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Crazy Larry #1
09-11-2008, 06:25
http://www.thesyncpack.com/backpacker.html?gclid=CLif4J7C05UCFQYdswod6AYtig

Wilson
09-11-2008, 07:53
You can't always see where your footing with those things..many times ya want to see where to step.

hopefulhiker
09-11-2008, 09:04
I used a front pack with the luxury lite pack the whole way, reallly liked it.. but this sync pac weighs 2.2 lbs... too much. I am not sure you need the frame either...

fehchet
09-11-2008, 09:10
And belly sweat will drip down on your nether regions.

stranger
09-11-2008, 20:51
The best packs I've seen incorporating the front design is Aarn pack of New Zealand. Personally, with alot of experience with packs over the years, both using them and fitting them, the front design doesn't work for me, but I put alot of effort into the way I pack, I don't put anything outside my pack, I keep the weight high and close to my back - so never really had the pulling back sensation so many hikers complain about.

oldfivetango
09-11-2008, 21:09
I used a front pack with the luxury lite pack the whole way, reallly liked it.. but this sync pac weighs 2.2 lbs... too much. I am not sure you need the frame either...

I have the LL pack and front pack as well.The LL system is killing
my hips whenever I use it.Any ideas?

The front pack is a nice idea on the LL at least and does not
impede my view all that much-you learn to look ahead of the feet
somewhat and "little things" are readily accessible.Wearing it real
loose helps combat the heat issue.

Dont know how the two systems compare in price but I do know the
LL frame and condor bags weigh something like 22 ounces if you ditch
the little "seat"(aka joke) that comes with it.
Oldfivetango

Safety Pins
09-12-2008, 13:47
In addition to my Osprey Aura backpack, I also use a "fanny pack" in front, in which I keep some items that will help offset the backpack weight: tube of insect repellant, knife, small scissors, large spoon, the day's trailmix supply, T.P in a zip-lock, and a 0.5-liter bottle of water. I think this arrangement, in addition to keeping the back weight down somewhat, keeps the hiking unit (that would be me) a little better balanced.

Lawn Sale
09-12-2008, 18:43
Reminds me of the Dana Design Wet Rib (http://tetk.up.seesaa.net/image/wetrib1.jpg).

max patch
09-12-2008, 19:00
That thing just screams out "Newbie!!!"

ChinMusic
09-12-2008, 22:29
I kinda like the concept. At first the idea of 2.2 pounds was a total turn-off.

As a gear geek, I might have to give this thing a try.

bobbyw
09-12-2008, 23:00
Reminds me of the Dana Design Wet Rib (http://tetk.up.seesaa.net/image/wetrib1.jpg).

I was thinking about getting something like that, but I was unsure if it would fit on my pack so I wanted to check it out in an outfitter first... until you posted that.... my exact pack is the one in the photo

bobbyw
09-12-2008, 23:01
Reminds me of the Dana Design Wet Rib (http://tetk.up.seesaa.net/image/wetrib1.jpg).

I was thinking about getting something like that, but I was unsure if it would fit on my pack so I wanted to check it out in an outfitter first... until you posted that.... my exact pack is the one in the photo

Kerosene
09-13-2008, 12:22
The Wet Rib works fine on other packs, although it's a little heavy and over-engineered for its function.

The advantage of a true frontpack is that it can counterbalance some of the weight of the pack on your back, plus provide easy access to some gear.

cowboy nichols
09-13-2008, 15:03
I use a small front pack to carry Fancy (3lb.chihuahua} in She loves it and it makes carrying her easy. Havn't found it to interfere with seeing the trail .

Flush2wice
09-13-2008, 15:07
And belly sweat will drip down on your nether regions.
That's what I was thinking. It looks hot.

ChinMusic
09-13-2008, 22:35
I try to go light, but (good) photography works against this concept.

I'm going to a once(maybe not)-in-a-lifetime trip to Alaska next August. For such a scenic place, I want to take the best pictures I can.

I, for sure, will be taking my Canon Mark IIN, 17-40, 70-200 2.8L IS, 1.4X, and tripod. That stuff is heavy but I'm willing to put up with it on a trip like this.

I would think the 70-200, with the 1.4X attached, would fit into one of those water pouches perfectly. With it all in front it would be quick to pop the 17-40 off and pop the 70-200 on if some critter came into view.

For a Glacier NP trip in 07 I had a chest strap for the heavy camera body. It kept the camera from "bouncing" around but the pull on my neck was annoying. My sweat also fogged up my view finder for months. I would NOT use the chest strap for anything other than a short trip again.

I'm thinking this frontpack might be the ticket.

Lawn Sale
09-15-2008, 21:49
The Wet Rib works fine on other packs, although it's a little heavy and over-engineered for its function.



I primarily use mine in the winter, where weight isn't as much of an issue and having stuff at hand is. I love it and it fits on any pack, I've used it on them from a 1,700ci to my big 9,000ci. Very comfortable as well. It is typical Dana Design, built like a tank to take years of abuse, mine is 6 or 7 years old now and still works flawlessly. The good thing about them is you can get them in right or left, and with or without the water bottle holder. I put bars and a camera in mine to have at the ready, and the water bottle holder holds my gloves and hat perfectly.

Homer&Marje
09-17-2008, 09:48
I think Tyvek should try and get some royalties... he already invented the frontpack system... sort of

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=21274&original=1&c=searchresults&searchid=17568