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View Full Version : Does anyone find this as amusing as me?



spittinpigeon
07-27-2008, 05:01
Caption? This was taken on Greylock on Thursday.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v206/spittinpigeon/trail282.jpg

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 05:07
i fail to see the humor

spittinpigeon
07-27-2008, 05:23
That's because you are the resident dolt.

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 07:28
it's a big mud puddle on the trail up north. nothing unusual. what is a dolt? is it name calling?

Crazy Larry #1
07-27-2008, 07:30
it's a big mud puddle on the trail up north. nothing unusual. what is a dolt? is it name calling?
It's kind of like me calling you an old fart yesterday as you rode by on your Hog................

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 07:33
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dolt

Crazy Larry #1
07-27-2008, 07:39
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dolt
well in that case it sounds like he is name calling........you are still an old fart........

STEVEM
07-27-2008, 07:39
LW,

1. dolt 386 up (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=dolt#), 57 down (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=dolt#)http://www.urbandictionary.com/images/thumbsup.gif (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=dolt#)http://www.urbandictionary.com/images/thumbsdown.gif (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=dolt#)
A mental retard who is clueless not only about current events, but also has the IQ level of a rock. "Dolt" may be the most sophisticated insult in the English language. Dolts commonly populate such stereotypes as jocks, nerds, fruits, bookworms, and dorks.
You're a dolt.

STEVEM
07-27-2008, 07:42
it's a big mud puddle on the trail up north. nothing unusual. what is a dolt? is it name calling?

I've seen those puddles filled with frogs, frog eggs and tadpoles. Must be doltish frogs.

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 07:49
I've seen those puddles filled with frogs, frog eggs and tadpoles. Must be doltish frogs.

i've seen doltish hikers walk right thru them so they don't miss any trail

mudhead
07-27-2008, 07:53
i've seen doltish hikers walk right thru them so they don't miss any trail

They would be referred to as "Derwoods."

The Old Fhart
07-27-2008, 07:56
The Only Wanderer, I can see where Lone Wolf would consider being called an Old Fhart to be an insult!:D

rafe
07-27-2008, 08:02
i've seen doltish hikers walk right thru them so they don't miss any trail

Being highly aware of backcountry ethics and rules, you would know that that's exactly what they ought to be doing. It's not a "purity" thing.

Crazy Larry #1
07-27-2008, 08:09
The Only Wanderer, I can see where Lone Wolf would consider being called an Old Fhart to be an insult!:D
Actually he smiled, nodded and I think he even gestured with his finger that I was number one.

Truly I don't hink he understood a word I said because of that noise maker he was on..........:D

Crazy Larry #1
07-27-2008, 08:10
Being highly aware of backcountry ethics and rules, you would know that that's exactly what they ought to be doing. It's not a "purity" thing.
Horsey phooey! Cut a blue blaze right around it..........

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 08:12
Being highly aware of backcountry ethics and rules, you would know that that's exactly what they ought to be doing. It's not a "purity" thing.

but an intelligent person wouldn't wade thru it

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 08:13
The Only Wanderer, I can see where Lone Wolf would consider being called an Old Fhart to be an insult!:D

nope. it's a term of endearment

Kirby
07-27-2008, 08:16
That puddle is classic NE AT, nothing unusual.

If my shoes are already soaked, I march through it. If my shoes are dry, I find a way around it.

Kirby

sofaking
07-27-2008, 09:00
all of vermont looks like that right now...i'm past mass. so i don't care what it looks like anymore.

sasquatch2014
07-27-2008, 09:28
See now as a maintainer one way to look at it is that in the winter when it freezes over it makes for nice smooth flat trail.

Crazy Larry #1
07-27-2008, 09:41
That puddle is classic NE AT, nothing unusual.

If my shoes are already soaked, I march through it. If my shoes are dry, I find a way around it.

Kirbywith those long legs you probably could walk right over the top of the one that is pictured

sofaking
07-27-2008, 09:47
See now as a maintainer one way to look at it is that in the winter when it freezes over it makes for nice smooth flat trail.
i just have trouble deciding whether to bring my hockey skates or figure skates on my winter backpacking trips...

rafe
07-27-2008, 11:19
but an intelligent person wouldn't wade thru it

Heh. I'm not going to disagree with you. But I can cite any number of books on hiking ethics and such that say it's a bad thing to walk around it.

http://www.terrapinphoto.com/puddle_hopping.jpg

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 11:22
whatever, i'll walk around

Bearpaw
07-27-2008, 11:34
Heh. I'm not going to disagree with you. But I can cite any number of books on hiking ethics and such that say it's a bad thing to walk around it.

http://www.terrapinphoto.com/puddle_hopping.jpg

That picture is from Mike Clelland, a NOLS instructor I worked with on a couple of occasions. If we were with students, we'd wade through because it was the "textbook" thing to do. When we were on our own, and the students on their small groups, unless our boots were already soaked, we'd find a way around without creating a new or wider trail.

The problem is with making the mud hole bigger, not with reasonably keeping boots dry. The issue in the picture is creating the new trail.l

Bearpaw
07-27-2008, 11:41
Just remember folks, personal attacks and name-calling are NOT the way to go. Even if you don't like Lone Wolf, lay off the name-calling here. He isn't going there. Please don't yourselves.

BTW, I find the original picture kinda funny because it is SO true.

rafe
07-27-2008, 12:00
That picture is from Mike Clelland, a NOLS instructor I worked with on a couple of occasions. If we were with students, we'd wade through because it was the "textbook" thing to do. When we were on our own, and the students on their small groups, unless our boots were already soaked, we'd find a way around without creating a new or wider trail.

The problem is with making the mud hole bigger, not with reasonably keeping boots dry. The issue in the picture is creating the new trail.l

I'd call it a pretty typical "ethical dilemma." There's no way to walk around it without tramping some undergrowth. The next hiker sees that track and sensibly figures, "Why not, I won't be the first..." and so it goes.

Like I said, I'm not disagreeing with you or Mike C. or LW -- just making a point that there are no saints among us. We all have a point where we say, "the law is an ass..."

Pedaling Fool
07-27-2008, 12:12
Being highly aware of backcountry ethics and rules, you would know that that's exactly what they ought to be doing. It's not a "purity" thing.


...Like I said, I'm not disagreeing with you or Mike C. or LW -- just making a point that there are no saints among us. We all have a point where we say, "the law is an ass..."
So if you were the first on the scene would you wade thru or make a new trail? I can't tell between these two posts.

Bearpaw
07-27-2008, 12:19
So if you were the first on the scene would you wade thru or make a new trail? I can't tell between these two posts.

If you carefully go well around, you make either so little trail that no one notices, or doesn't want to go the longish route around. I've done it more than once.

On trails where there is a mudhole and a clearly worn tread with no grass left that avoids it, I'm taking the clearly worn tread around. If any thing, at that point, you're best off dropping brush over the mud hole and making the new section the trail the only option.

rafe
07-27-2008, 12:23
So if you were the first on the scene would you wade thru or make a new trail? I can't tell between these two posts.

If you have to ask, you're missing my point. ;)

Pedaling Fool
07-27-2008, 12:24
If you have to ask, you're missing my point. ;)
I often do with your posts:sun

rafe
07-27-2008, 12:28
I often do with your posts:sun

To quote Hannibal Lechter, "Look deep inside your self." ;)

Bearpaw
07-27-2008, 12:30
To quote Hannibal Lechter, "Look deep inside your self." ;)

Seems to me Terrapin is saying use your best judgement. I like that philosophy.

A-Train
07-27-2008, 13:29
Caption? This was taken on Greylock on Thursday.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v206/spittinpigeon/trail282.jpg

I don't find this amusing. It's actually quite dreadful on a cold day with lots and lots of these.

Flush2wice
07-27-2008, 13:32
If you hike up to the left of that puddle a few hundred yards, there's a rock bar where it's safe to cross if you go 1st thing in the morning.

rafe
07-27-2008, 14:02
I don't find this amusing. It's actually quite dreadful on a cold day with lots and lots of these.

Ethan Pond trail (just south/west of Crawford notch) after a rain -- it's basically underwater. In a situation like that, just give up and slog through. There's no way to walk around every puddle, 'cuz the whole trail is one continuous puddle.

Wilson
07-27-2008, 14:41
Being highly aware of backcountry ethics and rules, you would know that that's exactly what they ought to be doing. It's not a "purity" thing.

No offence to you, but I first read something to that effect over 20 years ago... It makes absolutely no sense to me.

I work around and with erosion control professionals everyday and have a vacation bonus reward when I report a soil conservation violation, so I do understand the basic concept.

DavidNH
07-27-2008, 14:52
First. I got a chuckle out of this... brings back some fond (sarcastically speaking) memories of the AT in Vermont and in Maine.

I think I would be tempted to go around on the left edge. But it may be, in conditions this bad, time to give up on staying dry. Just slog through as quick as possible. Going slow just allows the water to seep more.


I know I tried my best to avoid mud and puddles..but I always end up with wet feet anyway. Even Goretex boots don't help after a certain point. Nothin does.

I can't help but think though, some trail work by the maintaining club.. a good water bar for instance, or a log bridge or something.. and this situation would not occurr!

DavidNH

Wilson
07-27-2008, 14:52
No offence to you, but I first read something to that effect over 20 years ago... It makes absolutely no sense to me.

I work around and with erosion control professionals everyday and have a vacation bonus reward when I report a soil conservation violation, so I do understand the basic concept.

Sorry, I posted the above before I read page 2...Looks like you ain't exactly drinking the koolaid.:)

rafe
07-27-2008, 15:50
I can't help but think though, some trail work by the maintaining club.. a good water bar for instance, or a log bridge or something.. and this situation would not occurr!

When the trail goes flat, it does, and it always will -- unless the treadway is artificially raised to be higher than the ground on either side. A lotta folks complain that the trail is over-engineered, as it is.

Kerosene
07-27-2008, 19:05
Sounds like the same location south of the summit of Greylock that I remember on a humid day in July 1979. Apparently I was deyhdrated before I came to the end of a string of small logs that had sunk into a bog. I attempted to hop to the base of several trees to avoid the 1-2 foot deep water, and overshot a tree due to my 45-pound packweight. My right leg sunk into the water and muck, which almost sucked off the high-top boot off my foot, which then caused my right thigh to cramp most uncomfortably. I still remember hugging that tree and trying to stop the cramping. Not fun.

sheepdog
07-27-2008, 19:13
What I want to know is should you ford it, or wait for the ferry?

saimyoji
07-27-2008, 19:25
What I want to know is should you ford it, or wait for the ferry?

pot stirring.....:rolleyes:

Erin
07-27-2008, 20:14
I have pumped water out of something that looked like that.

Lone Wolf
07-27-2008, 20:20
What I want to know is should you ford it, or wait for the ferry?

no. call in an airstrike and rearrange the problem

Pedaling Fool
07-27-2008, 20:32
...My right leg sunk into the water and muck, which almost sucked off the high-top boot off my foot, which then caused my right thigh to cramp most uncomfortably. I still remember hugging that tree and trying to stop the cramping. Not fun.
Same thing happened to me in Maine, but no tree to grab onto. It sucked:eek: ..... Ok that sucked....bada bing:D Please stop, you suck:rolleyes: That one really did suck....

Bare Bear
07-27-2008, 22:52
Hey I recognise it from the Floirda Trail...it's a dry spot for tenting. Just kidding FT'ers...there is only about 60 miles of really wet stuff on the whole thing, it just seems like it all is when you are trudging thru it.

Footslogger
07-27-2008, 23:02
Caption? This was taken on Greylock on Thursday.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v206/spittinpigeon/trail282.jpg

========================================

Gotta say that in 2003 this was a pretty common scene. Actually ...it's pretty tame by comparison.

'Slogger

Wise Old Owl
07-27-2008, 23:26
If you carefully go well around, you make either so little trail that no one notices, or doesn't want to go the longish route around. I've done it more than once.

On trails where there is a mudhole and a clearly worn tread with no grass left that avoids it, I'm taking the clearly worn tread around. If any thing, at that point, you're best off dropping brush over the mud hole and making the new section the trail the only option.

I am struggling with this, Loads of parks I have been in have side loops from mud, tree blow downs, Creeks etc. It's human nature to walk around and quite frankly, Nature can erase it in twenty years if we don't walk there. I have worked on erasing old trails so you couldn't find them, We close the access at both ends and brambles will close the rest in one year. So besides the obvious erosion why would we worry about this? Horses, dirt bikes, quads, & wood cutters do far more damage in the woods. We still practice "old & wrong" clear cutting here in the US. We still have big issues of building right up to the AT. I find the issue interesting, But I think there are bigger issues that need to be addressed.

River Runner
07-28-2008, 00:10
On trails where there is a mudhole and a clearly worn tread with no grass left that avoids it, I'm taking the clearly worn tread around. If any thing, at that point, you're best off dropping brush over the mud hole and making the new section the trail the only option.

I'd agree with this. Sometimes walking through a large mudhole can be a safety issue. You're never quite sure how deep you may sink in the mud, or if you may step badly on a rock that is hidden underneath, and it's easy to loose footing and fall, risking injury.

Flush2wice
07-28-2008, 00:41
I'd probly walk right through it and not even notice it

canoehead
07-28-2008, 06:50
Looks like it could be a great put in for my kayak.
Aint nothin like a class 5 run down the thunderbolt trail.

Plodderman
07-31-2008, 15:12
Go for it not really I would just find a way around it. But if it was one of those rainy days when I am soaked anyways I might just waddle through it.

Tin Man
07-31-2008, 15:45
Just catching up with this here thread. I guess I have been taking pictures of the wrong stuff. Buncha senseless puddle stirring going on here.

I vote for the airstrike.

jesse
07-31-2008, 15:59
seems to me the ethical thing to do is blaze a trail around mud holes, instead of making bigger mud holes.

minnesotasmith
07-31-2008, 16:35
See now as a maintainer one way to look at it is that in the winter when it freezes over it makes for nice smooth flat trail.

As a place that needs about 300# of coarse gravel or a puncheon. ;)

saimyoji
07-31-2008, 18:12
As a place that needs about 300# of coarse gravel or a puncheon. ;)

just pave the damn thing already :rolleyes:

minnesotasmith
07-31-2008, 19:26
Make that the puncheon. No need to encourage the horse-poop distributors or the "no trail we can't rip up"-mottoed ATV riders.

mudhead
07-31-2008, 19:50
just pave the damn thing already :rolleyes:

Hand rail would be special, too.

Blissful
07-31-2008, 19:50
Oops. I honestly thought we were supposed to notice the weird green mist like swamp gas rising from the puddle....

It's actually an interesting photo. I'd submit it as an ATC calendar photo. :)

emerald
07-31-2008, 19:59
As a place that needs about 300# of coarse gravel or a puncheon. ;)

It should be rerouted if possible or hikers should just ford. It probably isn't a place where water is found ordinarily.:rolleyes: What happens when you slip off the puncheon?

Homer&Marje
07-31-2008, 20:51
Maybe this has been said I didn't read the whole thread, but the major problem affecting the trail right now (from my own first hand accounts) is the over population of Beavers in Western massachusetts and up into vermont and New Hampshire. Just like other species that have been hunted to near nil numbers, put on a protection list in certain areas, and then repopulated but were never taken off the protection list to allow normal hunting seasons, they have over populated the area. What do beavers do, build dams, what do dams do, flood things. So whether this was just a puddle due to the unnatural amount of rainfall, the real problem is flat ground in between many hills and too many beavers.

Tennessee Viking
07-31-2008, 21:15
Heavily used collection pool

Homer&Marje
07-31-2008, 21:35
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=26726&original=1&c=523

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=26727&original=1&c=523

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=26728&original=1&c=523

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=26729&original=1&c=523

That's all.

Tin Man
07-31-2008, 21:51
It should be rerouted if possible or hikers should just ford. It probably isn't a place where water is found ordinarily.:rolleyes: What happens when you slip off the puncheon?

that's what the handrail is for. no need to fall in when you are merely passing

gghiker
08-01-2008, 17:32
Looks like a bad time to remember you can't swim!

I vote, wade on through.