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Critterman
02-12-2008, 10:22
Has anybody tried this permethrin clothing treatment (http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1&partNumber=56624&memberId=12500226) for ticks? It is the same ingredient that Exofficio uses in their Buzz Off clothes.

take-a-knee
02-12-2008, 10:44
It works great, just follow the directions and remember to wash all treated garments before you wear them. You can also buy permethrin in bulk at a pest control supply, mix it in a two gallon sprayer and treat large quantities, this is a longer lasting treatment.

greentick
02-12-2008, 10:47
I'll second that it works great. I got the sawyer brand at REI that has a refillable sprayer as part of the package.

Again, make sure it is completely dry before use. The army stuff comes in yellow cans with a green cap and said to re-treat after 6wks or six washings whichever comes first.

Bob S
02-12-2008, 13:27
It works great, just follow the directions and remember to wash all treated garments before you wear them. You can also buy permethrin in bulk at a pest control supply, mix it in a two gallon sprayer and treat large quantities, this is a longer lasting treatment.


I donít see any statements on either brand of Permethrin I have that says to wash the clothes after you apply it to the clothes. I have read that your skin (amino acids or something like that) deactivates the Permethrin within a few min of contact with your shin. It is not dangerous to humans when itís applied to the clothes as directed. It also last through like 6 laundering of the clothes, why would you want to start to wash it off and reduce itís effectiveness before you even use it the first time when there is no need to?

I went backpacking in Michiganís UP a few years ago and the flyís were so bad it almost drove us nuts, since that trip I have done a lot of research into bug juice and testing of it. Permethrin comes out with flying colors and is very safe. Here is some info I had saved on my computer, I canít remember what the web address is where I got it, but Iím sure if anyone looking into it would be able to find lots of good info to back it up as a safe product to use.

Permethrin: Although known as a repellent, Permethrin is actually a contact insecticide. That is, it kills ticks or other insects that come in contact with it. Permethrin is considered ideal because it is applied to clothing, gear, mosquito nets and bedding and is not applied directly on the body. When applied to clothing and equipment, Permethrin is very effective at reducing the mosquito population in your campsite or sleeping quarters by killing mosquitoes that "hang around" camp and land on things. Where ticks are a concern, Permethrin on clothing or gear will kill ticks that travel across as little as 10" of treated fabric. Spray applications of Permethrin remain effective up several weeks and through weekly washings. Dip applications can remain effective even longer. Permethrin is harmless to skin and is used extensively in other formulas for treatment of head lice.

take-a-knee
02-12-2008, 13:37
I donít see any statements on either brand of Permethrin I have that says to wash the clothes after you apply it to the clothes. I have read that your skin (amino acids or something like that) deactivates the Permethrin within a few min of contact with your shin. It is not dangerous to humans when itís applied to the clothes as directed. It also last through like 6 laundering of the clothes, why would you want to start to wash it off and reduce itís effectiveness before you even use it the first time when there is no need to?

I went backpacking in Michiganís UP a few years ago and the flyís were so bad it almost drove us nuts, since that trip I have done a lot of research into bug juice and testing of it. Permethrin comes out with flying colors and is very safe. Here is some info I had saved on my computer, I canít remember what the web address is where I got it, but Iím sure if anyone looking into it would be able to find lots of good info to back it up as a safe product to use.

Permethrin: Although known as a repellent, Permethrin is actually a contact insecticide. That is, it kills ticks or other insects that come in contact with it. Permethrin is considered ideal because it is applied to clothing, gear, mosquito nets and bedding and is not applied directly on the body. When applied to clothing and equipment, Permethrin is very effective at reducing the mosquito population in your campsite or sleeping quarters by killing mosquitoes that "hang around" camp and land on things. Where ticks are a concern, Permethrin on clothing or gear will kill ticks that travel across as little as 10" of treated fabric. Spray applications of Permethrin remain effective up several weeks and through weekly washings. Dip applications can remain effective even longer. Permethrin is harmless to skin and is used extensively in other formulas for treatment of head lice.


Permethrin, considered by most (but not all) authorities to be quite safe, is a potential skin irritant. It is also delivered via a spray can that also contains propellant, solvents, etc. The army uses this product and reccomends washing garments before use.

The Cheat
02-12-2008, 13:43
I treat mine and my kids clothes with permethrin. Works great. We've all had lyme disease (myself multiple times), but we haven't had new cases since using permethrin (last 3 years or so).

It also keeps down the mosquitoes.

RenoRoamer
02-12-2008, 14:09
If you spray it on the outside only of your clothes, then there is absolutely no reason to wash them first. Now if you soak the clothes in permethrin, then you might want to wash them first. Some people have tried wearing dog flea and tick collars, which contain permethrin, around their legs. And the result is some very nasty sores from skin irritation. This shows that permethrin is entirely benign with respect to humans, though it is true that in small does the body can neutralize it. Same principle as aspirin: one aspirin won't hurt you, but a whole bottle may.

Anyone who hikes the AT and doesn't treat their clothes with permethrin is an absolute fool. Even though I've yet to hike the AT myself, it is obvious to me that Lyme disease is far and away the most serious danger that can be prepared for and potentially prevented (I don't see how you can prepare for falls and knee injuries) and permethrin is the best means of prevention. Treat hat, shirt, short or long pants, socks and boots (especially if the boots have fabric tops). Ticks can still get on your legs if you are wearing shorts, so be sure to look down every so often. What you definitely don't want is ticks getting up past your thighs and especially into your hair, because then they become difficult to find.

The 6oz Sawyer spray bottles of permethrin are nicely packaged so they can be included in your mail drops or bounce box for retreatment every 4 weeks. Or order from REI and have it shipped to you.

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 14:21
The stuff is great! I treat my clothes and my hammocks with it, never had any problems or bites!

Bob S
02-12-2008, 14:27
Permethrin, considered by most (but not all) authorities to be quite safe, is a potential skin irritant. It is also delivered via a spray can that also contains propellant, solvents, etc. The army uses this product and reccomends washing garments before use.
Iím just going by what Iíve read on it and by the 2 companies that make it whoís cans of it I have. And none of the info I have says to wash the garments first.

If you have any link to a web site that says otherwise pleas post it, I would like to read it.

orangebug
02-12-2008, 14:37
Permethrin is safe, effective but not a panacea. You still have to be aware of your legs, wrists, shirt collar and such for ticks to encroach. Gaiters may be a good idea, and are just as easily treated.

take-a-knee
02-12-2008, 15:42
Iím just going by what Iíve read on it and by the 2 companies that make it whoís cans of it I have. And none of the info I have says to wash the garments first.

If you have any link to a web site that says otherwise pleas post it, I would like to read it.

I don't have a source, I remember what I read in Army Field Manuals (I was an SF Medic) and what I was taught by Preventive Medicine NCO's. Like I said earlier, I don't think the permethrin will harm you, absorption of any solvent however, may damage your liver, YMMV.

Lakes
02-12-2008, 16:05
Thanks for the heads up on this product, never heard of it, but it sounds awesome.

Anyway, is there anything on the bottles that says you shouldn't spray it on DWR treated materials? Any thoughts on spraying a garment or shoes with DWR then permethrin?

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 16:20
Anyway, is there anything on the bottles that says you shouldn't spray it on DWR treated materials? Any thoughts on spraying a garment or shoes with DWR then permethrin?

I've used it on hammocks that have a DWR treatment, no issues. I can't see why it would be a problem to treat garments or shoes that have a DWR coating.

Critterman
02-12-2008, 16:24
................. The army uses this product and reccomends washing garments before use.


Iím just going by what Iíve read on it and by the 2 companies that make it whoís cans of it I have. And none of the info I have says to wash the garments first..............

I think you are both right. There is a product that you soak your clothing with in a plastic bag and that may be what Take-a-knee may be talking about.

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 16:27
The soaking method (last time I checked) is only sold to the military. It is much more gooder (Florida for better) as it gives complete coverage without worrying about it. Treatments last a couple of weeks longer. If I remember right, there was something on the container that said to wash the garments prior to wearing, but can't say for sure.

Critterman
02-12-2008, 16:27
I have often found ticks under and near my underwear in the summer when I have on shorts so the next question is, has anybody treated their underwear with this stuff?

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 16:37
What's underwear?

Probably climbed up your leg; treat your socks and shorts. All they need to do is come in contact with a treated material and it kills em. I've watched ticks start to climb my socks only to fall off an inch or two later.

take-a-knee
02-12-2008, 16:37
I have often found ticks under and near my underwear in the summer when I have on shorts so the next question is, has anybody treated their underwear with this stuff?

I wouldn't recommend it. Keep your tee shirt tucked into your pants, keep your pants tucked into your jungle boots (?), and wear a boonie hat. Now you see why those army guys dress funny.

Deadeye
02-12-2008, 16:55
Permethrin's a wonderful chemical, and I trust everyone who tells me it's safe - 100%, no questions asked. I presume the folks telling us it's safe are the same that told us not to worry about des, celebrex, ddt, agent orange...:confused:

Not saying I won't use it, but if I do, I'll assume the risk and try to minimize the risk by following the directions and using as little as possible.

Same goes for DEET, Lipitor, ibuprofen, acetaminophen...

Bob S
02-12-2008, 17:04
I don't have a source, I remember what I read in Army Field Manuals (I was an SF Medic) and what I was taught by Preventive Medicine NCO's. Like I said earlier, I don't think the permethrin will harm you, absorption of any solvent however, may damage your liver, YMMV.


Iím not against washing the garment you sprayed with it first if itís what should be done. I have never read this and the info I have found does not address it. Iím going to do some more looking on-line to get a better answer. I donít want to end up with problems from a chemical if i can easily avoid it.

GGS2
02-12-2008, 17:11
Permethrin's a wonderful chemical, and I trust everyone who tells me it's safe - 100%, no questions asked. ...

Oh, thank heaven some-one else broke the ice. Thanks, Deadeye. I've been sitting on my hands.

This stuff is a general sodium channel interference poison (neurotoxin) that is bad for cats, insects of all kinds, probably all invertebrates, and fish, according to what I have read so far. It is not considered a poison for humans essentially because our skin defenses are so good. It is widely used in agriculture as a general pesticide, which means that it also kills bees and other beneficials, and probably sterilizes the soil locally. I have yet to see a discussion of the ecological half life of the stuff, or the load on the watershed where it is used. I also don't know what effect wading in a trail ford with permethrin treated shoes, socks or gaiters might have.

In other words, please don't assume this stuff is harmless and non-toxic. It is neither. However, its benefits of use may outweigh the risks of ticks and other insects out in the bush. That's for you to decide. Just don't spread it about like after-shave, and don't wear it next to your skin, would be my advice. But then i don't like DEET either. Don't have much of an alternative though.

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 17:16
Without taking the time to Google the info, the stuff they use for agriculture is a derivative of the chrysanthemum just like Peremethrin, but chemically different. They are cousins, just not kissing cousins.

GGS2
02-12-2008, 17:22
Without taking the time to Google the info, the stuff they use for agriculture is a derivative of the chrysanthemum just like Peremethrin, but chemically different. They are cousins, just not kissing cousins.

Yeah, I guess. I haven't done a complete screen for this, either. But I hike in agricultural land most of the time, and I wonder what is the runoff that I get to drink. This is why I like to use a filter (for e-coli et al.), preferably with carbon (for nasty ag. chemicals), and actually drink town or bottled water whenever I can. I am beginning to think that the best all around solution is boiling, even with all the hassle. I'm working myself up to a wood stove system. I have an old Zip, but it's a bit too heavy for my liking.

Cannibal
02-12-2008, 17:28
I feel ya there GGS2. I live in an area surrounded by citrus groves and have pulled plenty of water out of questionable sources; never have gotten comfortable with that. I'm not sure boiling would help remove the chemicals or not. I know my SteriPen is good for organics, but not the chemicals. Scary! :eek:

Bob S
02-12-2008, 17:28
Oh, thank heaven some-one else broke the ice. Thanks, Deadeye. I've been sitting on my hands.

This stuff is a general sodium channel interference poison (neurotoxin) that is bad for cats, insects of all kinds, probably all invertebrates, and fish, according to what I have read so far. It is not considered a poison for humans essentially because our skin defenses are so good. It is widely used in agriculture as a general pesticide, which means that it also kills bees and other beneficials, and probably sterilizes the soil locally. I have yet to see a discussion of the ecological half life of the stuff, or the load on the watershed where it is used. I also don't know what effect wading in a trail ford with permethrin treated shoes, socks or gaiters might have.

In other words, please don't assume this stuff is harmless and non-toxic. It is neither. However, its benefits of use may outweigh the risks of ticks and other insects out in the bush. That's for you to decide. Just don't spread it about like after-shave, and don't wear it next to your skin, would be my advice. But then i don't like DEET either. Don't have much of an alternative though.


Donít assume that itís harmful just because itís a chemical. Many of us always seem to take things that way.

DEET has a very good safety record for going on 60-years (itís a product of WWII) that doesnít mean you abuse its use. But I donít think anyone can make a very effective argument that itís a real danger to us or the environment. While a few people show some skin rash to its use, there are millions of applications of it every year, problems with it are statistically nothing.


Permethrin is used for head lice with kids, itís used for crops and also for clothes. It seems to be building a good safety record of itís own.

By the way itís not interchangeable in itís uses, the kind in the sprays and liquid for clothes has bonding agents that allow it to bond to cloth. The farm use and head lice shampoo are different and should not be cross-used as it will not work well.

Don H
02-12-2008, 17:42
We have lots of deer ticks here in Maryland and I know many people who have had Lyme Disease. I use Permethrin (the 6 week stuff) on my pants, shirts, socks above the ankle, shoes and hat. I spray up inside the pants cuff on long and short pants. If I'm wearing shorts I spray my legs with a DEET spray.

The Cheat
02-12-2008, 18:11
The absolute best prevention is Permethrin on your clothes, DEET on your skin. The military has tested this effective in areas where unprotected skin would get 1000+ bites per hour.

That said, DEET and the lemon eucalyptus alternative both leave me with burning skin. And you couldn't pay me enough to go somewhere with that high a concentration of mosquitoes.

I use Cutter advanced with Picardin. That plus the permethrin on the clothes.

RenoRoamer
02-12-2008, 21:52
Someone above said the military soak version of permethrin was only sold to the military--not true. Available from REI. Search on Sawyer or Permethrin.

I'm not a big fan of the military soak method because it is something of a nuisance. I think spraying works just as effectively, you just have to do it more often. So? Include some spray containers of permethrin in your maildrops. The 6oz Sawyer spray bottle from REI is nicely packaged in plastic wrapping so it won't leak and is thus ideal for mailing. 6oz treats one set of clothes.

Someone mentioned the ecological half-life of permethrin. It is fairly short, because permethrin is destroyed by both oxygen and sunlight. So if you plan to treat clothes but not wear them for a while, then Sawyer recommends putting the clothes in a plastic bag so the permethrin treatment doesn't wear off.

Permethrin is EXTREMELY toxic to fish. So don't pour unused permethrin down the storm sewers where it might drain into a stream. Instead, just pour on an outdoor concrete surface where the water will evaporate and the permethrin will be quickly destroyed by sunlight.

Permethrin, like many other chemicals (salt, aspirin, alcohol) is probably bad for humans in large quantities but can be metabolized in small quanitites. The benefits almost certainly outweigh the risks unless you are a rare person with allergies to permethrin. There is no dispute in the medical literature that Lyme disease can easily ruin your health. The dangers of small amounts of exposure to permethrin, if any, pale in comparison to these known dangers of Lyme disease.

GGS2
02-12-2008, 22:12
Donít assume that itís harmful just because itís a chemical. ...

<Big digression>
Well, the older I get, the more unintended consequences I notice to the general use of man-made chemicals assumed to be harmless. Everything from supposedly inert chemicals like Freon to those perfectly passive plastics. I see that our whole way of life is built on these things, and I do not find this comforting. I'm not saying shun all chemicals. That is plain ignorance, since we are all made up of chemicals and so is everything else. Chemistry is just a discipline of study concerning the combinations and systems of atomic compounds.

What I am talking about are novelties: compounds that natural systems have not ever seen before, and are not adapted to. These are things that the natural systems of the world will require several thousand to million years to get used to, and we are turning every oil well and mine shaft into them as fast as we can. What I would like is for everyone to just slow down. Not just a little bit, but a whole lot. What's the hurry? Where are you going?

I know that permethrin is a good thing for people in Lyme country. That stuff is heading our way too. That doesn't mean I need to feel good about it. So by all means use it if you judge it to be your best solution to a nasty problem. I will too. But I will probably use it as little as I can, and with due regard for the creatures of the world on which all of our lives depend.:-?

And... That the good folks that brought us agent orange have decided to dip each recruit in permethrin and deet does not actually fill me with warm cuddlies either. Not just the USA either: our own military has a rather pitiful record in exercising due dilligence in the health care of their personnel. It is for them an expedient solution to a problem. That does not mean it is the last word on the subject.:(
</Big digression>

GGS2
02-12-2008, 22:19
... Permethrin is EXTREMELY toxic to fish. So don't pour unused permethrin down the storm sewers where it might drain into a stream. Instead, just pour on an outdoor concrete surface where the water will evaporate and the permethrin will be quickly destroyed by sunlight. ...

Good advice. However, it is also toxic to cats, so don't pour it onto concrete frequented by any cat. Also don't pour it onto your lawn or flower bed. It will persist longer in the soil, and poison probably any animal that lives in that soil.

marvin-r
07-10-2009, 07:19
The best way to remove a tick from your skin is to pinch it with your index finger and thumb and pull gently at a 90 degree angle. The use of fire, Vaseline, or nail polish is not an appropriate approach for removing ticks. On some occasions, the head of the tick will remain in the skin after the body is pulled off. Simply grip it with a pair of tweezers and it will come out. There are several ways to avoid acquiring ticks. Proper clothing should be worn when camping and the spraying of that clothing with applicable bug spray will diminish the risk of getting bitten. If you have a dog, maintaining its hygiene through bathing will greatly reduce the risk of ticks entering your home. scottsdale pest control (http://www.pestbomb.com/providers-Scottsdale-AZ.html)

amac
07-13-2009, 20:10
I was interested in some of the statements made here. I have both kinds of treatment from Sawyers, spray and soak. The only difference according to the writing on the boxes is that the soak is the "military treatment". Neither has any indication on the box to wash before wearing, the only caution is to let fully dry before using. Also, both boxes say they are good for 6 launderings. Until now I, too, had understood that the soak was longer lasting.

Ol Mole
07-13-2009, 20:27
I use a different method. I take a clove of garlic with me when I am out backpacking. Before hitting the trail, I break it open and rub it around my ankles, wrists and neck as these are the main acccess points for the ticks. This also works to discourage fleas and chiggers from getting a ride. I've used this for over 20 years and never had a problem with them.

johnnybgood
07-13-2009, 20:51
I use a different method. I take a clove of garlic with me when I am out backpacking. Before hitting the trail, I break it open and rub it around my ankles, wrists and neck as these are the main acccess points for the ticks. This also works to discourage fleas and chiggers from getting a ride. I've used this for over 20 years and never had a problem with them.
I just might give that a try Mole , does garlic works on skeeters ? Those pesky blood suckers nail me no sooner than I walk out the door.

They act like they know that I'm a universal blood donor.:D

gregp
07-13-2009, 21:10
I've been using it for several months now and haven't seen a single tick. I use the directions for my shorts, and shirts but spray a little more heavily on socks and shoes.

A little DEET on the exposed skin and I'm good to go and bug free.

Summit
07-13-2009, 21:50
So Hollywood didn't invent the tale that garlic keeps vampires (blood suckers) away? :-?

amac
07-14-2009, 07:07
I use a different method. I take a clove of garlic with me when I am out backpacking. Before hitting the trail, I break it open and rub it around my ankles, wrists and neck as these are the main acccess points for the ticks. This also works to discourage fleas and chiggers from getting a ride. I've used this for over 20 years and never had a problem with them.

Mole, interesting technique. How often do you have to reapply?

World-Wide
07-14-2009, 08:00
Tick protection for pups!! W-W
http://www.lifeinthefastlane.ca/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/body_armor_dog_1.jpg

lustreking
07-14-2009, 09:12
A while ago, I bought a can of the Repel Permanone spray, but I haven't used it yet because at least twice I've read that it is poisonous to cats. I have two cats that, most of the time, I don't want to kill. :D

Is the permethrin just dangerous to them when it's wet, or will dry, treated clothes be a problem? I would, of course, treat the clothes and let them dry outside, but cats have a tendency to rub against legs and ankles... exactly the places I want to make sure that I treat.

BOWSINGER
07-14-2009, 10:27
FOUND ON THE 'NET:
Actually, here in Colorado, we embrace ticks, and, in fact celebrate them in the Annual Heeney, Colorado, Tick Festival the second Saturday of every June, where they feature Tick Circuses, Tick floats in the parade and a Tick King and Queen...(I'm not making this up, and, as a matter of fact, I think I may have hooked up with a former Tick Queen in a bar up there one night.). http://www.coloradodreams.com/tfhome.htm (http://www.coloradodreams.com/tfhome.htm)

The high mountain town of Heeney is also world-famous, (thanks to Jay Leno), as the home of the Heeney Master Bait & Tackle Shop.

brooklynkayak
07-14-2009, 13:05
My observations:

1) Lyme disease, rocky mountain spotted fever,.. are serious business for anyone who hikes and especially dogs. Permethrin is the safest bet, but be careful about keeping treated article away from cats. Stor your treated items in a container that cats won't come in contact with.

2) The popular spay treatments are usually only 0.5% permethrin. Commercial permethrin is 10% and approx the same price. We use the commercial, dilute to 1 to 20 parts water and soak our hikintg clothing in the solution in garbage bags for a few minutes. Hang to dry and then wash to remove any other chemicals.
We do this about once every couple months,

3) I have noticed that mosquitos tend to not bite me when I'm wearing my treated clothing, but i have been bitten through garments treated with permethrin so it doesn't appear to repel all mosquitos.

dradius
07-16-2009, 13:30
I may have overlooked it, but just wanted to let people know that you can buy spray with 0.5% permethrin at walmart for 5 bucks.

flemdawg1
07-16-2009, 14:04
I used the Permaone spray last month. My camp clothes were good the whole trip, 2 nights, however the hiking clothes lost effectiveness as I spent much of time wading across/thru creeks.

Downhill Trucker
07-16-2009, 21:04
I have often found ticks under and near my underwear in the summer when I have on shorts so the next question is, has anybody treated their underwear with this stuff?

I did and it worked great!

puddingboy
07-16-2009, 22:22
anyway to use this stuff on dogs? make them wear doggy clothes treated with permtherin? my dog gets loaded with ticks after a brushy hike.

lustreking
07-17-2009, 15:39
A while ago, I bought a can of the Repel Permanone spray, but I haven't used it yet because at least twice I've read that it is poisonous to cats. I have two cats that, most of the time, I don't want to kill. :D

Is the permethrin just dangerous to them when it's wet, or will dry, treated clothes be a problem? I would, of course, treat the clothes and let them dry outside, but cats have a tendency to rub against legs and ankles... exactly the places I want to make sure that I treat.

So I decided to pose this question to the makers of Permanone, and here's their response:



Thank you for contacting United Industries regarding the Repel Permanone product. Once the product has completely dried on your treated clothing/gear it is safe for your cats to be around. It will not harm them if they rub against your leg or lay on the clothing. Although we do not have any data stating that Permethrin is dangerous to cats, we suggest that you consult your veterinarian regarding Permethrin in its dried state if you still have concerns. We appreciate your interest in, and use of our products. Have a wonderful weekend and please let me know if I may be of any further assistance.

Abra Schwartz
Product Specialist
United Industries
A Subsidiary of Spectrum Brands
PH: 1-800-332-5553

Jonnycat
07-18-2009, 11:29
If you guys are worried about permethrin, you will be shocked to learn about the prevalence of Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) (http://www.dhmo.org/)in our environment. It's just frightening how common this stuff is (they even use it to dilute permethrin - talk about CRAZY!)

flemdawg1
07-18-2009, 12:04
If you guys are worried about permethrin, you will be shocked to learn about the prevalence of Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) (http://www.dhmo.org/)in our environment. It's just frightening how common this stuff is (they even use it to dilute permethrin - talk about CRAZY!)

I heard the CIA used it in water boarding. Diabolical that stuff is.

Alli
07-25-2009, 12:58
I heard the CIA used it in water boarding. Diabolical that stuff is.

It's in our lakes and streams, and thousands of people die each year from inhaling it!

Also I drink 8 glasses of it every day :-?

Snowleopard
07-26-2009, 21:09
If you guys are worried about permethrin, you will be shocked to learn about the prevalence of Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) (http://www.dhmo.org/)in our environment. It's just frightening how common this stuff is ...
It's been a particularly bad year for DHMO in the northeast. It's falling from the sky as I type accompanied by some kind of electrical discharge and loud booming noise. :confused:

On another note, I tried this Buzzoff hat with cape: http://www.exofficio.com/product_details.aspx?item_cd=3151-0815&key=e51a32c3-aa52-4324-a387-36500cba3009
Buzzoff is basically Permethrin incorporated into the fabric. It works great!! When the mosquitos go for my ears now they die!

David@whiteblaze
07-27-2009, 23:35
hey, Cannibal, thanks for translating tomy language, i normallydont use that bet-whatever word.

Heater
07-28-2009, 04:32
hey, Cannibal, thanks for translating tomy language, i normallydont use that bet-whatever word.

I like your sig max2mus.

brocken spectre
01-07-2010, 11:33
Has anyone tried the Buzz Off clothes? Is the effect about the same as the spray on Permethrin?

Powell19
01-07-2010, 18:33
http://www.sawyerproducts.com/msds/MSDS%20SP657%2024ozTrigger.PDF
http://www.scjohnson.ca/msds/OFF!%20Deep%20Woods%20Sportsmen%20Insect%20Repelle nt%20I%20(Pump).pdf

Here's the MSDS on Sawyer permethrin, and Off! Deep Woods if anyone wants to check them out. I've personally never used the permethrin. I've always been a deet man. I think I'll try the permethrin, though. It seems to be a little safer than deet.

Snowleopard
01-07-2010, 19:15
Has anyone tried the Buzz Off clothes? Is the effect about the same as the spray on Permethrin?
The active ingredient in Buzz Off clothes is Permethrin. The main difference is that the Buzz Off stuff lasts longer, but it's awfully expensive.

The spray permethrin lasts 6 washings or 6 weeks. It lasts somewhat longer if you store it in a plastic bag when not wearing it. Do the spraying outside and let it dry. I redo it every month or two; for a thruhike where you're wearing the stuff all day, every day, I'd redo it every couple weeks or month.

kanga
01-07-2010, 23:10
permethrin kills many small animals. let's use more so that we can avoid those pesky bugs! they sure are dangerous! never mind the minimal discomfort from putting up with being outside. let's poison everything we can out of laziness and self-righteousness! rockin'! yeah, baby!

vonfrick
01-07-2010, 23:13
i permethrin all my clothes kanga...which to my recollection, you were snuggled up with last summer.........miss you girlfriend

Doooglas
01-10-2010, 05:48
I use a different method. I take a clove of garlic with me when I am out backpacking. Before hitting the trail, I break it open and rub it around my ankles, wrists and neck as these are the main acccess points for the ticks. This also works to discourage fleas and chiggers from getting a ride. I've used this for over 20 years and never had a problem with them.

Plus it's great for attracting Italian chicks :o

Surplusman
01-10-2010, 07:59
I've been told that powdered rosemary is effective against ticks, but I've never seen any proof of it. I guess you're supposed to dust your clothes, underwear, socks, boots and hats with it.