36
any suggestions on best hammock for us who "pack a bit of weight"?

If you make your own hammock you can design it to hold whatever weight you want. It's all in the materials you use, and the size and quality of the webbing/rope.

I made Speer hammock. I made it to hold 350 lbs by using 1.5 inch webbings and 4 ply Supplex/Taslan 4.4 oz. sq.

I'll probably make a lighter one using 2 ply Supplex at about 3.0 or so.

Nightwalker
07-05-2006, 12:25
Just to clarify...by "I still have it", I meant the hammock and not the 285 pounds. I now weigh 240.

Brian
T-BACK
Yeah, I weigh 230-240, according to when my last hike was. The only problem that I'm seeing with hammock camping is that my pack will gain weight. That is, if I use a Speer or HH.

A lot of people use a hammock to lose weight in their pack, but my tent only weighs 30 ounces, including stakes and bag (Six Moons Lunar Solo E).

Anyway, Wal-Mart has a lightweight web/string one that I might try, and it'd also be interesting to give the homemade one described above a shot.

I'm always messing around with new stuff. I believe that II Opinions 6:66 says it best: "Be thou a gearhead, and be not ashamed."

Thanks to all for the good posts.

Time To Fly 97
07-05-2006, 14:57
I think hammocks are great. I evolved from tents to tarps (thru-hiked in a tarp) to now...a Hennessey Hammock (Delux Asym Expedition). I sleep very well and stay completely dry even in "monsoonal" rain storms - which are actually fun in a hammock. It has the advantages of being able to see everything around you and have fresher air (unlike tents) and more comfortable than ground sleeping (tarp). They weigh a little more than a tarp, but I think the comfort is worth it. They are easy to set up (get snakeskins) and you never have to spend an extra 10 minutes finding a flat place to camp or clearing twigs and rocks. It leaves less of a footprint, especially if you use tree huggers.

I use a Tikka plus headlamp - it hinges with no batteries in the back.

I'm 6'3 and weigh 245.... absolutely comfortable.

I bring a full length z-rest and a 20 degree bag. In Summer I sleep on top of the bag or just on the zrest in capalene...in colder weather I wear more clothes to sleep. If it is colder and windy (which is the issue with hammocks), I put my gortex coat and pants along the sides to make more of a wind block. I haven't had any problems with being too cold. I get a little condensation on my sleeping bag sometimes - pretty rare and not a problem.

When you are a week out and your body aches at the end of the day, the hammock is always something to look forward to after a campfire.

TTF

Alligator
07-05-2006, 14:59
...
I'm always messing around with new stuff. I believe that II Opinions 6:66 says it best: "Be thou a gearhead, and be not ashamed."

Thanks to all for the good posts.That's funny, you ought to put that in your sig line for a week.

strnorm
07-06-2006, 20:34
Get rid of the extra weight,tent ground cloth sleeping pad and bag, i use a hammock with a small fleece blanket,workrk well in northeast pa. in may, ps put a tarp over the hammock and get one with a bug net

K0OPG
07-08-2006, 00:03
:confused: I haven't read all of the posts for this one but IMHO, do what you want to do. If you like/prefer tents, like I do, then find a nice lightweight one and use it. If you really want to switch to a hammock, then don't ask anyone, just do it. It is what you prefer. kinda like hike your own hike...sleep in what you want to sleep in.

just my two cents worth.

why do we say..."a penny for your thoughts...but everyone has to put their two cents worth in? where does the extra penny go?

peter_pan
07-08-2006, 09:03
:confused:

just my two cents worth.

why do we say..."a penny for your thoughts...but everyone has to put their two cents worth in? where does the extra penny go?


To their hammock fund...

Pan