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DavidNH
06-09-2008, 08:44
With our first heat wave (3-4 days in a row of 90 + temps) hitting New England now.. I have gotten curious about hikers and heat.

How hot and humid does it have to be before you decide to ditch a planned hike? Do you hang it up when the forcast temp hits 90? 100? What is the hottest weather you have day hiked in??

Me, if it is over 90 and at all humid, then I don't wanna hike. I'll get a nice glass of ice tea and lounge in the shade or stay even stay in side with air conditioning or a good fan!


For purposes of this post, I am not referring to AT thru hikers. They pretty much have to face what ever elements come their way!

DavidNH

Frolicking Dinosaurs
06-09-2008, 08:52
I'm older and old injuries swell like crazy in heat. Much above 85F and I'm not out there hiking. I also have lung problems that are aggravated by heat. In the interest of not having SAR come out unnecessarily, I don't hike when it is over 85F in the mountains.

Bulldawg
06-09-2008, 08:55
I would probably not undertake any moderate to strenuous mountain hikes past 90*F. And that means 90*F in the mountains. I hiked this past weekend and it was just a tick over my limits. Past 90*F though I might consider a river or creek side hike, say the Chattoga River system of trails. If you get too hot, go just in the creek!

mudhead
06-09-2008, 08:55
Acclimation. I was good to 100*F when I lived in CO. Yesterday was OK at 5PM. Today, as in right now, bites. From 59*F and foggy, to 85*F. Warm overnight. I will dayhike this afternoon, see if I can get an eylid sweat worked up. Serves me right, I did not speak well of the winter we had.

We are having two of our three summer days here this week.

The best part, is that the tomatoes might set some fruit.

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 08:57
With our first heat wave (3-4 days in a row of 90 + temps) hitting New England now.. I have gotten curious about hikers and heat.

How hot and humid does it have to be before you decide to ditch a planned hike? Do you hang it up when the forcast temp hits 90? 100? What is the hottest weather you have day hiked in??

Me, if it is over 90 and at all humid, then I don't wanna hike. I'll get a nice glass of ice tea and lounge in the shade or stay even stay in side with air conditioning or a good fan!


For purposes of this post, I am not referring to AT thru hikers. They pretty much have to face what ever elements come their way!

DavidNH
i did that so-called weenie roller coaster in no. virginia a couple of times in 100 degree heat. wasn't tough at all

mudhead
06-09-2008, 08:59
i did that so-called weenie roller coaster in no. virginia a couple of times in 100 degree heat. wasn't tough at all

That is because you are always so cool!

Gray Blazer
06-09-2008, 09:02
Ya'll would have a hard time here in FL. I was laughing at the natives in New England a few years back during a "heat wave". All the state highway workers were just leaning on their shovels and wiping their brows and the temps were way up in the mid 80's. Of course I love my AC. When I went to elementary school in Orlando and Clearwater, the schools were not ACed. Most of Clearwater High was not ACed. Somehow you do it.

I think we ought to pass some gorical laws so there won't be any more heat waves and hurricanes and tidal waves or polar bears dying.

HikerRanky
06-09-2008, 09:09
Good Morning David,

Saturday I went hiking for 7 miles at a local park here in Middle Tennessee.

The temp was 90, but there was a bit of a constant breeze in the forest that day. Pace was somewhere in the 2 mph range on average.. Stopped at several points and rehydrated my body and bandanas in an effort to cool down. I had a 2L Platy and that was sufficient.

Later that day, I found out that the relative humidity was at 85%, making the heat index right at 117...

While I had a good time, it was a bit too much in hindsight...

Cookerhiker
06-09-2008, 09:10
Full sun vs. part sun vs. shade,
Up vs. down vs. level
Humidity level
Pack weight
Availability of water
Breeze vs. still air

Worst AT backpacking heat I experienced was NJ in June '04. Mid 90s with extreme humidity, mosquitos, mostly in full sun. On the other hand, the hiking terrain was easy but it didn't help. Nights were more oppressive than days. I was supposed to hike for 10 days but bailed after 3. A drenching thunderstorm helped some.

But dry conditions can be unpleasant. On my JMT hike in '06 (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=4830), I experienced some stretches where full sun, dust & sand, clogged nostrils & chaffing thighs made conditions unpalatable, all on long downhill parts.

Re hottest weather I've day-hiked in, probably 95 near where Wolf hiked - between Snickers Gap & Keys Gap in VA just north of the roller coaster.

Jimmers
06-09-2008, 09:14
Getting acclimated to the heat definately helps, to a point. What gets me isn't so much the heat though, it's humidity. I've been fine hiking in 95 deg heat in Utah, and even above 100 at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Put me on the AT in 95 degree heat with 90% humidity though and forget it, I don't feel like walking two feet like alone hike. Maybe it depends on what's motivating you to hike at the time?

rafe
06-09-2008, 09:16
I cut short my June 2005 section hike 'cuz it was too damned hot to hike. I remember downing about five bottles of cold juice at the garden center where the AT crosses Rte. 7 near Great Barrington. Scooting across the open summit of Race Mtn., looking for a spot of shade. Low to mid eighties I can deal with. Above that, not so much.

Cookerhiker
06-09-2008, 09:16
. ....Me, if it is over 90 and at all humid, then I don't wanna hike. I'll get a nice glass of ice tea and lounge in the shade or stay even stay in side with air conditioning or a good fan!....DavidNH

David, if you're talking about day-hiking, wouldn't you enjoy hiking from the 90+ valley up into the Presidentials, say to 5,000' or even to Mt. Washington which is rarely above 70? The first 2 miles or so would be miserable but eventually you'd hit the cooler temps and breezes. You'd likley appreciate it more on days like that.

rafe
06-09-2008, 09:28
Speaking of hiking in extreme heat, y'all might wanna check the other thread about David Horton's CDT speed-hike attempt. It seems extreme heat ended that effort. Don't be macho. Hiking without proper hydration can be physically harmful. Never mind sun stroke, without adequate water you can permanently damage your kidneys.

Around this time last year I had a few bouts with kidney stones. Not fun. The doctors don't really know what causes them -- but one common refrain is "drink lots of water." They recommend three liters of water per day even for normal day-to-day city life. Think how much more you'd need for hiking hard on a 90-degree day.

Lellers
06-09-2008, 09:28
It's the humidity that kills me. It's been 98 and h*ll holy humidity for the past couple of days, and I don't have a/c in my house. Yeah, I'm the last of the crazy people who doesn't have air conditioning in Philly. We do have a pool, though. When it's sticky, I just hate it. And I work from home, so no relief in an air conditioned office.

A few years back, I was visiting friends in Dallas. It was 90-ish, but on those particular days, there was way lower humidity than I'm used to up here. The Texans kept asking me how I liked the heat down there. For some reason, they seemed to think that it doesn't get hot in Philly cuz it's "up north". I thought it was quite pleasant in Dallas at that particular moment.

So for me, I will hike into the 90s if there is water on the trail and the humidity isn't making everything feel like a wet wool blanket. In fact, one of my fave hikes is an overnight trip to Ricketts Glen with a day hike along the Falls Trail. It's always cool there.

rhjanes
06-09-2008, 09:38
acclimation. I'm here in the N TX area. I walk 5 miles a day, more like evening in the summer. As long as the Temp-Humidity number is 100 or below, I head out, but the sun is setting. I'm also walking in exposed area, which has winds to help. But also beating down sun!

jersey joe
06-09-2008, 09:45
90-100 degree weather isn't TOO hot. It just seems like it to a lot of the weenies that have a hard time leaving their air conditioning these days.

Mrs Baggins
06-09-2008, 09:46
With our first heat wave (3-4 days in a row of 90 + temps) hitting New England now.. I have gotten curious about hikers and heat.

How hot and humid does it have to be before you decide to ditch a planned hike? Do you hang it up when the forcast temp hits 90? 100? What is the hottest weather you have day hiked in??

Me, if it is over 90 and at all humid, then I don't wanna hike. I'll get a nice glass of ice tea and lounge in the shade or stay even stay in side with air conditioning or a good fan!


For purposes of this post, I am not referring to AT thru hikers. They pretty much have to face what ever elements come their way!

DavidNH

It's just never too hot for me. :sun I've sectioned in July in 90+ and high humidity. I've day hiked here in 100+ and high humidity. I drink oceans of water the whole time and I'm quite happy. I hate the cold more than anything. I'd rather dress way down in the heat than bundle up in the cold. I may get warm as long as I'm moving in cold weather but the instant I stop I'm freezing again. I've also spent a few days in Death Valley in 120 degree dry heat in late June. We have a tent trailer but NO a/c unit on it, so there was no escape. And we soaked it up. Loved it. In my case it's genetic memory - my Nordic and German ancestors didn't go to Minnesota or North Dakota when they left the Old Country. They went straight to Hawaii. I'm just genetically programmed to love hot weather.

Skyline
06-09-2008, 10:12
The extreme heat/humidity is a hike-killer for me in the hottest part of the day. Say, anything with a heat index above 90.

If you hike from the break of dawn (or earlier) until about 10-11am, and/or hike after about 6-7pm, it's usually not so bad. I'm not much of a morning person but this is one way—coupled with staying well-hydrated and keeping a cotton t-shirt wet while hiking—to survive the heat and not be too miserable.

ChinMusic
06-09-2008, 10:33
Hiking in the heat/humidity is hard enough. But what is WORSE for me is trying to sleep when it is still 80+ at 10pm with dew points near 70. I just can't sleep and am totally miserable.

Day-hiking in such heat is not a deal-breaker, but if I have to sleep in the stuff......pass.

rafe
06-09-2008, 10:34
Good idea to take a long siesta on seriously hot days. Hike early AM, and late into the evening. But take a long break during the hottest part of the day.

sherrill
06-09-2008, 10:40
I flew into Anchorage once and it was 78 degress and beautiful. When I got into the hotel shuttle the driver had the AC cranking.

tlbj6142
06-09-2008, 10:52
Hiking in the heat/humidity is hard enough. But what is WORSE for me is trying to sleep when it is still 80+ at 10pm with dew points near 70. I just can't sleep and am totally miserable.I agree. Hiking in heat isn't much of an issue, it is sleeping. Even in my cool hammock, I couldn't sleep one night I had in late July (had to be 80%+ humidity 80+F at 11pm) on a trip in southern Ohio a few years back. What was going to be a 2 night trip, turned into a long day hike (~17.5 miles) the next day and a drive home. Yuck!

4eyedbuzzard
06-09-2008, 10:59
90-100 degree weather isn't TOO hot. It just seems like it to a lot of the weenies that have a hard time leaving their air conditioning these days.

Well, lets see. If it's 98.6 degrees out and the humidity is 100%, the body can't be cooled by convection or evaporation. So if you do much of anything physical without introducing cold water internally or externally and/or moving air to aid in evaporative cooling, you're body will overheat. Just simple physics, and all the machismo BS in the world won't change it

Gray Blazer
06-09-2008, 11:05
Well, lets see. If it's 98.6 degrees out and the humidity is 100%, the body can't be cooled by convection or evaporation. So if you do much of anything physical without introducing cold water internally or externally and/or moving air to aid in evaporative cooling, you're body will overheat. Just simple physics, and all the machismo BS in the world won't change it
If the humidity was 100% wouldn't it be raining or foggy or something close? Now try 90% and tossing watermelons in N FL in June all day. How's that for some machismo BS?:banana

4eyedbuzzard
06-09-2008, 11:39
If the humidity was 100% wouldn't it be raining or foggy or something close? Now try 90% and tossing watermelons in N FL in June all day. How's that for some machismo BS?:banana

Yep. But you can get real close to saturation (100% RH)without fog. And rain forms due to atmospheric conditions at higher altitudes, not at ground level. While less usual, it can rain when the surface RH is even 50% or lower.

Unless you use cold liquids and/or are getting some degree of evaporative cooling, no person is going to toss melons all day for very long without raising their body temperature beyond medical limits and suffering the consequences. It's medically impossible. Sooner or later they have to cool down somehow. Brain cell death begins at a body temperature 106 F. There's a reason for the expression "that boy spent too much time out in the sun".

There are weather/ambient conditions at which no matter how much fluid you take in you simply can't cool the body enough to make up for the heat generated by a lot of phyical activity. Continuing activity under these conditions leads to heat exhaustion/prostration. Then comes heat stroke. And hyperthermia can be just as deadly as hypothermia.

Blissful
06-09-2008, 11:55
We had this kind of weather in MA last year. Between that and mosquitoes, plus a broken hip buckle, we got off for a few days. But if not for the broken hip belt and knowing me, we probably would have hiked on.

But I made sure we had electroyle replacement for our drink bottles. And ate bananas whenever I could.

Crazy Larry #1
06-09-2008, 11:56
It's too darn hot here right now.....

Rockhound
06-09-2008, 12:01
I pay no attention to weather reports. I figure the weather is going to do what its going to do. If i want to hike, I hike and just prepare myself for what nature might bring. Of course I might hunker down for hurricanes, tornadoes or blizzards.

jersey joe
06-09-2008, 12:02
Well, lets see. If it's 98.6 degrees out and the humidity is 100%, the body can't be cooled by convection or evaporation. So if you do much of anything physical without introducing cold water internally or externally and/or moving air to aid in evaporative cooling, you're body will overheat. Just simple physics, and all the machismo BS in the world won't change it
It would not be a wise idea to hike in 100 degree humid weather without drinking fluids. As long as you have enough water 90-100 degrees is not TOO hot for most people to go hiking, I don't care what physics you pull out of your hat.

4eyedbuzzard
06-09-2008, 12:05
I pay no attention to weather reports. I figure the weather is going to do what its going to do. If i want to hike, I hike and just prepare myself for what nature might bring. Of course I might hunker down for hurricanes, tornadoes or blizzards.

I might just hunker down by a nice lake or stream during 100 degree/high humidity heat too.

mudhead
06-09-2008, 12:06
I flew into Anchorage once and it was 78 degress and beautiful. When I got into the hotel shuttle the driver had the AC cranking.

That's a toasty temp for AK.

Some medications can screw with your temperature regulation. As well as natural insulation. If you have ever had heat stress, you would remember it.

doggiebag
06-09-2008, 12:07
Good idea to take a long siesta on seriously hot days. Hike early AM, and late into the evening. But take a long break during the hottest part of the day.
Agreed. It's dangerously hot out there right now. This is the type of weather that night hiking makes the most sense. I would probably be asleep near a creek in these conditions and just make the miles at night. I've also found it easier to tackle long climbs when you can't see the summit. I invested in a nice strong headlamp for night hikes.

WalkingStick75
06-09-2008, 12:21
Hot days, Clear night.... perfect for a night hike.

Rockhound
06-09-2008, 12:24
It would not be a wise idea to hike in 100 degree humid weather without drinking fluids. As long as you have enough water 90-100 degrees is not TOO hot for most people to go hiking, I don't care what physics you pull out of your hat.
I don't think it it was his hat from which he pulled that statistic. I think he pulled it out of somewhere else.

jersey joe
06-09-2008, 12:25
I don't think it it was his hat from which he pulled that statistic. I think he pulled it out of somewhere else.
I was trying to be nice. :)

rafe
06-09-2008, 12:43
Wow. It only took two pages for the thread to degrade into a pissing contest.

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 12:45
Wow. It only took two pages for the thread to degrade into a pissing contest.

there's a good pissing match on trailplace about dogs having rights :)

doggiebag
06-09-2008, 12:49
there's a good pissing match on trailplace about dogs having rights :)
Sorry for the thread drift folks:
Can a moderator see everything a user is doing even if we're on invisible mode?

gypsy
06-09-2008, 12:54
there's a good pissing match on trailplace about dogs having rights :)
http://www.trailplace.com/forums/showthread.php?t=458

Survivor Dave
06-09-2008, 13:06
Hot here in HOTlanta for sure. Midday temp is 94 degrees. I hope the hikers are not too exposed and have lots of water and food.

Summit
06-09-2008, 13:13
Last weekend's Shining Rock Wilderness hike will be it for me until fall ushers in some cooler air. It's not about being a "weenie" jersey joe. It's about being smart! :eek: :p Seriously, if you enjoy it, then do it, but don't put people who don't do it because they don't enjoy it down. I don't enjoy hot, heavy sweating hiking, tepid humid nights, and relentlessly dealing with bugs. Fall will come soon enough! :)

Bulldawg
06-09-2008, 13:27
It is so hot here in Gainesville, GA that I brought my lunch today to keep from having to leave my air conditioned office until 5PM.

woodsy
06-09-2008, 13:59
Two NH hikers victims (http://www.theunionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Heat+was+likely+factor+in+fe lling+two+hikers&articleId=929f388c-5bd2-454f-ac07-9904d95b3fdf) of 90 deg temps yesterday

emerald
06-09-2008, 14:16
Good idea to take a long siesta on seriously hot days. Hike early AM, and late into the evening. But take a long break during the hottest part of the day.

Near water in the shade if you can. Consider Schubert's Gap.:cool:

Yahtzee
06-09-2008, 14:23
Went out yesterday to drop off some cold stuff for NOBO's leaving the Doyle. Didn't see a one in 7 miles. Headed to the Doyle last night forgetting it closed at 8 but saw a crew of hikers on the balcony. So, I guess yesterday was too hot.

Going from Boiling Springs to Duncannon over the this stretch of days has to be brutal. Scott's Farm water can only stay cold so long.

rafe
06-09-2008, 14:23
Near water in the shade if you can. Consider Schubert's Gap.:cool:

Or Hertlein campsite. Nice flowing stream there... something I didn't see much of in PA last August.

Pokey2006
06-09-2008, 14:26
It all depends on how much beer you drink the night before. Only time I had trouble in the heat was when I had a wicked hangover.

emerald
06-09-2008, 14:36
Or Hertlein campsite. Nice flowing stream there... something I didn't see much of in PA last August.

Same place as Schubert's Gap. I was referring to the natural features. Your stream flows into the former Blue Mountain Electric Company hydro dam just downhill.;)

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 14:38
or you can illegally swim in sunfish pond like most thru-hikers do

rafe
06-09-2008, 14:52
or you can illegally swim in sunfish pond like most thru-hikers do

I didn't swim in it... but I did dip my feet. :D

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 14:53
I didn't swim in it... but I did dip my feet. :D

in 2000 i walked on the pond. it was december

wahoo
06-09-2008, 15:03
Come and hike down here in Sunny Florida right now. The weather is great...! We get these crazy afternoon showers for about 30 minutes and then after that you get to hike with steam rising off of your body. Now that's hot!
How hot is too hot? Well, I guess if you pass out, then that means it was too hot. Otherwise, keep hiking!

Cookerhiker
06-09-2008, 15:05
I had my share of hot muggy days on last year's Long Trail hike although likely not as hot as now. It sure made Stratton Pond (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=205059) a godsend at the end of one of those hot ones. No one there but me, the frogs, and salamanders.

rafe
06-09-2008, 15:18
I had my share of hot muggy days on last year's Long Trail hike although likely not as hot as now. It sure made Stratton Pond (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=205059) a godsend at the end of one of those hot ones. No one there but me, the frogs, and salamanders.

Yep, nice place to swim, as was Little Rock Pond. The AT in Maine is blessed with lots of great swimming holes.

Last summer I walked along the C&O into Harpers Ferry on a hot weekend afternoon... watching hundreds of folks in inner tubes floating down and splashing around on the Potomac. I felt dumb... the folks in the water had the right idea.

4eyedbuzzard
06-09-2008, 15:25
I don't think it it was his hat from which he pulled that statistic. I think he pulled it out of somewhere else.

Actually, I didn't state or "pull" any "statistics". I simply stated physical facts about heat transfer, evaporative cooling, and medical facts.

The primary method the body uses to cool itself is perspiration, with heat carried away by the additional energy required to cause a phase state change of (sweated) water to water vapor at the same temperature. This is called heat of vaporization. If both air temperature and %RH are in the very high 90's there is simply not enough air available to allow evaporation of enough sweat/water to cool the body to keep up with the heat it produces during heavy physical exertion. Drinking or applying COLD fluids can obviously aid in cooling the body, but drinking water at the same ambient temperatures will only prevent dehydration - not necessarily lower body temperature unless it can somehow be evaporated. Fans or any airflow(like a nice breeze) can help by greatly increasing the mass of air passing over the skin available for evaporative heat transfer. Rarely is air 100% saturated, so even if the RH is 95%+, by using a fan you can greatly increase the amount of air available for evaporation and cooling.

Hiking in really hot humid weather is fine if people like to do it, and they understand that under certain conditions hydration alone simply isn't enough to prevent heat illnesses from occuring.

That you choose to be ignorant of the physical universe is your choice. If you want to refute something though, please try to do so civilly and intelligently by first removing your head from the orifice you claim my "statistics" came from.

For anyone interested here's a heat index chart and some heat safety info: http://www.nsis.org/weather/heatindex.html

leeki pole
06-09-2008, 15:38
That's a toasty temp for AK.

Some medications can screw with your temperature regulation. As well as natural insulation. If you have ever had heat stress, you would remember it.
Tell me about it. I was training for a marathon, doing 50 mile weeks. I took off on a midday run, an 18 miler and drank an electrolyte drink at 9 miles. The weather forecast was for 82 and cloudy, it ended up being 94 with 80 per cent humidity and sunny. Not good. At 14 miles I completely bonked. Thankfully I got to a friend's house where my wife came and she and my friend literally picked me up, put me in the truck and took me to the hospital.

The electrolyte drink, the ER doctor told me, shut down my ability to hydrate due to the sugar content in the drink. After 3 hours in the ER and 2 IV's I was fine. So be careful about electrolyte drinks, water is best. This wasn't my first marathon and I'd been running seriously for 18 years and not a novice. Water, water in the heat. I've never had another electrolyte during exercise, only after.

AlwaysHiking
06-09-2008, 15:47
Movement causes air contact. Wearing very little by way of clothing exposes more skin to air contact.

When it's hot, humid and hot, I'm fine drinking plenty of water and actually moving. When I stop, lord help me, that's when I start to overheat.


Actually, I didn't state or "pull" any "statistics". I simply stated physical facts about heat transfer, evaporative cooling, and medical facts.

The primary method the body uses to cool itself is perspiration, with heat carried away by the additional energy required to cause a phase state change of (sweated) water to water vapor at the same temperature. This is called heat of vaporization. If both air temperature and %RH are in the very high 90's there is simply not enough air available to allow evaporation of enough sweat/water to cool the body to keep up with the heat it produces during heavy physical exertion. Drinking or applying COLD fluids can obviously aid in cooling the body, but drinking water at the same ambient temperatures will only prevent dehydration - not necessarily lower body temperature unless it can somehow be evaporated. Fans or any airflow(like a nice breeze) can help by greatly increasing the mass of air passing over the skin available for evaporative heat transfer. Rarely is air 100% saturated, so even if the RH is 95%+, by using a fan you can greatly increase the amount of air available for evaporation and cooling.

Hiking in really hot humid weather is fine if people like to do it, and they understand that under certain conditions hydration alone simply isn't enough to prevent heat illnesses from occuring.

That you choose to be ignorant of the physical universe is your choice. If you want to refute something though, please try to do so civilly and intelligently by first removing your head from the orifice you claim my "statistics" came from.

For anyone interested here's a heat index chart and some heat safety info: http://www.nsis.org/weather/heatindex.html

rafe
06-09-2008, 15:52
I spend my days in a cubicle (boo! hiss!) but right next to a huge window (yay!) There are some days I look out the window and think, "I'm glad I'm not hiking in this sch!tt." This is one of those days.

yappy
06-09-2008, 16:04
At about 65 in Alaska folks start complaining about the heat. We don't like it hot here. But, on At and pct we hiked in HOT weather.. all part of it i guess. Even though I live in Alaska now i grew up in the Virgin islands ..haha. Go figure !

tlbj6142
06-09-2008, 16:07
I spend my days in a cubicle (boo! hiss!) but right next to a huge window (yay!) There are some days I look out the window and think, "I'm glad I'm not hiking in this sch!tt." This is one of those days.Wow! Me, too! Cubicle with a window...I will say that I don't mind day hiking in stupid heat. In fact, I sort of like it, as I think of day hiking as a sweat-n-pain sort of hobby (that I enjoy). But for backpacking where I want to be a bit more casual (and have to sleep outside), I avoid the heat when I can.

The Old Fhart
06-09-2008, 16:30
The 4eyedbuzzard knows what he's talking about and what he says makes perfect sense. You could also get the same information from the CDC website (http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heat_guide.asp) or many other places. Heat exhaustion is serious and is what apparently stopped David Horton's CDT speed hike (http://eco-xsports.blogspot.com/). Heat stroke can be terminal and those that survive can have permanent neurological damage, at the least. What the CDC site says is (emphasis mine):

"Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. Historically, from 1979-2003, excessive heat exposure caused 8,015 deaths in the United States. During this period, more people in this country died from extreme heat than from hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes combined. In 2001, 300 deaths were caused by excessive heat exposure.

People suffer heat-related illness when their bodies are unable to compensate and properly cool themselves. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isn't enough. In such cases, a person's body temperature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs.

Several factors affect the body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather. When the humidity is high, sweat will not evaporate as quickly, preventing the body from releasing heat quickly. Other conditions related to risk include age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use.

Because heat-related deaths are preventable, people need to be aware of who is at greatest risk and what actions can be taken to prevent a heat-related illness or death. The elderly, the very young, and people with mental illness and chronic diseases are at highest risk. However, even young and healthy individuals can succumb to heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather. Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death. If a home is not air-conditioned, people can reduce their risk for heat-related illness by spending time in public facilities that are air-conditioned."

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 16:33
thru-hikers must trudge on thru the heat to reach that holy grail mountain to get the patch and certificate. heat stroke be damned. it's that important

Bare Bear
06-09-2008, 16:38
"Mad dogs and Englishmen..."
That us why the hiking season in Fl starts in Jan and runs thru April usually.

Lone Wolf
06-09-2008, 16:39
ain't much hiking in fla. anyway

tlbj6142
06-09-2008, 16:45
"from 1979-2003, excessive heat exposure caused 8,015 deaths in the United StatesGood information OF, but I have to wonder how many of the 8K deaths are due to friendless less mobile older folks trapped in a non-AC apartment in a big city during a "heat wave"? Versus someone performing a leisure activity?

Johnny Swank
06-09-2008, 16:54
Good idea to take a long siesta on seriously hot days. Hike early AM, and late into the evening. But take a long break during the hottest part of the day.


That's what we did the last month on the Mississippi. We hit Mississippi and Louisiana in July. Holy hell I thought my brain was going to melt, and there ain't any place to hide from the sun on the middle of the river.

Lessons:
1) Drink lots of water. I was going through 1.5 gallons a day at the end.
2) Wear a wide brim hat
3) Long sleeve shirts beat sunscreen

We're probably doing the first half of the PCT in 2010, and we're playing with geeking out with umbrellas.

The Old Fhart
06-09-2008, 17:08
Tlbj6142-"Good information OF, but I have to wonder how many of the 8K deaths are due to friendless less mobile older folks trapped in a non-AC apartment in a big city during a "heat wave"? Versus someone performing a leisure activity?""However, even young and healthy individuals can succumb to heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather." There is a big difference between a 'leisure' activity (done in spare time) and a an activity done 'leisurely' (done without haste). Hiking is strenuous and a lot of thru hikes aren't done leisurely.;)

Every so often on the news you will hear of a football practice, a military drill, marathon, or a 4th of July parade where people collapse from the heat. During a heat wave you hear of the elderly and infirm in cities that die but I don't know the percentages for each. It is a problem everyone has to watch out for.

Interesting question though.

rafe
06-09-2008, 17:21
Years ago (ca. 1985) there was an ugly scene in MA where a State Police drill sergeant effectively killed a trainee (and injured several others) during a training exercise in hot weather. Here's a link (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE4D6163EF934A1575AC0A96E9482 60&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all). Go ahead, be a macho man...

max patch
06-09-2008, 17:27
This is a good time to do the Lake Winifield loop in Georgia.

ToyYoda
06-09-2008, 17:37
how hot is too hot? the temp at my place.

power has been out since saturday afternoon.. its been 100+ with index every day since. thats too hot. :(

doggiebag
06-09-2008, 17:41
how hot is too hot? the temp at my place.

power has been out since saturday afternoon.. its been 100+ with index every day since. thats too hot. :(

Wow that really sucks. We just got ours back 2 days ago. I feel for you.

ToyYoda
06-09-2008, 17:47
its back on now, called a few hours ago and my machine picked up.. granted, it did that yesterday. I figured it wasnt coming on for awhile so went to the laundromat to do some clothes, 20 minutes and 20 bucks later I decided maybe ill call and see if its back on.. haha, sure nuff.

finished up and went home.. ran ac for like an hour and it went back out. so we will see if its really on for good this time. last couple nights have been horrible trying to sleep. thankfully I ran some food to my grandmothers house to put in her fridge cause I just loaded up for a few weeks so I didnt have to go back to the store for awhile.

lets hope the cat is still alive and kicking when I get home in an hour.

what area you in doggie? apparently quite a few people in annapolis and over the bridge have been out for even longer.

doggiebag
06-09-2008, 17:56
We were out of power for a good 2 days. Staying cool was impossible. I'd just jump in the shower and didn't bother toweling off. Tried to drive to the Potomac to do some swimming and the river was too swollen/dangerous. Hope your cat is still alive as well. I'll shoot you a PM to avoid thread drift.

NICKTHEGREEK
06-09-2008, 18:02
there's a good pissing match on trailplace about dogs having rights :)
What about lefts?

Survivor Dave
06-10-2008, 06:53
My A/C is still running...........countless days.

earlyriser26
06-10-2008, 07:25
Going out to VA tommorow. Hopefuly it has "cooled down to the upper 80's" it was in the upper 90's a couple of days ago. Go slow and drink lots of water. At least I can leave an extra set of warm clothes behind.

sherrill
06-10-2008, 07:47
[. Water, water in the heat. I've never had another electrolyte during exercise, only after.[/QUOTE]

For me as well. I'll have a cool glass of G-rade after a workout, but only after I've completely cooled down. Otherwise, water only.

highway
06-10-2008, 07:53
ain't much hiking in fla. anyway

But we get to summit Mt Dora, if we can find it!

jersey joe
06-10-2008, 09:09
It's not about being a "weenie" jersey joe. It's about being smart! :eek: :p Seriously, if you enjoy it, then do it, but don't put people who don't do it because they don't enjoy it down.
Perhaps "weenie" was a poor choice of words. Perhaps only going hiking in optimal conditions is in fact "smart". Just think, if you put a treadmill in your air conditioned living room, that would be an even "smarter" way to hike! :D

mudhead
06-10-2008, 09:59
ain't much hiking in fla. anyway

Big Indian mound on the north side of Tampa Bay. You can run up and down it a few times. Some park, no memory today. Cooked what's left.

Time To Fly 97
06-10-2008, 11:01
Hiking in the heat can be reduced by altering your sleep schedule. Get up at sunrise, camel up, and hike thru he morning. Keep on the lookout for creeks or ponds that you can siesta near all through the afternoon, soak your feet, drink lots of water. Even if you have to siesta a mile off the trail to find a good spot, this well worth the effort. Then hike some miles in the evening. It is different - less sleep at night, early starts, you feel like you should be hiking in the afternoon...kinda messes with your internal clock. Once you get used to it, these are actually beautiful times to hike (sunrise, sunsets, more wildlife) and siesta-ing at the right places makes every day a vacation.

Also, I learned on the PCT in the desert sections that an umbrella or tarp with mylar over it can reduce temps by 15 degrees underneath. You can get clothing that has sunblock SPF 40 in the weave. Lots of options to make the best of the hot sections.

Happy hiking!

TTF

Summit
06-10-2008, 12:00
Perhaps "weenie" was a poor choice of words. Perhaps only going hiking in optimal conditions is in fact "smart". Just think, if you put a treadmill in your air conditioned living room, that would be an even "smarter" way to hike! :DYeah, but tenting sites are not optimal! :p

jersey joe
06-10-2008, 12:20
Yeah, but tenting sites are not optimal! :p
True, the wife hates when i leave tent stake holes in the living room floor.

woodsy
06-10-2008, 12:23
Temperature change with elevation on this Mt Washington Auto Road temp/humidity profile
(http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/arvp/)

dessertrat
06-10-2008, 12:25
It is all completely individual. There is no place on the AT where it gets so hot that there aren't some people who can tolerate it. People just have to know there own limits, and not let themselves overheat/dehydrate.

sheepdog
06-10-2008, 13:01
It is all completely individual. There is no place on the AT where it gets so hot that there aren't some people who can tolerate it. People just have to know there own limits, and not let themselves overheat/dehydrate.
You've got that right. Just go to the beach in Forida in December. Its 65 degrees and us northerners are in our shorts swimming. The Floridians have coats and mittens on.:D

Bearpaw88
06-10-2008, 13:07
With our first heat wave (3-4 days in a row of 90 + temps) hitting New England now.. I have gotten curious about hikers and heat.

How hot and humid does it have to be before you decide to ditch a planned hike? Do you hang it up when the forcast temp hits 90? 100? What is the hottest weather you have day hiked in??

Me, if it is over 90 and at all humid, then I don't wanna hike. I'll get a nice glass of ice tea and lounge in the shade or stay even stay in side with air conditioning or a good fan!


For purposes of this post, I am not referring to AT thru hikers. They pretty much have to face what ever elements come their way!

DavidNH


I am from WI and anything over 90 sucks for me. If it is ever over 90 I hike at night. Some may call me a wuss. Thats okay.

Cookerhiker
06-10-2008, 13:24
You've got that right. Just go to the beach in Forida in December. Its 65 degrees and us northerners are in our shorts swimming. The Floridians have coats and mittens on.:D

A few years ago in early February, I went snorkeling in Pennekamp state part in the Keys. I was the only one in the boat who didn't ask for a wetsuit. A few people asked me if I was cold and I responded that a 70 degree water temp was good enough for me.

wakapak
06-10-2008, 13:33
Hiking in the heat can be reduced by altering your sleep schedule. Get up at sunrise, camel up, and hike thru he morning. Keep on the lookout for creeks or ponds that you can siesta near all through the afternoon, soak your feet, drink lots of water. Even if you have to siesta a mile off the trail to find a good spot, this well worth the effort. Then hike some miles in the evening. It is different - less sleep at night, early starts, you feel like you should be hiking in the afternoon...kinda messes with your internal clock. Once you get used to it, these are actually beautiful times to hike (sunrise, sunsets, more wildlife) and siesta-ing at the right places makes every day a vacation.

Also, I learned on the PCT in the desert sections that an umbrella or tarp with mylar over it can reduce temps by 15 degrees underneath. You can get clothing that has sunblock SPF 40 in the weave. Lots of options to make the best of the hot sections.

Happy hiking!

TTF

The early morning/later evening hiking with very long siestas is what we are currently doing out here!! Right now we are actually in Buchanan VA until later this afternoon when it's cooler temps to hike on!! :sun

Survivor Dave
06-10-2008, 13:37
I just opened my electric bill........too depressed to write a check.:datz

wrongway_08
06-10-2008, 13:46
I dont mind the heat or humidity, as long as I am stuck out in it. So hiking/biking/kayaking in extreme heat doesnt bother me.

Its when your in the a/c, then in the heat, then in the a/c, then in the heat........... that bothers me, that sucks.

but everyone is different and you have to just go off what feels okay to you. If your okay with 105 heat and 50 percent humidity, go for it. If 90 degrees makes you feel like falling over - stop and relax, enjoy the taking n the view for a while.

Chaco Taco
06-10-2008, 13:47
I dont care who ya are, its freakin hot here in VA.
"Its gettin hot in here, so take off all ya clothes" Hike Naked day is upon us!!! YAY! I hope it rains!:banana

wrongway_08
06-10-2008, 14:36
I dont care who ya are, its freakin hot here in VA.
"Its gettin hot in here, so take off all ya clothes" Hike Naked day is upon us!!! YAY! I hope it rains!:banana

I dont think anyone wants to see me naked on the trail! It'll never get hot enough for you all to want that ..... :D!

southpaw95
06-10-2008, 14:54
It's so hot here in Catawba I saw a straight guy drinking a ZIMA.:sun

Johnny Thunder
06-10-2008, 14:57
It's so hot here in Catawba I saw a straight guy drinking a ZIMA.:sun

Chaco...I saw it, too...seriously, the guy wears a skirt just one time and you got to start questioning.

Incahiker
06-10-2008, 14:58
I went for a nice hike in Georgia on sunday, got to about 94. Took my dog with me too. Yes I know, sounds like I could have killed us both. But I chose a hike that skirted a COLD mountain stream the whole way. My dog kept jumping in the stream every 2 minutes, and I was right behind her. It turned out to be one of the best hikes I have been on. I definitely decided not to hike to the top of a mountain with no water :eek:. It was hot, but the cold mountain water on a cotton bandana around your neck kept me nice and cool. My dog stayed wet the whole time, and we took it real easy.

bloodmountainman
06-10-2008, 15:07
It's so hot here in Catawba I saw a straight guy drinking a ZIMA.:sun
It's so hot here in the Ga. mountains I saw a dog steam cleaning a fire hydrant!:sun

southpaw95
06-10-2008, 15:24
It's so hot here in the Ga. mountains I saw a dog steam cleaning a fire hydrant!:sun


yeh you did.

It's so hot i saw a dog chashin' a cat and they were both walkin':sun

Jay B.
06-10-2008, 15:35
Your question was "How hot does it have to be before you ditch a planned hike". My answer would be probably be anything above 70 degrees. I have been section the AT for several years now and much rather hike late fall ,winter and very early spring. Different strokes for different folks but the heat and humidity is not something I enjoy. The views are not as good in the summer, to many bugs, snakes, posion ivy, and people. Being a section hiker allows you to pick the best weather and time of year. I have done all the macho stuff and now enjoy hiking more by selecting the best times to enjoy the AT!! To each his own!!!

peanuts
06-10-2008, 15:41
jay b, you are not the only one who likes to hike below 70 degrees!:sun

Cookerhiker
06-10-2008, 16:09
.....the heat and humidity is not something I enjoy. The views are not as good in the summer, to many bugs, snakes, posion ivy, and people. Being a section hiker allows you to pick the best weather and time of year. ...!!!

My sentiments exactly. I think I've used the same words in describing my section hiking.

Summer is a great time to hike......in the Rockies, Cascades, High Sierra, Ireland, Norway, the Alps.....

A-Train
06-10-2008, 16:11
Try "teaching" a class of middle school kids in 99 degree heat, full humidity with no AC. Not fun!:)

Cookerhiker
06-10-2008, 16:15
Try "teaching" a class of middle school kids in 99 degree heat, full humidity with no AC. Not fun!:)

And inner-city to boot, no?

Jay B.
06-10-2008, 16:33
About the worst hiking conditions I can imagine is 90 degree or above heat or minus 0 and a 30 mile per hour wind. I would still take the cold over the heat any day!!!!! My choice is 20-30 at night and 50-55 during the day. Perfect!! Also can carry the kind of food I like to eat into the backcountry without the worry of spoilage!!!