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Gobo73
02-04-2004, 23:57
Looking for some insight on how much clothing to bring. This is what I plan on bringing. If you would let me know what you think if it's to much or to little or if I'm leaving anything out. I'll be starting in late February. Thank you ahead of time for your knowledge that you will be sharing with myself and others.

1 Northface Denali jacket
1 wool sweater
1 pr fleece gloves
1 fleece hat
2 prs of shorts
1 pr gators
1 spandex undershort
1 spandex winter underpant
3 breathable long sleave first layer shirts
3 breathable short sleave first layer shirts
5 pr coolmax liner socks
5 pr wool socks
1 pr Vasque hiking boots
1 pr New Balnce trail running sneakers
rain top and bottom
fleece pant and top for sleeping

Happy
02-05-2004, 02:03
Way too many clothes...the rule of thumb is you can't wear it ALL at one time leave it home...the secret is to be able to layer everything. You will need two pair of socks to hike in and one pair to sleep in, one pair of long underware to sleep in. MAYBE 2 shirts and one pair of underware and shorts(zip-off pants great)
Include a pair of gloves and a pair of OR Rain Mitts and a hat and balaclovia.
Wind Jacket or mid-weight fleece and rain jacket and pants and you are set!
You only need Trailrunners (prefer) OR boots.

Happy
02-05-2004, 02:38
I will be hiking on February 29th (approach trail) hope to meet you! I will be wearing:
Silk weight t-shirt (short sleeve)
Mid weight underwear top (Zip-T)
Marmot Dri-Clime Windshirt
REI Briefs
REI Convertable (ZIP OFF) Pants
Hiking weight socks and liners
Montrail Vitness Trailrunners
1 ounce trailrunner gaiters

I will be be packing:
2 pair of socks (one pair doubles as gloves and sleeping socks), glove liners, OR rain mitts, lightweight balaclovia and windstopper hat
Midweight long underwear pants (to sleep in)
WM Flight Jacket (for camp and long breaks)
Marmot Precip Jacket and Pants

SGT Rock
02-05-2004, 03:25
Way too many clothes...the rule of thumb is you can't wear it ALL at one time leave it home...the secret is to be able to layer everything. You will need two pair of socks to hike in and one pair to sleep in, one pair of long underware to sleep in. MAYBE 2 shirts and one pair of underware and shorts(zip-off pants great)
Include a pair of gloves and a pair of OR Rain Mitts and a hat and balaclovia.
Wind Jacket or mid-weight fleece and rain jacket and pants and you are set!
You only need Trailrunners (prefer) OR boots.

Happy is correct, don't carry a lot of clothng unless you can wear it all at once if you need too. You will usually only be 3-7 days between stops and you don't need a wardrobe of clean clothing to carry if that is your concern.

I don't normally like to comment about clothing as each person has a comfort level that is determined by a lot of things. If you are not acclimated to being outside, then it will take about a week for you living on the trail to get to a point where you will feel comfortable with less clothing in the same weather. I can remember hiking in February 2000 and living in single digits. By the first week the 60s felt like a heat wave.

But each person is different, I have seen soldiers that bundle like they are in arctic weather in just the 50s. No matter what, you will have to live outside and find what works for you.

Here is an example of what works for me:

Everything works with everything else. Since I have a rain jacket, that is also my parka when combined with a liner, my socks all work in layers, same with gloves and mittens.

Worn hiking clothes - most weather down into the 40-50s:
-spandex shorts as underwear - they prevent chafffing and don't freak people out if you go around in just them for laundry and swimming in public.
-wicking shirt - usually short sleeve
-sock liners
-running shoes - you can wear these as slippers in camp. No camp shoes needed.
-cargo shorts - more durable and they have pockets
-OPTIONAL - mini gaters
-OPTIONAL - wicking ball cap
Weight: 3-1/2 pounds including shoes

Extra clothing/camp clothing:
-another pair of spandex shorts
-another pair of sock liners - wash the other pair when you switch. Sock rotation is important
-a sil-nylon clothing bag big enough to hold all clothing even in winter
-OPTIONAL - another wicking shirt, usually long sleeve.
Weight: about 1/2 to 1 pound

Rain Gear - doubles as camp clothing, insulation, and wind breakers.
-Rain Jacket with pit zips
-rain pants
-Goretex rain mittens
-Goretex socks - can be used in camp in a shelter as footwear.
Weight: about 1 pound

Spring/Fall clothing for temps between 30-50:
-fleece or polypro top and bottom. This can be an outer layer or go under your rain jacket
-fleece or polypro glove liners - used under rain mittens
-extra pair of sock liners - I save these for dry camp socks in bed
-a neck gaiter - it can be a hat or a neck warmer as you need it
Weight: about 1-1/2 pounds

Winter clothing for temps between 0-30:
-Field jacket liner and field pants liners - to wear under rain gear turning them into parkas.
-Thick wool socks
-Fleece mitten liners
-knit hat - combined with the neck giter you can make a balaclava
Weight: about 1-1/2 pounds

For about 4 1/2 to 5 pounds (pack weight) I have a system that has worked for me into the single digits. What works for you may include more or less layers, but they all work together.

Your sleeping system (bag and pad) is always your last refuge if it gets very cold.

Kozmic Zian
02-09-2004, 13:12
Well guys......Clothing...remember lst, This is Not a Wilderness. The AT has many access roads with a short hitch to town. My theory on clothing and pack weight is ' If you don't use it everyday, don't pack it'....It's only to figure where the next outfitter is to purchase what you need. True, you gotta' be ready for everything (all weather) when you start, but again....'Less is More' when youre talking about carrying your 'house' on your back.
I usually pack an extra pr socks (1) and liners, Rain Gear (jacket only), Fleece jacket, gloves (liners & covers),one polypro short shirt, one long; one long poly pants; 2 shorts; gaitors (short); boots (less than 3lbs, forget camp shoes or Tevas till you get to Maine for Fording). Everybody does it differently. I use 'The Rule of Six Fives'....a way of determining overall pack weight. You group everthing you carry into Six 'groups'....none of which can weigh over 5 lbs. The Groups are
1) Sleeping Gear - Tent, Sleeping Bag, Air Mattress
2) Clothing - All clothing, including what you're wearing
3) Backpack - And all accessories
4) Boots
5) Food & Water
6) Everything Else
If all of these catagories have >=5lbs of weight then you're sitting pretty. 30lbs is not alot to carry on Da Trail. Any weight you can shave off of these individual 5lb catagories is gravy. You can shift them around, like 3lbs here, 6lbs there....as long as the average comes out to 5lbs in each category, you're there! Any shaving of lbs is to your advantage, as a lb here or there really ads up over the course of a distance walk or Thru-Hike.
Just remember, if you need some extra clothes, or new stuff, you can buy it in town...............Kozmic [email protected]
____________________________________
'We're up hikin' The Appalachia Trail, Oh yes we are, Oh yes we are, and We're almost to ...................! KZ's Song For The Trail

chris
02-10-2004, 10:46
You can see what I took on the PCT at http://mypage.iu.edu/~chwillet/travel/PCT/gear.html

It is mostly what I would take on the AT if I were leaving in late Feb. I would probably exchange the pullover for a Flight jacket, and the shorts would stay at home. The nylon pants would get replaced with some dryskin ones, the long sleeve shirt with a different, warmer top, and I would take along a headband. Maybe a pair of wool socks.

Once May rolled around, I would change to:

2 pair running socks
Flight vest
Rainshield Jacket
thermal top
thermal tights
liner gloves
warm hat

I'd be wearing:

Shorts
T-shirt
running socks
trail runners
bandanna
underwear
watch

Note: No spare t-shirt or pants. Once I broke into Vermont or NH, I'd probably add some thermal tights.

Flash Hand
02-19-2004, 04:34
I will be hitting the trail on March 22, northbound thru hike and was discussing about pants with my fellow hiker. I told him that I wouldn't need pants and he mentioned that I will be sorry because I would suffer in some winter-like weather in the south during March and sometimes April and in Maine during fall season. I thought that the legs wouldnt hurt. I have seen some women walking around with dress in the winter. I know that ears, nose, chest, hands and toe are sensitive to cold. Do you guys agree if I will just use nylon shorts all the way? Or should I bring a different kind of pant, similar to pajama or lighter kind for very freezing weather?

Myself, I hate pants... never like them.

Flash Hand :jump

Frosty
02-19-2004, 09:07
When it comes to clothing, there is a big difference in upper body and lower body. Legs are bone and muscle and if they get cold it isn't nearly as bad as getting your body cavity and internal organs cold. Covering head especially ears, hands and feet are mostly because (IMO) blood flows closer to the surface in these areas and you don't want cool blood flowing back to your internal organs.

Snowshoeing on New Years Day, I broke through an iced over stream and went in up to my knee. Ice water, very cold. But I had nice thorlo socks and good duofold thermals (poly + wool layered). WIthing a minute of walking I didn't notice I was wet expect for the squishy feeling around my toes as water pooled there. It was about 20 degrees and no danger and I was on the way out, so I just walked. Honestly, I didn't notice any cold. It might have been different had I been wearing shorts, but not too much as long as I kept moving

Had I slipped and fell sideways and wet my upper body, thisng might have been different.

I have also been sailing off Maine, wearing long-sleeved shirt, another shirt, sweatshirt, windreaker and shorts.

I can hike in shorts when it is cold. The problem will be evening in camp, when you are not walking. The morning won't be bad as long as you start walking within a few minutes of getting out of your bag.

If it snows, you may have to bail and get to a town.

And as always, when you go unltralight in clothing you are guessing that you won't be prevented from hiking because of illness/injury. A broken ankle, cold weather and inadequate clothing is a dangerous combination.

For me, for a March start, carrying a pair of thermals until you are past Mt Rogers is not too big a weight penalty for the potential gain.

YMMV,

DeoreDX
02-19-2004, 10:03
I told him that I wouldn't need pants and he mentioned that I will be sorry because I would suffer in some winter-like weather in the south during March and sometimes April and in Maine during fall season.
Flash Hand :jump
Living in Al/Ga/Tn most of my life I say that March and April can bring some of the worst winter weather of the year. In fact, the two worst snowstorms my grandmother has seen in the 80 years of her life has been in April. I too hate pants and get into my shorts as soon as possible. I know *I* wouldn't want to start in March w/o pant.

highway
02-19-2004, 10:17
Myself, I hate pants... never like them.

Flash Hand :jump

I share the same sentiment. When the temps are down i just walk faster and that seems to keep me warm-until now, anyway.

Happy
02-19-2004, 12:35
That is why they started making zip-offs...works great for only a few ounces.

retread
03-14-2004, 12:40
You've gotten some good advice already...but I must re-enforce that you have too many sox and too many shirts. Also depending on the thickness, that wool sweater will be way too heavy.

I have already posted a list of my clothes on a thread by DeniseL. if you wanna see what I took.

I agree with Sgt. Rock...after a few weeks you get used to the weather. I have sat around shelters in a T-shirt an a fleece and noticed people around me in long johns, fleece and a parka.

I also agree that you don't need long pants. I hiked in snow in the Smokies with only lt/wt polypro bottoms and nylon shorts over them. Just keep moving. As long as you're walking...you're warm.

Have a good hike, Retread

Toolshed
03-16-2004, 09:48
Living in Al/Ga/Tn most of my life I say that March and April can bring some of the worst winter weather of the year. In fact, the two worst snowstorms my grandmother has seen in the 80 years of her life has been in April. I too hate pants and get into my shorts as soon as possible. I know *I* wouldn't want to start in March w/o pant.

legs have fewer nerve cells than other parts ear nose, fingers, toes. So you wouldn't necessarily feel the cold on your shin. I hike in weather >35 with shorts and just bring a pair of light 4 oz running tights and 4 oz windpants in the event I really need a leg insulating layer.

Texas Dreamer
03-16-2004, 10:17
Up thread a bit--
Loved the 6 5's by Kozmic Zion (I wrote it down, as I'm in the beginning stages of gear collecting), but how on earth do you keep food and water under 5 lbs?

DeoreDX
03-16-2004, 10:57
legs have fewer nerve cells than other parts ear nose, fingers, toes. So you wouldn't necessarily feel the cold on your shin.
I agree. My legs never really feel cold while I am moving even if it's in the low 40's. But, I have found that I need to consume less calories and can keep my energy levels up better when the temps are below ~55 with something covering my legs (which translates to more miles faster and more comfortably). I can only assume that w/o leg coverings while it's chilly I get too much heat loss via my legs even though they do not feel cold. Not everyone's body structure and metabolism etc is the same so YMMV.