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tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 19:26
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?

Tinker
12-27-2007, 19:39
I bought a Zzip stove about 8 years ago and used it for several short term hikes. Wet fuel is the biggest problem, though if you carry a big enough knife you can split small downed branches and use the dry wood inside. My stove weighs a pound which is more than I like to carry these days. I keep it in my collection and occasionally "show it off" to my friends. Dirty pots are a given with any wood fire, though the only sticky black stuff I've come across comes from pine or other softwoods. I used to keep my cookpot in a nylon bag to keep other things clean, and I stored some of my food in the pot, using what would have otherwise been dead space in my pack. I believe the black patina on the bottom of a pot helps it cook more evenly and possibly more quickly.
If you decide to use one, try to find a headlamp with the same size batteries as a back-up in case your fan batteries die. The batteries, from my experience, last quite a while, at least two three day trips in the fall, in one case. Expect to get between a week and two from the batteries if you use it twice a day and actually cook over it. The new stoves may be more efficient, and there is a promising stove (windscreen and pot support, actually) which uses any one of the popular pots, is shaped like a cone, and uses wood to cook. No batteries, and some folks here own and use them.
Yes, the Zzip is bulky, as well as heavy, and that's another reason I don't carry it any more.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 19:55
The one that is shaped like a cone is called a trailstove?

Tinker
12-27-2007, 19:58
That's one. I believe there are others. Stick around, you'll find out from someone here, I'm sure.

kayak karl
12-27-2007, 20:42
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?

these are plans for a wood stove. i used a colman fuel can. i take it on short trips because it doubles as a pot stand for soda can stove. weight 3.5 oz. boil time was 5 min with 16 oz. water. no piece of wood was larger then 3/8" thick. the pic with the stove it is boiling water in a chinese rice container. (coyotewhips: it can BE done:D)

http://zenstoves.net/Templates/NimblewillNomadStove.pdf

shelterbuilder
12-27-2007, 21:04
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?

Good suggestion about using a headlamp with the same size batteries, Tinker. And yes, the carbon on the bottom of the pot will help distribute heat faster and more evenly. Bag the stove in your pack, and when the weather threatens to be nasty, gather enough tinder and small twigs to get your next fire going BEFORE the rain starts (carry it with you in a small bag).

You like a campfire??? With a ZipStove, you'll always have one!

Bob S
12-27-2007, 21:16
I have several Wood stoves, (no ZIP Stove) A Stratus Trailstove, a
Woodgas stove and 3 homemade wood stoves. And a Thermette. The one I
like the most for backpacking is a homemade ver of the Woodgas. It
works great. Itís the hottest stove I have. I like the Thermette a lot,
but itís too big to take backpacking, I use it for car camping and
canoeing.
If I were only going to use store bought stoves I would go with the
Woodgas stove for backpacking. It (like the homemade one) has very
little soot residue on your pans. And is small enough to pack and it
really can poor out the heat.

The homemade stoves cost nothing as I made them out of all the junk I
have.
The Trailstove cost $26.00
The Thermette $109.00
The Woodgas cost $60.00

<O:p</O:p

4eyedbuzzard
12-27-2007, 21:16
I've had a Zip since about 1991. It's a GREAT stove for a week long backcountry fishing trip or if you're more hiking AND camping as you can gather up a plentiful supply of wood and cook as long as you like. Then again, a campfire and small lightweight grate can often achieve the same purpose as well.

I got rid of the damper on my stove and soldered in a speed potentiometer(speed control) so the fan is now variable speed which makes it much easier to regulate the flame.

I don't think I'd like it on a long hike where I was looking for convenience, low weight, and miles. The pot(s) do get very sooty. You can't use it in a tent or shelter(well, if the wind was right you could in some shelters but others might not like it), and it does take a while to gather fuel and start the fire going. Even when wet though I've never had a problem getting it going with just a little dry tinder whittled from some sticks.

mkmangold
12-27-2007, 22:00
4Eyes: can you give me details on the potentiometer (like what size, wiring, etc)? I bought the D-cell battery attachement which comes off and on with alligator clips and I like the idea of a controlled burn.

tomsawyer222
12-27-2007, 22:07
Any one had experiance the the trail stove it does look like a relativly good stove a little heavy though

4eyedbuzzard
12-27-2007, 22:33
4Eyes: can you give me details on the potentiometer (like what size, wiring, etc)? I bought the D-cell battery attachement which comes off and on with alligator clips and I like the idea of a controlled burn.

I just soldered a single turn 5K ohm 2 watt pot in series with the positive battery lead going to the motor and glued the pot to the base with a little RTV silicone just to keep it out of the way/flopping around. In hindsight, I can see where it would be better on a short length of wire(maybe 20 to 24 gauge) so you don't bump the stove when turning the speed up/down. I got rid of the metal damper as it was no longer needed to control the airflow. The old Zips weren't all that well made, and I repalced the original battery holder/switch assembly as well with one pilfered from work(radio-shack type stuff).

CoyoteWhips
12-27-2007, 23:26
the pic with the stove it is boiling water in a chinese rice container. (coyotewhips: it can BE done:D)

http://zenstoves.net/Templates/NimblewillNomadStove.pdf

Rad scientist!

Terry7
12-28-2007, 11:29
I have several Wood stoves, (no ZIP Stove) A Stratus Trailstove, a
Woodgas stove and 3 homemade wood stoves. And a Thermette. The one I
like the most for backpacking is a homemade ver of the Woodgas. It
works great. Itís the hottest stove I have. I like the Thermette a lot,
but itís too big to take backpacking, I use it for car camping and
canoeing.
If I were only going to use store bought stoves I would go with the
Woodgas stove for backpacking. It (like the homemade one) has very
little soot residue on your pans. And is small enough to pack and it
really can poor out the heat.

The homemade stoves cost nothing as I made them out of all the junk I
have.
The Trailstove cost $26.00
The Thermette $109.00
The Woodgas cost $60.00

<O:p</O:p
The Woodgas stove I saw on the net was made of stainless steel and I think weighed aleast 2 lbs. Can you buy one made of lighter stuff ? What is a good web site for making a home made Woodgas stove?

SteveJ
12-28-2007, 13:20
these are plans for a wood stove. i used a colman fuel can. i take it on short trips because it doubles as a pot stand for soda can stove. weight 3.5 oz. boil time was 5 min with 16 oz. water. no piece of wood was larger then 3/8" thick. the pic with the stove it is boiling water in a chinese rice container. (coyotewhips: it can BE done:D)

http://zenstoves.net/Templates/NimblewillNomadStove.pdf

nice...what's your stove made out of, to be only 3.5 oz? anyone know where you can get titanium to make something like this? I thought thru-hiker.com carried it, but it wasn't there when I just checked.....

kayak karl
12-28-2007, 13:59
nice...what's your stove made out of, to be only 3.5 oz? anyone know where you can get titanium to make something like this? I thought thru-hiker.com carried it, but it wasn't there when I just checked.....
was made out of a solvent can (steel). was wrong about weight. the one in pic was 4.2oz. did a square one that is 3.5oz. u coulld use an aluminum cookie sheet and cut with a scroll saw! just an idea.

Bob S
12-28-2007, 14:49
The Woodgas stove I saw on the net was made of stainless steel and I think weighed aleast 2 lbs. Can you buy one made of lighter stuff ? What is a good web site for making a home made Woodgas stove?


I donít know of any web site for making a homemade Woodgas stove. I just took a look at the Woodgas stove and made a copy of it, in fact mine looks almost exactly like it. I made it out of a stainless steel canister set, Computer fan and a Radio shack $3.00 motor. $2.29 Battery holder. I have lots of electronic things around so the switch, & plugs cost nothing. The Stainless Steel canister set I got for $2.00 at a local flee market.
I would post pictures of the build and finished stove, but I never took time to figure out how to upload pictures to the net.

russb
12-28-2007, 15:24
I would post pictures of the build and finished stove, but I never took time to figure out how to upload pictures to the net.

When you click on "post reply" scroll down a little and you will see a button for "manage attachment". Someone with your ingenuity should be able to figure it out from there.

weary
12-28-2007, 15:35
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?
I carried a Zip Stove in 1993 and for many hundreds of miles before and since. It is the ideal stove, in my opinion, for long distance hiking.

I sometimes use my whisper light for weekend trips, when one container of fuel suffices. But on longer walks the Zip is ideal. Like all natural things, there is a bit of a learning curb. Starting any wood fire requires a bit of experience.

But once you get the hang of it the Zip is an excellent backpacking tool.

No. I never used a fire starter -- other than birch bark I found on the trail, and occasional scraps of newspapers found in shelters.

The critics tell us a bit about the schizophrenic nature of backpackers. Most are adamantly against using soap on the trail, but react in horror to a bit of soot.

A Zip Stove is an ideal cooking device. But it is especially great for those of us who for budget or philosophical reasons like to really cook on the trail as opposed to buying expensive heat and serve convenience foods.

My Zip allows me to boil generic rice, create pea soups, bake beans from scratch, cook oatmeal, make pancakes, purify suspicious water -- all without any worry about fuel supply.

My Zip has never failed to start, regardless of weather conditions. I rarely had to wait supper while I gathered wood. I just pick up a few handfuls of wood and birch bark as I walk during the day.

Weary

rafe
12-28-2007, 16:08
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?


I used a Zip stove for a couple of 100-mile AT sections. The attraction was not needing to carry or worry about fuel. Starting it wasn't hard, just time-consuming. Yes, it leaves lots of soot... on your cooking gear, your hands, etc. I've left it behind these last couple of years. Decided that it was just too much fuss and bother. On my '06 section I went back to my old MSR Whisperlite. This year, I went with Pocket Rocket (canister stove.)

Bob S
12-28-2007, 20:36
Extra Batteries
If you look at the Woodgas camp stove web site you can find a solar battery charger they sell for 22.00 It is very portable & light. I have had one for several years. I bought it at Harbor Tools for 12.00, they still sell them for this price, it’s the exact same charger. You could use this solar charger and NIMH batteries to have unlimited time in the woods.


Using Aluminum

I would say NO to aluminum, my homemade Woodgas stove melted the 1/8 inch aluminum cross bar pot support the first time I fired it up. I made a new set out of Stainless Steel and have had no problems with it.

mkmangold
12-28-2007, 21:11
4Eyes: thanks.
Bob S: the New Agie co-author of the last "Complete Walker" had the same concept and determination. Solar charger charges the batteries during the day; cooks at night. I personally keep an extra alkaline around just in case.

Bob S
12-29-2007, 00:57
4Eyes: thanks.
Bob S: the New Agie co-author of the last "Complete Walker" had the same concept and determination. Solar charger charges the batteries during the day; cooks at night. I personally keep an extra alkaline around just in case.


I take one set of Alkaline and one set of rechargeables. This way Iím covered if the NIMHís donít get topped off during the day. Once charged they will last at least two days on the charge (the fan doesnít draw much) but Iím always ready just incase they come up dead. Two extra AA Batts donít take up much space.

bull
02-09-2008, 10:58
Check this out, http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/pennywood.html
Fantastic site that Mark Jurey shares.
Bull

rafe
02-09-2008, 16:56
For what it's worth, the fan in the classic Zip stove goes six hours on a single AA cell. That's a lot of cooking.

mystic
02-09-2008, 17:08
I love my zip stove. I got mine last fall. A small note with the stove states that the new pot that comes with the stove set is a little smaller since their supplier has changed. And that it might stick if you store the stove in the pot.

OK, no biggy I figured and I hiked away. It was a little stuck a couple times but nothing I wasn't able to get apart. But after about a week the base ring of the stove popped off. I was able to duct tape it and called the 800 # on the side of the stove. Jeannie sent a new stove to my next mail stop for free.

So make sure you stick a bandana or something in between the pot and the stove for storage.

astrogirl
02-10-2008, 01:18
I have a bushbuddy ultra I took on a section last year and an overnight in January.

I don't have trouble getting it started or keeping it going, but it's slow to boil. I'm not sure if I need to move to bigger fuel faster or if I need to add a double wall to keep in heat, or maybe a heat director on the pot.

If it looks like rain or I hear thunder, I pick up some dry fuel, especially the little stuff, and stick it in a ziploc. You can burn damp wood once you've got the stove going.

Also, if you want hot water in the morning, it's better to stash some fuel before bed. Dew can make the whole process slower and I know I don't have a lot of patience in the morning.

Bob S
02-10-2008, 03:05
I have a bushbuddy ultra I took on a section last year and an overnight in January.

I don't have trouble getting it started or keeping it going, but it's slow to boil. I'm not sure if I need to move to bigger fuel faster or if I need to add a double wall to keep in heat, or maybe a heat director on the pot.

If it looks like rain or I hear thunder, I pick up some dry fuel, especially the little stuff, and stick it in a ziploc. You can burn damp wood once you've got the stove going.

Also, if you want hot water in the morning, it's better to stash some fuel before bed. Dew can make the whole process slower and I know I don't have a lot of patience in the morning.



Pickup wood as I walk and put it in a freezer bag.
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Looking at the U-tube video on the buhsbuddy site it looks like a good well made stove other then the price. Kinda expensive for a non-forced air stove when you can buy a Woodgas stove for Ĺ the price.
<o:p></o:p>
The Trail stove is stainless steel and sells for 25.00.

Roland
02-10-2008, 03:09
Pickup wood as I walk and put it in a freezer bag.
ffice:office" /><o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p></o>:p>
Looking at the U-tube video on the buhsbuddy site it looks like a good well made stove other then the price. Kinda expensive for a non-forced air stove when you can buy a Woodgas stove for Ĺ the price.
<o>:p></o>:p>
The Trail stove is stainless steel and sells for 25.00.

Bob S,

MS Word played a trick on you. If you use Word to compose your posts, preview the post after you paste it to the reply<reply to="" thread=""> window. That will allow you to view, then edit, the gremlins.</reply>

Bob S
02-10-2008, 03:11
Bob S,

MS Word played a trick on you. If you use Word to compose your posts, preview the post after you paste it to the <REPLY thread="" to="">window. That will allow you to view, then edit, the gremlins.</REPLY>
My spelling sucks, And I do use Word to type up my post.
Normally it doesnít do that, I have no idea why it decides to on occasion do it.

russb
02-10-2008, 08:12
My spelling sucks, And I do use Word to type up my post.
Normally it doesnít do that, I have no idea why it decides to on occasion do it.

Have you tried firefox as your browser? It has a built-in spell checker for online posting.

Wise Old Owl
02-10-2008, 12:09
I have several Wood stoves, (no ZIP Stove) A Stratus Trailstove, a
Woodgas stove and 3 homemade wood stoves. And a Thermette. The one I
like the most for backpacking is a homemade ver of the Woodgas. It
works great. Itís the hottest stove I have. I like the Thermette a lot,
but itís too big to take backpacking, I use it for car camping and
canoeing.


The homemade stoves cost nothing as I made them out of all the junk I
have.
The Trailstove cost $26.00
The Thermette $109.00
The Woodgas cost $60.00

<O:p</O:p


Thank's for the information on the Thermette. I had never heard about it, I went to their website for the video. I was wondering why you would even take it car camping, a flat coleman stove with Griddle plate would be far more useful, and the copper must have jacked the price up now. I will look for you answer here Bob,

Thanks,

Mark

Bob S
02-10-2008, 15:12
Thank's for the information on the Thermette. I had never heard about it, I went to their website for the video. I was wondering why you would even take it car camping, a flat coleman stove with Griddle plate would be far more useful, and the copper must have jacked the price up now. I will look for you answer here Bob,

Thanks,

Mark

Why I take a car camping (actually a minivan) is that I camp in lots of campgrounds and I drive there. I like backpacking, but itís only one part of the camping I do. I want to try some bicycle camping this summer and do more canoeing. I donít do backpacking as much as I would like because of medical reasons, I was in a motorcycle accident and broke lots of bones, both knees among the list. Backpacking is at times painful to do. So I do other camping to still get out to enjoy the outdoors. <O:p</O:p
<O:p

I have at least one dozen camp stoves, Iím a stoveaholic (Iím not sure how to spell that? ) and I donít really need another one. But I keep buying them if I see one I like. <O:p
<O:p</O:p

I go to a week long Christian rock music festival in June (www.alive.org (http://www.alive.org/)) and itís primitive camping, they have these semi-truck showers they bring in and charge you to take showers. Not that I canít afford the $4.00 a day for a shower but I have my own homemade camp shower enclosure and I use the Thermette to heat the water for it. Yea I could heat water with any of the other stoves I have, but I saw this thing and liked it, so I bought one (actually I bought 2 of them, one for a Christmas present for my brother) I also use it to heat water for dishes when car-camping. I also go in several other primitive camping trips every year, the Thermette just makes sense to me, and itís fun to use. I like that I donít need to carry fuel with me to use it.
<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
And to purify water if needed. Just this last week there was a lot of flooding going on here in NW Ohio, there was a boil your water notice sent out I could have just did it on the stove, but NO, I went outside gathered up some sticks and used the Thermette. Like I said Iím a stoveaholic, I had a smile on my face while I was digging sticks out of the snow to fire it up. Sounds sad doesnít it???:confused:
<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
As far as cooking on it, yes I have lots of other options for cooking, but I enjoy getting out and trying new & different ways to do things.
<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
It really seems to draw attention from people, they will see it running and comment on it and say they should get one. I would imagine the price will scare a lot of people off, but I see it as a useful and neat way to cook and heat water with fuel I find along the way.

There are other kettles similar to the Thermette (about Ĺ doz of them), the Kelly Kettle is the most popular. If you want more info do a search for storm kettle & Kelly Kettle.
<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
I would at some point like to find a smaller one to use for backpacking as this one is too big to backpack with. Kelly Kettle makes a smaller one, but even it is still big for backpacking.

Bob<O:p</O:p<O:p</O:p

Bob S
02-11-2008, 02:34
Here are some pictures of the Thermette I have. The first thing I did to it was to change the wire handles as they were not very good, and I burnt my hands when picking it up. :eek: The new handle I put on it is strong and works great.



http://photos.toast.net/slideshow.asp?user=n8spi&album=Thermette&index=2&timer=&PictDisp=0 (http://photos.toast.net/slideshow.asp?user=n8spi&album=Thermette&index=2&timer=&PictDisp=0)


</SPAN>

NorthCountryWoods
04-11-2008, 19:19
Just got the Woodgas stove and I was very impressed. It's a bit heavy and my intention was for canoe camping, it's doable for backpacking. We used it when we camped out on the farmstead last weekend and it really pumps out the BTUs. We're talkin blast-furnace-burn-your-face-off BTUs!

My buddy works with Titanium and knows how to weld it and he wants to rip it apart and try to copy it in Ti. Not sure how much weight savings that would be.

Nomad94
04-11-2008, 20:36
Has any one had any experiance using a sierra zip stove or anything like it? does it really save you some weight or just make your pots nasty? I realize you dont need to carry fuel you just find it and that would work well on the AT cause there is no desert sections but you have to carry fire starters right? Or can you work it like a real fire well enough? what about the extra batteries to keep the fan going?:-?

Used a zip stove for a couple of hundred miles a few years back.

Wet wood-- I was able to burn wet wood/fuel once I got the stove to temp by using dry duff I found or tinder that I carried. Under shelters is sometimes a good place to find some dry stuff...

Smell & soot-- To be honest, I got tired of dealing with the soot and the smell after awhile. Depending on the fuel you use (and what is available), it can get pretty smoky. Invariably the bag I carried the pot in would get sooty, which would get my hands sooty, etc. Just a pita to keep clean. I've thought about using tin foil for the bottom of my pots, but haven't tried.

I liked the stove so much I bought a couple of different versions with accessories. I still break it out from time to time for the 'wow' factor. As for a potentiometer, my earlier models had one 'built-in', just fiddle with the battery in the case and the current would fluctuate :)

It is too 'fidgety' for me now. Played with alcohol stoves, they're a bit too fidgety for me as well (I like to cook for a bit longer with good simmering capabilities). Use a pocket rocket and am happy, but I have been meaning to bust out the zip again for weekend use.

mkmangold
04-11-2008, 21:47
Even though I already have a Zip stove, I ordered a WoodGas stove and it arrived yesterday. I like for 2 reasons: the proceeds go towards helpling 23rd world nations decrease wood use and because one can run it directly from the sun. It has a solar panel that not only charges 2 NiMH batteries but it also plugs directly into the stove and runs it on a sunny day.
If anyone is interested, I can give a report on it when I get a chance to use it.

Bob S
04-11-2008, 22:05
Even though I already have a Zip stove, I ordered a WoodGas stove and it arrived yesterday. I like for 2 reasons: the proceeds go towards helpling 23rd world nations decrease wood use and because one can run it directly from the sun. It has a solar panel that not only charges 2 NiMH batteries but it also plugs directly into the stove and runs it on a sunny day.
If anyone is interested, I can give a report on it when I get a chance to use it.


Since you already have the solar panel it wonít do you any good. But Woodgas sells the solar panel for $22.00, and Harbor Tools sells the same one (with all the same wires & plugs for attachment) for $12.00

I have the Harbor Tools panel and it runs my homemade Woodgas stove almost as good as the batteries do.
<O:p</O:p<O:p

SGT Rock
04-11-2008, 22:15
Is this the stove you are talking about? http://www.woodgas.com/bookSTOVE.htm

mkmangold
04-11-2008, 22:35
Since you already have the solar panel it wonít do you any good. But Woodgas sells the solar panel for $22.00, and Harbor Tools sells the same one (with all the same wires & plugs for attachment) for $12.00

I have the Harbor Tools panel and it runs my homemade Woodgas stove almost as good as the batteries do.
<O:p</O:p<O:p

I bought the solar charger with the WoodGas stove. It is $22.00. It plugs into one of two receptacles, either "low" or "high" but I'd like to hook up a switch to vary the fan.

Sgt: that's the stove but the site I ordered from was www.woodgas-stove.com (http://www.woodgas-stove.com). I'm ditching the handle, too.

Frosty
04-12-2008, 00:06
If anyone is interested, I can give a report on it when I get a chance to use it.I'm interested. Don't forget to weigh it for us.

mkmangold
04-12-2008, 00:17
I'm interested. Don't forget to weigh it for us.

No problema. I hike mainly in Wisconsin and northern Illinois so the supply of fuel (wood) is NEVER a problem. My main issue with the Zip stove has always been with getting it started. In about 9 days I'll address this issue with the WoodGas stove.
I am also blessed to be able to do testing on 3 Zelph stoves. If his stoves can be made available in mass quantities to 23rd world nations, we can all live in cooking paradise.

Bob S
04-12-2008, 00:30
I bought the solar charger with the WoodGas stove. It is $22.00. It plugs into one of two receptacles, either "low" or "high" but I'd like to hook up a switch to vary the fan.

Sgt: that's the stove but the site I ordered from was www.woodgas-stove.com (http://www.woodgas-stove.com). I'm ditching the handle, too.


I canít say how to hook up a switch to the Woodgas stove. I have never seen one other then looking at it on the net. I would have to see the stove and likely take it apart to see how itís wired (I can guess how itís done but not sure ďa resister for low power?Ē) I know it has 2-plugs for high & low, I would hazard a guess this was done because they thought it easier to do then to make a multi-voltage battery pack.

<O:p
The homemade Woodgas stove I made has one plug. I rewired the battery pack and installed a 3-position switch to give me a high, off and low position on the switch. The idea of having to grab the stove and unplug it, and then hold it to plug it back into a new plug while running with hot food on it seemed like a very bad idea. So I made a switch mounted to the battery pack that allows me to do it easily and safely while cooking.
<O:p</O:p
A potentiometer (variable resister, volume control) could also be an option for you to install, but they are for the most part fragile things not made to take a lot of amperage and may not handle the current of the motor, and you need to figure out the best resistance of the potentiometer to buy . I think it would work, but without testing the amperage draw of the motor, who can say. It would require a place to mount it (make a mount on the battery holder) or have a separate box that would take up as much space as a 2-AA battery pack.


Here is a picture of the one I made.

Bob S
04-12-2008, 00:34
What's a 23rd world nation?

mkmangold
04-12-2008, 00:50
What's a 23rd world nation?
I get a little insulted by the phrase "third world nation" so I use "23rd world nation as a satire of that. Essentially it means those places, whether here in the US or abroad that have a need for essential things like clean water, good food, quality health care, and plentiful fuel for cooking. Along with the invention of textiles, I think that the cooking of food is one of the hallmarks of civilization.

"The idea of having to grab the stove and unplug it, and then hold it to plug it back into a new plug while running with hot food on it seemed like a very bad idea. So I made a switch mounted to the battery pack that allows me to do it easily and safely while cooking."
I agree. Actually, it seems kind of dumb.

mkmangold
04-12-2008, 00:52
Bob: uh oh. YOUR idea is good. The concept of plugging in and plugging out the plugging in again seems kind of dumb.

SunnyWalker
04-16-2008, 23:01
Tomsawyer: I have a Stratus Trailstove and have used it on hikes. I tired taking the alcohol part and using alcohol with it also. I would rather use the wood aspect. Never had a problem. Like others have said have a ziplock bag handy to pick up some stuff on the trail before you camp if it looks like its going to rain. Some people don't like them because they have to blow and blow. I find if you follow the directions it works great and blowing is minimul. The problems come when you fill up the inside to much. I like not have to carry batteries for it nor fuel. To each his own.

4eyedbuzzard
04-16-2008, 23:07
I can’t say how to hook up a switch to the Woodgas stove. I have never seen one other then looking at it on the net. I would have to see the stove and likely take it apart to see how it’s wired (I can guess how it’s done but not sure “a resister for low power?”) I know it has 2-plugs for high & low, I would hazard a guess this was done because they thought it easier to do then to make a multi-voltage battery pack.

<O:p
The homemade Woodgas stove I made has one plug. I rewired the battery pack and installed a 3-position switch to give me a high, off and low position on the switch. The idea of having to grab the stove and unplug it, and then hold it to plug it back into a new plug while running with hot food on it seemed like a very bad idea. So I made a switch mounted to the battery pack that allows me to do it easily and safely while cooking.
<O:p</O:p
A potentiometer (variable resister, volume control) could also be an option for you to install, but they are for the most part fragile things not made to take a lot of amperage and may not handle the current of the motor, and you need to figure out the best resistance of the potentiometer to buy . I think it would work, but without testing the amperage draw of the motor, who can say. It would require a place to mount it (make a mount on the battery holder) or have a separate box that would take up as much space as a 2-AA battery pack.


Here is a picture of the one I made.

I put a 2W 5K ohm pot in series with the motor on my Zip back in 1991 and it still works fine. Glued it on with RTV. No problems.

Bob S
04-16-2008, 23:31
I put a 2W 5K ohm pot in series with the motor on my Zip back in 1991 and it still works fine. Glued it on with RTV. No problems.



I see nothing wrong with you gluing the pot on and using it that way. I have a garage machine shop/ wood shop combo work area. I have a background in wood working, electrical work, and also I worked as a machinist for a few years. I have a tendency to build things from the machinist point of view in that I build something that is generally more complicated and durable then what most people would build. I have just as much fun with the design and build as I do in using it. I look at things like the Woodgas stove, figure what I donít like about it and make improvements to it. And have fun doing it.

SunnyWalker
04-16-2008, 23:51
TomSawyer: I also saw another good idea. A hiker talked about using Esbitt tabs with three or four tent stakes. He put the tab on the ground with the three/our tent stakes in the ground sticking up to hold the pot. So in essence cooked without a stove. Wow, all the stove selles don't like that!

astrogirl
04-20-2008, 19:06
Pickup wood as I walk and put it in a freezer bag. [/SIZE]

Looking at the U-tube video on the buhsbuddy site it looks like a good well made stove other then the price. Kinda expensive for a non-forced air stove when you can buy a Woodgas stove for Ĺ the price.[/SIZE]


Just got back from a 135 mile section. The stove does weigh almost nothing and of course there's no blower -- works by a chimney effect. I switched to a small light Primus teapot I got from REI outlet for 60% off, and I'm getting much faster boils.

It's fussy to start, but I love that I can just keep it going as long as I like and I also love that it chases off those darn gnats that don't leave until the sun goes down.

Berserker
04-30-2008, 13:09
I have a bushbuddy ultra I took on a section last year and an overnight in January.

I don't have trouble getting it started or keeping it going, but it's slow to boil. I'm not sure if I need to move to bigger fuel faster or if I need to add a double wall to keep in heat, or maybe a heat director on the pot.

If it looks like rain or I hear thunder, I pick up some dry fuel, especially the little stuff, and stick it in a ziploc. You can burn damp wood once you've got the stove going.

Also, if you want hot water in the morning, it's better to stash some fuel before bed. Dew can make the whole process slower and I know I don't have a lot of patience in the morning.

I also have a Bushbuddy, and yeah it's pricey but it works well. I have yet to actually "field test" it so to speak, but I have boiled water on my back porch using it. I also used it as a "fire pit" on one of my last section hikes.

It is pretty easy to get going, and it burns everything down to a miniscule amount of ash. Due to it's double wall design it can be picked up from the bottom with bare hands while it is going. It also doesn't weigh much compared to the Sierra stove the OP mentioned. The Bushbuddy in a Snowpeak ti 900 pot (this is pot the Bushbuddy was designed to fit in although I believe it fits in other pots too such as one sold by BPL) weighs 10.9 oz on my postal scale.

rdpolete
05-01-2008, 01:33
I saw some plans for a bush buddy home made stove made from a 1 pint and 1 quart unlined paint can. Does anyone know where you can still find unlined paint cans, other than on the web, (because I am cheap and I don't need 150 of them nor do I need to pay for 5 X shipping of the cost of the cans)?

Roland
05-01-2008, 03:12
Plastic paint cans are fast replacing metal cans. The Sherwin Williams store in my town still has metal cans. They are used for custom color jobs, and not usually displayed for retail sale. If you ask, they'll probably sell you a few empty cans.

Are they unlined? I don't know. Because they might be used for water-base products, they may well be epoxy coated. The coating will burn-off with use; don't use in a confined space. Use a propane torch to burn the liner before you start building the stove, if you prefer.

I'm sure you know that these cans are not rustproof, and that heating them will accelerate oxidation. But given the low cost of the cans (especially if you recycle a used can), and the pleasure derived from tinkering, have at it. Let us know how it turns out.

rdpolete
05-01-2008, 22:15
Thanks I will try burning off the lining. I did not know if it would cause a big mess or not.

Bob S
05-01-2008, 23:07
Just burn it off in the back yard before you cook anything on it.

Montego
05-01-2008, 23:16
I saw some plans for a bush buddy home made stove made from a 1 pint and 1 quart unlined paint can. Does anyone know where you can still find unlined paint cans, other than on the web, (because I am cheap and I don't need 150 of them nor do I need to pay for 5 X shipping of the cost of the cans)?

I haven't checked in a little over a year, but, you could stll get new, unfilled paint cans in both the gallon and quart size (with lids) from both the Home Depot and Lowes stores. Check with the floor associate in the paint department.

mkmangold
05-01-2008, 23:40
I will be off and on the AT next week and I'm going to be experimenting, this time, stoves and meals. I'm going to try out my new WoodGas stove (modified slightly) and 3 of Zelph's masterpieces, unmodified except for a surprise. I'll give a low-down on everything when I get back.

mkmangold
05-10-2008, 22:48
Just pulled into Wisconsin from the AT in Georgia. The WoodGas stove worked well enough. Brought 2 cups of water to a boil in 8 minutes. I ditched the handle and 2 metal pieces that serve to hold the pot. Instead I used 2 tent stakes.
I gave my Ring of Fire to my wife's uncle who is going to the Dominican Republic next month to build houses. I figure that while wood may be in short supply there, alcohol is plentiful the world over.

Bob S
05-10-2008, 23:55
Just pulled into Wisconsin from the AT in Georgia. The WoodGas stove worked well enough. Brought 2 cups of water to a boil in 8 minutes. I ditched the handle and 2 metal pieces that serve to hold the pot. Instead I used 2 tent stakes.
I gave my Ring of Fire to my wife's uncle who is going to the Dominican Republic next month to build houses. I figure that while wood may be in short supply there, alcohol is plentiful the world over.



If they are building a house, I would guess that the scraps from it would be more then enough for a wood camp stove.

That and the fact that most places in the world have trees and generate debris should keep any wood stove in fuel.

mkmangold
05-11-2008, 00:34
If they are building a house, I would guess that the scraps from it would be more then enough for a wood camp stove.

That and the fact that most places in the world have trees and generate debris should keep any wood stove in fuel.




I've only seen pictures of the mudslides caused from deforestation. Traditional homes are some combination of mud and straw but I'm not sure what the newer homes will be built from.