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NCYankee
10-30-2008, 08:26
I have a Dana Design Terraplane that I have been carrying for at least 14 years as my primary pack regardless of whether I am going out for a night or two weeks.

I know that everyone gets gear lust but is there anything wrong with carrying this massive 8lb pack for a sectional hike on the AT or would you suggest one of these new high tech light weight deals?

CBSSTony
10-30-2008, 08:45
I like my Terraplane, I don't run down the trail and still believe your gear should be at least as tough as the abuse given to it. Hike your own hike.

KG4FAM
10-30-2008, 08:51
I still carry a Dana Design Bomb Pack. Over 4.5 pounds for 3200 ci, but its comfortable.

kanga
10-30-2008, 08:53
i have a 14 yr old arc light the wind. best pack ever. use it as my winter pack. may be heavy but it will never tear up. it's one of the few pieces of equipment that i can truly rely on. things were always better before china came into the picture...

skinewmexico
10-30-2008, 09:06
I've reached the age where I need all the help I can get, and if I can save 6 pounds with a new pack, I do it. Lots of people trying to make a living in the US making lightweight gear, and I do my best to help them. When it wears out, it wears out, and I replace it. I'd hate to be stuck with old technology that long, as the backpacking industry evolves and improves. The old gear may be bombproof, but I've never been bombed on the trail. YMMV.

The Will
10-30-2008, 09:19
I know that everyone gets gear lust but is there anything wrong with carrying this massive 8lb pack for a sectional hike on the AT or would you suggest one of these new high tech light weight deals?


Nothing wrong with that at all. Whatever suites you, whatever you prefer. The choice is yours.

bigcranky
10-30-2008, 10:00
Nothing wrong with a Terraplane. Great pack. If it works for you, keep on trucking -- er, hiking.

That said, as I have gotten older, lightening up my pack weight has helped a lot. Part of that is a sub-2 pound pack (SMD Starlite.) But I still have my old Shasta just in case.

bulldog49
10-30-2008, 10:11
Nothing wrong with a Terraplane. Great pack. If it works for you, keep on trucking -- er, hiking.

That said, as I have gotten older, lightening up my pack weight has helped a lot. Part of that is a sub-2 pound pack (SMD Starlite.) But I still have my old Shasta just in case.


Bigcranky, how do you like your Starlite? I've been looking at them and plan to buy one soon. Do you use the stays or go frameless?

Toolshed
10-30-2008, 12:09
I have an 8 lb Astralplane that is now 9 years old (almost identical to the Terraplane OK). I still carry it in cold weather or on hikes with the kids stuff (shorter overnights) but I carry a 4 lb lighter kelty Haiku which fits my gear better during the summer months. When I have used my Astral in the summer, It is just too big and I find myself looking for ways to "fill the void"....

Alligator
10-30-2008, 12:39
Nothing wrong with it, it's your back:sun. I've got a big pack that I still use for winter, extended, or family trips. However, nothing wrong with taking 4-6 lbs off your load either.

Sly
10-30-2008, 13:07
My Terraplane is collecting dust, but I did carry it the length of the AT and PCT. I took off the lid on the PCT, what a difference! ;)

bigcranky
10-30-2008, 13:12
Bigcranky, how do you like your Starlite? I've been looking at them and plan to buy one soon. Do you use the stays or go frameless?

Love it. I use the stays most of the time -- they give the pack some structure and make it easier to load. Also the stays make the load lifters work properly. I have the older model from 2004, so I can't comment on the redesigned version, though it looks fine on line.

strez
10-30-2008, 13:42
I have the Mystery Ranch G-6000, which is the modern equivalent to the Terraplane. Although I love it to death and use it for all sorts of trips, if I were doing the entire AT, I would certainly grab something lighter (like an Osprey Atmos). Day in and day out - that's a lot of extra weight to be hauling around the Appalachians. Plus, it would give me the excuse to buy a new pack.:banana

Feral Bill
10-30-2008, 14:54
For heavy loads my Terraplane is my first choice. I might well take it when I through some day. Much of that weight is in the comfortable suspension. I do have an older Granite Gear Cornice that gets more use for weekends, though.

NICKTHEGREEK
10-30-2008, 16:57
If you don't carry the right pack, tent, sleeping bag and stove you won't fit in with all the other ants marching along in step. Conform dammit! There are rules you have to follow.

skinewmexico
10-30-2008, 17:49
If you like it, use it and don't give it another thought. I know that my pack, sleeping bag, tent, stove, and inflatable mattress combined weigh about what your pack weighs, and for me, I find that to be a much more enjoyable experience. YMMV.

Texasgirl
10-31-2008, 00:04
I have a Dana Design, as well as the REI UL 45. For winter hiking I need the extra room and weight carrying ability. Even though I don't wanna give in to the extra 4 lbs or so over the REI UL, the Dana carries them so smoothly, efficiently that I don't notice the extra weight of winter clothing on my shoulders/hips.

oruoja
10-31-2008, 17:14
My Terraplane is now twelve years old and this summer for a two week trip on the Long Trail I was going to use the Osprey Atmos 65 which I have owned for two years. While sorting my gear and deciding what to bring I ended up carrying the Dana instead. It does weigh much more, but handles gear much better. For my extended trips and colder weather hikes the Dana will probably remain my primary pack.

slow
10-31-2008, 19:05
Hard to beat for real winter and one i will never sell.

stranger
10-31-2008, 19:51
The Dana Terraplane is a good pack, one of the best ever made, and that's why it's still around and still functional. It's heavy but it's not designed for thru-hiking, it's designed to haul 80lb loads through hell and fit midgets to giants.

AT hiking is just so fashionable these days, it's very trendy, and now it's Osprey, GG, ULA and other ultra-light packs, but 15 years ago it was all about Terraplanes and Gregory Massifs, its' all relative.

Keep in mind you can collapse the bottom of the Terraplane to make the capacity a bit more realistic. Also, toss the lid to save half a pound. It's a good pack.

Crazy Larry #1
10-31-2008, 19:57
I have a Dana Design Terraplane that I have been carrying for at least 14 years as my primary pack regardless of whether I am going out for a night or two weeks.

I know that everyone gets gear lust but is there anything wrong with carrying this massive 8lb pack for a sectional hike on the AT or would you suggest one of these new high tech light weight deals?
Ever since I have gotten rid of my Terraplane I have missed it......

The neat thig about it was the fact that whatever I wanted to take with me I had enough options to select from of where to put them.

i have a Gregory Shasta that does not even compare.