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SC Ryan
12-30-2007, 10:13
Are you doing anything to get in shape before you leave? :-?

SGT Rock
12-30-2007, 10:13
Yes - eating a lot and walking a lot. I've bulked up by 5 pounds of bodyfat.

wrongway_08
12-30-2007, 10:26
I keep to my normal schedule:
- aprox 2 times a week I mountain bike for a few hours.
- Hike trails around the house.
- Back pack, not as much as I want but I get out some.
- Starting to lift weights agian - stopped for a long while.
- Getting rid of or stop using a lot of the privilages of home life.
- Getting used to putting together and shopping for "trail meals".
- will be getting back into upstream Kayaking to build back, shoulder and hip muscle back up.

rafe
12-30-2007, 10:34
Bicycling works for me. And of course hiking. Otherwise, I'm a mouse potato.

JAK
12-30-2007, 10:37
So far I've just been doing the eating part.

mudhead
12-30-2007, 10:37
Yes - eating a lot and walking a lot. I've bulked up by 5 pounds of bodyfat.

Cookies.

Yum.

SGT Rock
12-30-2007, 10:39
Cookies.

Yum.
How did you know? Actually, in order to maintain some variety I have also been ingesting pork.

Lone Wolf
12-30-2007, 10:40
Are you doing anything to get in shape before you leave? :-?

unless you're really overweight and in general bad health there's not much you need to do to get in shape. some cardio/vascular exercise wouldn't hurt

Kirby
12-30-2007, 10:48
Every now and then I walk around with my pack, mainly just to have a refresher on what the pack feels like. I am generally healthy person, and stay in generally good shape yesr round.

Kirby

rafe
12-30-2007, 11:05
From experience and age... "physical preparation" gets more important as one grows older. Young-uns can skip it. Old pharts probably need to work at it a bit.

Pedaling Fool
12-30-2007, 11:10
Are you doing anything to get in shape before you leave? :-?
Always workout with weights, cycling, running, stair climbing, stretching.... Not for the trail, but for the ravage of time.

Just a Hiker
12-30-2007, 11:13
Are you doing anything to get in shape before you leave? :-?

I am getting as fat as I can!

JAK
12-30-2007, 11:28
I'm making a New Years revolution to get me and Margaret outside for at least a full hour each and every day rain or shine. Well we'll see how that lasts. :)

take-a-knee
12-30-2007, 12:01
Always workout with weights, cycling, running, stair climbing, stretching.... Not for the trail, but for the ravage of time.

At least someone gets it, most of y'all like looking like the Bowflex "before" models I guess.

oso loco
12-30-2007, 12:53
Best is to get out walking, with weight on your back. Carrying a pack puts stress on knees and feet that is quite different from what you get riding a bike. I've also seen hikers with baby soft feet have to deal with enormous blisters that could have been avoided by doing more walking beforehand. Some end up quitting because of the blisters. Better to prepare your feet for the trail ahead of time.

take-a-knee
12-30-2007, 13:07
Best is to get out walking, with weight on your back. Carrying a pack puts stress on knees and feet that is quite different from what you get riding a bike. I've also seen hikers with baby soft feet have to deal with enormous blisters that could have been avoided by doing more walking beforehand. Some end up quitting because of the blisters. Better to prepare your feet for the trail ahead of time.

Exactly this is the undoing of many Army Special Forces trainees. When a blister gets bad and painful enough it changes your gait and how your muscles are loaded, usually favoring the uninjured side. A strain or connective tissue injury on that opposite side often ends that soldiers training...all from a blister.

Pedaling Fool
12-30-2007, 13:11
I walked barefooted on pavement around my neighborhood prior to my '06 thru; probably a little over-doing it for preparations, but it worked great for me - no blisters, not even a hint of one.

Just a Hiker
12-30-2007, 13:13
At least someone gets it, most of y'all like looking like the Bowflex "before" models I guess.


If a person has hiked enough, you have the luxury of sitting around for awhile and getting fat; because when you get back on the trail, your body and muscles know exactly what to do, and trust me, that extra weight will come in handy about 4 months into a thru-hike. Enjoy your bowflex! :D


Just Jim

Kirby
12-30-2007, 13:29
In regards to blisters, here is a somewhat interesting story.

When I went through the wilderness this summer, I met a thru hiker from acorss the ponds. One morning as I was getting ready to head out for the day. He made the comment(as I was putting my sock liners on), that for the first 30 miles(to Neels gap), he was constantly getting blisters. He said at Neels Gap he purchased some sock liners, and did not have a single blister for the rest of the trip. I have also been fortunate not to get a blister in the lower back heel(where a lot of people seem to get them).

He also used the same pair of boots from Springer to Katahdin.

Kirby

Uncle Tom
12-30-2007, 13:38
I agree that prepping your feet is the most important thing.
Some people who were in really great shape from the ankles up were among the ones that suffered the most when their feet began to first develop blisters, and then blisters on blisters. And the key to that is figuring out how much your own feet sweat and then being ready to come up with solutions to maintaining dry socks as long as possible.
I thru-hiked the Trail in 2007, and my feet are still screwed up. I sustained in both forefeet that is unrelenting, despite my efforts at ongoing treatment . They both hurt now, even as I type this. If i had it to do all over again , I'd would find a sports oriented podiatrist in my area and get evaluated for a custom foot orthortic, BEFORE I started walking. I don't know if is is available on-line, but the print edition of Backpacking Light magazine ( Issue 8 ) has an excellent article on this whole issue, entitled " Can Arch Support Boost Trail Performance? " by Howard E. Friedman, DPM.


Best is to get out walking, with weight on your back. Carrying a pack puts stress on knees and feet that is quite different from what you get riding a bike. I've also seen hikers with baby soft feet have to deal with enormous blisters that could have been avoided by doing more walking beforehand. Some end up quitting because of the blisters. Better to prepare your feet for the trail ahead of time.

Blissful
12-30-2007, 13:38
Cardiovascularly I was okay when I started, but none of the muscle groups and joints, etc were in shape. Nothing gets you in shape like just getting out there and hiking day in and day out. And give yourself time to build up to the regimen of long distance hiking, no matter what shape you're in. Don't push too much too soon or your knees and shins will dislike you real quick.

My best to this year's hiking class. Thinking of you. :)

Blissful
12-30-2007, 13:40
For blisters-

I ditched my gaiters and went to trail runners with good socks and I used Spenco hiking insoles (green ones).

rafe
12-30-2007, 13:43
Blisters are a bummer. Somehow I managed to avoid them during my first long AT section in 1990 -- wearing mid-weight leather boots, and pooping along at 11 miles per day. Since then, not so lucky!

ISTM, foot care during a hike is paramount. Walking with wet boots and socks will happen, and in my experience, that's when blisters are most likely to form.

Carry lots of moleskin and Gold Bond. Carry spare socks. Keep toenails clipped. When you get to camp, wash and then air out your feet. Take breaks during the day, get the weight off your feet. Dip your (bare) feet in cool streams when you get the chance.

futureatwalker
12-31-2007, 06:36
Iím preparing for a section hike of the AT at the beginning of April, and this year my goal is to do Georgia. Iíd love to thru-hike in one go, and was (and perhaps still am) planning on doing this when I retire. However, my perspective changed this year after I suffered a slipped disc. I could hardly stand, let alone carry a backpack. If I have this kind of problem now, at age 42, am I really going to be able to hike the whole AT at 65? My father, age 67, canít walk down the street because of his back. My thinking is that itís better to do the trail in sections now, rather than wait and not be able to do any. (Incidentally, I wonder what the success rate is for retirees on the trail? If only 10-20% of all hikers who start succeed, the percentages must be lower for older folks.)

So, my physical preparation is, in part, therapy. And yes, carrying a backpack in the mountains is a curious form of therapy for a back injury, but, well, I really want to hike the trail.

My back pain has gone, so Iím now getting in shape by running. My goal is to run for an hour over routes that have hills, and Iím not far from this now. I try to go out 3-4 times a week, although some of these runs are short. I go regardless of the weather Ė I want to be ready for rain, snow, and low motivation. So, at the moment, this is my AT: long runs in the dark, with a flashlight, on rural roads, with the moon and the stars above.

dessertrat
12-31-2007, 10:38
In regards to blisters, here is a somewhat interesting story.

When I went through the wilderness this summer, I met a thru hiker from acorss the ponds. One morning as I was getting ready to head out for the day. He made the comment(as I was putting my sock liners on), that for the first 30 miles(to Neels gap), he was constantly getting blisters. He said at Neels Gap he purchased some sock liners, and did not have a single blister for the rest of the trip. I have also been fortunate not to get a blister in the lower back heel(where a lot of people seem to get them).

He also used the same pair of boots from Springer to Katahdin.

Kirby

A nylon inner sock and a wool outer usually prevents blisters. Every time I've decided to skip the sock liner/dress sock (same thing, really) I've regretted it.

Pedaling Fool
12-31-2007, 11:28
Iím preparing for a section hike of the AT at the beginning of April, and this year my goal is to do Georgia...
Running is great, but it is equally important to do weight training, not just for preparation of a hike, but for a strong body that you can get some mileage out of. There are many resistance exercises for your upper/lower back and core muscles that are important for carrying a backpack.

Bearpaw
12-31-2007, 12:37
My back pain has gone, so Iím now getting in shape by running. My goal is to run for an hour over routes that have hills, and Iím not far from this now. I try to go out 3-4 times a week, although some of these runs are short.

Runs will help with cardiovascular conditioning, but will leave you sore with perhaps an even worse back on the trail.

In the Marine Corps, others who could run circles around me often faltered during humps with packs. Walking, particularly in mountains on rough trail, uses surprisingly different muscles groups compared to running. Add pack weight and the whole situation can feel very different.

If you enjoy running, by all means continue. I've found it better for weight loss than walking, even with my pack. For me, excess weight is my biggest reason for occasional lower back pain. But I would recommend hiking uneven terrain with your pack as the best way to prep your body for a section hike.

I would also suggest looking at an external frame pack as it tends to transfer weight differently (different center of gravity) and many with lower back problems find them more comfortable than internal frames.

SGT Rock
12-31-2007, 13:01
Also playing video games sharpens your hand eye coordination - so Resident Evil 4 is a big part of my prep.

Kirby
12-31-2007, 13:08
Also playing video games sharpens your hand eye coordination - so Resident Evil 4 is a big part of my prep.

What's coincidental about this statement is that, as one of the few teen-agers on this site, I play absolutely 0 video games.

Kirby

Lone Wolf
12-31-2007, 13:09
I play absolutely 0 video games.

Kirby

me either. never have, never will

Red Hat
12-31-2007, 13:12
Didn't think I would either till my grandson was playing his WII... He bowled, golfed, played tennis and baseball, not using some silly control, but actually swinging like the sport. Cool! I loved playing golf and bowling, it was neat!

johnny quest
12-31-2007, 13:17
doing football stadium bleachers wearing a flak jacket (10 lb.) and a small pack with 10-20 lbs. of chain in it. easy strides, slow pace, to best mirror the action of climbing a switchback trail with a 30 lb pack. how often have i done it????
well, it sounds good.

rafe
12-31-2007, 13:17
Flight simulator was kinda cool for a while. Haven't played it in ages, tho.

4eyedbuzzard
12-31-2007, 13:18
The Wii ain't a bad thing given the winters up here. I don't play any of the other consoles like PS3, but Wii golf is especially fun, and a lot less pricey than a flight and tee times in FL.

4eyedbuzzard
12-31-2007, 13:22
Flight simulator was kinda cool for a while. Haven't played it in ages, tho.

I got into it for a while I was learning to fly, as it's actually good instrument practice, but then FAA made my life miserable because of some old medical issues and wanted me to jump through hoops to get my certificate. It became the straw that broke the camels back. Still boot up FS occaisionally, but otherwise I'd rather play 9 on the Wii.

Terry7
12-31-2007, 14:25
Alot of core body work, squats, dead lifts, crunchs, and side bends.

mudhead
12-31-2007, 15:00
Also playing video games sharpens your hand eye coordination - so Resident Evil 4 is a big part of my prep.

How you supposed to do your 2oz cookie curls?

You a one handed gamer?

SGT Rock
12-31-2007, 15:35
I eat during cutscenes.

Critterman
01-01-2008, 19:52
Always workout with weights, cycling, running, stair climbing, stretching.... Not for the trail, but for the ravage of time.

You are only 43, just wait it gets worse :eek:

Montego
01-01-2008, 19:55
You are only 43, just wait it gets worse :eek:

And worse :eek:

Pedaling Fool
01-01-2008, 20:08
You are only 43, just wait it gets worse :eek:
Yeah, true. This is why I don't push myself too hard anymore when I workout. I think working-out is, generally, beneficial unless it's overdone, then it just wears down the body and the mind follows.

Something else I should have mentioned is that most people that do workout, do so for about 1 hour @ ~3-5 times per week. And then what do they do...sit around and type on a computer, or watch TV, or read, or whatever...
So I believe it's very beneficial to do some type of exercise(s) while sitting around, things like: squats (w/o weights - of course), push-ups, sit-ups... But this would envolve discipline, something many Americans are not noted for. So we blame the Government for our failing health....

Montego
01-01-2008, 20:16
Like the man said at his 100th Birthday party, "If I knew I was going to live to be a hundred, I would have taken better care of myself" :D

Pedaling Fool
01-01-2008, 20:21
Youth is wasted on the young;)

mudhead
01-01-2008, 20:26
You are only 43, just wait it gets worse :eek:
ouch!

And worse :eek:
You mean it creaks and clicks more?

I all of a sudden wish I had not sucked down the second chunk of lazag.

Or all the outside pieces of a batch of oatmeal bars.

I hope I can put the sweet tooth away in the next couple of days.

Happy New Year!

Grinder
01-01-2008, 20:31
I'm an old guy who hiked the trail the first time last year. I have a long history of running and bicycling, but no longer run because of stiffness.

To get ready for my hike I walked about 5 miles a day. I thought this would allow ten mile days with some on the job training and sweat.

It turned out to be much more cardio vascular than I imagined. My tongue was dragging.

When I returned, searching for more suitable training, I went to the local high school and climbed the football stadium with my pack on.

That was a pretty good imitation of the trail.

I would advise doing that with your pack on at least once to see if you are in the ball park. My stadium is about 50 feet high and I would do ten reps.

HTH

Tom

Montego
01-01-2008, 20:31
ouch!

You mean it creaks and clicks more?

I all of a sudden wish I had not sucked down the second chunk of lazag.

Or all the outside pieces of a batch of oatmeal bars.

I hope I can put the sweet tooth away in the next couple of days.

Happy New Year!

Naw. Ya just get like me. Half bald, half deaf, half blind, 'n half crazy! Can't wait to start my thru-hike :rolleyes:

take-a-knee
01-01-2008, 21:06
Runs will help with cardiovascular conditioning, but will leave you sore with perhaps an even worse back on the trail.

In the Marine Corps, others who could run circles around me often faltered during humps with packs. Walking, particularly in mountains on rough trail, uses surprisingly different muscles groups compared to running. Add pack weight and the whole situation can feel very different.

If you enjoy running, by all means continue. I've found it better for weight loss than walking, even with my pack. For me, excess weight is my biggest reason for occasional lower back pain. But I would recommend hiking uneven terrain with your pack as the best way to prep your body for a section hike.

I would also suggest looking at an external frame pack as it tends to transfer weight differently (different center of gravity) and many with lower back problems find them more comfortable than internal frames.

I run, but I never run two days in a row. I think your joints and connective tissues need a day off. If you think about it, it is similar to age old weight lifting practice, you don't work the same muscles two days in a row, you gain strength on your rest day. If you want to do cardio on the days you don't run, join a gym and get on an elliptical trainer, or do circuits with weights, ie, let one muscle group rest while you work another, and go from set to set with no breaks and do high reps (15 or so).

take-a-knee
01-01-2008, 21:11
I'm an old guy who hiked the trail the first time last year. I have a long history of running and bicycling, but no longer run because of stiffness.

To get ready for my hike I walked about 5 miles a day. I thought this would allow ten mile days with some on the job training and sweat.

It turned out to be much more cardio vascular than I imagined. My tongue was dragging.

When I returned, searching for more suitable training, I went to the local high school and climbed the football stadium with my pack on.

That was a pretty good imitation of the trail.

I would advise doing that with your pack on at least once to see if you are in the ball park. My stadium is about 50 feet high and I would do ten reps.

HTH

Tom

Or find yourself one of these:

http://www.nautilus.com/catalog/step_up_view.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=25343743020 36768&bmUID=1199236084684&adID=degstairmaster&bmUID=1199236089811

NYFD uses this machine for their fitness test, you walk a certain profile (steps per minute) with a weighted vest (to simulate turnout gear). They put a heart rate monitor on you, if your HR goes too high, you flunk.

Critterman
01-01-2008, 21:33
I semi-retired in September and if all the stars align just right I might get to try a thru in March. So I figured I would try to get in shape just in case I get to go. Last month I started working out at a gym, weights 3 days a week and cardio 5 days a week. Can't jog on these knees. Surprisingly I can already see a big improvement. I am still the " before " model for the bow-flex ad but I feel much better and creak less.

Pedaling Fool
01-01-2008, 21:43
... Can't jog on these knees...
Keep doing them weights, will help with those big descents. Sometimes I think the descents (with a pack on) are worse than plain running, w/ respect to impact.
:sun

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 21:47
Keep doing them weights, will help with those big descents. Sometimes I think the descents (with a pack on) are worse than plain running, w/ respect to impact.
:sun

hmmm. i ran a 54 mile trail race where the last 4 miles were a descent to the finish. loved it. never did any weight training

Pedaling Fool
01-01-2008, 21:52
hmmm. i ran a 54 mile trail race where the last 4 miles were a descent to the finish. loved it. never did any weight training
This forum is for us mere mortals.

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 21:53
so i guess you don't use hikin poles since you do weight training

Pedaling Fool
01-01-2008, 21:55
All mortals use poles.

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 21:57
all weenies use poles

saimyoji
01-01-2008, 21:58
hmmm. i ran a 54 mile trail race where the last 4 miles were a descent to the finish. loved it. never did any weight training


Yeah, but you're a hiking god, carry no body fat and slurp PBRs like they're a metabolic necessity. :cool:

For you non-deitys, a steady regimen of cardiofitness and weight training is a necessity. You don't get to Katahdin by being a super fit runner, nor do you get there by being Arnold. Its a balance in the middle. Get strong enough to carry your pack, then carry it around a while. Easy enough. Takes time. You're gonna walk 4-6 months, put in 4-6 months training.

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 22:00
Yeah, but you're a hiking god, carry no body fat and slurp PBRs like they're a metabolic necessity. :cool:


yes i'm a hiking god but i'm a fat ass that drinks Busch Light

Critterman
01-01-2008, 22:01
Keep doing them weights, will help with those big descents. Sometimes I think the descents (with a pack on) are worse than plain running, w/ respect to impact.
:sun

I would much rather go uphill than down, it really is tough on the knees.

Programbo
01-01-2008, 22:04
At least someone gets it, most of y'all like looking like the Bowflex "before" models I guess.

You must be thinking of Wayne Gregory :D ...I was luck a way long time ago because up untill I was 19 I use to walk a really long hilly newpaper route 6 days a week...I would walk like 6+ miles every morning and deliver like 500 papers...Back then we carried them in just a long 3 inch wide canvas strap that ran across your shoulder and around the opposite hip with the bundle of 50 or so papers balanced across it in front of you...After doing that for 5 years I was in perfect hiking condition at all times....But as others have mentioned just walking and biking would be good...For the AT you don`t have to be in Triathlon shape..If you are just in OK shape to start take it slowly and after a month you`ll be up to speed and once you get far enough up the trail you`ll make good time and make up for the slower start..From Harpers Ferry-MASS the trail barely gets above 2,000' so don`t get discouraged if you fall behind everyone elses milages at first

Kirby
01-01-2008, 22:08
hmmm. i ran a 54 mile trail race where the last 4 miles were a descent to the finish. loved it. never did any weight training

Over how many days?

Or maybe this is one of those times where I completely miss the sarcasm.

Kirby

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 22:10
Over how many days?

Or maybe this is one of those times where I completely miss the sarcasm.

Kirby

i ran it in 10 hours, 6 minutes

Kirby
01-01-2008, 22:11
i ran it in 10 hours, 6 minutes


:eek::eek::eek::banana:banana:banana

Kirby

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 22:13
:eek::eek::eek::banana:banana:banana

Kirby

www.extremeultrarunning.com/2005_mmtr/finishers.htm
76th place

Kirby
01-01-2008, 22:16
www.extremeultrarunning.com/2005_mmtr/finishers.htm (http://www.extremeultrarunning.com/2005_mmtr/finishers.htm)
76th place

One can only assume you are David Blair. You said trail race, what type of terrain was it?

Kirby

SGT Rock
01-01-2008, 22:17
I hear it was all mental.



Actually, damn. The 1st place guy did 54 miles in less than 7 hours. I'm impressed. Is he still living?

Lone Wolf
01-01-2008, 22:21
One can only assume you are David Blair. You said trail race, what type of terrain was it?

Kirby

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gk3dO1wJWxE

Mad Hatter 08
01-01-2008, 23:49
awesome vid lw

Pedaling Fool
01-02-2008, 00:10
awesome vid lw
Yeah, now I feel like a real weenie.

rafe
01-02-2008, 00:18
Yeah, now I feel like a real weenie.

Precisely why (imo) this stuff has nothing to do with hiking. No hiker should ever be made to feel like a weenie. That's not right. (OK, off my soapbox now.)

TNjed
01-02-2008, 00:48
Are you doing anything to get in shape before you leave? :-?
all you gotta do is make sure your legs and lungs are strong

Mags
01-02-2008, 12:19
Read this:
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?p=184425#post184425


good stuff.

SGT Rock
01-02-2008, 15:09
I've started adding Bannana Splits to my workout.

johnny quest
01-02-2008, 16:23
cool video, l. wolf. as you know, its all mind over matter. if you dont mind, it dont matter. ooohrah.

Tin Man
01-02-2008, 16:26
me either. never have, never will

Obviously, you have not tried Wii Golf.

Mags
01-02-2008, 17:00
I've started adding Bannana Splits to my workout.

Before doing the CDT, I hit the Southern/Mountain Sun (http://www.mountainsunpub.com/) many times.

I am sure the Java Porter (http://www.mountainsunpub.com/beer.htm) helped immensley over the months I spent on the trail. It also helps after hikes, skis, moving, getting together with friends, chatting up women, breaking up with a particular woman, etc.

I highly suggest 16 oz curls to everyone.

jessicacomp
01-02-2008, 22:20
I go to the gym when I can, but that really has nothing to do with the trail.
I also just got snowshoes, so that I can do some winter hiking.
And finally, I play wii boxing until my arms are shaking, so thats preparing for if I have to box bears, I guess.

Dazzy001
01-02-2008, 22:44
This is guna sound sill, But i have hiked 10+ miles a day, My feet swet badly when i hike, i use two pairs of socks and my boots are a half size bigger than i need, and change them twice to three times a day whilst on the trail, and have never had a blister anywere on my feet. Maybe i am just lucky...

Kirby
01-02-2008, 22:49
This is guna sound sill, But i have hiked 10+ miles a day, My feet swet badly when i hike, i use two pairs of socks and my boots are a half size bigger than i need, and change them twice to three times a day whilst on the trail, and have never had a blister anywere on my feet. Maybe i am just lucky...

Wait:
Do you change your boots or your socks three times a day?:-?

Kirby

Dazzy001
01-02-2008, 22:59
Sorry for the misunderstanding, I change my socks two to three times a day.

Darren