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Puppy
10-19-2008, 14:07
What would be the best state/area to live in....for the access to great hiking very close by, (and hopefully some snowboarding too within a couple hours drive)...not interested in a big city - I like a smaller population.

I decided am going to move to live where I can do the stuff I like to do easily - I like the NC mountains and Southern Utah - but would like to know of any great areas I could consider. Thanks !

Puppy

NICKTHEGREEK
10-19-2008, 14:26
What would be the best state/area to live in....for the access to great hiking very close by, (and hopefully some snowboarding too within a couple hours drive)...not interested in a big city - I like a smaller population.

I decided am going to move to live where I can do the stuff I like to do easily - I like the NC mountains and Southern Utah - but would like to know of any great areas I could consider. Thanks !

Puppy
Flagstaff AZ, altitude, snow, Grand Canyon, Sedona and the Coconino NF.

DapperD
10-19-2008, 16:09
What would be the best state/area to live in....for the access to great hiking very close by, (and hopefully some snowboarding too within a couple hours drive)...not interested in a big city - I like a smaller population.

I decided am going to move to live where I can do the stuff I like to do easily - I like the NC mountains and Southern Utah - but would like to know of any great areas I could consider. Thanks !

PuppyI would have to say Colorado. Believe it to have won the fittest state "award",and that speaks for itself. Also it has some of the most rugged,coolest, and I believe the most states bordering it. But if you want the ultimate, I would have to say Alaska!

Lone Wolf
10-19-2008, 16:09
Damascus, Virginia

mts4602
10-19-2008, 16:13
Boulder Colorado..

I want to move there myself.

A-Train
10-19-2008, 16:22
Boulder CO, Burlington VT, Lake Placid NY, Asheville NC, Big Bear CA, Ashland OR.

Really any place in the mountains will have hiking and provide some skiing/snowboarding. If you're looking for smaller more rural places, there are tons and tons. Aren't all small mountain towns the same anyway, :)

Lone Wolf
10-19-2008, 16:23
Damascus, Virginia

or Jay, Vermont

Mrs Baggins
10-19-2008, 16:38
Lived in Denver CO for 3 long years - - 9 months of winter, and please, spare me the outcry of "not true!" I lived it. It can easily start snowing in September and still be snowing in June. And then there are the 70 mph sustained winds across the high prairie. Boulder is extremely socialist and controlling. And the Rainbow family arrives every year to take over Pearl Street Mall. Yes, it can be beautiful.........but you won't be hiking anywhere til mid-late June after the snow melts and you'll be done hiking after the first heavy snowfall in the Rockies - anywhere from mid-September to late October.

Flagstaff AZ - lived down in Phoenix for 3 years. We really liked both Flagstaff and Prescott. Lots of great hiking and decent skiing/snowboarding. And when you're sick of the cold you can escape south to soak up some sun and heat even in mid-Winter. Of course, you'll have to dodge the 1000's of 90 yr old Snowbirds that show up there in their brand new Caddies (poor fixed income seniors you know).

Maryland and Virginia - my vote goes here. Lived in Maryland for 7 years and now we're moving to northern Virginia. Endless hiking possibilities and there are ski/snowboard slopes nearby. Winters generally don't really set in til late November and are over by mid-March. NOTHING like the deep cold of Colorado -- not even close. And Colorado is subject to tornadoes and some spectacular hail storms. Just look at the cars in Boulder - - they look like they were attacked with ball peen hammers. Once watched a tornado come through downtown Boulder at mid-day and finally touch down in a lake just outside of town. People were running and screaming like a 50's horror flick. But it was 1998.

Montana Mac
10-19-2008, 16:38
Cooke City, Montana

Small town: approx year round population is 77 people.
Altitude: 7,600 feet
Hiking: YNP - Beartooth Mountains
Winter time: Snowboarding wherever you want
Demographics: Cooke City is a "younger crowd" town
Work: Most places are looking for help - most business is tourist orientated - ie, restaurants, motels
Drinking: Yes, especially after spending a day boarding
Hooking up: If you are a gal you are outnumbered by the guys.

Winter and summer brings a lot of tourists - spring and fall are the "dead" times of year

Jim Adams
10-19-2008, 17:24
Monson, Me.

geek

Kirby
10-19-2008, 17:31
Bethel, Maine.

Gorham, NH.

Rangeley, Maine.

Lincoln, NH.

Boone, NC. Not sure what the skiing is like, but it sits in the Appalachians. Home of Appalachian State University.

A little more upscale would be Hanover, NH.

I know people who live in Boulder, they love it.

Kirby

fiddlehead
10-19-2008, 18:59
Salt Lake City

fiddlehead
10-19-2008, 19:00
Or Interlaken, Switzerland if you can afford it

TwistedToad
10-19-2008, 19:04
north east TN is a great place!

rlharris
10-19-2008, 19:14
I wouldn't include Lincoln, NH, in the list. There are small, less expensive, more livable towns in the area that have equally good access to hiking, snowshoeing, and snowboarding areas. Among other downsides to Lincoln, it usually has the highest gasoline prices in the state :eek:


Bethel, Maine.

Gorham, NH.

Rangeley, Maine.

Lincoln, NH.

Boone, NC. Not sure what the skiing is like, but it sits in the Appalachians. Home of Appalachian State University.

A little more upscale would be Hanover, NH.

I know people who live in Boulder, they love it.

Kirby

Roots
10-19-2008, 20:04
Brevard, NC

*30 minutes from Asheville
*5 miles from Pisgah National Forest
*Land of over 250 waterfalls
*at least 5 state parks around area
*Just a great little town!

taildragger
10-19-2008, 20:13
Missoula Montana (plus the have great beer!!!)

Spokane WA, if you're willing to put up with Spokane

Logan UT

Silver City, NM

Flagstaff, AZ

Durango, CO (by far the coolest city I've listed :) )

Anywhere in Wyoming

Seattle WA (on the outskirts would be cool)

Hood River, OR

Jah
10-19-2008, 20:21
This thread has me thinking I want to move to Flagstaff.

Serial 07
10-19-2008, 20:30
my vote is for vermont...

Jah
10-19-2008, 20:37
I went to college in Burlington, and while a very fun place, the college atmosphere that dominates the area gets old.

Yahtzee
10-19-2008, 20:38
waitsfield, vt.

ki0eh
10-19-2008, 21:03
If you like your mountain towns un-trendy and inexpensive, try Renovo, PA.

hnryclay
10-19-2008, 21:56
It all depends, if you are young, and want to start a family I think Blacksburg Virginia, or anywhere in the New River Valley is an excellent place to live. The winters generally start here in November, and are over in March. We get snow every year, although it is rarely enough to cause transportation problems. We are within 2 hours of several ski areas. The AT runs through Giles, Montgomery, Craig, and Roanoke counties all which are within 30 minutes or less drive of downtown Blacksburg. The public schools in the area are excellent, and you are close to three large colleges, and several smaller schools. Virginia is a very cheap place to live on the east coast as far as state taxes go, and the cost of living in the south west part of the state is well below most metropolitan areas of the country. There is a healthy job market in and around Blacksburg, mostly involving Virginia Tech. The difference between a town like Boone, or Damascus, and Blacksburg is size, and jobs. In my honest opinion there is no place in Virginia as beautiful as the areas surrounding Damascus. There are however very few good paying jobs in and around Washington, or Grayson counties, whereas in the Montgomery, and Roanoke county area there is significant growth. Another great thing about Virginia is you have all the beauty of the mountains, and are still just a days journey by car to the beach.

Trillium
10-19-2008, 22:10
or Jay, Vermontthat has to be one pretty dang cold place. :cool:

Tipi Walter
10-19-2008, 22:21
When I first moved to Boone, NC, in 1973, it was like some Alaska frontier town with tough winters and understanding locals. There was a contingent of ex-students and old hippies who got "back to the land" and allowed newcomers and vagabonds to join them in overhauled barns, yurts, tipis and tents. A guy with a backpack could travel on foot thruout the county and not camp at the same place twice if he didn't want. There weren't the No Trespassing signs so common in other places and the whole area felt like one big national forest.

Damascus has the same feel to it but Boone has grown so tremendously in the last 20 years that it's now a nightmare of traffic snarls and Neighborhood Watch paranoia--although I'd sure like to strap on the old hobo bedroll again and recreate a Watauga County winter trip from 1982.

DapperD
10-19-2008, 22:49
What would be the best state/area to live in....for the access to great hiking very close by, (and hopefully some snowboarding too within a couple hours drive)...not interested in a big city - I like a smaller population.

I decided am going to move to live where I can do the stuff I like to do easily - I like the NC mountains and Southern Utah - but would like to know of any great areas I could consider. Thanks !

PuppyOne might also give a look into Dane County,Wisconsin(home to Madison). Pitched as a "green" city, Madison and Dane County has 6000 acres of parkland! including 260 parks and 14 conservation parks. Dane county has more than 150 miles of bike trails, also offered are fishing,boating,swimming,golf and tennis,skating,skiing(downhill and x-country)and snowmobiling- all this in addition to hiking to your hearts content.:)

squirrel bait
10-19-2008, 22:57
I selected the state you live in, but not for the same reasons. My vote.

Pocatello, Idaho. Or the area around it. Yellowstone, Sawtooth, Targhee, the Tetons, and the Humbloldt in Nevada are all within an easy day drive. Plus if you go to Humboldt you can stop at Jackpot Nevada.

Teller County Colorado. You can be surrounded by the Pike National Forest. Just to the west of there is Gunnison NF. To the south the Great Sand Dunes NP. To the east the always prominent Pikes Peak.

But once again, North Carolina is hard to beat.

mudhead
10-20-2008, 05:14
All good answers. I figure every place has pluses and minuses.

I try to remind myself that a place is what you make of it...

Homer&Marje
10-20-2008, 07:57
New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Colorado, Oregon, Utah, Alaska

jaywalke
10-20-2008, 09:42
I think Blacksburg Virginia, or anywhere in the New River Valley is an excellent place to live.

I'll second that. I lived at 20 addresses in a dozen states before settling in the NRV. This is a great place to live if you are not a city person. There are even areas cheaper than Blacksburg, but still close enough for an easy commute to a good job. Lots of folks who work at Virginia Tech live up in Giles county (Pearisburg), where you can buy a decent house for $70K.

I can hit a half-dozen different AT trailheads within 45 minutes drive from my house.

Oh, and weather is a subjective thing. I grew up in the northwoods, so I don't think they even have winter down here. It's more like a long autumn with maybe one or two good snows. The hiking is great year-round.

jod
10-20-2008, 15:00
it doesn't get too much better than Lake Tahoe, CA. Tahoe City isn't a city.

North Woodstock, NH is better than Lincoln, NH. The job situation is better in Littleton, NH.

Waitsfield and Warren, VT are great too.

I've lived in all 3. I'm MA now on the NH border.

My wife used to live in Denver. it's nice there too.

taildragger
10-20-2008, 15:03
One other thing to consider, states that are resource rich still have good economies right now (I get calls in OKC all the time about coming to work for people, thats what an oil economy does during a boom)

Yukon
10-20-2008, 15:04
Vermont all the way!!! Within 50 mile radius of Manchester :)

Marta
10-20-2008, 15:09
Taos, NM

Any mountain town in Colorado

If you're not so keen on snow, Hot Springs, Boone, Brevard, Sylva, Franklin, or any other small town in Western NC.

PS--I just reread the message. For snowboarding, definitely go with the Rockies instead of NC. You can snowboard here, but...

little bear
10-20-2008, 15:21
Franklin Maine.........if I could talk the wife into it I would move back there in a heartbeat. You are 30 min to Bar Harbor, Mt Desert Island, surrounded by Mountains, within 40 miles there are 1000's of bodies of water to kayak. Snow mobiling, hiking its all right there. Population is like 700, ur 10 min to Ellsworth wich has all you need. Did I mention my fahter built the only store in the town............man I wish I was back there now.
LB

mcstick
10-20-2008, 15:29
I think Chicago has got to be the clear choice.

sasquatch2014
10-20-2008, 15:35
I have lived in Wy and Co and am now in NY. Grew up in Pa. If you go for Colorado stay away from the front range if you can avoid it it is just one big city. Mrs Baggins forgot to talk about all the days in the middle of the winter where it gets up to the 50's or higher with bright blue sky. Yes you get some harsh weather out west so if you are meek and mild go somewhere else. Worked winters in a small and I mean small town area called Salida Co. and worked up and down the valley with the Collegiate Range of 14,000 ft peaks to the west. Great little micro climate. On the other side of Monarch Pass and Ski area is the town of Gunnison Co. Avoid it if you don't like cold. One of the coldest spots in the lower 48 states.

Lived in a few spots in WY. My favorite spot and if I could move back there right now I would is a small town in north central Wy at the foot of the Bighorn Mts called Sheridan. Long winters and small town. Nearest Mall is about 120 plus miles away. Nice thing is out there if you want too you can make that in a bit over an hour. You do the math. The Bighorns are awesome mts very empty even in the summer. most tourist are in a hurry to get to the BLack Hills or to Yellowstone so they skip over. Lived in Cheyenne out on the plains and it sucked in a lot of ways. I think that the average wind speed on my place was in the 20's. That was average high winds were 50's and up. There is no such thing as a day without wind. If its under 10 then its a calm day. Ask Footslogger. He lives over in Laramie Wy they have it worse. Also worked Casper in the Winters. If you have ever been there then enough said.

Living an hour and a half an hour of NYC. I am surrounded by farms. I have towns with anything I need a half hour away. I am 5 miles from the AT. I can be in VT ski areas in an easy drive. I can go in to NYC if I want on a train and sleep on the way home. The winters are gray but not overly harsh. The summers are hot and humid.

The one ing that I have learned is you have to look for that special thing in what ever place you land and learn to seek out the unique. I have seen things in all places that would make me want to live there and things that make you run screaming as well.

Long answer short.... I don't have any suggestions for you except try em and see.

Mags
10-20-2008, 15:42
Lived in Denver CO for 3 long years - - 9 months of winter, and please, spare me the outcry of "not true!"



Well, having grown up in the cold, damp and dismal Northeast/S. New England (Rhode Island), I find the weather in Colorado to be rather nice.

I find winters to be mild, sunnny and enjoyable. My friend, from INDIA, finds that to be true as well. I don,t care where you grew up..it is probablynot as hot and humid as southern India. :)

Seriously, I am surprised at this 9 mos of winter declaration. Perspective I guess, as I hiked in shorts and a tshirt yesterday. Then again, I seeyou are from S. Carolina. If you do not likewinter activities (which is NOT the case for a snowboarding person), you will probably not enjoy Colorado. You can hike all year in the foothills. But, yes, in the high country, you will need to strap on skis or snowshoes. But, gliding along a backcountry trail, in fresh powder, with the intense blue skies and the sun shining makes me love winter out here.

Again, it is perspective. I honestly think the winters are mild. More sunshine than Florida, too. :sun

Tornadoes CAN happen in the foothills area..but that is more liklely to happen further East on the plains. Heck, Tornadoes happened in RI too once in a very great while. Does not mean it is normal weather.

As for the hippie stuff. The Rainbow familiy taking over the Pearl Street Mall? You are more likely to see "Granola Yuppies" than hippies. Boulder has its quirks. But, the 8000 ft peaks in a city park and 45 minutes to the Continental Divide makes me love the area so. Plus the quirks are what makes the area so interesting. If I wanted conformity, Id move back home. My political roots for whatever it is worth are Conservative Democrat (think tradespeople, ethnic Catholic, whatever-the-hell-you-want to call it). Family considers me liberal (I read for fun and listen to NPR. ), the people here consider me somewhat conservative as I will admit to having considered McCain in 2000. I aint exactly a radical. :)
I grew up in suburban hell in RI. Colorado was so different for me.
Ive been here almost ten years and do not plan on leaving.

I am sorry to hear your time here was not as good, but I felt the need to put a positive spin on the place I now call home.

Photo from an awful CO winter. :D
http://www.pmags.com/joomla/index.php/component/option,com_gallery2/Itemid,36/?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=16638

soad
10-20-2008, 17:29
Buena Vista, CO
Wytheville, VA
Francoina, NH
Waynesville, NC

All small towns with great hiking nearby. Waynesville is kinda a rich spot, Buena Vista feels like a frontier town, Franconia is small, very small.

leeki pole
10-20-2008, 17:44
Shhhh....Townsend, Tennessee....small town, right next to GSMNP and Cade's Cove.....close to Knoxville and Maryville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg....reasonable real estate prices, climate is great....just ask Sgt. Rock.....but this is a secret.....don't tell anybody.....

Bearpaw
10-20-2008, 17:49
Shhhh....Townsend, Tennessee....small town, right next to GSMNP and Cade's Cove.....close to Knoxville and Maryville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg....reasonable real estate prices, climate is great....just ask Sgt. Rock.....but this is a secret.....don't tell anybody.....

SHUTUP!! We don't want it to turn into another Gatlinburg, ya' know?!;)

MOWGLI
10-20-2008, 17:50
Shhhh....Townsend, Tennessee...climate is great....

If you like pea soup humidity and smog for 5 months.

Tipi Walter
10-20-2008, 17:56
If you like pea soup humidity and smog for 5 months.

More like 12 months of smog.

Auntie Mame
10-20-2008, 19:17
Puppy! Its so good to see a word from you here! I vote Virginia or Maine. If you want to check out Maine, c'mon up. We can show you around.

garlic08
10-20-2008, 19:52
Shhh, Mags. We have enough people here in Colorado. I was kinda glad to see Mrs. Baggins' post. Let's keep 'em all away if we can.

taildragger
10-20-2008, 19:56
Shhh, Mags. We have enough people here in Colorado. I was kinda glad to see Mrs. Baggins' post. Let's keep 'em all away if we can.


Or at least keep them away from the Animas River areas.

weary
10-20-2008, 20:23
I would add Farmington, ME, to KIrby's list (Bethel, and Rangeley Maine, and Gorham, NH).

Actually, most any place in Maine outside of Portland and Lewiston areas.

Rangeley, however, is within an hour of some of the best and wildest trails and mountains in the east. As a bonus, you get a college town with relatively cheap tuition. Some surveys think the University of Maine at Farmington is among the top liberal arts colleges in the nation.

My town on the midcoast of Maine should rank pretty high also. It's 40 miles from the University of Southern Maine, and has 5,000 acres of protected lands -- more than most small towns anywhere.

We also have great access to the water -- the Kennebec estuary, sheltered waters running many miles to the north and south, and, of course, the entire Gulf of Maine and the Atlantic Ocean.

Weary

sasquatch2014
10-20-2008, 22:35
Shhh, Mags. We have enough people here in Colorado. I was kinda glad to see Mrs. Baggins' post. Let's keep 'em all away if we can.

All you need to do is wait for another disaster to hit California and another wave of them will head for Colorado, again.

BV is a great town. I know when I was working in the Salida area we would run up and all the other sales reps would meet up and we would go to the Quincey's there as it was closer than running up to Leadville.

Yahtzee
10-20-2008, 22:45
Forgot to mention Leadville, Co. Elbert at the ready and the CO Trail right there. Good snowboarding at Cooper and Copper. Cheap. Sunny. About all you can ask for. Plus, a sizable hiker population to socialize with.

Blister
10-20-2008, 23:13
Forgot to mention Leadville, Co. Elbert at the ready and the CO Trail right there. Good snowboarding at Cooper and Copper. Cheap. Sunny. About all you can ask for. Plus, a sizable hiker population to socialize with.

Not to mention the highest brewery in the united states, if its still open that is.

I'm in North Woodstock, NH and love it have also lived along the trail in North Adams, MA, Manchester ctr, Stratton and Bromley Mountain, VT, and finally Hanover, Glencliff and North Woodstock NH This by far is my favorite for outdoor activities summer and winter 3 ski resorts and more trails than you could hike in a season.

mudhead
10-21-2008, 05:17
Rangeley, however

Weary
Has become touristy/summer residenty. Gas was $0.40/gal more than in Stratton, when I went through awhile back. @20 miles apart.

All you need to do is wait for another disaster to hit California and another wave of them will head for Colorado, again.

BV

You have proven that you know the scoop on the Front Range.

BV-Wonder what that translates to? BV-Go West. Nice.

Pokey2006
10-21-2008, 05:55
DON'T go to New England unless you really love the winter. Yes, you like snowboarding. But do you really love the snow, the cold, for months and months on end? If so, then, sure, OK, maybe New England is for you. God bless you. If so, there are lots of small towns in NH that are quite affordable and pleasant to live in. Just go up to the mountains and take your pick. The mountain belt in either NH or VT have communities which would be cool to live in.

But if you really like hiking, more than snowboarding, I wouldn't recommend New England. The hiking season is just too short. If snowboarding is secondary to hiking, check out the southern states.

Just issuing the warning that you'd better love love love snow before you decide that New England is the place for you...

peakbagger
10-21-2008, 09:23
If you do consider northern New england, plan on renting for an entire year including winter. Some folks just dont do well with a long winter. Seasonal effective disorder can and does kick in for some folks that do fine farther south. If you pick your days in the winter, the hiking (and snowshoeing) is faster and easier than hiking in the summer and the views are incredible. Usually the locals wont get that sociable with you until you have been here through a "real " winter.

If the Northeast sounds good, take into account the tax difference in Me NH and VT. Me and Vt are typically the highest overall tax burden and NH is the near the lowest in the lower 48. Even in NH, there can be a significant difference in property taxes from town to town. Heck there are some remote areas in NH that have no state or local taxes.

Overall plan on a potentially higher cost of living in the NE than the mid atlantic. It costs money to heat a house and plow a driveway unless you have enough land and motivation to cut your own wood and do the drvieway yourself.

The Solemates
10-21-2008, 09:31
I've been all over 47 of the 50 states (never been to MT, OR, or ND), and if I could pick anywhere, it would probably be Colorado. Not sure which town....I'd have to do more reconnaissance. I was in CO all last week, and the true fall temperatures were awesome. I try to make it there as much as I can find the excuse to go.

Another good choice for me, albeit a bit yuppie, would be NH.

But alas, I dont think we will ever live in these places since my better half says it is too far from family in the Carolinas.

So, that being the case, if I had to choose somewhere close to the Carolinas, my first choice would be somewhere in the NE TN or SW VA area. But then again, I've always retained in my mind many places I could easily live.

JAK
10-21-2008, 09:57
I like it here. It's not the best, but it's close enough for the girls I go out with.

weary
10-21-2008, 10:07
Has become touristy/summer residenty. Gas was $0.40/gal more than in Stratton, when I went through awhile back. @20 miles apart......
I agree. My contribution to Kirby's list was Farmington, where gas is typically 20 cents a gallon less than Stratton, and like most college towns has a vibrant intellectual community.

Farmington provided most of the ideas and work, for instance, that made our mountain conference so successful a couple of years ago.

Weary www.matlt.org

woodsy
10-21-2008, 10:37
Has become touristy/summer residenty. Gas was $0.40/gal more than in Stratton, when I went through awhile back. @20 miles apart.





I agree. My contribution to Kirby's list was Farmington, where gas is typically 20 cents a gallon less than Stratton, and like most college towns has a vibrant intellectual community.



Weary www.matlt.org (http://www.matlt.org)
None of the towns listed in above posts, like most maine towns, are fit to live in...high taxes(we even have taxes on snack food)...high unemployment rates, no gainful employment anywhere north of Portland.
nine months of coooooold winter and 3 months of summer(some years:rolleyes:).
We do encourage people with lots of money to visit, but never encourage people to actually move here.;)

Skyline
10-21-2008, 11:03
You'll find a mild climate, but one with four distinct seasons, anywhere east or west Shenandoah National Park. The AT runs right through it, plus 400+ miles of other trails, and a couple hundred more the next mountain range west (Massanutten). Skiing, snowboarding, etc. is about an hour away at two different resorts--and even more are a bit further.

Cost of living where I live (Luray, just west of Thornton Gap in SNP) isn't bad. The ol' boy network (socially, politically) is slowly being dismantled so newcomers feel more welcome. Good jobs are lacking right here, but if you're willing to travel 30 to 45 minutes there are decent opportunities. Self-employment is also an option so long as your universe of clients extends beyond the local area.

weary
10-21-2008, 11:14
None of the towns listed in above posts, like most maine towns, are fit to live in...high taxes(we even have taxes on snack food)...high unemployment rates, no gainful employment anywhere north of Portland.
nine months of coooooold winter and 3 months of summer(some years:rolleyes:).
We do encourage people with lots of money to visit, but never encourage people to actually move here.;)
Come on Woodsy. We have taxes on snacks to get a little something out of the tourists.
I encourage them to live in my town -- or at least buy property here. They pay half our property taxes and have no kids in school -- and donate heavily to the volunteer ambulance when they have their little aches and pains. I.e. they cost us little or nothing, and keep my taxes low enough so I can continue to live on my two acres of waterfront. What's not to like.:)

They also donate heavily to our town land trust, and some even give us their property when they get tired of our nine months of snow. Retirees are especially valuable. They have amazing insights into how to get money and land, even one couple who worked for decades as executives in a major oil company. They know all the tricks. :)

Weary

A-Train
10-21-2008, 11:40
DON'T go to New England unless you really love the winter. Yes, you like snowboarding. But do you really love the snow, the cold, for months and months on end? If so, then, sure, OK, maybe New England is for you. God bless you. If so, there are lots of small towns in NH that are quite affordable and pleasant to live in. Just go up to the mountains and take your pick. The mountain belt in either NH or VT have communities which would be cool to live in.

But if you really like hiking, more than snowboarding, I wouldn't recommend New England. The hiking season is just too short. If snowboarding is secondary to hiking, check out the southern states.

Just issuing the warning that you'd better love love love snow before you decide that New England is the place for you...

Agreed. I went to college in Burlington VT for 4 years. The winter can go on forever and many years you can't hike in the spring (Snow/mud/slop) where as further south this is a great time to hike. One must really love to snowboard/ski. I, do not.

TunnelvisionGAME09
10-21-2008, 11:55
Boone, NC. Not sure what the skiing is like, but it sits in the Appalachians. Home of Appalachian State University.



Right near Boone you have a couple of skiing/boarding options. I went to school in Asheville and most people head to the Boone area for their snow fix.

Cookerhiker
10-21-2008, 11:57
Even though I may be moving, I'll put in a plug for Western MD. FYI, "Western MD" is not Frederick or Hagerstown - I'm talking far west of the I-68/I70 split. We're far enough from the large cities such that there's little traffic or high real estate prices but within 2-3 hours of Dulles, BWI, and Pittsburgh airports. At over 2,000' elevation, Frostburg has 4 true seasons; per Wikipedia, we average 100" of snow, sufficient for snowshoeing & X-country skiing. There's also downhill skiing. Summers are warm but never oppressively hot; even rare hot days are followed by cool pleasant evenings.

Cycling: we've got the Great Allegheny Passage (http://www.atatrail.org) and the C&O Canal (http://www.nps.gov/choh/)which begins in nearby Cumberland.

Hiking: plenty of it in all 3 states - MD, WV, and PA. Best spots are in Monongahela National Forest (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/) home of Dolly Sods (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/dolly_scenic.html) and Otter Creek (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/rec/wilderness_areas/Otter_Creek_Wilderness_brochure.pdf)Wilderness areas. There's also the Allegheny Trail (http://wvscenictrails.org/a-trail.html) - 330 miles from the AT on Pearis Mountain north to the WV-PA border. In Pennsylvania, there's the Laurel Highlands Trail (http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateParks/parks/laurelridge.aspx) which I hiked last winter. These are just the long trails - there are a myriad of trails for day hikes in the forests of all 3 states.

Water sports: flatwater paddling on the Potomac and parts of the Youghiogheny. Whitewater on the Youghiogheny and Cheat.

With Frostburg State University (http://www.frostburg.edu/) (especially its excellent public radio station) and the Allegheny Arts Council, there's lots of concerts, plays, special films, and other cultural things to do. Both Frostburg and Cumberland have an excellent selection of local restaurants and pubs. Right next to me is a pub with 10 brews on-tap and scads of bottled varieties which serves decent food, one of at least half a dozen pubs in Frostburg. With all this, you can also take country drives without any traffic except for Amish buggies; there are a number of Amish stores and farms which sell their products direct.

Housing is affordable (still) whether you want an historic home in-town or a log cabin down a remote road.

The only bummer for me is that I live further from the AT (100 miles) than I ever have in my life. Again, not sure if I'm staying but I'm liking it more and more in the 21 months I've lived here.

Deadeye
10-21-2008, 12:39
Burlington, Vermont.

Can reach many Long Trail crossings and several ski areas (Smugglers, Stowe, Mad River) in one hour or less, can get to the AT, Montreal, or the Adirondack High Peaks in 90 minutes, White Mountains in 2 hours. Lake Champlain is on your doorstep. 4 real seasons (5 if you include mud season)

Mags
10-21-2008, 14:32
Shhh, Mags. We have enough people here in Colorado. I was kinda glad to see Mrs. Baggins' post. Let's keep 'em all away if we can.


You are right..it sucks. Don't go to Colorado. It is awful. Awful I say....

:D

Cabin Fever
10-21-2008, 15:37
I believe the most states bordering it.

That would be Tennessee my friend....in clockwise fashion:

Kentucky
Virginia
North Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Missouri

Cabin Fever
10-21-2008, 15:40
Right near Boone you have a couple of skiing/boarding options. I went to school in Asheville and most people head to the Boone area for their snow fix.

For the most part, Boone and Tri-Cities, TN (Kingsport, Johnson City, Bristol) are the same region. The AT runs in between and a truck load of other trails close by such as Grayson Highlands, Linville Gorge and Grandfather Mountain, Cherokee National Forest and Smokies are just down the road.

woodsy
10-21-2008, 16:08
Come on Woodsy. We have taxes on snacks to get a little something out of the tourists.


Weary
Yeah but we residents have to pay taxes on snacks(pastrys, potato chips, candy etc) too, that ain't right:rolleyes:
I forgot to mention that we got 16' of snow last winter:eek:, was holed up for 2 weeks at one spell living on Moose meat, Venison and Potatoes. Fortunately, I was able to get to the general store for beer on the snowmobile.:D
Maine ain't for everyone, most of us live here cause where to poor to move "away".

Cookerhiker
10-21-2008, 16:13
I would have to say Colorado. Believe it to have won the fittest state "award",and that speaks for itself. Also it has some of the most rugged,coolest, and I believe the most states bordering it. But if you want the ultimate, I would have to say Alaska!


That would be Tennessee my friend....in clockwise fashion:

Kentucky
Virginia
North Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Missouri

Tied with Missouri:

Arkansas
Oklahoma
Kansas
Nebraska
Iowa
Illinois
Kentucky
Tennessee

Cabin Fever
10-21-2008, 16:25
Tied with Missouri:

Arkansas
Oklahoma
Kansas
Nebraska
Iowa
Illinois
Kentucky
Tennessee

I have been lied to for years!

taildragger
10-21-2008, 18:07
Yeah but we residents have to pay taxes on snacks(pastrys, potato chips, candy etc) too, that ain't right:rolleyes:
I forgot to mention that we got 16' of snow last winter:eek:, was holed up for 2 weeks at one spell living on Moose meat, Venison and Potatoes. Fortunately, I was able to get to the general store for beer on the snowmobile.:D
Maine ain't for everyone, most of us live here cause where to poor to move "away".

So, maybe my master plan of moving to Maine is right up my alley. Moose meat, bear, venison, snowmobiles, and scrotal frostbite chills, hell yes :banana:banana:banana

woodsy
10-21-2008, 18:25
So, maybe my master plan of moving to Maine is right up my alley. Moose meat, bear, venison, snowmobiles, and scrotal frostbite chills, hell yes :banana:banana:banana
LOL, Look me up when you get here, we can always use help rounding up wild game to eat, turn the clock back to the 1850's :D

taildragger
10-21-2008, 18:27
LOL, Look me up when you get here, we can always use help rounding up wild game to eat, turn the clock back to the 1850's :D


I dunno, I'm batting 0.000 this year with the bow, botched a chance on a turkey stalk and let a 4pt buck walk (too small, but looked tasty). I'm gonna have to start taking out squirrels for stew meat if this streak keeps up (or maybe I'll luck out and get some more hogs :banana)

Mags
10-21-2008, 18:34
I'm gonna have to start taking out squirrels for stew meat if this streak keeps up (or maybe I'll luck out and get some more hogs :banana)


http://yankeefarmersmarket.stores.yahoo.net/bufstewmeat1.html

I'm lazy, though....

taildragger
10-21-2008, 18:42
http://yankeefarmersmarket.stores.yahoo.net/bufstewmeat1.html

I'm lazy, though....

No need to order that out here, b/c of Montana Ted, I have to watch out for buffalo on the roads at night, I've nearly been hit by a few of them (they liked to charge my jeep at night)

ki0eh
10-21-2008, 18:47
I'll put in a plug for Western MD.
* * *
Hiking: plenty of it in all 3 states - MD, WV, and PA. Best spots are in Monongahela National Forest (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/) home of Dolly Sods (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/dolly_scenic.html) and Otter Creek (http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/rec/wilderness_areas/Otter_Creek_Wilderness_brochure.pdf)Wilderness areas. There's also the Allegheny Trail (http://wvscenictrails.org/a-trail.html) - 330 miles from the AT on Pearis Mountain north to the WV-PA border. In Pennsylvania, there's the Laurel Highlands Trail (http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateParks/parks/laurelridge.aspx) which I hiked last winter. These are just the long trails - there are a myriad of trails for day hikes in the forests of all 3 states.

You forgot the longest and closest one: http://www.greateasterntrail.org ;)


The only bummer for me is that I live further from the AT (100 miles) than I ever have in my life. Again, not sure if I'm staying but I'm liking it more and more in the 21 months I've lived here.

For those who need to work for a living, the utter lack of job opportunities in Allegany and Garrett counties bears mentioning...

PJ 2005
10-21-2008, 19:06
This thread has me thinking I want to move to Flagstaff.


From Maine? ...really?

Bilbo
10-21-2008, 19:07
I live in Wintergreen Mountain Village just outside of Charlottesville, Virginia. They have skiing at Wintergreen Resort and the Appalachian Trial runs through a part of the community.

Cookerhiker
10-21-2008, 19:10
You forgot the longest and closest one: http://www.greateasterntrail.org ;)



For those who need to work for a living, the utter lack of job opportunities in Allegany and Garrett counties bears mentioning...

I guess because I'm not looking back east but when I think of it, the Great Eastern Trail is just as close as Laurel Highlands or Monongahela NF. In fact, I work with a PATC crew near the Great Eastern Trail (Tuscarora Trail) along Great North Mountain on the VA/WV border.

Re jobs, Allegany probably has more opportunities than Garrett but limited compared to larger metropolitan areas. But some of the posters on this thread have also cited places with limited job potential: think Wyoming.

boarstone
10-21-2008, 19:17
Superior, Montana.....western Montana, in the mts...isolated

weary
10-21-2008, 19:20
Yeah but we residents have to pay taxes on snacks(pastrys, potato chips, candy etc) too, that ain't right:rolleyes:
I forgot to mention that we got 16' of snow last winter:eek:, was holed up for 2 weeks at one spell living on Moose meat, Venison and Potatoes. Fortunately, I was able to get to the general store for beer on the snowmobile.:D
Maine ain't for everyone, most of us live here cause where to poor to move "away".
I was snowed in once in Phippsburg. We had 30 inches of snow Thanksgiving afternoon and couldn't get home for five days. But that was 70 years ago. I remember the experience vividly -- and fondly.

But I admit to feeling a bit poor lately. I'm just glad I didn't "lock in" the price of oil last July. Its dropped a buck, or more, since. We have yet to turn on the oil boiler for house warming purposes. (it heats our hot water year round.)

Weary

taildragger
10-21-2008, 19:20
Re jobs, Allegany probably has more opportunities than Garrett but limited compared to larger metropolitan areas. But some of the posters on this thread have also cited places with limited job potential: think Wyoming.

Work on the rigs, they need people badly, and the pay rivals drug dealers :banana. Plus its a job that is anti-desk jockey

mudhead
10-21-2008, 19:23
Usually the locals wont get that sociable with you until you have been here through a "real " winter.


If ever, maybe.


nine months of coooooold winter and 3 months of summer(some years:rolleyes:).


Maybe 10 days of my idea of summer weather.

July was a wasted month, unless you are a slug.

Maine has a vile climate. Whatever am I doing here.

woodsy
10-21-2008, 19:45
If ever, maybe.




Maine has a vile climate. Whatever am I doing here.
Probably too poor to move "away":rolleyes: LOL:D

sasquatch2014
10-21-2008, 19:56
Work on the rigs, they need people badly, and the pay rivals drug dealers :banana. Plus its a job that is anti-desk jockey

While the pay is good the work will make you old before your time. I used to share the "Extended Stay" wing with a lot of the oil field workers when I was working in Casper and had a friend that I had worked with that was burned really badly in a treater tank fire. Now the cush job is one of the heavy equipment operators at the big strip mines. Some of these are into the 6 figure range and the cabs of these things are almost as nice as sitting in your lazy boy in the living room, ok maybe a bit of a stretch but not too much.

taildragger
10-21-2008, 20:01
While the pay is good the work will make you old before your time. I used to share the "Extended Stay" wing with a lot of the oil field workers when I was working in Casper and had a friend that I had worked with that was burned really badly in a treater tank fire. Now the cush job is one of the heavy equipment operators at the big strip mines. Some of these are into the 6 figure range and the cabs of these things are almost as nice as sitting in your lazy boy in the living room, ok maybe a bit of a stretch but not too much.


Depends on the work that you do for them, but yeah, long hours and days, but its not behind a desk (most important thing to me)

Texasgirl
10-24-2008, 14:54
You are right..it sucks. Don't go to Colorado. It is awful. Awful I say....

:D

Seriously Mags? Cause I was gonna offer Colorado Springs/Manitou. It's one of my possibles along with N Carolina and Austin Texas (no mountains but big hills)

Mags
10-24-2008, 15:31
Seriously Mags? Cause I was gonna offer Colorado Springs/Manitou. It's one of my possibles along with N Carolina and Austin Texas (no mountains but big hills)

Notice the big grin. ;)

Texasgirl
10-25-2008, 07:59
OOps, missed the grin. I see the plot now - you're just trying to keep all us Texans out of Colorado. BTW... I love the Boulder area.

Mags
10-25-2008, 14:31
OOps, missed the grin. I see the plot now - you're just trying to keep all us Texans out of Colorado. BTW... I love the Boulder area.

Heh. Have you been to Lake City or Creede? The gift shops down there actually have TEXAS memorabilia!

Yeah, I am partial to the Boulder area too. ;)

I am working a craptacular shift (12n-9pm bleech!) for a little bit. Part of what is keeping me sane is being able to get a good hike in the Boulder foothills before my shirt starts.

My hike this morning really showed the foothills in all its glory. The cottonwoods were a bright yellow and the choke cherries red, the sun was shining and the sky was cloudless. Makes my day a little better. Now, if only I could get my social life back.... :)

Texasgirl
10-26-2008, 00:39
Mags, You still trail running too in dem dar parts?

Texasgirl
10-26-2008, 00:43
Heh. Have you been to Lake City or Creede? The gift shops down there actually have TEXAS memorabilia! ..... the foothills in all its glory. The cottonwoods were a bright yellow and the choke cherries red, the sun was shining and the sky was cloudless.

Texas memorabilia? Breckenridge has a store with it too. Copy cats all of them. :)

I'm jealous of the view you described. I never knew leaves could turn such brillant colors til I did some trails in RMNP in Sept 2006. Good heavens. It was as if God himself blessed all those trees a brilllant gold coins in place of leaves, then surrounded them with blazing reds and oranges for accent.

drastic_quench
10-26-2008, 04:30
I would have to say Colorado. Believe it to have won the fittest state "award",and that speaks for itself. Also it has some of the most rugged,coolest, and I believe the most states bordering it. But if you want the ultimate, I would have to say Alaska!
Actually Colorado was cited as the LEAST obese state. "Most fit" is a lot of spin on "not quite as fat as the rest of us".

harvestmoon
10-26-2008, 08:47
Flagstaff is a really cool town if you can afford housing, it's pretty darn expensive. I would move there in a second, but I already lived 4 years in that area and it's time to explore more places. As far as snowboarding, they only really have one mountain and hopefully it snows enough for it to open! It's always nice and sunny there even though it gets cold, it's a very different kinda cold, I'm from Canada trust me. It would be a good choice.

I've also been to Burlington, VT a bunch of times, it has all you mention you want as far as hiking and snowboarding and small town but the cold winters are crazy, especially if you're not used to them, it gets long after 6 months.

I should be moving to Asheville, NC next month and I'm really excited, it seems like a nice place....That's what I like to do, choose the place I want to live in, explore for a while and then move on to another place and start all over again...!

If you have any questions about Flagstaff just let me know!

Asheville here I come!!!

Roots
10-26-2008, 11:29
Flagstaff is a really cool town if you can afford housing, it's pretty darn expensive. I would move there in a second, but I already lived 4 years in that area and it's time to explore more places. As far as snowboarding, they only really have one mountain and hopefully it snows enough for it to open! It's always nice and sunny there even though it gets cold, it's a very different kinda cold, I'm from Canada trust me. It would be a good choice.

I've also been to Burlington, VT a bunch of times, it has all you mention you want as far as hiking and snowboarding and small town but the cold winters are crazy, especially if you're not used to them, it gets long after 6 months.

I should be moving to Asheville, NC next month and I'm really excited, it seems like a nice place....That's what I like to do, choose the place I want to live in, explore for a while and then move on to another place and start all over again...!

If you have any questions about Flagstaff just let me know!

Asheville here I come!!!


Welcome to the area!:welcome

You'll love living here!!

DapperD
10-26-2008, 12:05
Actually Colorado was cited as the LEAST obese state. "Most fit" is a lot of spin on "not quite as fat as the rest of us".I believe you to be correct. Doing a little research, I found a 2002 Men's Fitness magazine survey, and according to it, and using their terms, the top five "Fittest" cities were:

1. Colorado Springs,CO
2. Denver, CO
3. San Diego,CA
4. Seattle,WA
5.San Francisco,CA

The top five "Fattest" Cities were:

1.Houston,TX
2.Chicago,IL
3.Detroit,MI
4.Philadelphia,PA
5.Dallas,TX.

rdsoxfan
10-26-2008, 18:31
Boulder, and Aspen , CO are ground zero for that type of lifestyle. Also Conway, NH. :) Hope this helps.


Rem Dawg

Hoop Time
10-27-2008, 11:03
If you like your mountain towns un-trendy and inexpensive, try Renovo, PA.

Un-trendy would be an understatement!

I can't comment on other places, but Central Pa. is a pretty good place to live if you like the outdoors. If you want a bigger city with quick access to great places to hike, the Harrisburg region fits the bill. In addition to the AT running through the area, we are surrounded by other great places within an hour or two drive. If you like to fish, add in the fact that we are also within an hour or two of some of the best trout streams east of the Mississippi.

At the same time, we are within an hour or two of Baltimore/DC and Philly and three hours from NYC, so if you want a good mix of wilderness and civilization, you'll find it here.

Also a fairly stable economy with lower than national ave. unemployment rates and a reasonable cost of living.

If you prefer a little more rural environment, the State College area is pretty nice. If I had my druthers I'd retire to someplace along Penns Creek near Coburn. Lots of hiking and fishing opportunities around there.

Mags
10-27-2008, 13:26
Mags, You still trail running too in dem dar parts?

Just for fun on short runs.

I realized that the long, sanctioned races aren't my thing. (It is an athletic even that takes place outdoors as opposed to an outdoors event that happens be athletic :) )

Tipi Walter
10-27-2008, 14:17
Flagstaff is a really cool town if you can afford housing, it's pretty darn expensive. I would move there in a second, but I already lived 4 years in that area and it's time to explore more places. As far as snowboarding, they only really have one mountain and hopefully it snows enough for it to open! It's always nice and sunny there even though it gets cold, it's a very different kinda cold, I'm from Canada trust me. It would be a good choice.

I've also been to Burlington, VT a bunch of times, it has all you mention you want as far as hiking and snowboarding and small town but the cold winters are crazy, especially if you're not used to them, it gets long after 6 months.

I should be moving to Asheville, NC next month and I'm really excited, it seems like a nice place....That's what I like to do, choose the place I want to live in, explore for a while and then move on to another place and start all over again...!

If you have any questions about Flagstaff just let me know!

Asheville here I come!!!

I just returned from Asheville last week to do some business and it was a four hour trip from my place in east TN. I lived in Boone NC for about 30 years and many of my Boone friends have migrated to Asheville over the years. Asheville is a good backpacking hub with the Nantahala and Shining Rock to the southwest(along with the Blue Ridge Parkway), the AT to the north around Big Bald/Madison County)and Pisgah Grandfather district to the east and northeast.

When you pull out a map, find Morganton to the east on the interstate and follow Hiway 181 north and you'll see a big wide world of backpacking available to you(Harpers Creek/Lost Cove Creek/Raider Camp Creek/Wilson Creek/Steels Creek/Linville Gorge/Lost Valley and the Temple of the Gods). Not to mention Shining Rock wilderness and the Black Mountains/Mt Mitchell not too far north/northeast around Burnsville/Spruce Pine and a little hippie community called Celo, NC. Good folks.

And of course, there's always Boone . . . . .

sherrill
10-27-2008, 14:45
Barnardsville, NC (only because my wife and I just bought some land up there :D )

nufsaid
10-27-2008, 15:04
Asheville is a great area. Lots of great places within an hour or so.

Good luck.

DapperD
10-27-2008, 21:48
Asheville is a great area. Lots of great places within an hour or so.

Good luck.Having visited Western North Carolina twice so far for vacations, traveling on the Blue Ridge Parkway, visiting Mount Mitchell,Linville Falls, Chimney Rock and many other locations, I would have to say that that area of the state near Ashville has to be one of the nicest areas anyone would want to live.

Burkest
10-27-2008, 22:55
If you are up for extreme winters you should consider Duluth, MN. The city is reasonably large (90,000) so there are jobs and stuff to do. There is a Ski area inside the city limits and 2 more within 90 minutes. The Superior hiking trail runs thru town and goes to all the way to canada. The north country trail segment thru the chequamegon national forest is 60 minutes away. The BWCA is about a 2 hours away. I used to live there and loved it but now I am in Madison, WI which is ok but I would like to move back if I could.:(

Jim Adams
10-28-2008, 00:00
Un-trendy would be an understatement!


If you prefer a little more rural environment, the State College area is pretty nice. If I had my druthers I'd retire to someplace along Penns Creek near Coburn. Lots of hiking and fishing opportunities around there.
...and canoeing, mt. biking, horseback riding, hang gliding, soaring, hunting, rally racing, road biking, motorcycling, ice fishing and car camping...and it's rarely ever crowded!:sun

geek

ki0eh
10-28-2008, 08:45
If I had my druthers I'd retire to someplace along Penns Creek near Coburn. Lots of hiking and fishing opportunities around there.

Right now we're wondering if we should list Coburn as a re-supply point along the MST/GET, especially with Poe Valley SP being closed for another year apparently. Someone asked about re-supply at Milroy and we said NO NO NO! Can you imagine walking or hitching along US 322 in Seven Mountains???

sixhusbands
10-28-2008, 09:08
We live in Upstate New York. 2 hours from the high peaks region of the Adirondacks, 4 hours from the Green mountains of Vermont and 6 hours from the White mountains in New Hampshire. Plus one hour from Lake Ontario and most of the Finger lakes. two hours from the Thousand Islands and 40 minutes from the snow capital of the east (Tug Hill averages over 300 inches a year) hiking, camping, fishing, boating,skiing we have it all.

In under 4 hours you can be in Toronto or New York City, 5 hours to Boston for all your shopping , theater and restaurant fixes

ki0eh
10-28-2008, 09:25
We live in Upstate New York. * * * we have it all.

...except jobs. A 3.9 GPA engineering degree from Syracuse, got me at age 28, Uncle Sam paying to load my stuff in a one-way rental truck heading for Iowa.

squirrel bait
10-28-2008, 09:30
you might love it. Lots to do and all of it outside. Cedar Rapids took a terrible hit but the rest of the state is a beautiful place to live. Enjoy.

cheoee hiker
10-28-2008, 10:42
Oconee County, SC. It is the county in the extreme NW corner of South Carolina. There are more than 20 significant waterfalls in the county, 2 whitewater rivers (including the Chattooga), Lake Jocasee, The Foothills Trail, The chattooga river trail, tons of other hiking trails....The list goes on and on. Plus, it is not overdeveloped and is generally a beautiful place just to drive around and live in. The weather is great 4 seasons (that is, we get all 4 seasons but all are mild. Long falls and springs). Lastly, if you can't find work in this mostly rural county, you are 45 minutes to a major (and great) town in Greenville, SC.

Check Oconee County out for retirement if you are a hiker or a lover of nature.

Hoop Time
10-30-2008, 17:07
...and canoeing, mt. biking, horseback riding, hang gliding, soaring, hunting, rally racing, road biking, motorcycling, ice fishing and car camping...and it's rarely ever crowded!:sun

geek

Depends on your def. of crowded. During prime hatches, Penns is getting to be like a golf course. But I was at Poe Paddy overnight a week ago and had the stream to myself. Only three campsites taken in the entire park ... two guys mountain biking, me and another guy who was mixing fishing and photography, but seemed mostly just looking to get away from it all.

But even when the place fills up, it still retains a remote, out in the woods feeling. Huge bonus points for having no cell phone signals there. Nobody can eff with ya!

BradMT
12-23-2008, 13:33
Well, I'm glad no one mentioned Bozeman...

I could live in parts of:

MT, ID, WY, WA, OR, CA, ME, VT, NH, MA, NY,

And MAYBE, parts of: AZ, NM, CO... maybe.

Happiness, you bring that with you, because wherever you go, there you are...

yappy
12-23-2008, 17:04
Joseph Oregon but DON'T tell anyone, Curlew and Republic Wa are cool too. Juneau is supposed to be awesome.. oh yeah, and Cordova Alaska.. ohlalala.

Dogwood
12-23-2008, 18:41
If I told everyone, then everyone would start going there! Then, it wouldn't be the best place to hike!

mcheyne242
01-02-2009, 23:15
Jackson Hole, Wyoming

yellow stone, the tetons, and the snake rive

Plodderman
01-03-2009, 17:54
I hike the AT a lot but live in Southern Ohio and have many different trails within ten miles. Wayne National Forrest, Buckeye trail and many others including some in Eastern Kentucky. Not much Snow Boarding though.

solo29
01-03-2009, 19:06
boulder i live before lots to do

yappy
01-03-2009, 19:12
Joseph is so nice cuz it is'nt " found " yet and the mnts are superb... truely lovely and the Snake river canyon is quite special as well. We did a 60 mile hike down there and did'nt see a boot print. Plus, there was a little place that made donuts in the summer and they were yummy. It is a dead rd though... not much going on there...but, if you like big, empty country then it is awesome. On the other hand we are in Curlew Wa and NOTHING goes on here !..haha...gorgeous here as well. All of Eastern Oregon is very very nice.

superman
01-03-2009, 19:15
I'm close enough to day hike the entire area from the Long Trail in Vermont to Gorham, NH. I like where I am even though it's the new crime capital of the world. A young stupid guy with a gun tried to rob the general store and the lady that owns it sent him packing. :-? Maybe we'll get mad at the young fool... when we stop laughing at him.

Dogwood
01-03-2009, 19:27
Really hard to beat the area around southern Utah/northern Arizona for sheer miles of hiking trails and solitude. U could locate to the area around Flagstaff, AZ or southern UT and be within 300 miles of 7-8 National Parks plus several others in the 600 mile vicinity. All the while being close to winter powder!

joshua5878
01-03-2009, 19:35
I have a 2nd home in Waynesville-Maggie Valley NC, it is paradise, Asheville 20 minutes away, SMNP 20 minutes... Mild Winters, Mild Summers...

yappy
01-03-2009, 19:42
I like the " mild winters- mild summer "part. That is the tuff thing about AK.. the WINTERS.

mudhead
01-04-2009, 09:07
Joseph Oregon but DON'T tell anyone,

I think they know. Lots of pretty timber near there.

Heard a blurb on the weather channel about FB. -50*F ambient. I figured people drank due to the daylight issues.

Probably no practical difference between -40 and -50. I intend to never find out first hand. Hope the trip back is OK.

yappy
01-04-2009, 11:27
Hi Mudhead, yeah.. we have friends that said it hit -60 100 south of FB. We are leaving in a few days. Ah well... it was good while it lasted. At least the sun is begining to creep over the horizon and a slow and painful tease of the Spring to come.

I love Joseph becuz the Wallowas are glorious and the Snake River Canyon EMPTY. There are a couple of other VERY cool places in Eastern Or...

Plodderman
01-05-2009, 00:37
I wouldn't mind living in Virginia as there seem to be a lot of mountains and beautiful places to hike. Maybe around Grayson Highlands.

Ramble~On
01-05-2009, 03:44
Brevard, NC

*30 minutes from Asheville
*5 miles from Pisgah National Forest
*Land of over 250 waterfalls
*at least 5 state parks around area
*Just a great little town!

I like my lazy, little mountain town of Sylva. Asheville or Waynesville would make good choices if you're not into tiny little towns.
Excellent hiking and the climate is right for me with a well balanced four seasons - not too cold, not too hot. Great Smoky Mountains National Park makes a nice backyard! Excellent whitewater too.