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SGT Rock
09-03-2002, 22:55
Summer Clothing (50F and up)
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 8"x18" - Clothing bag 1.3
1 Spandex shorts 3.0
Total 4.3

Rain Gear
1 ProVent Jacket 8.1
1 ProVent Pants 5.3
1 Seal Skinz socks 3.5
1 OR Gor-Tex rain mittens 1.2
Total 18.1

Spring/Fall Clothing (30 to 50 degrees)
1 REI PowerStretch Top 9.4
1 Arc'Teryx Rho Pants 8.2
1 Polypropylene glove liners 0.9
1 Polypropylene sock liners 1.2
1 *Knit cap - Army 2.1
Total 21.8

Winter Clothing (0 to 30 degrees)
1 *Field Jacket Liner - Army 10.4
1 *Field Pants liners - Army 8.9
1 *Wool trigger mittens - Army 3.5
1 Thorlo Light Hiker Socks 3.4
1 Polypropylene head gaiter 2.1
Total 28.3

Kitchen
1 Lexan Spoon 0.4
1 Snow Peak pots with mesh sack - large pot and pan 5.4
1 Pot scrubber 0.1
1 Turbo V8 stove and screen 1.0
1 Pot Cozy 0.8
1 Lighter 0.5
1 Homemade silk bandanna 1.0
3 12 ounce water bottles - fuel, oil, and dressing 1.8
1 Polar Pure iodine 3.2
1 Lemonade jar with homemade polypro cozy 2.3
1 32 ounce water bottle 1.0
1 Modified 100 ounce platypus 1.5
1 Plastic bottle for Tabasco 0.4
1 Film jar for vitamins 0.3
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 10"x21" - Food bag 1.5
3 Zip Lock bags (1 gallon) 1.5
3 Zip Lock bags (2 gallon) 2.1
4 Bread bags with ties 0.4
1 Tinder box 1.4
Total 26.6

Miscellaneous Gear
1 First Aid and Repair Kit with spare batteries 6.5
2 Spare film 1.2
1 Fleece bag for glasses 0.2
Total 7.9

Hygiene
1/2 pack towel 1.6
1 Dr Bronner's Mint Soap 2.9
1 toilet paper - 5 sheets = 0.1 ounces 1.2
1/2 kids tooth brush and travel tooth paste 1.3
1 Zip lock bag (1/2 gallon) 0.3
Total 7.3

Navigation and lights
1 Gallon zip lock 0.5
2 Laserlyte minibrite LED lights - green and blue 0.6
1 Trail journal 3.0
1 Pen 0.5
1 Map 2.9
Total 7.5

Sleeping Bag/Ruck/Shelter
1 Moonbow Gearskin - pack cloth version 28.0
1 Trash compactor bag 2.0
1 Nunatak Backcountry blanket 26.6
1 Homemade silk mummy liner 5.8
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 7"x15" 1.1
1 Equinox small pack cover 2.7
1 Mt Washington pad 8.0
1 Hennessy Ultralight A-Sym Hammock with Snakeskins 31.6
1 Rock/Stake bag 2.6
4 Gutter nail stakes 2.0
Total 110.3

Luxury Items
1 Sony AM/FM radio with lithium batteries 3.3
1 Book 6.3
Total 9.6

Clothing (Worn)
1 Polypropylene sock liners 1.2
1 Dufold Coolmax T-Shirt 5.0
1 Nike Air Pegasus running shoes 24.7
1 ID, money, credit cards, and keys 2.5
1 Iron Mountain Gear Trekking poles with tips 21.8
1 Duct tape - on trekking poles 3.0
1 Nike nylon shorts 5.9
1 Spandex shorts 3.0
1 lighter 0.5
1 Suunto compass 1.0
1 Leatherman Micra 1.8
1 Dog tags 0.9
2 Zip lock bags (1 gallon) 1.0
1 Map 2.9
1 Nike Hat 2.5
1 Guide Book 5.7
1 Glasses 0.9
1 Ultrapod camera tripod 1.6
1 Kodak Advantix C400 camera 7.2
1 Timex Ironman watch 1.0
Total 94.1

Food, Water, and Fuel
5 DAYS FOOD 161.8
40 OUNCES WATER 41.6
8 DAYS ALCOHOL FUEL 9.5
TOTAL 212.9

Pack Weight
TOTAL (summer)
409.9 OZ
25.62 LBS

TOTAL (spring/fall)
431.7 OZ
26.98 LBS

TOTAL (winter)
460.0 OZ
28.75 LBS

Dry Pack Weight
TOTAL (- food & water)
197.0 OZ
12.31 LBS

TOTAL (spring/fall - food & water)
218.8 OZ
13.68 LBS

TOTAL (winter - food & water)
247.1 OZ
15.44 LBS

12. CLOTHING (WORN)
96.8 OZ
6.05 LBS

From skin out
GRAND TOTAL (summer)
506.7 OZ
31.67 LBS

GRAND TOTAL (spring/fall)
528.5 OZ
33.03 LBS

GRAND TOTAL (winter)
556.8 OZ
34.80 LBS

Singletrack
09-13-2002, 18:05
I tried the Seal Skinz socks at the beginning of my Thru Hike, and they did not keep my feet dry inside my running shoes. After about 2 or 3 days of rain, when I took them off, my feet were like shriveld up prunes. They are also were very hot, even in cold weather. Eventually they became soaked with rain, and I could not stand to put them on because they were so wet.I threw them away at the next town. Whats your experience? I am looking for an alternative to keep my feet warm and dry.

SGT Rock
09-13-2002, 18:31
Actually I'm glad you gave me your experience with thm. I have yet to hit cold wet weather with them, so I have actually not used them yet. I tried Rockies and did not like the fit.

SGT Rock
09-13-2002, 23:03
I just thought about this, another thru-hiker I know that also uses running shoes mentioned using neopream socks, has anyone tried those?

Hammock Hanger
09-14-2002, 08:25
I've used them for snowboarding a lot. Used them a few times with my Chacos when hiking in cold wet weather. Never got around to wearing them with my boots. They will keep your feet warmer then regular socks. Drier, good when walking around camp in winter with sandals. They are heavier, will get grungy after a few wears, and this seems to affect the performance.

Hammock Hanger

Jumpstart
09-14-2002, 11:35
Hey Sgt Rock,

Your gear list looks good and it looks like you have spent a lot of time considering it.

Just from my own experience this last year, you could save about 1/2 pound if you ditch the head gaiter (you already have a hat, and a Nike Hat), and unless you are starting in February I can't imagine you would need that as well; the seal skin socks (when its pouring, nothing, nothing, nothing, will keep your feet dry :-); the OR rain mittens (you have the wool ones, which stay warm even when wet,), and I would put your vitamins in a baggie (lighter than a film canister). I carried my pack towel and never took it out of the pack, finally sending it home in Harper's Ferry, but of the people I know that did use one, they didn't use it until the summer months, when the opportunity to clean up near water was more appealing becuase of the warmth) I just used my bandana if I needed something..and 5 sheets of TP doesn't sound like all that much for a week's worth of time. Do your self a favor and ditch the Doc Bonners, you can clean your pots and pans well when you get to town, and on the trail, water and a good scrubby does the trick...and I'm sure I'll get slack over this but I really don't think you'd need the compass either. Just my two cents..tkae it or leave it :-)

Singletrack
09-14-2002, 13:59
Your pack list looks good, I am not one to tell someone to get rid of this or that just to save an ounce or two. You will figure that out yourself after awhile on your Thru Hike. Your weight is good, and will probably go down the longer you are on the Trail. One piece of gear I like, and you may want to consider, are some brand of zip n go pants. They are versatile and I wore them my whole Thru Hike.( except when washing them, then I wore my rain suit) They can be expensive, My Royal Robbins cost 70 bucks. Campmor has them cheaper. Make sure they are a lightweight nylon. I wore the legs attached in cold weather, and in all but the biggest downpour. They were the only pants/shorts I carried. I do not carry town clothes.

Kerosene
09-14-2002, 15:03
I recently purchased a lightweight pair of convertible pants from CampMor, I think they were from Cascade. They weigh in at 11 oz, which is 3-7 oz lighter than most of the other brands.

SGT Rock
09-14-2002, 16:49
The toilet paper 5 sheets = 0.1 ounces, and I carry 1.2 ounces, so that is really about 60 sheets. I can go at least a week on that. If you ever had to rely on only MRE paper, you get a technique going.

Good idea to loose the bottle for a bag. I've got some extra small zip lock bags the Army medics use for giving you pills in the field, never thought to use one. This one only weighs 0.15 onces. DONE DEAL! I'll try to get another and replace the pill bottle in the first aid kit with it. That will reduce weight twice. SWEET!

I was thinking that if I didn't use the Dr Bronners and the Towel by Fontanna they would go in the bounce box.

I'm a cold weather wussy, so the neck gaiter really forms a face cover when combined with my nit cap for a balaclava like cover in camp. The benifit is I can send it away when it gets warm enough.

I'm a compass and map freak, they are like a book to me, even though I know I do not need a compass to navigate the AT. In the morning the sun is on the right, and in the evening it is on the left - that is too simple. It's one of my "Hiker Geek" things to do to sit on a mountain like Cowrock with my compas and determine bearings to the ridge in front of me, then find it on a map.

I had (well still have) convertable pants. But my 5.9 ounce shorts and 5.8 ounce rain pants give me more flexible options for about the same weight (11.7 ounces total). I gave up the zip off pants in 2000, now I just use them when day hiking.

*** The term Hiker Geek is one my wife has given me. When I can tell her to the tenth of an ounce what any item in my pack weighs, the BTUs in alcohol, or how to keep water from running down your tarp lines, she calls me a Hiker Geek.

Kerosene
09-15-2002, 09:55
Careful, Sarge, "Hiker Geek" has the makings of a new trail name!

Uncle Wayne
09-18-2002, 07:17
Hey Sgt. Rock,

Good job on the gear list. I picked up a couple of ideas and have a couple for you.
1. I noticed you have "Lighter" listed twice, once under Kitchen and once under Clothing. Do you really carry two, one as a backup, instead of matches?
2. "Keys" were mentioned also which implies a key ring to hold "Keys" together. I carried one key to my vehicle, duct taped to my ID card, and left the rest of my keys in the vehicle.
3. I made copies, trimmed to size, of the sections we hiked instead of carrying the entire "Guide Book."
4. "Seal Skinz" socks don't work well for me. Your feet ain't gonna stay dry!
5. Instead of the "Dr. Bronner's soap" I carry a little campsuds in a doubled baggy.
6. I may have overlooked it but what do you use to hang your bear bag?
Thanks for sharing your gear list. Maybe we'll meet on the trail sometime.

SGT Rock
09-18-2002, 09:05
Good questions.

1. I have a lighter in my pocket, one in my pot, and I carry some waterproof matches and trick birthday candels in a pill bottle for back up (see tinder box).

2. Keys and lighter is actually a car key and a house key taped together with my military ID, driver's license, Insurance Card, and credit card. I also carry some cash, but not much. I try to get rid of all change before leaving town. All in a small zip lock bag.

3. I agree about the guide book. I really should start doing that.

4. I haven't given the Seal Skinz a good try yet, but I did try Rockies, I didn't like the fit, and they ended up being a better choice for keeping dry warm feet in camp than while hiking, maybe the Seal Skinz will end up getting relegated to the same thing. Honestly I don't mind wet feet as long as i can dry and clean them at the end of the day.

5. What are camp suds?

6. For a bear bag I use a 1.5 ounce sil-nylon stuff sack that has a loop on the bottom. Under Shelter and rucksack you will see a stake bag and 50' cord, the cord is also the drawstring on my stake bag. When I make camp, I put a rock in the stake bag for easier throwing and get my line set, then hoist the sil-nylon sack upside down. I'ts worked on a lot of backpacking trips including the Nantahalas. Mr Bear hasn't got it yet.

Peaks
09-18-2002, 16:35
Camp suds is another biodegradable backpacking liquid backpacking soap. Similar to Dr. Bonners.

One difference between the two brands that I am aware of is that Camps suds comes in a 2 oz bottle. (And that was more than enough for 1100 miles of AT). Smallest size for Dr. Bonners is 4 oz.

Maybe someone can explain the difference between the 2 products.

Peaks
09-18-2002, 16:38
What guide book are you talking about? Most hikers don't carry any guide books at all. However, they usually carry maps for the section they are hiking at present, and swap them out at mail drops.

If hikers carry the data book, the companion, or Wingfoot (which many do), then they usually cut the binding off first, and carry the pages for the section they are hiking at present, and swap them out like maps at mail drops.

Peaks
09-18-2002, 16:41
I carried waterproof matches on my first long distance trek. They didn't really work that well. A lighter is much more dependable for me. But, I could not judge when the flint would wear out. So I carry one with my cooking gear, and a spare with my emergency/back-up gear. Don't carry matches or candles anymore.

SGT Rock
09-18-2002, 19:44
I carry Dr. Bronners in a 2 ounce bottle - I think it's 2 ounces anyway. One reason I like Dr Bronners is the mint smell. I had an Uncle that grew up in the Mountains of NC that had done his masters thesis (way back in the 50s) on the mint plants. Anyway, he told me that since mint is a naturaly growing weed, many animals (like bears) do not associate it with food unlike some other soaps and other "civilized" smells.

For guide books, up until recently I've been using the ATC trail guides to each section when I section hike. I recently looked at a section guide and realized I don't need all those hiking tips, packing lists for first aid kits, lectures on LNT, wind chill charts, etc. I started carrying WFs book but miss some of the smaller details his book seems to leave out, so I've decided to carry WF's book and the AT data book. I will divide it into sections and only the pages from those guides that I'm hiking.

I've thought about getting rid of the waterproof matches. The space the matches take up could be replaced by a lighter, but I carry emergency fire starter after a summer trip in 1985 where a fire made in a rainstorm kept me from going into hypothermia after everything I owned got soaked in what could be best described as a flash flood thru my campsite. At 1.4 ounces I'll keep the candels and waterproof container (with a lighter).

On a cool note. I actually have my Grandfathers 1973 "Guide to the Appalachian Trail, the Nantahalas and Georgia" Publication #23, fourth edition. It weighs 12.5 ounces and has a binding in it that can be screwed apart so you can remove the needed sections. The maps are hand drawn fold out maps in the back section.

Peaks
09-19-2002, 07:16
Compare the maps in your 1970's guide book with the current AT maps.

The 1970's maps are very "basic." A USGS topo map was probably a better choice. You probably needed the guide book to fill in the details.

The quality of the current maps has incresed so much, that it almost makes the guide book obsolete. However, while the quality of the maps has improved, the AT guide book has not. I think that given the quality of current maps, it's redundant. So, I'd like to suggest that ATC slim down their guide books. This would be a good committee to be on with the ATC, if anyone wants to get involved and "give back."

Youngblood
09-19-2002, 08:27
I have tried the seal skins but quit using them.

What I used last winter worked very well for me. I used small plastic trash bags (Kroger brand * 4 gal. * 17"x18" * 0.60 mil.) over cheap nylon socks and covered this with my regular hiking socks. Works as a vapor barrier and keeps your feet very warm when sleeping or when hiking. In the winter I carried about a dozen of these bags for various things. I think they weigh about 0.25 ounce each and can be used as emergency overmittens, etc. when it is cold, wet and/or windy. I have also used them to keep my wet trail runners in my sleeping bag so that they didn't freeze up at night. After using them last winter, I will not leave home without them in cool weather. I leave two of them in my clothes bag all year long just in case my feet get cold when I am sleeping...you don't have to have the liner socks under them when you are sleeping, but I think you probably would want them when you are hiking.

Oh yeah, the price is right, they don't weigh much, they don't hold odors and they are easy to dry out.

Youngblood

Kerosene
09-19-2002, 09:30
I hope no one carries one of those guide books for any distance. However, the information can be valuable, or at least interesting. Here's what I do:


Set your copier to 67% reduction and copy 2 pages from the guidebook on each piece of paper.
Take all the pages you've copied, and trim them. They should be sized so that 8 guidebook pages can fit on one side of paper.
Tape 8 pages onto one side of paper and make a 100% copy.
Tape another 8 pages onto a side of paper.
Make 2-sided copies, for a total of 16 guidebook pages per piece of paper.

It usually takes 16-32 guidebook pages (1-2 pieces of paper) to cover 75-100 miles. You can dispose of the paper when you're done and pick up the next section's pages in your next mail drop. Total weight with ziploc plastic bag is about an ounce.

The Weasel
09-25-2002, 03:56
As you use guidebook pages (xerox or otherwise), lighten your load by leaving them in shelter registers for others.

The Weasel

Minerva
09-25-2002, 06:16
Why the tinder box? You seem to have plenty of ziplocks to keep tinder dry. Or, consider one emergency esbit fuel tab at .5oz, will burn for 12-15 min and can certainly get a fire started while saving you .9 oz.:confused:

SGT Rock
09-25-2002, 08:52
I think this is one of those areas of preference and method.

I like esbits as a cooking source, but the smell of storing one nauseates me. Hexamine smells like decaying dead fish. 1/2 ounce would be good for maybe 2 fires.

I like the trick birthday candles. they make a great fire starter, but not a fire source. I'm sure I could pare this down to less candles and a smaller bottle, but the candles give me a good source of fire starting for a week or more in case of bad wet weather wher I need a fire. This can last me until making town for resupply. About the only improvement I think I could make is reducing the weight of the bottle to a zip-lock. Since the candels work wen wet, and I already have 2 or 3 lighters, then they could stand to get a little wet, sharing a zip-lock with the first aid kit is a good idea.

EarlyRiser
09-25-2002, 17:14
the more you need a fire the harder it is to make one, its always good to have a backup plan. you never know when you might be stranded somwhere for whatever reason, possibly on the verge of hypothermia. having the proper tools/knowledge can save your life, or the lives of others as well.

SGT Rock
09-25-2002, 17:46
I totally agree. That trip in 1985 I learned a lesson about needing fire after everything got wet. I watched as my uncle made a fire with a lighter and a candle. With that he was able to get a fire going in the rain, and we kept that sucker going all night. High tec fabrics, modern digital convieniences, and new gear ideas all need the old tried and true fall backs like a compass, fire starter, and a first aid kit.

EarlyRiser
09-25-2002, 20:39
and even further than that, as useful as a fire starter and candle and matches are i believe its even more important to know the proper way to start a fire (say a one match fire) and how to start a fire using only materials you can find in your environment. a friend of mine on my last trip was teaching me how to make a matchless fire, either by bowdrill or handdrill and i was amazed at how quick and effective it is if you know what your doing. he had a fire going with a bowdrill in under five minutes (however it was under near perfect conditions, it had been dry for several days) he said hed spent months practicing somtimes not eating dinner untill he got a fire going because he said you never know when you might need a skill like this, even if your not in the backcountry. fire can keep you warm and it can keep you company, especialy when you need it most.

The Weasel
09-25-2002, 23:57
Ern --

Time for you to post a revised gear list so we can all whine about it and criticise about our gear obsessions!

The Weasel

SGT Rock
09-26-2002, 08:35
Summer Clothing (50F and up)
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 8"x18" - Clothing bag 1.3
1 Spandex shorts 3.0
Total 4.3

Rain Gear
1 ProVent Jacket 8.1
1 ProVent Pants 5.3
1 Seal Skinz socks 3.5
1 OR Gor-Tex rain mittens 1.2
Total 18.1

Spring/Fall Clothing (30 to 50 degrees)
1 REI PowerStretch Top 9.4
1 Arc'Teryx Rho Pants 8.2
1 Polypropylene glove liners 0.9
1 Polypropylene sock liners 1.2
1 *Knit cap - Army 2.1
Total 21.8

Winter Clothing (0 to 30 degrees)
1 *Field Jacket Liner - Army 10.4
1 *Field Pants liners - Army 8.9
1 *Wool trigger mittens - Army 3.5
1 Thorlo Light Hiker Socks 3.4
1 Polypropylene head gaiter 2.1
Total 28.3

Kitchen
1 Lexan Spoon 0.4
1 Snow Peak pots with mesh sack - large pot and pan 5.4
1 Pot scrubber 0.1
1 Modified Turbo V8 stove and screen 0.6
1 Pot Cozy 0.8
1 Lighter 0.5
1 Homemade silk bandanna 1.0
3 12 ounce water bottles - fuel, oil, and dressing 2.7
1 Aqua Mira (Haven't tried it yet) 2.0
1 Lemonade jar with homemade polypro cozy 2.3
1 32 ounce water bottle 1.0
1 Modified 100 ounce platypus 1.5
1 Plastic bottle for Tabasco 0.4
1 Film jar for vitamins 0.3
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 10"x21" - Food bag 1.5
3 Zip Lock bags (1 gallon) 1.5
3 Zip Lock bags (2 gallon) 2.1
4 Bread bags with ties 0.4
Total 23.9

Miscellaneous Gear
1 First Aid and Repair Kit with spare batteries 4.3
2 Spare film 1.2
1 Fleece bag for glasses 0.2
1 Fire starter pack 1.0
Total 6.7

Hygiene
1/2 pack towel 1.6
1 Dr Bronner's Mint Soap (2 ounce bottle) 2.9
1 toilet paper - 6 sheets = 0.1 ounces 1.2
1/2 kids tooth brush and travel tooth paste 1.3
1 Zip lock bag (1/2 gallon) 0.3
Total 7.3

Navigation and lights
1 Gallon zip lock 0.5
2 Laserlyte minibrite LED lights - green and blue 0.6
1 Trail journal 3.0
1 Pen 0.5
1 Map 2.9
Total 7.5

Sleeping Bag/Ruck/Shelter
1 Moonbow Gearskin - sil-nylon version on order 18.0
1 Trash compactor bag 2.0
1 Nunatak Backcountry blanket 26.6
1 Homemade silk mummy liner 5.8
1 Equinox Sil-Nylon stuff sack 7"x15" 1.1
1 Equinox small pack cover 2.7
1 Ozark Trails Pad 14.7
1 Hennessy Ultralight A-Sym Hammock with Snakeskins 31.6
1 Rock/Stake bag 2.6
4 Gutter nail stakes 2.0
Total 107.0

Luxury Items
1 Sony AM/FM radio with lithium batteries 3.3
1 Book 6.3
Total 9.6

Clothing (Worn)
1 Polypropylene sock liners 1.2
1 Dufold Coolmax T-Shirt 5.0
1 Nike Air Pegasus running shoes 24.7
1 ID, money, credit cards, and keys 2.5
1 Iron Mountain Gear Trekking poles with tips 21.8
1 Duct tape - on trekking poles 3.0
1 Nike nylon shorts 5.9
1 Spandex shorts 3.0
1 Suunto compass 1.0
1 Leatherman Micra 1.8
1 Dog tags 0.9
2 Zip lock bags (1 gallon) 1.0
1 Map 2.9
1 Nike Hat 2.5
1 Guide Book 5.7
1 Glasses 0.9
1 Ultrapod camera tripod 1.6
1 Kodak Advantix C400 camera 7.2
1 Timex Expedition watch 1.5
Total 94.1

Food, Water, and Fuel
5 DAYS FOOD 161.8
40 OUNCES WATER 41.6
8 DAYS ALCOHOL FUEL 9.5
TOTAL 212.9

Pack Weight
TOTAL (summer)
402.7 OZ
25.17 LBS

TOTAL (spring/fall)
424.5 OZ
26.53 LBS

TOTAL (winter)
460.0 OZ
28.30 LBS

Dry Pack Weight (summer)
TOTAL (- food & water)
189.8 OZ
11.86 LBS

TOTAL (spring/fall - food & water)
211.6 OZ
13.23 LBS

TOTAL (winter - food & water)
239.9 OZ
15.00 LBS

12. CLOTHING (WORN)
96.8 OZ
6.05 LBS

From skin out
GRAND TOTAL (summer)
499.5 OZ
31.22 LBS

GRAND TOTAL (spring/fall)
521.3 OZ
32.58 LBS

GRAND TOTAL (winter)
549.6 OZ
34.35 LBS

Also, I'm thinking about using a tarp with a Tyvek bivy and plastic ground cloth for use until Pearisburg, then switch out for my Henessy Hammock. Total Weight would be about 20.3 ounces, 11.3 ounces less. So switching my 28.3 ounces of winter clothing and 18.1 ounces of winter shelter (48.6 ounces) for my hammock, still means I'm dropping 17 ounces at Pearisburg.

Winter shelter ???
1 Moonbow Poncho/Tarp 10.6
2 Stakes 1.0
4 cords with minicarbineers 1.2
1 Tyvek bivy 5.5
1 plastic ground cloth 2.0
TOTAL 20.3

Last concern: I'm getting aclimatized to Louisiana weather and cold weather kills me. My clothing was good at one time, but will it be enough after 4 years of living in hot weather?

chris
09-26-2002, 08:59
One note about using Tyvek as a bivy: It is 100%
completely unbreathable. It is directly related to the material used in Haz-Mat suits. I would suspect you would wake up to a damp sleeping bag every morning.

SGT Rock
09-26-2002, 09:10
Bivy may have been the wrong way to describe it. It is actually a ground cloth with a 32" foot pocket. If you look at LW Gear's web site, I plan to make something like that, I have a 48"x105" piece in the mail on the way. http://members.tripod.com/lwgear/lwg.html

The 2.0 ounce piece of plastic is my make shift door or extra groundcloth for gear, or whatever.

chris
09-26-2002, 09:23
Ah! I did see one of those about. Nice idea but a little pricy on LW's site. Good plan to make your own.

DebW
10-02-2002, 14:40
Originally posted by chris
One note about using Tyvek as a bivy: It is 100%
completely unbreathable. It is directly related to the material used in Haz-Mat suits. I would suspect you would wake up to a damp sleeping bag every morning.

I don't think the 100% unbreathable is true. I've used Tyvek as a groundsheet under my tent and had condensation on the bottom of the tent floor, above the Tyvek. Have also slept on snow/ice with a Tyvek ground cloth and had my body heat melt the ice, resulting in condensation on the bottom of my foam pad, so vapor must have gone through the Tyvek. Can't say how the breathability compares with Goretex or other WB/breathable fabrics, but they do tout breathability as a reason Tyvek is used for housewrap. As a groundcloth, I'd prefer to have a nonbreathable fabric.

chris
10-02-2002, 14:51
Condensation and breathability are two different things. To illustrate this, think of taking a can
of beer out of the fridge on a hot day. In a few minutes, the can has lots of moisture on the outside from condensation. The moisture didn't breath through the aluminum, though. Two different processi.