PDA

View Full Version : White Blaze benefits from the Wild Cowboy



River Runner
12-19-2007, 03:23
Thanks to the entertainment value of this thread I decided to do my part and make a small donation to Whiteblaze.

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30747

Here's a challenge to all those who haven't donated yet. C'mon you know this site is funnier than any movie you've seen lately - pony up so we can keep the entertainment coming. Consider it your Christmas gift to yourself.

:D

jersey joe
12-19-2007, 11:52
I read the entire thread and then went to post a response and it was closed...

STEVEM
12-19-2007, 12:14
Too bad the "Cowboy Thread" died so young. It was the best entertainment around here since "Minnesotasmith Update". Beyond that, the Cowboy Thread was hiking at a record pace: 258 Posts in 16 hours. By comparison it took Minnesotasmith 52 days to hike 258 Posts.

jersey joe
12-19-2007, 12:18
curious, why was the post stopped?

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 12:21
curious, why was the post stopped?

good question. MOST threads on whiteblaze are FOS. they don't get locked down

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 12:28
I'm not going to miss it. I was duped by the dude before the thread ever started and wasted quite a bit of time giving advice he solicited before he let me know that the type of hike he was thinking of is one that nobody could give proper perspective on.
Least of all what I'm guessing would be about a 14,000 calorie/day diet. If he'd been honest about that from the beginning I never would have even attempted to answer him, but I fell for the mom story:( and thought I was helping. Then I found out that I was a fool for having spent the time.

rafe
12-19-2007, 12:28
good question. MOST threads on whiteblaze are FOS. they don't get locked down

Moderators have been heavy-handed of late. Certain moderators seem to be trolling as well, IMO.

berninbush
12-19-2007, 12:42
If he'd been honest about that from the beginning I never would have even attempted to answer him, but I fell for the mom story:( and thought I was helping. Then I found out that I was a fool for having spent the time.

You're experiencing what most people in the social-services world feel sooner or later. Someone with a story to tell appeals to you, you invest considerable time and effort into helping them, and then you become disillusioned when you feel they have "wasted" your efforts due to their own undisclosed issues.

I maintain that time spent helping others is never "wasted," even if the outcome isn't what you would have liked. One of God's purposes for us on earth is to help each other and those efforts are honored no matter what. And very often your work bears good fruit that you wouldn't even have expected. We don't have any way of verifying what Mr. Cowboy's full story is, what his motivations are, or what he'll do, but regardless of that you have helped to educate him more about hiking, and that's a good thing. He may not succeed in hiking the AT in 30 days, but if he uses your advice and hikes somewhere and has a good time, that's a good thing, isn't it?

If he kills himself trying the impossible, it's not your fault. ;)

JAK
12-19-2007, 12:42
It was a fitting end to a shooting star.

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 12:46
He may not succeed in hiking the AT in 30 days

No. He will NOT succeed. Nor will anybody else.

Yukon
12-19-2007, 12:58
No. He will NOT succeed. Nor will anybody else.

Is it really that unfathomable? I mean what if someone was the picture of perfect health with the best mountaineering and hiking skills and incredible determination? Is it HUMANLY possible? And I'm being totally serious here...any doctor's on here that could weigh in on this as far as if the body could handle such a venture?

Sly
12-19-2007, 12:58
LOL.... Looks like I missed all the fun. How'd that happen?

rafe
12-19-2007, 13:01
Is it really that unfathomable? I mean what if someone was the picture of perfect health with the best mountaineering and hiking skills and incredible determination? Is it HUMANLY possible? And I'm being totally serious here...any doctor's on here that could weigh in on this as far as if the body could handle such a venture?

I'm prone to weighing in on the wussie side, but I'd say no. 72.5 miles/day on the AT, for 30 days straight, is not possible. That's nearly three marathons per day, for a month, with 17 Everests worth of vertical thrown in for extra measure.

jersey joe
12-19-2007, 13:03
Even if the original poster was not genuine, good information still came out of that thread. How many calories it would take, or Squeaky telling us of the person who averaged 70miles per day for 40 days running around a city block. I just don't completely agree with or understand closing it.

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-19-2007, 13:04
I'm with LW on this one - I don't think it is humanly possible to cover an average of 72 - 73 miles per day with no zeros even if it was a totally supported hike given the terrain involved.

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 13:05
Is it really that unfathomable? I mean what if someone was the picture of perfect health with the best mountaineering and hiking skills and incredible determination? Is it HUMANLY possible? And I'm being totally serious here...any doctor's on here that could weigh in on this as far as if the body could handle such a venture?

it can't be done without support and maybe not with support

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 13:06
LOL.... Looks like I missed all the fun. How'd that happen?

certainly you weren't working or hiking? :)

jersey joe
12-19-2007, 13:17
I think that while it would be extremely difficult and is not probable it is possible. If someone can run 70miles over 40 days, then it seems very possible to do 73 miles over 30 days with hills. I'm assuming supported.

Smile
12-19-2007, 13:18
I suppose my cup is always half full, but this thread is very unkind.

Sometimes it's ok to try and fail, and maybe he needs to find out his own limits. He doesn't need such rough opposition for what he feels he should do, especially the "mommy issue" comments.

I don't think his posting on WB was such a good idea, but he obviously came here for support and advice - but with a plan that most see as foolish at best. IMHO, it's not like this guy was going to hike naked with no food in 40 days , he is making a plan, getting prepared, he's not endangering himself or anyone else - so let him go for it.

What is the harm of letting somebody try something that may not be fathomable? I hear there are thru hikers that do this every single year on trail. :)

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 13:19
i've been involved in a few supported speed hikes. 30 days is highly unlikely to happen. ever. 40 maybe

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-19-2007, 13:20
Running isn't going to work at all in the PA rocks nor in parts of Maine. There are planty of shorter areas where running isn't going to be feasible either.

Then there is the problem of the muscles tearing down day after day after day and never having a chance to heal.

rafe
12-19-2007, 14:35
I don't think his posting on WB was such a good idea, but he obviously came here for support and advice - but with a plan that most see as foolish at best. IMHO, it's not like this guy was going to hike naked with no food in 40 days , he is making a plan, getting prepared, he's not endangering himself or anyone else - so let him go for it.

I admit that folks were piling on, and not too kindly.

But from his comments on that thread and on others, it appeared that, up to that point, Cowboy had been asking all the usual newbie thru-hiker-wannabe questions. There's nothing wrong with that -- but to go from that, to beating the current record by a wide margin -- seems a bit surreal. When asked about prior AT experience, Cowboy gave no response. When questioned about "support" it became clear that Cowboy was not being serious.

rafe
12-19-2007, 14:36
Running isn't going to work at all in the PA rocks nor in parts of Maine.

Mahoosuc notch and South Arm come to mind...

Blissful
12-19-2007, 14:41
Mahoosuc notch and South Arm come to mind...


Well some guy I met at Speck Pond told me he did the notch in half an hour. Still trying to figure that one out.

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 14:59
Well some guy I met at Speck Pond told me he did the notch in half an hour. Still trying to figure that one out.

i've done the notch in 40 minutes. it's only .8 what's there to figure out? :)

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 15:01
Well some guy I met at Speck Pond told me he did the notch in half an hour. Still trying to figure that one out.
That'd be doable without a pack I would think for sure.

Smile
12-19-2007, 15:01
A little off topic, but a question about the notch; I have not done this part of the trail yet, someone told me it was the most dangerous part of the trail as you could fall in and get wedged between boulders, is this true?

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 15:04
no. not true

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 15:04
A little off topic, but a question about the notch; I have not done this part of the trail yet, someone told me it was the most dangerous part of the trail as you could fall in and get wedged between boulders, is this true?
Could you fall? True. Most dangerous part? Doubtful.

Pedaling Fool
12-19-2007, 15:05
It's, maybe, the most unique section of the trail, but I wouldn't say it's the most dangerous. I would be more cautious in the Whites, because of the weather. Actually, thinking about it, I think climbing Mt. Katahdin is more dangerous.

rafe
12-19-2007, 15:06
A little off topic, but a question about the notch; I have not done this part of the trail yet, someone told me it was the most dangerous part of the trail as you could fall in and get wedged between boulders, is this true?

I wouldn't call it "dangerous" but you do need to be a bit careful in the notch. I wouldn't want to do it during or after a heavy rain, for example. There are places where you have to choose -- between hopping from boulder to boulder, or crawling underneath or between them.

Skyline
12-19-2007, 15:07
Wolf, do you think Ward Leonard might have had a shot at accomplishing this, at his peak?

Lone Wolf
12-19-2007, 15:09
Wolf, do you think Ward Leonard might have had a shot at accomplishing this, at his peak?

30 days unsupported? no. 40 supported? quite possibly

Roots
12-19-2007, 15:09
This thread has made me officially tired of popcorn!!:D

BigCat
12-19-2007, 15:10
good question. MOST threads on whiteblaze are FOS. they don't get locked down

I think the mods were right to let it go. People need to learn how to spot a troll.

Although, I was a bit sad to see it. I've come to consider Whiteblaze a sanctuary from the constant trolling that goes on on other message boards.

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 15:16
This thread has made me officially tired of popcorn!!:D
Now that's funny!:D

River Runner
12-19-2007, 16:18
I think the mods were right to let it go. People need to learn how to spot a troll.

Although, I was a bit sad to see it. I've come to consider Whiteblaze a sanctuary from the constant trolling that goes on on other message boards.

I was sad to see it go. I thought it was hilarious.

Anyway, back on topic. For those who haven't donated yet, consider making a donation to WhiteBlaze for the entertainment value. :)

DawnTreader
12-19-2007, 17:03
Could you fall? True. Most dangerous part? Doubtful.

I was with you the day we conquered the Notch.. quite a bit ahead as I recall.. bad thunderstorms looming, I flew through in about 45 minutes.. waited at full goose? for Shanghi 3 hours later and soaked to the bone.. what a day.. what a great day.. I love that place..

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 17:09
I was with you the day we conquered the Notch.. quite a bit ahead as I recall.. bad thunderstorms looming, I flew through in about 45 minutes.. waited at full goose? for Shanghi 3 hours later and soaked to the bone.. what a day.. what a great day.. I love that place..
A drenched Warraghiyagey (storm beat me by about 2 minutes) runs into Full Goose where a very dry el Duderino sits happily. And a VERY wet and frustrated Shanghai shows a couple hours later.
Dude, true story, I entered the notch at almost 8pm this time around and traversed most of it in the gloamin, stepped on a rock that gave a little more than I would have guessed, only to find out it was a dead mooses' head, had a cigarette when I got to the other side (dark by then) and climbed out in complete darkness, over the mountain and got into my tent (thank you) at about 10:30 pm. Brit and Smokey were already there sound asleep.

wrongway_08
12-19-2007, 17:10
I think the mods were right to let it go. People need to learn how to spot a troll.

Although, I was a bit sad to see it. I've come to consider Whiteblaze a sanctuary from the constant trolling that goes on on other message boards.


I think most noticed the troll - it was just a great thread, that died before its time, plenty of intertainment left in it!

R.I.P.

Smile
12-19-2007, 17:11
This thread has made me officially tired of popcorn!!

Hopefully the next great thread will warrant getting out the chocolate :)

Frolicking Dinosaurs
12-19-2007, 17:12
::: Dino lick lips and eagerly awaits next great thread :::

River Runner
12-19-2007, 17:54
Mmmm... chocolate covered popcorn...

warraghiyagey
12-19-2007, 17:55
How about . . . . . . . . .(drum roll) . . . . . . . . bacon flavored beer?

maxNcathy
12-19-2007, 18:19
I can relate to people like Wild Cowboy.
I went through a rough period where I felt very insecure. I would dream of the great things I was going to do with relative ease..things like go to Harvard medical school then become a pilot and go to Australia to be a flying doctor. Then If perchance that didn't suit me I would return and do law school at Yale..
Once when I was about 10 years of age an adult once heard me going on about something and he said, "Talk is cheap, it takes money to buy whisky!"
He was so right.

ScottP
12-19-2007, 20:46
http://www.drinksdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Makers_Mark.html

Smile
12-19-2007, 20:49
Chocolate beer with Popcorn. :)
(I was thinking Samuel Adams Chocolate Bock)

Roots
12-19-2007, 20:54
Chocolate beer with chocolate ramen noodles boiling on the stove...ahhh

Waterbuffalo
12-19-2007, 21:04
How about . . . . . . . . .(drum roll) . . . . . . . . bacon flavored beer?

mmmmm.... beer........making my mouth water

4eyedbuzzard
12-19-2007, 21:16
Mmmm... chocolate covered popcorn...
Moose Munch from Harry and David's. Mmmmmm.

bigboots
12-19-2007, 21:37
I also found the wild cowboy thread to be entertaining. Very little meat but a lot of laughs.

It appears that though WB has closed that the original thread it has reappeared here. (by popular demand????

slow
12-19-2007, 23:01
Funny think is since its been closed he got another 150 miles under his belt in training.He just may have the last laugh?

warraghiyagey
12-20-2007, 02:35
Funny think is since its been closed he got another 150 miles under his belt in training.He just may have the last laugh?
Doubtful. What I wish for him is that he sees the length of the trail this coming year with his mom's dreams alive with his own.
And that he sees each step in it's entirety and has more than a blur to remember it by.

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 09:34
I could see a scenario where he goes for 30 and hikes it in 40 or so and still breaks the record. Does anyone know of any other planned speed record attempts this coming season?

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 09:36
I could see a scenario where he goes for 30 and hikes it in 40 or so and still breaks the record. Does anyone know of any other planned speed record attempts this coming season?

nope. 40 days unsupported can't be done.

JAK
12-20-2007, 09:45
What would be some general guidelines on what is 'unsupported'.
Could you have food waiting at trail heads, but not too close together?
What about vehicle lifts, off the trail, when you go to resupply?

My vote would be no vehicle lifts, no food drops, no mail drops.
Gotta buy all your own groceries and supplies all along the way.

Chuck Norris would carry a raised bed and grow his own veggies.

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 09:49
I don't think mail drops pushed a thru hike into the "supported" category. Especially if you send them all to yourself. When I think supported, I think someone in a car meeting you at a road after each day and feeding/housing you.

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 09:50
I don't think mail drops pushed a thru hike into the "supported" category. Especially if you send them all to yourself. When I think supported, I think someone in a car meeting you at a road after each day and feeding/housing you.

that is correct

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 09:52
nope. 40 days unsupported can't be done.

I'm going under the assumption that he would have to do it supported. Wolf, what IS the supported record and is there a link to the effort?

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 09:56
I'm going under the assumption that he would have to do it supported. Wolf, what IS the supported record and is there a link to the effort?

47 days. Google "Andy Thompson Appalachian Trail record"

4eyedbuzzard
12-20-2007, 09:59
I don't think mail drops pushed a thru hike into the "supported" category. Especially if you send them all to yourself. When I think supported, I think someone in a car meeting you at a road after each day and feeding/housing you.

What comes to my mind is someone basically trailrunning and slackpacking, perhaps with a hydration pack and that day's lunch, but with water/food drops at road crossings; and meals, shelter, fresh clothing and shoes, all carried to the evening's camp location by others. Even so, the current records are pushing the limits of human ability. Nobody's gonna blow it away by any significant number.

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 10:00
you are correct

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 10:27
47 days. Google "Andy Thompson Appalachian Trail record"

Thanks Wolf, I see he finally broke the record in 05 after coming up short in 98 and 01. The weather cause him to slow both times. Those journals make for great reading. You can see how hard it really is. A must read for cowboy or anyone else pondering a speed hike.

I also see in 05 Horton set the PCT record (67 days) at the age of 55.

rafe
12-20-2007, 10:36
I also see in 05 Horton set the PCT record (67 days) at the age of 55.

55. Peak age for hiking. :D

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 10:38
55. Peak age for hiking. :D

yeah, but not for speed hiking...hats off to horton!!!

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 10:41
Thanks Wolf, I see he finally broke the record in 05 after coming up short in 98 and 01. The weather cause him to slow both times. Those journals make for great reading. You can see how hard it really is. A must read for cowboy or anyone else pondering a speed hike.

I also see in 05 Horton set the PCT record (67 days) at the age of 55.

i was with him in 98 when he quit just before Stratton Mtn. in Vermont. though it had been raining for a few days that's not what made him quit. mentally he was done

rafe
12-20-2007, 10:41
yeah, but not for speed hiking...hats off to horton!!!

I'z faster at 55 than 37, by a good margin. I wouldn't mind having my 25-year old body back, but I wouldn't want to be 25 again.

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 10:55
i was with him in 98 when he quit just before Stratton Mtn. in Vermont. though it had been raining for a few days that's not what made him quit. mentally he was done

I was just going on what I read "According to Andrew, there was essentially one factor that "forced" him to cease in his attempt at the AT record. When he entered Vermont the rain was such that it had deteriorated the trail conditions to the point there were not enough hours in the day to maintain David's 1991 schedule. "
I'll take your word for it though, I can imagine how hard it would be mentally to do those miles day in and day out.

mudhead
12-20-2007, 12:21
I wouldn't mind having my 25-year old body back, but I wouldn't want to be 25 again.

I would. Where do I sign up.

Skyline
12-20-2007, 12:28
I'z faster at 55 than 37, by a good margin. I wouldn't mind having my 25-year old body back, but I wouldn't want to be 25 again.


If I could keep my mind, and the experiences filed away there--I'd love to look and feel 25 again! Too bad it doesn't work that way. :-?

weary
12-20-2007, 12:36
nope. 40 days unsupported can't be done.
That's my belief also. And very few can do it supported. FWIW, I measure success by the number of days spent on a trail, not by how few.

jersey joe
12-20-2007, 12:41
That's my belief also. And very few can do it supported. FWIW, I measure success by the number of days spent on a trail, not by how few.
Depends on your goal.

slow
12-20-2007, 23:45
If this kid is true...he can make it in under 40.

Most people look at old school stats...that would NEVER make the pros in todays world.He has a chance in today's world.

Lone Wolf
12-20-2007, 23:47
If this kid is true...he can make it in under 40.

Most people look at old school stats...that would NEVER make the pros in todays world.He has a chance in today's world.

no he can't. neither can you.

slow
12-21-2007, 00:06
no he can't. neither can you.

I think the time will be had time and time again by the youth...but not me or you.

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 00:08
I think the time will be had time and time again by the youth...but not me or you.

obviously you haven't walked the AT

slow
12-21-2007, 00:14
Kids today are so much stronger than 20 yr past...in all sports.

This kid if for real has a shot.

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 00:15
obviously you haven't walked the AT

like i said.

envirodiver
12-21-2007, 00:20
Kids today are so much stronger than 20 yr past...in all sports.

This kid if for real has a shot.

No they aren't. They are spoiled video playing, junk food eating brats.

They may be good at sports, but they won't play anything that does not have a controller with out referees, uniforms and coaches.

Put on their own resources with no support, let's see how they do.

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 00:21
they like steroids and other ways to cheat

JAK
12-21-2007, 00:22
Wolf,
If unsupported, how many extra miles would be added to a record attempting thru-hike, for resupply?

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 00:23
Wolf,
If unsupported, how many extra miles would be added to a record attempting thru-hike, for resupply?

a s**tload

slow
12-21-2007, 00:29
like i said.

Yes you are right....in walking the full trail.

Can the young studs of today top the time ...EASY.

Tin Man
12-21-2007, 00:29
What if a few guys got together and did a relay, how many days could a baton be passed from Springer to Katahdin?

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 00:32
Yes you are right....in walking the full trail.

Can the young studs of today top the time ...EASY.

come out of the closet and prove it. which record are you EASILY going to top?

River Runner
12-21-2007, 00:34
Yes you are right....in walking the full trail.

Can the young studs of today top the time ...EASY.

Not EASY. It would take a lot of planning, conditioning and support. I think it's pretty well been established that 70+ miles a day for 30 days is basically impossible. And especially impossible if the person is trying to go unsupported & having to procure their own food and shelter.

While it's great to encourage someone to break a record, the person has be at their peak in a particular sport before breaking a record. Records are also nearly always broken in small increments - not by over 25% as the Cowboy proposed.

doggiebag
12-21-2007, 00:37
Not EASY. It would take a lot of planning, conditioning and support. I think it's pretty well been established that 70+ miles a day for 30 days is basically impossible. And especially impossible if the person is trying to go unsupported & having to procure their own food and shelter.

While it's great to encourage someone to break a record, the person has be at their peak in a particular sport before breaking a record. Records are also nearly always broken in small increments - not by over 25% as the Cowboy proposed.
Is this the support thread for the 34 year old Wild Cowboy with Mad Cow disease? Or is there a kid with a similar condition and delusion?

The Mechanical Man
12-21-2007, 00:45
I am not young, but my wife found me with a studfinder,.... do I qualify?

JAK
12-21-2007, 00:45
I would think so. Now in theory you could stash your pack and run in, then fast hike back out with the food using a small daypack. Still a lot of extra miles though, and the risks and hassles of stashing and recovering your pack.

Even working on the notion of 30 days, the food to cover that distance is still a s**tload, compressed into a shorter time span. Covering more distance per day would allow some flexibility in picking resupply points, but whatever it works out to, 5 pounds of food per day or whatever, your either doing a lot of extra distance and eating alot in towns while your there, or your lugging a heckova lot of food.

But what if you were one of these ultramarathoners and instead of carrying a crazy amount of food you only carried a half days worth and ran into town every day and did most of your eating there? Say 90 miles a day, for 30 days, that's 2700 miles, enough for about 600 extra miles, or 10 extra miles in and 10 extra miles out each and every day to run in and eat some food and run back out again, to sleep on the trail.

Whether or not it is doable or not, would that count as unsupported?
Would 10 miles be a reasonable average distance into town, and 70 miles a reasonable average distance on the trail between resupply points?

River Runner
12-21-2007, 00:45
Is this the support thread for the 34 year old Wild Cowboy with Mad Cow disease? Or is there a kid with a similar condition and delusion?

Ssshhh!!! Don't let the secret out. :dance

doggiebag
12-21-2007, 00:52
Ok I'll get back to plucking my ostrich.
Regards.

JAK
12-21-2007, 00:55
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ejs09vhj1x4

Humans are perhaps the most adapted endurance animal on the planet, but I would have to agree with L.Wolf on this one. There are physical limits. 100 miles in a day is doable. 100 consecutive days of marathons is doable. I am not sure if 26 consecutive days of 100 milers is doable, even on flat even terrain. That's just nuts.

4eyedbuzzard
12-21-2007, 01:07
If this kid is true...he can make it in under 40.

Most people look at old school stats...that would NEVER make the pros in todays world.He has a chance in today's world.

Andy Thompson's current record is 47 days, 13 hrs, 31 minutes, set in 2005. He beat the old record(Peter Palmer, 1999) of 48 days, 20 hrs, 11 minutes by over a full day. Can someone do better? Possibly. Can they blow it away by 17 or even 7 days? Not a chance. Doing the AT in 40 days would be like someone running an 8.29 second 100 meters or a marathon in 1:45 - just isn't going to happen. There just isn't that much difference in human performance at the elite level. If the current record is broken it will likely be by a single day and more likely by just a few hours.

JAK
12-21-2007, 01:14
100 miles a day for 6 days, even 10 days is doable. They do that record stuff in a stadium though. I know. Boring. I think the rough terrain stuff are mostly 100 miles in under a day stuff. I'm not sure what the record might be for 30 days, or if there was ever such a race longer than 10 days, flat or rough terrain. David Horton averaged 42 miles a day on the PCT, supported of course. That was for 63 days over 2650 miles.

If you did the AT as a 2650 mile unsupported run with eating and resupply in trail towns, and you were someone even fitter than David Horton, someone like Yiannis Kouros maybe, in his prime, could you do it in 30 days? I don't think so. 40 days maybe. 30 days you might as well be talking 3 minute mile, uphill.

River Runner
12-21-2007, 01:14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ejs09vhj1x4

Humans are perhaps the most adapted endurance animal on the planet, but I would have to agree with L.Wolf on this one. There are physical limits. 100 miles in a day is doable. 100 consecutive days of marathons is doable. I am not sure if 26 consecutive days of 100 milers is doable, even on flat even terrain. That's just nuts.

Awesome video - thanks for the link.

slow
12-21-2007, 01:16
they like steroids and other ways to cheat


EASY,i'm a old man ...but know that the young will hold all top standard for all.

JAK
12-21-2007, 01:18
Besides which, if you could do the AT in just 30 days, what would be the deal? A 30 day trek is nothing. Everyone would be doing it. It's like parachuting. Anyone can jump the last 5 feet. ;)

Pedaling Fool
12-21-2007, 01:26
...He beat the old record(Peter Palmer, 1999) of 48 days, 20 hrs, 11 minutes by over a full day...
Peter Palmer, that's his name! I saw him in 1999 when me and my father did our Rockfish Gap - Harper's Ferry hike. I remember his support guy being annoyed by him, because Peter yelled at him for not having something ready as he got to the support van, then he was off again...

JAK
12-21-2007, 01:28
One story during the war had a British officer having the idea of training a company of Gurkas as parachute troops! He got a bunch of Gurkas together an explained that they would be taken up in the air and jump at five thousand feet. The men talked together for a while before a Gurka seargent said all the Gurkas agreed to jump but asked the officer if the men could please start jumping at three hundred feet and work their way up to five thousand feet. The British officer told the men that they could not do that because at three hundred feet their parachute would not have time to open. The Gurka seargent talked to the men some more, and then turning back to the British offer asked, "The men want to know, What's a parachute?"

slow
12-21-2007, 01:30
Like i said ...if this kid is true he can do it in 40 days.

JAK
12-21-2007, 01:34
If the kid is true he will do it without a parachute.

warraghiyagey
12-21-2007, 01:42
Ssshhh!!! Don't let the secret out. :dance
Too late.:rolleyes: :cool: :(

STEVEM
12-21-2007, 09:17
Thanks to the entertainment value of this thread I decided to do my part and make a small donation to Whiteblaze.

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30747

Here's a challenge to all those who haven't donated yet. C'mon you know this site is funnier than any movie you've seen lately - pony up so we can keep the entertainment coming. Consider it your Christmas gift to yourself.

:D

I will put my contribution in the mail today.

I'm really thankful that my boss doesn't know how much time I spent on Whiteblaze this year.

Critterman
12-21-2007, 09:50
Humans are perhaps the most adapted endurance animal on the planet,

The arctic tern migrates 22,000 miles a year and spends most of its life in the air without landing. I don't think Wild Cowboy can match that.

4eyedbuzzard
12-21-2007, 10:29
I wish I had that many frequent flyer miles.:D

ScottP
12-21-2007, 13:39
I think that someone could shatter all of our distance hiking records. The catch, is that he would probably wreck his body and never be able to walk again.

Crazy Larry #1
12-21-2007, 13:46
I think I'll do the entire width of the trail in less than fifteen seconds today. And I'm going to do it without any support at all! Maybe I can get Lone Wolf and Roy to go with me? We might even stop in the middle and take a five second rest while dodging traffic because without a doubt it will be totally exhausting.........

Lone Wolf
12-21-2007, 13:48
I think I'll do the entire width of the trail in less than fifteen seconds today. And I'm going to do it without any support at all! Maybe I can get Lone Wolf and Roy to go with me? We might even stop in the middle and take a five second rest while dodging traffic because without a doubt it will be totally exhausting.........

i'll do it but it has to be in front of Dot's. I'll need a beer afterward

Crazy Larry #1
12-21-2007, 13:50
i'll do it but it has to be in front of Dot's. I'll need a beer afterward
Okay, where's Roy? Maybe we'll all have a beer...............:-?

driller
12-21-2007, 14:00
I am not young, but my wife found me with a studfinder,.... do I qualify?what were you doing with the stud finder? I really don't want to know!!!!!!

Kirby
12-21-2007, 14:22
He could easily teleport the trail in about .000001 seconds, faster with support.

Kirby

slow
12-23-2007, 21:47
Andy Thompson's current record is 47 days, 13 hrs, 31 minutes, set in 2005. He beat the old record(Peter Palmer, 1999) of 48 days, 20 hrs, 11 minutes by over a full day. Can someone do better? Possibly. Can they blow it away by 17 or even 7 days? Not a chance. Doing the AT in 40 days would be like someone running an 8.29 second 100 meters or a marathon in 1:45 - just isn't going to happen. There just isn't that much difference in human performance at the elite level. If the current record is broken it will likely be by a single day and more likely by just a few hours.

You make some good points.If this kid is really training this hard everyday he has a shot a beating the record easy ...if all goes well for him?

4eyedbuzzard
12-23-2007, 21:58
You make some good points.If this kid is really training this hard everyday he has a shot a beating the record easy ...if all goes well for him?

If all goes VERY well. He'll need a good dose of luck. Weather, trail conditions, injury, etc. I think Andy Thompson abandoned two record attempts prior to setting it successfully, one late into the hike in Vermont due to rain/muddy trail - there was just no way he could cover the distance in the time remaining given the conditions.

slow
12-23-2007, 22:53
If all goes VERY well. He'll need a good dose of luck. Weather, trail conditions, injury, etc. I think Andy Thompson abandoned two record attempts prior to setting it successfully, one late into the hike in Vermont due to rain/muddy trail - there was just no way he could cover the distance in the time remaining given the conditions.

That's the hard part...conditions for time and being safe.

Texasgirl
12-23-2007, 23:39
Wow.... I managed to miss the original running of this flick! 2 questions: Why is a 34-year old referred to as a "kid"? And no matter how great his 30+ body is, training and all that, isn't there a whole mental side of fortitude, patience, smarts that's also needed to cover that kind of ground regardless if in 47 days or 6 months?

slow
12-23-2007, 23:54
Wow.... I managed to miss the original running of this flick! 2 questions: Why is a 34-year old referred to as a "kid"? And no matter how great his 30+ body is, training and all that, isn't there a whole mental side of fortitude, patience, smarts that's also needed to cover that kind of ground regardless if in 47 days or 6 months?

Well at my age.:)
He seem's to have all the other covered by past post's.

River Runner
12-24-2007, 03:54
Wow.... I managed to miss the original running of this flick! 2 questions: Why is a 34-year old referred to as a "kid"?

General immature reaction to advise from those experienced with the trail? :-?

Texasgirl
12-24-2007, 13:16
Ah....immaturity evidenced by ignoring words of wisdoms from the elders or veterans equals "kid" name. Makes perfectly good sense now.