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Lyle
02-15-2008, 15:53
Anyone seen one of these yet?

Looks awful good to me. One pound - full protection.

http://www.gossamergear.com/cgi-bin/gossamergear/The_One.html

Footslogger
02-15-2008, 15:58
Great looking shelter. From the outside it appears to have the same general shape as my 11 oz Wild Oasis from Six Moon Design. But this one appears to have some inner walls and a floor ?? Also kinda similar to the Lunar Solo, but thats a 23 oz shelter.

Man ...that thing's light !!

'Slogger

BR360
02-15-2008, 16:20
Light, yes, and only $275.00 That's only $16 an ounce!

rafe
02-15-2008, 18:36
I'd be wary of the nearly-horizontal flat surfaces. But if it works, it'll be a winner.

Roland
02-15-2008, 19:08
I'd be wary of the nearly-horizontal flat surfaces. But if it works, it'll be a winner.

What do you mean by this? I don't understand.

Lyle
02-15-2008, 19:29
Speaking for terrapin, I believe he thinks it is a flatter pitch than I do. I know what his concern is, I've had a few of the stretched out pyramid tents that have tended to sag, particularly if there was any chance of snow or ice.

I think the photo might be deceiving as far as how flat it is. If you watch the video, it looks about the same pitch as many standard A-frames were way back when, maybe slightly less of an angle. I don't think it is all that flat, but I may be wrong. That is one reason I was asking if anyone has actually seen one yet.

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but hands on is worth a thousand pictures. :-)

Forgive me for speaking for you terrapin, feel free to correct me if I'm FOS.

Roland
02-15-2008, 19:34
Thanks for the interpretation. I watched the video. The slope of the "roof" does not look particularly flat. And because the poles attach at the ridge, I would not expect the ridge to sag much at all.

wrongway_08
02-15-2008, 19:46
Pretty cool tent but that price tag seems steep, maybe if I could see if in person to get a better idea of the construction. Not sayn anything bad about it but would need to see it in person to drop that much money on it.

Smile
02-15-2008, 19:59
I'll have to agree, the price is a little steep. Nice looking shelter though :)

rafe
02-16-2008, 00:05
Forgive me for speaking for you terrapin, feel free to correct me if I'm FOS.

No problem. I think we're on the same page. All fabrics sag a bit when they get damp or wet. The slope of the tent's roof has to be steep enough so that rain drains off immediately, even with some sag in the fabric.

Tinker
02-16-2008, 00:19
It's nice that the tent uses two poles (if you hike with trekking poles). There's probably a good amount of usable headroom vs. a single pole flat pyramid style.

I'm done buying tents for a while. I almost wish I needed one.

Roland
02-16-2008, 02:08
~
I'm done buying tents for a while. I almost wish I needed one.

It sounds like you're trying to justify buying "just one more". :D

map man
02-16-2008, 09:53
By the time you add six tent stakes, the polycro ground cloth (which the manufacturer advises), and two tent poles (for those of us who don't use trekking poles) the weight goes from 17 ounces to about 1 lb., 10 ounces, and that is in the same ballpark as the Six Moon Lunar Solo and Tarptent Contrail, only a little more expensive.

On the plus side, it looks well made and designed, has good head room, and that spinnaker material intigues me because I read it is more truly "waterproof" than silnylon.

(by the way, the dog wandering in and out of the setup video was a nice entertaining touch:D)

Nearly Normal
02-17-2008, 10:03
I would have liked to seen a little more closeup on the bathtub floor. The front side looked to stand up well but I wanted to see the head and foot ends and what keeps them standing.
Nice looking overall.
Be great to see it from the users view in a wind driven downpour.
That would sell it.

Appalachian Tater
02-17-2008, 15:39
By the time you add six tent stakes, the polycro ground cloth (which the manufacturer advises), and two tent poles (for those of us who don't use trekking poles) the weight goes from 17 ounces to about 1 lb., 10 ounces, and that is in the same ballpark as the Six Moon Lunar Solo and Tarptent Contrail, only a little more expensive.

They should call it "The One and a Half".

ChinMusic
02-17-2008, 15:56
By the time you add six tent stakes, the polycro ground cloth (which the manufacturer advises), and two tent poles (for those of us who don't use trekking poles) the weight goes from 17 ounces to about 1 lb., 10 ounces, and that is in the same ballpark as the Six Moon Lunar Solo and Tarptent Contrail, only a little more expensive.

To be fair the Lunar Solo weights do not include stakes, tent poles, or ground cloth either. I think The One picks up on the design of the Lunar Solo and improves upon it. I like how it uses both poles (more head room) and how the poles are attached. With my LS I have a tendency to push on the pole with my butt as I roll around at night. I sometimes will push the base of the pole a bit and cause the tent to sag. The strap at the base of The One prevents this.

Appalachian Tater
02-17-2008, 16:00
Seam-sealing can also add more weight. On a large shelter, it can be a couple of ounces.

spittinpigeon
02-17-2008, 16:16
In a heavy wind, it could keep you awake with how noisy the fabric is.

Tin Man
02-17-2008, 16:19
In a heavy wind, it could keep you awake with how noisy the fabric is.

Yep. Wind is silent. Fabric is noisy. :rolleyes:

ChinMusic
02-17-2008, 16:28
Any speculation on condensation or "breathability" issues with this material over the LS?

slow
02-17-2008, 17:29
Any speculation on condensation or "breathability" issues with this material over the LS?

I think it would have more condensation,due to spinnaker is more waterproof than sil.Still looks good on paper.
I had condensation with my LS but not my DUO,due to better venting.

slow
02-17-2008, 20:34
Also putting weight on sil,will leak alot quicker then spinnaker.

ChinMusic
02-17-2008, 20:44
I believe that spinnaker material has less stretch as well so it would not need to be tightened as much as the Lunar Solo.

I bet is would be loud in the rain though. I wear earplugs anyway if I'm having trouble sleeping, so no biggie for me.

Tinker
02-17-2008, 20:58
I recently found out that spinnaker cloth is made of either nylon or polyester, the nylon being stronger and better for racing spinnakers, and the polyester, though weaker, stands up to uv rays better.
Most of the UL stuff is nylon, therefore will stretch when wet. I don't see how it would be more waterproof the lighter it gets, though. Maybe tighter weave from thinner fibers?

slow
02-17-2008, 21:05
I recently found out that spinnaker cloth is made of either nylon or polyester, the nylon being stronger and better for racing spinnakers, and the polyester, though weaker, stands up to uv rays better.
Most of the UL stuff is nylon, therefore will stretch when wet. I don't see how it would be more waterproof the lighter it gets, though. Maybe tighter weave from thinner fibers?

Yes,the weave is the key,after the fiber.Cuben has the most per w.t.:)

rafe
02-17-2008, 21:08
The Other One (http://arts.ucsc.edu/GDead/AGDL/other1.html). :D :cool: :banana (Sorry, way off-topic. I couldn't resist.)

jersey joe
02-17-2008, 21:36
looks like a great tent.
1lb is very light.
price tag seems a bit high though.

spittinpigeon
02-17-2008, 21:49
Ya, the price is too high. But I'm eager to try it out. I haven't picked up a tent for my hike yet. Maybe I'll take one for the team and let you all know how it works.

ChinMusic
02-17-2008, 21:51
This would be a great tent for Lone Wolf. He needs to learn to hike with poles......

jersey joe
02-17-2008, 21:52
I'd be curious to hear how durable it is.

Lone Wolf
02-17-2008, 21:54
This would be a great tent for Lone Wolf. He needs to learn to hike with poles......

no. you sheeples need to walk with me and learn "the way".

slow
02-17-2008, 22:17
I'd be curious to hear how durable it is.

Spinnaker is stronger than SIL,but need's more care.That means clean ground.:)

Heater
02-17-2008, 23:11
I think I'll call him tomorrow and see about doing a side by side test with the "One" the "Squall Classic" and maybe the "SpinnShelter."

Also, you can get a good view of the bathtub floor by viewing the video.
Use fullscreen mode.

Kerosene
02-17-2008, 23:29
Note that The One has 17.5 sq ft of sleeping space (with 15" of height at the ends), while the Lunar Solo has 27.5 sq ft. This probably explains a lot of the 5.5 oz weight difference. The vestibule coverage is about the same (10.4 vs. 10.0 sq ft), so you will likely need to put more of your gear into the vestibule instead of in the tent as you can with the Lunar Solo.

ChinMusic
02-17-2008, 23:35
Note that The One has 17.5 sq ft of sleeping space (with 15" of height at the ends), while the Lunar Solo has 27.5 sq ft. This probably explains a lot of the 5.5 oz weight difference. The vestibule coverage is about the same (10.4 vs. 10.0 sq ft), so you will likely need to put more of your gear into the vestibule instead of in the tent as you can with the Lunar Solo.
Good point. I'm kinda spoiled with the LS having that natural corner to throw all my stuff. Even with my dog in the LS there is plenty of room and he doesn't need the head room.......

Lyle
02-18-2008, 09:07
Looks like they've added more detailed photos to the website. At least I didn't see them before, don't think I just missed 'em. :)

HeartWalker
02-18-2008, 11:54
Looks like a great shelter but at 84 inches I don't see tall people being able to fit.

ofthearth
02-18-2008, 12:08
Pretty cool tent but that price tag seems steep, maybe if I could see if in person to get a better idea of the construction. Not sayn anything bad about it but would need to see it in person to drop that much money on it.

The return policy at GG seems to recognize this problem: return policy below:

Your satisfaction is important to us, and we recognize the inherent difficulty in evaluating products that are primarily sold over the internet. If you get a product and it is not what you expected, please return it unused within 30 days of your purchase date for a refund of the purchase price. All returns require a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number. To receive an RMA#, please login to your account that you created when you placed your order by clicking on the Login link at the top of the page. Select the order number and item that you wish to return.


Note that The One has 17.5 sq ft of sleeping space (with 15" of height at the ends), while the Lunar Solo has 27.5 sq ft. This probably explains a lot of the 5.5 oz weight difference. The vestibule coverage is about the same (10.4 vs. 10.0 sq ft), so you will likely need to put more of your gear into the vestibule instead of in the tent as you can with the Lunar Solo.

Seems to be about the same floor as the Hubba (17 sq ft ?) but I was wondering about the vestibule. Does it seem to be pretty high up - wondering about wind/rain blowing in/under.


Looks like they've added more detailed photos to the website. At least I didn't see them before, don't think I just missed 'em. :)

They are new pics. The images there before were all the same (right hand viiew, I think.) Must have been some code glitch).

So who's going to be the first?????????? so we can get a first hand review?

ofthearth

Lyle
02-18-2008, 12:19
I'm thinking about it big time. Will probably break down and order one today or tomorrow. Just ordered a Wild Oasis on Sat, haven't gotten it yet. Will keep the one I like best or maybe both. I just sold my Cave and Nest, so I'm in dire need of additional shelters! Been hammocking lately, but gotta keep options open. :-)

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 12:35
Looks like a great shelter but at 84 inches I don't see tall people being able to fit.

If it helps, I'm 6'4", the video gives you some idea of how it fits me. I agree it would be tight for people taller than that, we unfortunately had to cut the height off somewhere. It is always a tradeoff between size, footprint and weight.

--Glen

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 12:38
Note that The One has 17.5 sq ft of sleeping space (with 15" of height at the ends), while the Lunar Solo has 27.5 sq ft. This probably explains a lot of the 5.5 oz weight difference. The vestibule coverage is about the same (10.4 vs. 10.0 sq ft), so you will likely need to put more of your gear into the vestibule instead of in the tent as you can with the Lunar Solo.
I suspect that you can't directly compare the numbers, since The One measurement is to the limits of the bathtub floor, and I suspect the Lunar Solo measurements are to the edge of the canopy.

--Glen

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 12:43
Ya, the price is too high. But I'm eager to try it out. I haven't picked up a tent for my hike yet. Maybe I'll take one for the team and let you all know how it works.
Yeah, sorry to everyone about the price. If it makes y'all feel any better, I don't get paid by Gossamer Gear, and I designed The One. Unfortunately, not everyone has as generous a 'day job' as I do, and Gossamer Gear does have paid staff. We all wish we could charge less, but if we don't make it a viable business, then the products just aren't available at all.

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 12:45
Good point. I'm kinda spoiled with the LS having that natural corner to throw all my stuff. Even with my dog in the LS there is plenty of room and he doesn't need the head room.......
There is still a corner in The One to put gear into, opposite the entrance. Don't know about room for the dog, maybe if he's not too big and doesn't move around a lot.

--Glen

Tinker
02-18-2008, 14:58
Hey, Glenn,

Thanks for the pack. (GVP G1). I've moved to a smaller one, but yours showed me that I don't need a frame to hike comfortably.

Lyle
02-18-2008, 15:11
Ok, I did it. I ordered one. I agree, they are expensive, but that is one of the advantages of being single with no dependents. While not rich, I can indulge myself and not have to answer to anyone but me! :-)

Not sure when I'll be able to test these out, but will let you know what I think as soon as I do.

Tinker
02-18-2008, 15:16
Lyle, you are the MAN!

Tell us all about it!

ChinMusic
02-18-2008, 16:06
I suspect that you can't directly compare the numbers, since The One measurement is to the limits of the bathtub floor, and I suspect the Lunar Solo measurements are to the edge of the canopy.

--Glen
Thanks for posting here Glen. It looks like a wonderful design and it at the top of my list for when I need a new tent. I like the way the poles are attached with the loop at the base, the rear vent, the interior pocket (LS does not have one), and the fact that the material won't stretch as much and need to be re-tightened as much. I do not use a ground cloth with my Lunar Solo and am a bit concerned about the strength of the flooring material you use.

It looks to me that The One is 4" shorter. But with the use of two poles it should be less of an issue of your head touching the tent even if it is shorter.
Here is the link for the floor plan of the Lunar Solo showing interior dimensions. Is there a similar diagram for The One?
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=36

dessertrat
02-18-2008, 16:15
Glenn, I don't mean to sound negative, but is it how hot the microphone is, or is the tent really as noisy as it sounds? I thought the tent was insanely noisy at first, but then when the dog came up, I could hear him breathing, too, so that makes me think it may be more of an audio recording issue than the tent really sounding like a bowl of rice crispies.

JERMM
02-18-2008, 17:09
I ordered "ONE" this afternoon, hope to have it by the end of the week. An approximate 2 lb savings is a lot for me and will have my pack weight around 14 lbs before food and water.

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 18:22
Thanks for posting here Glen. It looks like a wonderful design and it at the top of my list for when I need a new tent. I like the way the poles are attached with the loop at the base, the rear vent, the interior pocket (LS does not have one), and the fact that the material won't stretch as much and need to be re-tightened as much. I do not use a ground cloth with my Lunar Solo and am a bit concerned about the strength of the flooring material you use.

It looks to me that The One is 4" shorter. But with the use of two poles it should be less of an issue of your head touching the tent even if it is shorter.
Here is the link for the floor plan of the Lunar Solo showing interior dimensions. Is there a similar diagram for The One?
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=36

We have similar diagrams, just haven't had a chance to put them up yet.

gvanpeski
02-18-2008, 18:25
Glenn, I don't mean to sound negative, but is it how hot the microphone is, or is the tent really as noisy as it sounds? I thought the tent was insanely noisy at first, but then when the dog came up, I could hear him breathing, too, so that makes me think it may be more of an audio recording issue than the tent really sounding like a bowl of rice crispies.
Well, you haven't heard how loud my dog breathes! The video was a 'quick and dirty' job, done with a $30 mic, so sound quality was not great. I think some of the background noise is just wind on the mic, but spinnaker can be noisy when brand new. It gets softer (and quieter) with use.

--Glen

dessertrat
02-18-2008, 21:20
I think I might get one. I use poles anyway, and I've been shopping for a solo shelter. (I love my TNF Tadpole, but at 4 pounds, it's a bit much to carry just for myself-- but then again, I claim I like the exercise, right?)

take-a-knee
02-18-2008, 22:36
I think I might get one. I use poles anyway, and I've been shopping for a solo shelter. (I love my TNF Tadpole, but at 4 pounds, it's a bit much to carry just for myself-- but then again, I claim I like the exercise, right?)

I like my NF Tadpole well enough I'm thinking about fibraplex poles for it, but this One shelter looks way cool. The two shelters are really for different environments, so just get the One and you'll be set for whatever trip you decide.

HeartWalker
02-19-2008, 11:57
Does it have doors on both sides? From the pics from the left side and the right it appears that it does? The other question which was asked earlier, is can the vestibule be set up lower to the ground in storms or in colder weather?

Froggy
02-19-2008, 12:17
For comparison purposes, my SMD Wild Oasis tent weighs 20 3/8 oz., including a large (too large, really) Tyvec ground cloth, six stakes, and a Tarptent pole, one stuff sack, and one rubber band. The Wild Oasis has been seam sealed and has various little loops and things.

I like my Wild Oasis....

Note that The One needs a longer pole than the 45" poles that either SMD or Tarptent use. If you're using adjustable hiking poles, no problem, mate.

tanzer2250
02-19-2008, 12:32
How do you recommend staking the on hard bround or platforms? Will rocks keep it tensioned?

ben.

Lyle
02-19-2008, 12:42
My experience is that there are actually very few areas where you cannot get a stake into the ground. In those places, rocks or logs can work, I have extended guylines to reach a near-by bush or sapling, or some combination. Often if a stake cannot be inserted fully, a smaller to medium size rock placed on top of it will hold it in position quite well. Many platforms will have some type of attachments designed into them.

SC Ryan
02-19-2008, 12:55
The Other One (http://arts.ucsc.edu/GDead/AGDL/other1.html). :D :cool: :banana (Sorry, way off-topic. I couldn't resist.)

:D;) Read my mind

sirbingo
02-19-2008, 14:58
Looks cool but too rich for my blood.

gvanpeski
02-19-2008, 14:59
Does it have doors on both sides? From the pics from the left side and the right it appears that it does? The other question which was asked earlier, is can the vestibule be set up lower to the ground in storms or in colder weather?

Sorry, the vestibule does not extend all the way to the ground.

--Glen

gvanpeski
02-19-2008, 15:00
My experience is that there are actually very few areas where you cannot get a stake into the ground. In those places, rocks or logs can work, I have extended guylines to reach a near-by bush or sapling, or some combination. Often if a stake cannot be inserted fully, a smaller to medium size rock placed on top of it will hold it in position quite well. Many platforms will have some type of attachments designed into them.
In areas like this, be sure to take extra line, as the rigging that comes with The One will not lend itself to these situations.

--Glen

Footslogger
02-19-2008, 15:07
After watching the set-up video I'd have to say that square inch, for square inch - - the Wild Oasis is easier to pitch. Of course, the Wild Oasis does not have a floor but a small piece of Tyvek takes care of that.

Actually, the "ONE" reminds me a little of the Wanderlust Nomad Lite I hiked the AT with in 2003. The thing I really like(d) about that tent (and the "ONE") is that the entire front wall is mesh - - better ventillation and a better awning/covered vestibule.

Would be interested in some feedback once you guys get yours and take it out in the field for a shake down.

'Slogger

take-a-knee
02-19-2008, 15:45
In areas like this, be sure to take extra line, as the rigging that comes with The One will not lend itself to these situations.

--Glen

Some theraband tensioners would help, of course they'll help set up any shelter, especially one of silnylon.

ofthearth
02-23-2008, 16:47
Just got back from Pisgah.Rain, sleet, some wet snow(used my Hubba). The One was waiting for me when I got back.

To provide some context:
I spent some time setting The One up in a neighbors nice grassy, open, soft, sheltered, sunny yard.

Thought what I would do is respond to some of the questions that have been asked with my observations(and questions) and hopefully others will add or correct my information. I'll be comparing The One to The Hubba realizing for example that the hubba has a nice big door - and a pole that weights something to accomplish that.


I would have liked to seen a little more closeup on the bathtub floor. The front side looked to stand up well but I wanted to see the head and foot ends and what keeps them standing.
Nice looking overall.
Be great to see it from the users view in a wind driven downpour.
That would sell it.

The bath tub floor does stand up all around the tent. A little slack in some places. I tried a number of different heights on my poles to see if I could get the netting a little tighter but was unable to do so. Maybe someone else will have an insight here.


They should call it "The One and a
Half".

Having just returned fromhiking with my Hubba I can only say........What a difference!!!!!!! in weight (and I like my Hubba-just not the weight).




To be fair the Lunar Solo weights do not include stakes, tent poles, or ground cloth either. I think The One picks up on the design of the Lunar Solo and improves upon it. I like how it uses both poles (more head room) and how the poles are attached. With my LS I have a tendency to push on the pole with my butt as I roll around at night. I sometimes will push the base of the pole a bit and cause the tent to sag. The strap at the base of The One prevents this.

I saw a loop to put the pole in for the rear pole but not the front (my have over looked it). They have done a nice job of providing attachments for the pole to the rear of the tent. The attachments are well thought out and even have a means to tighten the loop.
I think the one includes the weight of the ground ( which weighted 45 grams on my scale) but not the stakes -6 grams each.


In a heavy wind, it could keep you awake with how noisy the fabric is.

Points to stake down the rear wall of the tent in between the main points.


I think it would have more condensation,due to spinnaker is more waterproof than sil.Still looks good on paper.
I had condensation with my LS but not my DUO,due to better venting.

Vent on the rear wall at the peak. The base of the wall is pretty tight to the ground. Tried to see if I could get more ventilation under the wall but was unable to do so. Seems like this goes with the design of the vetibule being so high. Point it into the wind and you'll be fine. I also tried to get the vestibule closer to the ground but could not.


I believe that spinnaker material has less stretch as well so it would not need to be tightened as much as the Lunar Solo. I bet is would be loud in the rain though. I wear earplugs anyway if I'm having trouble sleeping, so no biggie for me.

The tension points were very easy to use. Very straight forward-what I would call little jam cleats - worked well.


Spinnaker is stronger than SIL,but need's more care.That means clean ground.:)

The ground cloth provided is very thin - maybe some new kind of material?


Note that The One has 17.5 sq ft of sleeping space (with 15" of height at the ends), while the Lunar Solo has 27.5 sq ft. This probably explains a lot of the 5.5 oz weight difference. The vestibule coverage is about the same (10.4 vs. 10.0 sq ft), so you will likely need to put more of your gear into the vestibule instead of in the tent as you can with the Lunar Solo.

I had my dog with me this trip so all of my gear went in the tent. Usually gear stays in the vestibule but with sleet and rain it was the gear or the dog in the tent and the gear had not been out wandering in the rain to see what what was going on. I think the hubba is about the same floor space as the one and it can be done. Enough room around the edges to spread stuff out. Also, I'm 6'1" and as Glen said there's enough room to stretch out. And good head room.


I suspect that you can't directly compare the numbers, since The One measurement is to the limits of the bathtub floor, and I suspect the Lunar Solo measurements are to the edge of the canopy.
--Glen

There seemed to be about the same room on the floor as the hubba around the sides maybe a little shorter on the ends but again I did stretch out and there seemed to be a couple of inches on either end. Did not have my bag in the tent so can't comment on that.


There is still a corner in The One to put gear into, opposite the entrance. Don't know about room for the dog, maybe if he's not too big and doesn't move around a lot.
--Glen

It's only a half door with post in the center so keep in mind that unless you sleep with the door at your feet, the dog is going to be coming in over your gear/bag/pad.


Thanks for posting here Glen. It looks like a wonderful design...........

The tent does show a good deal of thought and attention to detail!



I think I might get one. I use poles anyway, and I've been shopping for a solo shelter. (I love my TNF Tadpole, but at 4 pounds, it's a bit much to carry just for myself-- but then again, I claim I like the exercise, right?)

Just where I am! Looking for a one pound version of my tent!


Does it have doors on both sides? From the pics from the left side and the right it appears that it does? The other question which was asked earlier, is can the vestibule be set up lower to the ground in storms or in colder weather?

No. It does not have a door on both sides. Maybe someone will be able to get it set up with more clearence on the rear for those warm times ventilation is needed.



How do you recommend staking the on hard bround or platforms? Will rocks keep it tensioned?


My experience is that there are actually very few areas where you cannot get a stake into the ground. In those places, rocks or logs can work, I have extended guylines to reach a near-by bush or sapling, or some combination. Often if a stake cannot be inserted fully, a smaller to medium size rock placed on top of it will hold it in position quite well. Many platforms will have some type of attachments designed into them.

Was wondering the same thing the first night in Pisgah. First problem would have been no open place to camp. Some flats by the river/creek but I'm a little skidish about sleeping in a tent next to a river when it's raining, so next best spot was up the hill off the trail next to a tree between some rocks. I think I would have had a hard time getting all of the stakes in and lines out in order to set the tent up. As it was, I got a couple of corner stakes in(on the hubba) and then had a hard time moving things around enough to get the vestabule staked out. (Had to set the stake in at a pretty sharpe angle and it pulled out a couple of times.)


[QUOTE=Footslogger;542252]After watching the set-up video I'd have to say that square inch, for square inch - - the Wild Oasis is easier to pitch. Of course, the Wild Oasis does not have a floor but a small piece of Tyvek takes care of that.

Don't know the Wild Oasis but in an open space the one went up pretty easy/quick. All I did was stake the corners, stick my poles in, stake them out and then tension the lines. A lot quicker/easier than my hubba and no worry about the floor filling up while you're trying to get the fly up.

Hope this is useful info and waiting to see what others have discovered.

ofthearth

mudhead
02-23-2008, 17:01
You need a bigger tent or a smaller dog.

Just my opinion.

ofthearth
02-23-2008, 17:39
You need a bigger tent or a smaller dog.

Just my opinion.

He would probably like a bigger tent. But since I carry the tent .............

JERMM
02-23-2008, 18:37
I received my ONE on Thursday, found it to be easy set up, went back out this afternoon set up again and I agree with Ofthearth. Over all I like the tent, you will need to seal the seams especially where the bug screen meets the spinnaker material. I do wish the vestibule came closer to the ground, a blowing rain might come in enough to wet any gear left out.

The only problem I had was I couldn't get the bathtub floor to stand up in the head and foot ends, it folded down. I'm not sure why, could I have it too tight on the corners? Also the ends were flat on the ground not raised like in the photos and video on the Gossamer Gear website. Ofthearth please PM me if you have any ideas as to why this is happening.

I didn't have the same problem with my dog, she's a dachshund.

Lyle
02-23-2008, 19:18
I got mine on Thursday also. Haven't had a chance to try it out yet, been working - besides we have about a foot and a half of snow right now. I have Monday and Tuesday off next week, plan to take it somewhere nearby and do some snow camping with it Probably not what it was designed for, but until it warms up or I can head south, it'll have to do. I DO LIKE THE WEIGHT!!!!

J Rabbit, do you need to spread your stakes out a bit, at a bit of an angle to the outside?

Actually got both The One and the Wild Oasis on the same day - excellent speed from both companies, especially considering it was a holiday weekend.

ofthearth
02-23-2008, 19:30
I received my ONE on Thursday, found it to be easy set up, went back out this afternoon set up again and I agree with Ofthearth. Over all I like the tent, you will need to seal the seams especially where the bug screen meets the spinnaker material. I do wish the vestibule came closer to the ground, a blowing rain might come in enough to wet any gear left out.

The only problem I had was I couldn't get the bathtub floor to stand up in the head and foot ends, it folded down. I'm not sure why, could I have it too tight on the corners? Also the ends were flat on the ground not raised like in the photos and video on the Gossamer Gear website.

I didn't have the same problem with my dog, she's a dachshund.


j rabbit
Try spreading the stakes farther apart. I had somewhat the same problem. I checked the video/stills and was wondering the same thing. Thought maybe someone else would have some insights. What did you think about the points where the poles went through the gromets? I was wondering about wear.

ofthearth

JERMM
02-23-2008, 20:18
j rabbit
What did you think about the points where the poles went through the gromets? I was wondering about wear.

ofthearth

do you mean on the front where the tip of the hiking pole goes? If that's the same spot then yes I was wondering about it too. If I decide to keep it I will place a small piece of duct tape on the inside as a preventive.

I'll try placing the stakes more out to the side and see if that helps. thanks

ofthearth
02-24-2008, 08:46
J Rabbit
After watching the video again and reading the manual I would suggest checking pole height - should be 125 cm- and in the vid the spacing for the stakes is said to be "around 36 ins" and in the manual the spacing is 35 1/2. I also noticed he pulled /stretched the lines out pretty tight. See if this helps.

ofthearth

Terry7
02-24-2008, 15:15
This tent is just what I am looking for except how the Vestibule is so high off the ground. I do not see how you could keep anything dry in it if it was raining. Am I seeing this wrong? Is there any way to get it lower to the ground?

ofthearth
02-24-2008, 15:38
Sorry, the vestibule does not extend all the way to the ground.

--Glen

This is from the fellow that designed the tent so................

JERMM
02-24-2008, 17:05
Ofthearth, thanks for the tips. I set it up today, easy as it can be and the floor looks like it's suppose to. I'll sleep in it few nights, but I think it's a keeper.

Lyle
02-25-2008, 15:26
Ok, I went out with the snowblower and cleared a couple of patches in my backyard, then bought some gutter spikes to use a stakes so that I could drive them into the frozen ground.

I now have both the Wild Oasis and The One set up. I like them both, but the head room is much better in The One.

The W.O. side slope is quite shallow, so a lot of the room is not easily used. To be fair, however, I pitched it in the low, hunkered down method without using the extenders that could add considerable usable space. I do like the way the netting is designed, really turns inside at the bottom, so should work well in conjunction with a properly sized ground cloth to seal out most bugs. It does appear to be quite fragile tho (the bug netting) came with a HOT PINK warning tag in the stuff sack about how easily it snags. Out of the package for the first time, there were already some noticeable snags. Plan to spend part of tonight in each shelter, so will advise later on condensation.

The One was easy to set up aside from the fact that I use PacerPoles which have a pistol type grip on the end. It took some playing around to find a way to get it positioned at the back that appears to work reasonable well. The front was no problem. I really like the room inside T.O., all of it is usable space, easy to sit up in, plus the added convenience of the floor. I had no problem with the bathtub floor, seemed to pop right up the first time, but I had the advantage of the previous posts.

Took a moment or two to notice the plastic tensioner on the corner and back tie-outs. Work real easy once you notice them. :-) The way mine set up using the PacerPoles, there is pronounced front to back slope of the short ridge line. This should aid in both shedding wind and rain. Did the rest of you find this to be the case? I hadn't noticed it in the online photos or video. The vestibule does ride quite high, will have to keep any gear close to the door if any blowing rain.

I had planned to spend all of tonight in one of these, and tomorrow night in the other, but a pretty severe storm is on it's way starting this afternoon with freezing rain, then light snow and 5-10 MPH winds tonight. Tomorrow and tomorrow night are calling for more snow and higher winds, gusting up to 35MPH. I think I will forgo tomorrow's test. I don't plan to use these in harsh winter conditions, so no sense pushing them now. I do plan on sleeping out tonight.

Will let you know tomorrow how I fared. Low tonight supposed to be 24, tomorrow 11 - another reason to halt the test tomorrow. I'm not really a fair weather hiker, but come on, in my backyard? :-)

Nearly Normal
02-25-2008, 15:56
Thanks for the reviews.
I know gvanpeski is taking notes.

JERMM
02-25-2008, 17:43
Lyle- my set up is the same as yours with the front of the ridge line being higher than the back. I ordered the poles from GG, received them today and like how they set up vs. the trekking poles. I need my trekking poles for when I put up the rain shelter. I spent the morning applying seam sealer and slept in it last night with very little condensation this morning. After reading Ofthearth's post I have the bath tup floor standing up as it should. So far I am very impressed with TO.

I'm looking forward to hearing what you think after tonight and how you think the wind effects TO.

ofthearth
02-25-2008, 19:39
Would like to hear how the vestibule does in blowing conditions. J Rabbit, what do the poles weight?

JERMM
02-25-2008, 21:19
I will post the pole weight tomorrow.

JERMM
02-26-2008, 15:45
J Rabbit, what do the poles weight?

My scales aren't exactly precise, the best I can tell you is a hair under 3 oz. each, 3 section aluminum pole with shock cord and tips on both ends. They are very sturdy and hold the tent well.

Slept out last night and thru this mornings storm, winds gusting 45-60 depending on where you live, not knowing what the speed was where I live I'll take the lower end and say 45 mph, the tent hardly moved. I had it staked with one end into the wind. This afternoon the wind is WNW at 27, gusting to 40, The only movement I see in the tent is a little flutter in the vestibule.

As far as the vestibule not coming closer to the ground and the possibility of gear getting wet if left under the vest. I have enough room inside for my pack and boots. By positioning the vest. away from the wind direction, the rain did not blow in, the ground was dry under the vest. except for 3-4 inches just under the drip line.

Terry7
02-26-2008, 16:44
On "The One" is the space usable all the way to the back? In the video the ground cloth was a rectangle. Can you put your pack in the back corner and still have the bath tub sides up?

JERMM
02-26-2008, 17:44
On "The One" is the space usable all the way to the back? In the video the ground cloth was a rectangle. Can you put your pack in the back corner and still have the bath tub sides up?

The b-tub sides are all the way around, the tent has five sides, yes you can put your pack on the back side and still have b-tub sides standing up as long as the pack isn't pressing down on the sides. I'm not tall and can put my pack at my feet or head. see attached thumbnail for approximate floor dimensions and shape.

The foot print shipped with the tent is larger than the tent floor, I folded the two back sides under to match floor shape.

Terry7
02-26-2008, 19:32
The b-tub sides are all the way around, the tent has five sides, yes you can put your pack on the back side and still have b-tub sides standing up as long as the pack isn't pressing down on the sides. I'm not tall and can put my pack at my feet or head. see attached thumbnail for approximate floor dimensions and shape.

The foot print shipped with the tent is larger than the tent floor, I folded the two back sides under to match floor shape.

Thanks, I got it now the bath tub floor is 5 sided, Its hard to tell these things from the pictures and video. I like the weight and the spinnaker cloth that the tent is made of. My only problem is the vestibule being so high off the ground. I am going to get this tent or the Lunar Duo. I have done a lot of research and for me these two tents are the ones to get. With what they weigh I could carry both and use them every other day.

slow
02-26-2008, 19:53
WAY to hot,due to back side for summer use.

Terry7
03-01-2008, 10:37
What happemed to this thread? I was hoping to hear how this tent was after some of you guys had tried it out. Would like to hear your reviews.

Lyle
03-01-2008, 12:09
Sorry for the delay. I did take the Wild Oasis and The One out last monday. I had planned on sleeping in both, but ended up staying in The One all night. The weather was not as bad as predicted, 24*, mild breeze most of the night, about 2" of sleet/snow. Both tarps required an initial adjustment once the fabrics had cooled down.

My impressions, in addition to what I have already reported are broken down below.

Snow handling:

The One seemed to fare better, but I was inside, so able to tap the tarp occasionally. The snow did slide down to the base, but this eventually blocked the ventilation around three sides and caused some decrease in interior room. It was by no means problematic though. Once I got up, I brushed the snow from around the base and made minimal adjustments to the tensioners to once again achieve a very taught pitch.

The Wild Oasis seemed to accumulate more snow, which decreased interior room substantially. To be fair though, I was not inside to tap the tarp to encourage it to slide down.

Condensation:

NO PROBLEM! This surprised me. Even with three of the sides in effect sealed by snow, there was only a small amount of frost formed directly over my head. The rest of the canopy was damp, but no frost, beads, or trickles of water. I attribute this to several things: the high vestibule and large front mesh wall, combined with the two relatively large peak vents allowed for good air movement. Also there was a moderate breeze most of the night which I'm sure helped. Finally, since I'm a side sleeper, most of the night my face was either pointed at the mesh at the rear of the tent, or at the large front mesh door.

Vestibule coverage:

Did not appear to be a problem with the snow/sleet. I saw no substantial accumulation inside the boarder of the vestibule. Still not decisive about wind driven rain, but if the vestibule is positioned downwind as recommended, may not be a problem.

Interior room:

Actually very pleased. Sitting up without brushing the tarp required some care, but no contortions. was able to sit upright in the centre quite comfortably. I had plenty of unused space at my head and feet (I'm 5'9"). Inside the tent with me were a standard size bed pillow (hey, I was in my back yard!), a stuffed bivey sack (thought I may need it for condensation problems - didn't), and my Down sleeping bag storage sack (larger than my full backpack) filled with a down jacket, my clothes. This lay very nicely at the rear of the tent, in the small pointy area of the floor. I did not feel cramped at all. Don't recall ever hitting the support pole.

Overall:

Very impressed so far. While not ideal for snow, I would have confidence that it can handle an early AT adventure. Did not have severe winds, but no problem with a moderate breeze. I went ahead and ordered the aluminium poles also. I plan to do some bicycle travel this summer, so decided this would work well for me then also. Very happy so far, will have to wait and see about condensation in hot, humid conditions, but the high vestibule and large peak vents give me hope that it may not be bad.

My $0.02 worth thus far.

Terry7
03-01-2008, 15:59
Thanks, This thread got me started on tent tarps, I had never consider them before. I have done alot of research and for me it has come down to The One or The Lunar Duo. Because I never sleep in shelters and tent every night on the trail and will be out for 5-6 months, I have decided on the Lunar Duo because it is bigger and the vestubles go all the way to the ground. I am going to order this tent Monday and will post a review. If I just wanted a backup shelter then I would have gone with The One. Thanks for your reviews.

ChinMusic
03-01-2008, 20:32
Thanks, ....for me it has come down to The One or The Lunar Duo. Because I never sleep in shelters and tent every night on the trail and will be out for 5-6 months, I have decided on the Lunar Duo because it is bigger and the vestubles go all the way to the ground. I am going to order this tent Monday and will post a review. If I just wanted a backup shelter then I would have gone with The One. Thanks for your reviews.
I own a Lunar Solo but my thinking is along the same lines as yours. If I were doing a thru this year I would start out with my Lunar Solo and see how it went. If I didn't own the Lunar Solo I would be torn between The One and the Duo.

The One def looks like a Lunar Solo killer.

ofthearth
03-19-2008, 07:33
More info on "The One". Has anybody had any problems with rain/sleet etc blowing in under the vestibule?

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=11751&disable_pagination=1&id=CrxWQGZ9:64.241.37.140

Cherokee Bill
03-23-2008, 19:49
:D Based on the posts so far, if you were going to buy a tent tomorrow, which would you purchase, the "One" or the Lunar Solo :-?

mudhead
03-23-2008, 20:46
And if you were 6'1"?

tcbonline
03-24-2008, 09:53
And if you were 6'1"?

I'm 6'2 and fit fine. Having enough room is not an issue I would say unless you're over 6'4.

High Altitude
03-24-2008, 15:02
And if you were 6'1"?

Glen in the video for "the one" is 6'4"

ofthearth
04-07-2008, 07:31
info on "The One"

Jeff Sharp
<jeff@gossamergear.com>

It has come to our attention that some customers are experiencing an issue
with two of the grosgrain tabs on the beak/vestibule of The One. The two
tabs in question are at the bottom corners of the vestibule that are near
the ground when the tent is pitched. They were sewn with two lines of
stitching, and although they passed our tests during that phase, this is
apparently not strong enough in some cases to hold them onto the tent fabric
in strong winds or when pulled with a lot of force. Therefore we suggest
adding another line of stitching below the current line in order to
strengthen these tabs. This is a very simple procedure and takes about 2
minutes on a machine and about 5 minutes if sewing by hand. I have attached a picture showing where the lines of stiching should go.
However if you would like to return the tent to us for repair, we will reimburse the associated shipping costs for return. Please address the package to:

Gossamer Gear Repair
4801 W. Frances Pl.
Austin, TX 78731

Please include your name and return address of where you would like the tent
shipped back and also the shipping cost you incurred when mailing it to us.
You should receive your repaired tent back approximately 7 to 10 days after
we receive it for repair. Please remove stakes, extra line or other
accessories that might be in the tent stuff sack so these things do not
become lost during the repair.

If you do not live in the United States, it is most likely not worth the
time it takes to return the tent to us for repair. Therefore we will offer
a $10 gift certificate, good for purchase of any of our products, to anyone
living outside of the United States who cannot repair the tent themselves.
Please email jeff@gossamergear.com if this is the case.

We at Gossamer Gear are committed to serving our customers to the best of
our ability and appreciate your business and support of Gossamer Gear and
the ultralight community. We hope you enjoy The One and hope that it serves
you well.

Sincerely,

Jeff Sharp
Production Manager

Note: All of The Ones that were ordered and shipped after March 30, 2008
have already been repaired as have all of the remaining Ones we have in
stock.

Lyle
04-07-2008, 09:34
Yeah, I just got this email too. Once I got the proper file for the picture of the repair, I decided that even I could handle this repair myself. Looks VERY EASY. Simple 1 1/4" straight line of stitching on two tabs. I may decide to do all the tabs once I take a closer look, just for the added insurance.