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Wags
03-12-2008, 12:09
ok so i have all my gear for myself and my lady (she just bought me a little gsi pot/frying pan thingy YAY HEHEHHE - but i'll be doing the cooking so that's a present for her as well, nicely done), except for our sleeping pads and our dinnerware (plates, mugs, silverware).

i'm looking for recommendations on pad combinations (i'd like the option to carry both, or 1 or the other depending on conditions). i'm almost 100% set on buying both a closed cell pad and a smaller, torso-length inflatable to put on top of that for extra cushion. i was originally going to skimp on the pads for now, but decided that if my gal doesn't sleep well out there she's not going to continue hiking and camping w/ me :(

i'm open to suggestions as which inflatable to check out as well if you suggest that route (or even just buying a 'small' as opposed to a torso length or 2/3 length pad)

idea 1:
wallyworld blue pad + inflatable torso pad

idea 2:
ridgerest + inflatable torso pad

idea 3:
wallyworld blue pad + torso length (nightline torso type thing)

idea 4:
ridgerest + torso length nightline pad

idea 5:
zrest + inflatable (although i'm hesitant to get the ridgerest b/c i've heard of condesation problems with it and if it's my primary use of insulation the water build up is kind of a drag)

idea 6
zrest + nightline

Tipi Walter
03-12-2008, 12:17
Why bother with two pads when one will do? The Prolite 4s are very comfy, even make a woman's . Personally, if you want comfort, I'd go with a thermarest Trail Comfort large(25x77x2 inches).

Jail Break
03-12-2008, 12:19
I played around with the same idea(s) for the longest time, tried many of them, this pad + that pad, blah blah blah, and I finally came to one conclusion. A 2" inflatable (I chose the Trail-Pro Therm-A-Rest) is comfortable ALL THE TIME. It's slightly heavy, but if you want your gal to be comfy, it's a win/win option. Only 1 thing to carry, I fold it rather than roll it and keep it inside my pack against my back. I'm waiting for all the "why don't you just put a brick in your pack" comments about the weight, but a good night's sleep is so valuable, it's worth the little extra weight. I'm a bad sleeper and NEED something that comfortable. It's worth every ounce to be able to sleep all night, and wake up feeling refreshed instead of even more sore.

take-a-knee
03-12-2008, 12:27
ok so i have all my gear for myself and my lady (she just bought me a little gsi pot/frying pan thingy YAY HEHEHHE - but i'll be doing the cooking so that's a present for her as well, nicely done), except for our sleeping pads and our dinnerware (plates, mugs, silverware).

i'm looking for recommendations on pad combinations (i'd like the option to carry both, or 1 or the other depending on conditions). i'm almost 100% set on buying both a closed cell pad and a smaller, torso-length inflatable to put on top of that for extra cushion. i was originally going to skimp on the pads for now, but decided that if my gal doesn't sleep well out there she's not going to continue hiking and camping w/ me :(

i'm open to suggestions as which inflatable to check out as well if you suggest that route (or even just buying a 'small' as opposed to a torso length or 2/3 length pad)

idea 1:
wallyworld blue pad + inflatable torso pad

idea 2:
ridgerest + inflatable torso pad

idea 3:
wallyworld blue pad + torso length (nightline torso type thing)

idea 4:
ridgerest + torso length nightline pad

idea 5:
zrest + inflatable (although i'm hesitant to get the ridgerest b/c i've heard of condesation problems with it and if it's my primary use of insulation the water build up is kind of a drag)

idea 6
zrest + nightline

Excellent combinations, the lightest would be an evazote pad of a thickness appropriate for the temps with a Prolite 3 but a ridgerest is more durable than the evazote.

As for 2in thick inflatable pads, anyone who actually needs one to rest needs a hammock and just hasn't figured it out yet.

And for all you thermarest users who've owned them forever and they've never sprung a leak, all I can say is mine don't leak anymore either since they stay stowed behind the couch.

Wags
03-12-2008, 12:40
one of my big reasonings for wanting a closed cell pad in addition to the air pad is for something to sit on while just chilling around camp (really one of the attractive features of the zrest, but i'm pretty sure the condesation warnings have made me not want to get that pad). the other reason is that the air pads don't really provide insulation unless i go out and drop 150 bucks on one of those 2 in 1 things

Tipi Walter
03-12-2008, 12:43
And for all you thermarest users who've owned them forever and they've never sprung a leak, all I can say is mine don't leak anymore either since they stay stowed behind the couch.


I started with a thermarest in 1980 to replace my old floppy ensolite and had about 12-15 of them since then, and this is with near constant use. I lived on them in the tipi for 21 years and never had a leak except for the freakish delamination process that sometimes occurs with heavy use(this is when a large air bubble deforms the pad making sleep nearly impossible).

All of my leaks occurred due to pilot error, and the main mistake I made was strapping the pads to the outside of the pack and getting pinhole briar leaks as a result. Thermarest leaks can be avoided simply by:

1 Either carry inside the pack or outside in a stuff sack with the pad wrapped in a tarp/ground cloth.
2 Always use an extra tarp or ground cloth inside the tent floor(or outside) to deter thorn holes and pinholes thru the floor.
3 Never let your dog anywhere near the thing(especially puppies).
4 Never use them in a chair configuration or throw them on the bare ground as a sitting/laying pad. This goes for shelter floors, too. Put a tarp underneath.

With these simple precautions a thermy can last for years without leaking.

Jail Break
03-12-2008, 13:01
As for 2in thick inflatable pads, anyone who actually needs one to rest needs a hammock and just hasn't figured it out yet.

And for all you thermarest users who've owned them forever and they've never sprung a leak, all I can say is mine don't leak anymore either since they stay stowed behind the couch.

...OR, maybe someone who uses a 2in thick inflatable pad has been hiking/camping for 25+ years and knows what he needs to get a good night's rest. And maybe since that person can't sleep on his back already knows for a fact that he CAN'T sleep in a hammock and doesn't need to figure anything out... because he owns 3 hammocks. Nice for relaxing for 1/2 hour, but that's it.

As for leaks, some genius entrepreneur came up with an amazing, space age, never before heard of invention. He called it a "repair-kit", or something. Even though I own just about every inflatable mattress made, I've never had to use it, through years and years of using inflatables.

So if you have bad circulation and can't sleep on a thin inflatable or closed cell foam pad, or if you don't want to turn yourself into a dangling bear-pinata, or if you have a lady-friend who likes to be comfortable, there are other options available, such as a thicker inflatable, which was offered just a suggestion, and didn't really require crticism.

Blissful
03-12-2008, 14:09
Pro lite 4 or a Big Agnes insulated (I use Big Agnes and love it)

take-a-knee
03-12-2008, 14:13
...OR, maybe someone who uses a 2in thick inflatable pad has been hiking/camping for 25+ years and knows what he needs to get a good night's rest. And maybe since that person can't sleep on his back already knows for a fact that he CAN'T sleep in a hammock and doesn't need to figure anything out... because he owns 3 hammocks. Nice for relaxing for 1/2 hour, but that's it.

As for leaks, some genius entrepreneur came up with an amazing, space age, never before heard of invention. He called it a "repair-kit", or something. Even though I own just about every inflatable mattress made, I've never had to use it, through years and years of using inflatables.

So if you have bad circulation and can't sleep on a thin inflatable or closed cell foam pad, or if you don't want to turn yourself into a dangling bear-pinata, or if you have a lady-friend who likes to be comfortable, there are other options available, such as a thicker inflatable, which was offered just a suggestion, and didn't really require crticism.

Get over it Jailbreak...and turn your flag right-side up.

Tobit
03-12-2008, 14:24
I'm thinking of a similar combination setup with an Oware evazote pad trimmed to 30" wide and a 25" wide RidgeRest chopped to torso length on top.

Jail Break
03-12-2008, 16:15
Get over it Jailbreak...and turn your flag right-side up.

Oh don't worry, I'm totally over you... and I will when I see fit.:cool:

mudhead
03-12-2008, 16:26
I like full-length. Cold feet suck.

Fiddleback
03-12-2008, 19:15
Before I started hammock hanging I almost always used two pads on the ground. Ironically, the best combination I ever found I happened on just a couple seasons ago when I shared a tent with a hammock-less friend.

(As posted in other threads on other forums recently)... I folded my hammock pad, a 60X40X3/8" Oware, along its long axis and inserted my 22 year-old Thermarest. It was very comfortable; no pressure points, no cold coming through (temps were low- to mid-40s with snow around, but not under, the tent), no slipping off the pads and the pads themselves did not slip with each other. It was a tremendous improvement to the Thermarest for just 7oz additional weight of the Oware.

FB

aaroniguana
03-12-2008, 19:51
I use Idea #1. A trimmed and reshaped Wallyworld $5 blue pad and an REI Lite Core short pad. I have three discs in my back which have been virtually non-existant for over ten years. And I've never awoken with a sore back on the trail or even had cold legs. To me it's worth the extra 10 ounces to carry the blue one.

Panzer1
03-12-2008, 20:11
one of my big reasonings for wanting a closed cell pad in addition to the air pad is for something to sit on while just chilling around camp (really one of the attractive features of the zrest, but i'm pretty sure the condesation warnings have made me not want to get that pad).

I just took an old closed cell pad and cut it down to make a seat. (weight 3.1 ounces)

Panzer

elray
03-12-2008, 21:12
Some good food for thought here so I'll add my two-cents. I use a Thermorest Lite three quarter length over a full length Z Rest. It's the most comfortable bed I've come up with, the Z is shock corded to the outside of the pack and makes a handy seat/lunch table/midday nap surface that's easy to access and stow. I've been sectioning the Trail for many years and believe that a good nights rest is essential, damn the extra weight!

Wags
03-12-2008, 21:43
i think i'm gonna start out w/ option #1 and option #2. i gotta buy duplicates in pads b/c my girl will be out w/ me. so i'll buy a wally pad and a ridgerest, and then 2 torso inflatables. then the lady and i can compare/contrast w/ the different bases. if the wally world one sucks balls, so what, it's 6 bucks. if the ridgerest is no different than the wallyworld i should be able to return it as long as we don't destroy it and go pay 5 bucks for the wally one.

keep the info coming though please. you guys help me out so much w/ your experience...

Wags
03-12-2008, 22:08
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=376421&memberId=12500226&catalogId=40000000226

i think i'm gonna give that a try

Wags
03-12-2008, 22:17
and probably this
http://www.backcountry.com/store/BAG0012/Big-Agnes-Air-Core-REM-Sleeping-Pad-Mummy.html?RSC_ID=WR_BAG0012

or this:

http://www.backcountry.com/store/BAG0124/Big-Agnes-Insulated-Air-Core-Sleeping-Pad-Mummy.html?CMP_ID=SH_BZR001&CMP_SKU=BAG0124&mv_pc=r111

Thrasher
03-12-2008, 22:41
My wife and I have the thermarest prolite 4s. The 4 is a half of an inch thicker than the 3. We went for more comfort too. My wife has the womens version. We really like them and are very comfortable for us. I don't think I would like having two pads just because of the volume they take up in or on my pack, but whatever makes you comfortable go for it. We probably would have gotten the REI lite core pads if we hadn't of gotten the thermarest pads on sale. From you options listed, number 1 and 2 sound the best to me. I'd probably go with the walmart pad just to save money.

hopefulhiker
03-12-2008, 22:52
I used a cut down ridgerest,torso length, and a regular mummy Big Agnes Air core.. It worked well, because a couple of times the airmattress went flat.. Also I was middle aged when I did the hike and a side sleeper...