PDA

View Full Version : Gear list; your critique - March 15 GAMA hike



climberdave
03-05-2008, 18:26
Pack: Arcíteryx Acrux 50 (med) - current ski pack
Sleeping bag: Mountain HW UltraLamina 32
Pad: Big Agnes Air Core REM mummy cut
Tent: BD First Light - current ski tent

Clothes:
Patagonia convertible pants with belt
Patagonia island hopper nylon long sleeve shirt
Capilene t shirt
Baggie shorts
Capilene top and bottoms (mid weight)
Patagonia micro puff jacket (old style with hood)
Montbell puffy pants
2 pair Throlo light hikers
1 pair Throlo expedition weight (camp) and emergency gloves
Smart wool glove liners
Wool hat
Running hat
Marmot Essence rain jacket
Patagonia Rain shadow pants
Crocks for camp and emergency hiking shoes

Cooking
MSR stowaway pot (not too big, not too small)
MSR pocket rocket
8oz canister
Back up 4oz canister until I get the balls to only carry one
Lexan spork cut to fit in pot (am I the only one who likes these?)
Guyot Designs Squishy bowl for a cup (also makes great stress ball)
Handkerchief for general clean up.
Leatherman squirt (pliers)
MSR dromedary with tube
Pur (katadyn) scout filter (itís heavy but very effective)


Miscellaneous:
Petzle Tikka with 3 aaa spares
40ft uber-thin cord
Spare glasses
Tooth brush/ paste
Dental floss
Large gage needle
EAR PLUGS (ha ha)
TH Companion (cut for sections) + data book?
Small compass
Lip stuff
Blister stuff
Granite gear stuff sacks (air bags) 2 for food, 2 for clothes
Dow te Ching
Iphone with charger (pay bills in town, camera, and check emails) not on trail!!
ID, CC, $

Movement:
Asolo Fugitive GTX boots
Leki Makalu poles with 3ft of duck tape on each one
OR low cut running gaiters

Most of this stuff comes from my ski pack so it has been tested and approved by moi (new boots, rain stuff, and sleeping bag). The puffy stuff adds to my sleeping bag until Roanoke, VA and then bumped North

Christopher Robin
03-05-2008, 18:53
Maps, maches, whistle,foot powder, first aid kit.

Appalachian Tater
03-05-2008, 19:07
I probably would leave the puffy pants and rain pants at home.
Also would set up autopay on all my bills, even if I took the iPhone. Consider a refillable phone card as well.
Why put the duct tape on the poles where you have to lift it with your arms and it gets grungy? You can just as easily do a flat roll and stick it in your pack.
Dammit, I don't get to say "earplugs". Oh well.
You really don't need to carry spare batteries for your headlight unless you plan to night hike a lot. They don't all of a sudden stop working, they dim very slowly over a period of weeks, you have plenty of warning to get new ones. Those batteries will seem pretty heavy by the time you get to North Carolina.
Do you have a heavy-duty garbage bag for a pack liner?
I like three pairs of socks, but it's a personal problem, as long as you have a dry pair to sleep in, you should be fine.
I carried spare glasses the whole way but if I had to do it again, wouldn't. Get some kind of cord or something so you don't lose them. You can also cut a piece of thin plastic tubing (mower gas line) and put over the ear pieces. You may also want Cat Crap or similar and a clean cloth to wipe them with. Be warned that wiping them when they are wet from sweat will scratch because of the salt crystals.
Do you need the cup? It's not that big of a deal, but if you don't actually need it, don't take it.
Try to talk yourself out of the extra canister if you don't want to switch to an alcohol stove.
Multivitamins + vitamin I.

tlbj6142
03-05-2008, 21:46
I probably would leave the puffy pants and rain pants at home.I understand you are starting in March, but I have to agree, the puffy pants can probably go home. If it is so cold you need to wear your leggings, zipoff pants and puffy pants to keep warm, stop and setup up camp! Also, seems like you have 2 pairs of shorts (shorts plus zipoffs). One for sleeping?

Keep the rain pants until it warms up a bit (40F and rain sucks). Maybe send them home before or after the Smokies?!?!

Maybe a fleece balaclava rather than the wool hat. Warmer than the wool if if you really need it, yet flexible enough for times when you don't. Might want a ball cap of sorts rather than the running hat (or is the running hat a cap?) to wear when it is raining to keep some water off your glasses.

I also like a long handled Ti spoon rather than a lexan spoon. Lexan breaks, and the long handle is nice when you switch over to boil in the bag type meals. Do you really need the bowl?

Some of these items might just drop out on their own (you send them home) as you hike.

Cuffs
03-05-2008, 21:54
Why are you only going as far as Massachusetts? If youve gone that far, why not go to Maine?

Appalachian Tater
03-05-2008, 22:05
Why are you only going as far as Massachusetts? If youve gone that far, why not go to Maine?Yeah, it's only another 680+ miles.

bigcranky
03-05-2008, 22:06
I dunno, the puffy pants and micropuff jacket would be good inside that 32-F bag on the colder nights in April. Last year we had a cold snap in mid-April. Or you could just stick your legs in your sleeping bag when you get cold around camp. (Not always optimal.) I bring rain pants in cold weather, though I understand that some hikers do not.

You probably are not the only person to like Lexan sporks. But. Lexan breaks, and/or melts. My personal feeling is that a spork is the definition of a compromise -- a solution that does nothing well. Plus it pokes holes in the bottom of my ziploc bags that I like to eat out of on occasion.

Is the Big Agnes pad insulated? How does it handle cold weather? You ski, so you probably already know the answer to this.

You can always send stuff back and make any adjustments at Neel Gap. Otherwise looks good - enjoy.

climberdave
03-05-2008, 22:48
Thanks for the replies.

Lets see I forgot to include whistle in my list so there it is.

The pack is waterproof so no garbage-bags/rain covers needed.

Poor, poor spork I guess this is where we part. Actually I bought it by accident (rush) and prefer the lexan mini-shovel so as to get more with each scoop when sharing bowls.
I was on the fence about the puffy pants, but they're sooo light 8oz - ok - out

Rain pants stay. Super light and make great laundry day wear, but I understand that they can go.

My pad isn't insulated, but it fits very nicely inside my sb and is very comfy. When sleeping on snow I usally have two pads (closed and open) to share the load. Both are ultra lights, but suck apart. I broke my back about 10 years ago in a rock climbing accident and now just love nice padding between me and the floor.

My cup is a work of modern polymer engineering (plus I get very tired of frying my lips drinking from hot pans) so I splurged on this thing. It just balls up and slips where ever there is a little room. Plus I'm a coffee drinker and need an AM fix.

The running hat is a larger brim base ball style hat that is a bit thinner, and isn't cotton.

My wool hat is 20% silk and 80% Qivuit with ear coverage and it won hands down to my expedition weight balaclava. Trust me ya'll will be jealous :)

I really hadn’t even contemplated hiking in my puffy pants, but just an additional layer when sleeping in a 32 bag and the temp goes South, but as stated above - out

My mistake, I am going to Maine and need to learn my state abbreviations.

Sorry the phone/camera has to stay. I'm a national level emergency responder and while I have 7 months off to hike I'm still on call if the sh** hits the fan. That said I'm vary much against casual conversations using cell phones in the woods, or when relied solely on for emergencies (forgoing good sound judgment). Sorry, I'll stop ranting.

Thanks for the tips and tricks. I've spent a lot of time on the AT around VA, NC and some of PA, but all the way has been a dream for a number of years. Yeee haaw

Frosty
03-05-2008, 23:12
The pack is waterproof so no garbage-bags/rain covers needed.You will be packing wet gear in the bag, and it is nice to be able to keep your not-yet-wet things dry. At least for one more day.

As far as a waterproof bag goes, have you tested it yourself? You might want to load it with all your gear and put it out on the lawn for a few hours in a driving rainstorm.

On the trail would be a bad time to find out you should have carried that 2 ounce trash compactor bag for you clothes and ZipLocs for your clothing.

Appalachian Tater
03-05-2008, 23:17
I would be worried about the bag being waterproof, too. Will it keep everything dry even if you have to walk in the rain for a week straight?

climberdave
03-05-2008, 23:26
It's waterproof to the point that you can use it canyoneering and as a dry bag on rivers. I've had it for over a year now in everything the Pacific NW can throw at it with out as much as a scratch. There is a shock cord lattice up the back to hang wet gear on if necessary, but what really sucks is when my bladder bag somehow leaks and the water has no place to go.:eek:

I've used the trash compactor bag trick with other packs with much success and actually picked it up from a through-hiker many years ago.

d

Appalachian Tater
03-05-2008, 23:27
Don't worry, GAMAs are smarter than Deltas and don't have to work so hard as Betas.

Panzer1
03-06-2008, 22:49
Leatherman squirt (pliers)

I think you would do better with a Leatherman Micra (scissors).
You would find more uses for a scissors than a pliers. I don't know what you would really do with a pliers anyway on the trail.

Panzer

Runsalone
03-07-2008, 13:00
It's waterproof to the point that you can use it canyoneering and as a dry bag on rivers. I've had it for over a year now in everything the Pacific NW can throw at it with out as much as a scratch. There is a shock cord lattice up the back to hang wet gear on if necessary, but what really sucks is when my bladder bag somehow leaks and the water has no place to go.:eek:

I've used the trash compactor bag trick with other packs with much success and actually picked it up from a through-hiker many years ago.

d


Thats pretty cool! Dang, must be nice not to have to muck about with a pack cover.:banana

Appalachian Tater
03-07-2008, 13:04
That is a beautiful pack, and it should be, for $400 and 3.5 pounds. What is the actual weight?

http://www.northernlightstrading.com/istar.asp?a=6&id=4580!127

gaga
03-07-2008, 13:06
well, i didn`t read it all,(your gear list)but it looks expensive, so it must be good :D

ScottP
03-07-2008, 16:33
Looks more like what I'd imagine a skiing gear list to be. I'm sure you'll work from there to a reasonable thru-hiking gear list.

Panzer1
03-08-2008, 00:10
One thing I would recommend is to get a warmer sleeping bag. The one you listed is : Sleeping bag: Mountain Hardware Ultra Lamina 32
Its only rated to 32 degrees. I would recommend at lease a 20 degree bag.
Also, your bag is synthetic and I would recommend a goose down bag instead because it compresses down into a smaller stuff sack.

Panzer

Panzer1
03-08-2008, 00:16
I think that's a first rate tent. You will like that tent. I have the Black Diamond Light house tent, a similar tent and love it.

Panzer

Panzer1
03-08-2008, 00:27
Back up 4oz canister until I get the balls to only carry oneI also have the pocket rocket and have had the urge to carry a small back up. But using the 8 ounce canister I have never ran out and never needed a backup. I think you will be able to find spares along the way.

If your pack was heavy I would say to drop the spare cannister, but if your pack is a reasonable weight than the extra half pound won't matter that much.

Alternately, you could start off the hike without the spare and then pick a spare after, say, about 2 weeks.

Panzer

tlbj6142
03-09-2008, 00:44
What about nail clippers? I know many use scissors, but I can't, especially om toe nails.

I have an all in one setup from Gerber. Clippers, small blade and scissors.

dmb658
03-09-2008, 11:47
http://cgi.ebay.com/WINCHESTER-MULTI-TOOL-8-IN-1_W0QQitemZ6538392534QQcmdZViewItem

Dirty Harry
03-10-2008, 03:57
Nice gear, but to much of it, speaking from a lighter stand point.

Heater
03-10-2008, 09:50
I think you would do better with a Leatherman Micra (scissors).
You would find more uses for a scissors than a pliers. I don't know what you would really do with a pliers anyway on the trail.

Panzer

I like a separate pair of scissors like you get in a shaving kit, (about 2.5 inches long with blunt ends) rather than the ones on the knives with the very short and sharp pointy ends. Great for trimming beard and moustache, Gauze, tape, etc...

I need to get an new pair as I have about worn my current ones out after about 20 years.

climberdave
03-10-2008, 09:52
I agree about the ski gear set-up as that's what I normally do and it reealllyy hard to get out of the climb-up ski-down mountain mindset. At least I'm not carrying crampons and an axe !! :) I've trimmed down on some of the clothes, but the Appalachian Spring worries me some and until I get settled in I'll carry my insurance). A good friend of mine almost died of hypothermia last Nov and that still weighs heavily on my little brain.

Clippers have been added

When you need pliers you really need them and when you need scissors you have a knife.

The sb bag is what it is. The puffy jacket and pants will get me to 20 or so (puff pants are back in) and will be bumped after I get to Roanoke, VA (parents house).

I go through lots of gear so I usually buy stuff with great return policies (most of the stuff here was purchased with credit from other returns).

The bag was expensive (I went to a bar before I bought it), but this thing is bomber and I highly recommend it.

The pack is now fully loaded and ready to go. I'm always amazed at how much the last min. items weigh my pack down and think it's almost best to just pack in 20 min. and go than let it set and collect items.

See ya on the trail 3/15/08

climberdave

Dirty Harry
03-10-2008, 13:23
Ill be right behind ya, 3/16/08

Bigglesworth
03-10-2008, 14:15
ClimberDave and Dirty Harry, maybe I'll catch you...I leave on the 17th.

I'd like an opinion from anyone before I post my whole gear list soon. My sleping bag is a synthetic, mummy, 20 degree bag, about 4-5 years old (Kelty). A little heavy, but I don't want to spend the money to replace it and save 1 pound or so. Should I have any big worries about it keeping me warm enough if it drops really low (as in warm enough not to croak or lose toes)?

tlbj6142
03-10-2008, 14:22
Have fun, don't worry about the gear so much. As you seem to have everything you need, but you may have too much (and/or too heavy). Take what you have listed (including those items you've recently added) and you'll be fine. You just might send a few things home and/or replace them along the way. Most folks end up doing that. I'm sure it is very rare for someone to finish the trail with the same kit they started with.

climberdave
03-10-2008, 14:58
20 should keep you just fine with your clothes on, just wear a hat to bed, dry socks and don’t sleep directly on the ground. Also, you can use whatever tent/tarp shelter you have as a make shift bivy inside the AT shelters for another layer. If you get really cold just wrap the fly around yourself like a burrito for uber snuggly warmth. I had a friend do an ultra light through hike and he wore expedition weight thermies sierra design rain gear and wrapped himself in an ultra-light tarp at night while on a 3/4 closed cell pad. Too ruff for my aching bones, but you get the picture.

climberdave
03-10-2008, 15:18
I agree Gear is just that. Many a better person has hiked before me with WAY less stuff and in much better form. I am starting to enjoy the posts of people carying insturments and hope to settle around a fire one night and listen to a sweet mountian lullaby while drinking a fine single malt and watching the stars.

:sun

I guess it's just nerves that has me checking and rechecking.