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CrashnburnBiker
11-03-2008, 20:47
So I've been planning an '09 NOBO thru for the best part of 6 or 7 months now, buying my gear and saving money with a temp position at a respectable company (I just graduated from college in May, so I decided to hike before getting a "real job"). Today, however, the company I work for offered me a very decent job that I would start full time next month.

Given the economy, I'm a little worried about not accepting this position, going for a six month hike (that I might not even finish) and coming back to a bleak job market with no money. But it's hard to just give up on an adventure that I've been looking forward to and planning for so much.

Is anyone else in a similar position / time in your life? What are your plans?

Bulldawg
11-03-2008, 20:54
I'm not in a similar position myself, but looking around at the state of the economy and the state of the country in general; I'd suggest taking the job. The job market right now is really scary and if you have an offer for a great job in the field you want to work in, you might ought to jump at it. Just my .02 worth, not meant to down your hike in any way!

Tennessee Viking
11-03-2008, 20:55
I been trying to get a good job in media for the last 5 years, and I have the luck of find stuff that is talent pool or pays under $10 an hour.

I would take the job, the trail will always be there. And if it turns to be a sucky position, at least you can quit and go back hiking with some money in your pocket.

fiatspider2000
11-03-2008, 21:02
What degree did you just graduate with and what kind of job is it?

Deerleg
11-03-2008, 21:02
While I have longed to do a thru hike I have put my career and family ahead of that dream and it may or may not ever happen. It is certainly a choice I have made and it will be a choice for you too and the good news is whatever choice you make will be OK. My compromise has been a lifelong love affair with hiking and I am satisfied by the many shorter adventures I have had hiking the AT over many years.

CrashnburnBiker
11-03-2008, 21:09
FiatSpider (great car btw), my degree is in Psychology and the job is in the chemical industry. Strange I know- I didn't go to school to get a job, just to a solid education, so I really have very little idea what I want to do with the rest of my life. I figure a job with a good title will look good as experience on future resumes though. Luckily, my boss has given me a fair amount of time to think about this, so I'll certainly take your suggestions into consideration (the trail will always be there and I can always quit this job if I hate it) and weigh the pros and cons of both choices.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Deerleg
11-03-2008, 21:19
My son will graduate with a Psychology degree in May and is feeling the call of the trail too. Best of luck to you!

KG4FAM
11-03-2008, 21:28
This is a point in life where you have nothing holding you down so if you want to thru hike this is probably your chance until retirement. Once folks get a family it is near impossible to thru hike.

On the other hand its better to have that good job instead of having to take something that pays crap to keep the lights on. I worked at Best Buy during the holiday season a while back and my supervisor had a degree in history, but there are no jobs for a history major so he was doing the same job he could have done without all those student loans.

karoberts
11-03-2008, 21:30
My opinion: your hike is more important than any job.

~Ronin~
11-03-2008, 21:47
My opinion: your hike is more important than any job.

Agreed. I did not realize until it was too late that my degree (CJ) was not what I really wanted to do. In fact, at this point I have realized that doing what you want, is the most important thing. In the words of Chris McCandless...."Careers are a 20th century invention, and I'll do just fine without one." Best advice I've ever taken stock in, just wish I would have realized it before I spent 40K on a college degree.

Egads
11-03-2008, 21:49
Do you like the boss, the other people at work, & the job itself?

Bad employers & jobs are easy to find. Go hiking.

Good employers & jobs are hard to find. Go to work.:-?

Wilson
11-03-2008, 21:53
You're only 22. You've got the rest of your life to get a decent job. Unless you owe someone. Go hike. You won't regret it.
A good job, spouse and kids are most likely in your future, then thruhiking will have to wait for retirement.
Thats the way it worked for me....wish I'd hiked rather than worrying about losing a summers wages.

MOWGLI
11-03-2008, 21:58
Given the economy, I'm a little worried about not accepting this position, going for a six month hike (that I might not even finish) and coming back to a bleak job market with no money.

There's your answer.

A-Train
11-03-2008, 22:06
FiatSpider (great car btw), my degree is in Psychology and the job is in the chemical industry. Strange I know- I didn't go to school to get a job, just to a solid education, so I really have very little idea what I want to do with the rest of my life. I figure a job with a good title will look good as experience on future resumes though. Luckily, my boss has given me a fair amount of time to think about this, so I'll certainly take your suggestions into consideration (the trail will always be there and I can always quit this job if I hate it) and weigh the pros and cons of both choices.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Tough call. Some of the near-sided younger folks like myself will say Go for a hike! Those more conservative and looking to the bigger picture would tell you to take a hike.
The economy IS horrible and good full-time jobs with benefits are hard to come by. BUT it doesn't sound like this is your dream job or a field in which you're dying to work, but I don't know.

You may not get many opportunities to hike if you are young, in shape, debt free and aren't married or have kids. You'll have your whole life to find jobs.

It's gotta be a very tough decision, but I envy you. Either way, you'll have something good in front of you.

weary
11-03-2008, 22:16
I sort of lean on simply going for a thru hike. But I should note that I bounced around for nearly a decade, working for near minimum wages. I belatedly got a semblance of an education and managed to do quite well -- not in terms of wealth, but in terms of reaching the end of this life, comfortable about having spent my life for things that may out live it.

WEary

SteveJ
11-03-2008, 22:22
Do you like the boss, the other people at work, & the job itself?

Bad employers & jobs are easy to find. Go hiking.

Good employers & jobs are hard to find. Go to work.:-?

Most sensible advice I've read on this thread yet.....

CrashnburnBiker
11-03-2008, 22:42
Everyone - Thanks for the advice. I have a meeting with my supervisor later this week to discuss compensation and such; after that I'll have some time to think.

I'll keep you posted on my situation.

Again, if there's anyone out there in my shoes, I'd love to hear how you're handling things.

George
11-03-2008, 22:58
jobs change often, hiking takes little prep if you stay in shape(I often take off hours after a job ends) take your hike when you have no work and collect UI

sam4msu
11-03-2008, 23:23
Agreed. I did not realize until it was too late that my degree (CJ) was not what I really wanted to do. In fact, at this point I have realized that doing what you want, is the most important thing. In the words of Chris McCandless...."Careers are a 20th century invention, and I'll do just fine without one." Best advice I've ever taken stock in, just wish I would have realized it before I spent 40K on a college degree.


Let's see...How did that work out for Chris McCandless??? Maybe not the best "lifecoach" out there!!!

Chance09
11-04-2008, 00:32
Here is the way i see it, you may see it the same way. I'm 22 and graduating this december. I can live with my parents before and after the hike. If you work for however many years and then go hike your going to have to factor living after your hike into your budget. So u still have a nest egg for getting resettled after wards.

One bonus to your resume after the hike : Thru hike the WHOLE AT

just my 2 cents from someone in the same boat. I'm passing up a job making 30k on top of all my expenses.

Odd Thomas
11-04-2008, 07:10
Take the job. Chances are good wherever you work will fold anyway before the hike, it's going to get bad.

Montana Mac
11-04-2008, 08:11
Given the economy, I'm a little worried about not accepting this position, going for a six month hike (that I might not even finish) and coming back to a bleak job market with no money. But it's hard to just give up on an adventure that I've been looking forward to and planning for so much.

Is anyone else in a similar position / time in your life? What are your plans?

There is only one person that can make the decision for you. From your post I am not sure how strong the desire is to hike the AT. Is it a really strong burn or is it "Hey that would be a fun adventure to do" ?

If it is a strong burn I would openly discuss with your employer the fact that this is a "goal" you have set in your life to accomplish. That this determination and goal setting will carry-over into your job performance when you return to the company in the fall after completing your hike. If it is a "strong" company they will be there when you get back.

If it is not a strong burn take the job - no use being out there on a cold rainy day kicking yourself in the butt for not sitting in a warm office drawing a paycheck. Also like posted earlier the trail will still be there!

Homer&Marje
11-04-2008, 08:37
Heres the only question that comes to my mind. How easy is it to find jobs right now, in your particular field. I know that I am a fine dining waiter and can work in any restaurant you put in front of me (Providing they hire me) so for me the prospect of taking 6 months off is not that scary. On the contrary, Marje is an office manager type and it is increasingly hard to find work in this field.

Have you thought of asking the supervisor what they would do if you took 6 months off? Or maybe 3? Try and do it in 2 section hikes if you have to.

Hoop Time
11-04-2008, 08:51
On the one hand, you have to consider the financial implications. If you have a lot of debt from school, it could influence your analysis.

But if you don't have "grown-up" bills to pay yet, now might be a good time to try your hike. The freedom of being young and single should not be wasted. You will have plenty of time for jobs.

In the old days, when you took a job with a company and stayed with them your entire career, the argument to take the job was stronger. Nowadays, you are not likely to stay with the same company anyhow. You could make the argument there is a good chance you could have an opportunity to hike in the future when your company sends your job offseas. But then you might have obligations and responsibilities that keep you on a shorter leash by then.

Besides, it's not like this is your dream job you are passing on. It isn't even in your field.

buff_jeff
11-04-2008, 10:05
I say take the job, build your resume for a few years, and respectfully and responsibly leave and take your hike. When you come back you'll have solid work experience and maybe even the hike to put on your resume. Not to mention that you'll have some money in your pocket. Maybe your boss would even give you some time off to complete the hike. If the job sucks, just leave ASAP and start walking.

gravityman
11-04-2008, 11:07
At 22, I'd say get a higher degree! A masters or PhD will open doors you never thought were there. But only if you know what you want to do it in.

However, that said, I'd take the job and work for a few years. Then, when the time comes, tell them you want to take a leave of absence. Both my wife and I did that. Both companies said, yes, both even took us back when we were done. My wife declined as she wanted to do something else, but I'm super happy being back at my job.

Gotta work!

JAK
11-04-2008, 12:24
I'm inclined to say take the job. There is a good chance it won't be forever and you will get a chance to do your thru-hike very soon, and you can start doing it in sections now. Try and work your long distance hiking into your lifestyle. The experience of this job will give you something to reflect on as you hike through nature. It is perhaps the antithesis of your plans for a thru-hike, therefore I think they will go well together, in the grand scheme of things.

CowHead
11-04-2008, 14:11
What do fulltime working hikers do? Tell your job, wife I going hiking for six-months see you when I returned. Wife would understand but I donít think the job would? Do we (who are established in our career) wait until retirement and head to the hills? Yes all my vacation time I spend on the trails and I guess I could hop skip and jump my way along the AT till I finish it. Any suggestions or anyone besides (winning the lottery) has thoughts on this please let the rest of us know.

LIhikers
11-04-2008, 15:35
As you are considering your options in order to make this choice, remember that most people who start a thru hike don't finish it. If they ever go back and finish the trail they are then section hikers. Why not just plan to be a section hiker right from the start and work on hiking the AT during time off from the job?

CowHead
11-04-2008, 15:39
Thats what I planned to do. Sections at a time, for the AT... except I did tell the wife when I'm 80 I'm going to the thru-hike the PCT

daddytwosticks
11-04-2008, 15:52
If you have no wife, no kids, and no student loan debt, take the hike...you may be sorry in latter life if you had the opportunity now and passed it up. Once the wife, kids, etc. comes along, you'll find yourself in middle age wishing you took the hike way back in '09. :)

Reid
11-04-2008, 16:13
Seek ye first the Kingdom of Heaven

Lone Wolf
11-04-2008, 16:14
Seek ye first the Kingdom of Heaven

huh? :-?

elangomat
11-04-2008, 16:25
Do the hike! You don't want to get to age 50 and be filled with regrets. Do it while you have no one but yourself to be accountable/responsible for. When you get back work on a Masters degree.

~Ronin~
11-04-2008, 17:03
Let's see...How did that work out for Chris McCandless??? Maybe not the best "lifecoach" out there!!!


Haha, I didnt say I was gonna go starve to death in Alaska. I just meant that I can always find some kind of job, I don't need a career tying me down.

Montana Mac
11-04-2008, 17:16
Do the hike! You don't want to get to age 50 and be filled with regrets. Do it while you have no one but yourself to be accountable/responsible for. When you get back work on a Masters degree.

Hopefully being OVER 50 doesn't mean I can't do my thru next year:eek:

And as far as regrets I am having more fun and doing more stuff than when I was younger:D

Gaiter
11-04-2008, 17:26
Freelance.... is that an option in your industry??? I kinda make my own schedule, and choose how busy or not busy I want to be... but really the biggest benefit is slow season... which will be my hiking time

hperry
11-04-2008, 17:34
So I've been planning an '09 NOBO thru for the best part of 6 or 7 months now, buying my gear and saving money with a temp position at a respectable company (I just graduated from college in May, so I decided to hike before getting a "real job"). Today, however, the company I work for offered me a very decent job that I would start full time next month.

Given the economy, I'm a little worried about not accepting this position, going for a six month hike (that I might not even finish) and coming back to a bleak job market with no money. But it's hard to just give up on an adventure that I've been looking forward to and planning for so much.

Is anyone else in a similar position / time in your life? What are your plans?
you live in the united states. 'economic problems' are when the rich can't quite stuff their pockets as fast as they are used to.

what means more to you in life? going on adventures? or going on jobs?

mts4602
11-04-2008, 18:11
I'm in a similar situation. I graduate in May and am wondering what to do about getting a job, should I look for one now and say I can't work until after my hike or do I just start working on say I'll hike later in life.

I know for ME, if I don't through hike now I probably won't ever. I'm with a girl that I'm going to marry some day soon, I don't have any debt, and if I don't do it now then soon I'm going to have a career (hopefully), kids, and all those other responsibilties in life. I would have to wait unitl retirement most likely and while I understand a lot of people do that, SOME people don't live until retirement, or possibly I could have bad knees or something.

The list is endless. For me, I don't care what others say. The time to do a thru is now. I understand that when I come back I'll have to answer to employers as to what I did for the last 6 months, but honestly I don't care b/c everyone is entitled to take time out of their life to do something they truly want to.

Thats the decison you have to make, is this something you truly want to do. As others have said, if you are young, have no debt, just go for it.

humunuku
11-04-2008, 18:25
Hike now, jobs will be there. You may get tied down later in life and regret the missed opportunity. I guarantee a 6 month hike will be way more memorable than the first 6 months of a job.

windy city
11-04-2008, 18:29
Take the job. In February after working there for three months you will have a much clearer picture of what is best for you. If the job is not what you had hoped it would be,you will still have enough time to plan your hike.

hperry
11-04-2008, 18:41
Hike now, jobs will be there. You may get tied down later in life and regret the missed opportunity. I guarantee a 6 month hike will be way more memorable than the first 6 months of a job.
i agree. i am not trying to say this person's decision is not tough, because i graduated in may as well, and am working a temp job for my 09 thru. A quality job offered to me right now would get me thinking.

However, think of this: what is more likely to happen? You get a similar job of some type a year or two after your thru, or you somehow get another window for a thru hike later down the road? Think about it: taking the job now will get you used to the income, and you may buy a car, a house, hell even get married, all of these types of things make the thru hike window smaller. hell, in ten years, this society may start destroying the trail. don't think it aint possible.

dan8794
11-04-2008, 18:46
I am about to graduate college (well in about 1.5 years) and I really really want to do a thru after graduation. But, I'll be 25 years old...that's just not clear thinking.

I came to this realization the other day that it would be best that I get a job, and put the hike on the backburner and that sucks. But, it's what is best.

The trail will always be there, jobs won't...especially with this economy.

Take the job! (IMO)

hperry
11-04-2008, 19:48
I am about to graduate college (well in about 1.5 years) and I really really want to do a thru after graduation. But, I'll be 25 years old...that's just not clear thinking.

I came to this realization the other day that it would be best that I get a job, and put the hike on the backburner and that sucks. But, it's what is best.

The trail will always be there, jobs won't...especially with this economy.

Take the job! (IMO)

The trail may or may not always be there, but that is not the point. Its more about your opportunity to hike it. Jobs are compatible with houses, wives and children. Is a thru hike of the trail?

I am much more willing to take my opportunity to be a life-long wage worker for granted than i am willing to take my thru hike opportunity for granted.

i dont really care if the former doesn't work out!

judofish
11-04-2008, 20:21
This advice comes from someone who lived in the Caribbean a few years before entering the real world. I have hiked various portions of the AT and I plan to thru hike it one day and yes it will probably be after retirement...but if you have a chance to get a good paying job in this economy, I suggest you take it. Only you can make the decision and once you weigh the pros and cons, your decision will be the right one for your situation.

smokymtnsteve
11-04-2008, 20:24
if somebody really wants to work..there is always a job!

go hike

A-Train
11-04-2008, 21:37
I am about to graduate college (well in about 1.5 years) and I really really want to do a thru after graduation. But, I'll be 25 years old...that's just not clear thinking.

I came to this realization the other day that it would be best that I get a job, and put the hike on the backburner and that sucks. But, it's what is best.

The trail will always be there, jobs won't...especially with this economy.

Take the job! (IMO)

Do the hike, if you're dying to do it. You really think someone is gonna hire you cause you're 25, but at 26 with a thru-hike they won't??

I think you may change in a yr and a half and certainly the economy will one way or another. Why decide now?

Life is about being creative and sometimes you can do things non-traditionally. There is no mold that says one must get a real job at 25, get married, buy a house and a car, etc. Unless of course that is what you believe. Don't let your dreams get squashed by what you perceive reality to be.

Reid
11-05-2008, 01:14
In response to Lone Wolf's "uh"
I've had fun on A.T., I've got a great job, I just said seek ye first the kingdom of Heaven. It was the first thing that came to mind when I read someone was making a tough decision and the effects on life everyone was speaking of. I thought It was a great time to drop it in.

Macallister Vagabond
11-05-2008, 13:10
Perhaps I'm in the minority, but I am more than confident in my abilities and I am convinced that I could get a job if I wanted a job.

In my opinion, it's the job that can wait.

hperry
11-05-2008, 13:21
Perhaps I'm in the minority, but I am more than confident in my abilities and I am convinced that I could get a job if I wanted a job.

In my opinion, it's the job that can wait.
yeah, it amazes me when i hear someone say "the trail will always be there." Probably true, but i know waaay too many older men who would love to get out on the trail if even for a month but cannot make it work given their current circumstances.

While your dream job may not always be there for you, you can just about count on a job of some form being there for you. Your wife and kids won't have a problem with you working, and neither will your creditors or lenders. They might have trouble with you going on a 5 month hike.

smokymtnsteve
11-05-2008, 16:54
or you could get lucky and die right after your hike and not have to do that sort of thing:D


maybe drown or something fording the kennebec:rolleyes:

bigboots
11-05-2008, 18:59
I was in the same boat. I had a similar choice to make. I had a job offer before I graduated in spring of 07, a girlfriend, and a good life. I had to decide job or trail. I opted for working for 2 yrs to get experience. Now, I am preparing to hike and my boss says that he wants me back (we will see about it when I return, due to economy). But I want to do the trail before I have any lifetime commitments(house, wife, kids, etc). I no longer have any debt, no longer have a steady girlfriend (she wasn't to thrilled about the hike to begin with), and have a little $$ saved for the trip now.

That is what I did. As previously mentioned... it's your call.
Good luck!

tom_alan
11-05-2008, 22:13
I lost my job in April and have 25+ years of management background. I was just hired on the first of this month. The way the economy is I would say take the job. You're still young and there will be other opportunities.
JMHO

Blissful
11-05-2008, 22:16
That's a tough decision, but the trail will always be there. The job will likely not.

MARKO HANGMAN III
11-05-2008, 22:28
Take the full time position, work at the job through Feb., save at least $5,000, then quit to hike the AT. Take 6 months to hike to Katahdin, spend only $3,000, and have the time of your life. After you finish the trail, go back home, relax for a month or two, and update your resume. Then go find another job.

It worked for me!

MARKO HANGMAN III
11-05-2008, 22:37
hike Now, Jobs Will Be There. You May Get Tied Down Later In Life And Regret The Missed Opportunity. I Guarantee A 6 Month Hike Will Be Way More Memorable Than The First 6 Months Of A Job.


Very Good Point!

Deerleg
11-06-2008, 09:09
you live in the united states. 'economic problems' are when the rich can't quite stuff their pockets as fast as they are used to. thats a little cynical maybe...if you own a car and have a long commute the last few months or so, or have a variable rate mortgage or just got laid off you probably have economic problems. I got married in 1981 when we were in a similar situation and had economic problems because I din't have 2 nickels to rub together. I was (and still am) in love with my bride and worked hard to pay the rent and support my family all by choice.


what means more to you in life? going on adventures? or going on jobs?
We all can live richly no mater how you define it. No regrets one way or the other ;)

mudhead
11-06-2008, 09:13
I was (and still am) in love with my bride No regrets one way or the other ;)

That is something I have not seen for sale!

CrashnburnBiker
11-06-2008, 19:04
So the president of my company (my boss) asked me into his office to speak with me about working full time. In a surprise turn, and one of the kindest gestures I've ever received, he told me to hike.

He went on to explain how he grew up without parents, paid for his own education by working full time during school and has worked ever since. He told me he regretted that he never had time to do anything the likes of what I have been planning and that he wouldn't be able to forgive himself if he pulled me away from my dream to work full time.

The position that I was offered will be given to someone else, however, he told me that when I return from my hike, he'll find another job for me there.

Because the company would pay for me to go to graduate school, I'll be able to hike and then return to Connecticut with a job and education waiting.

I am f***ing thrilled.

Thanks for all your advice and see some of you on the trail in March! WOOOO!

mts4602
11-06-2008, 19:28
That's awesome man. Glad it worked out for you.

MOWGLI
11-06-2008, 20:00
Having your cake, and eating it too. You must be a solid individual. Good things tend to come to people who do the right thing.

Have a great hike!

tom_alan
11-06-2008, 21:32
So the president of my company (my boss) asked me into his office to speak with me about working full time. In a surprise turn, and one of the kindest gestures I've ever received, he told me to hike.

He went on to explain how he grew up without parents, paid for his own education by working full time during school and has worked ever since. He told me he regretted that he never had time to do anything the likes of what I have been planning and that he wouldn't be able to forgive himself if he pulled me away from my dream to work full time.

The position that I was offered will be given to someone else, however, he told me that when I return from my hike, he'll find another job for me there.

Because the company would pay for me to go to graduate school, I'll be able to hike and then return to Connecticut with a job and education waiting.

I am f***ing thrilled.

Thanks for all your advice and see some of you on the trail in March! WOOOO!

Sounds like you and your boss have a great relationship. I am glad things worked out for you! Enjoy!

mudhead
11-07-2008, 07:41
You would be very wise to send this employer an occasional post card from the trail. Not an e-mail. People like that deserve good treatment.

Congrats on you!

A-Train
11-07-2008, 10:58
You would be very wise to send this employer an occasional post card from the trail. Not an e-mail. People like that deserve good treatment.

Congrats on you!

How true. A hand-written letter goes a long way these days with some people.

BearII
11-07-2008, 14:14
You would be very wise to send this employer an occasional post card from the trail. Not an e-mail. People like that deserve good treatment.

Congrats on you!

This is an excellent idea!

Crash - before your post about the conversation with the boss I was going to say that if you really have a heart for the trail you should hike. As my tag line says, "there is always a way". Fortunately for you things worked out perfectly.

I have three kids, 25, 24, 22, with each one I've emphasized that they should not rush into college/jobs. They have their WHOLE life to work. The oldest has ended up traveling around the world, went to college, graduated 4.0 and has his dream job. The middle one did an internship at her favorite charity and traveled all over South America, just finishing up with a 4.0 in secondary ed as a math major. The youngest decided college wasn't for her yet went to work at a job she loves and now is studying to be a dive master and is getting ready to go to the Carribean!!

This career concept is bogus. I'm on 3rd "career" wildly successful at all of them and starting my 4th career, semi retirement. I've got several trips planned, including the AT next year. After playing for 4 or 5 years I'm planning to settle down again somewhere at whatever work strikes my fancy in my journeys.

Who knows, but you only have one life to live. Remember not to forsake your dreams. I'm a firm believer that we can either make life what we want it to be or live like everyone else, just drifting along getting sucked into the "normal" life. Life YOUR life, no one elses!!!

Best of luck and hopefully we'll see you out on the trail.

NICKTHEGREEK
11-07-2008, 14:54
So the president of my company (my boss) asked me into his office to speak with me about working full time. In a surprise turn, and one of the kindest gestures I've ever received, he told me to hike.

He went on to explain how he grew up without parents, paid for his own education by working full time during school and has worked ever since. He told me he regretted that he never had time to do anything the likes of what I have been planning and that he wouldn't be able to forgive himself if he pulled me away from my dream to work full time.

The position that I was offered will be given to someone else, however, he told me that when I return from my hike, he'll find another job for me there.

Because the company would pay for me to go to graduate school, I'll be able to hike and then return to Connecticut with a job and education waiting.

I am f***ing thrilled.

Thanks for all your advice and see some of you on the trail in March! WOOOO!
Dude, that's the old management school number 7. "Talk the guy out of taking the job because your wife is bustin on you for not hiring your worthless nephew and you're stuck legally so you're life sucks unless you can convince the guy to join the priesthood or French Foreign Legion or go hiking". :D:D
Enjoy!!

Rockhound
11-07-2008, 20:39
work is highly over rated. i quit in 2003 and have been happier ever since

bigboots
11-07-2008, 20:43
Way to go, that is awesome! I will see you on the trail!

Lilred
11-08-2008, 00:46
My doctor is a backpacker. Said he would write me a prescription to hike the AT to lower my cholesterol. My principal just told me last week that the board of education would honor it as a medical leave. My job would be waiting for me when I got back. Now I just have to come up with the money. LOLOL That's the tricky part for me.

Congrats on how this all worked out. Frankly, if I were 25 again and faced with that decision, I'd go hiking. You're only young once. Kudos to the boss.

BlindMoose
11-09-2008, 21:41
I am 49 and am going to spend my 50th B-Day thru-hiking the AT. I have had numerous jobs - but my goal in life is not to get enough accumulated to retire some day, it is to see things and experience things - not get thins. I have siblings who are so tied to their 'career' that they can't even take a weeks vacation without stressing out over being away from their security blanket. I have had jobs that i thought were 'the one' only to realize that there is no security or loyalty when it comes to business.
It all comes down to what is important to you in life- which of course has no guarantees (not even tomorrow). Do you want experience, security, or try to get both. Some do get both - but the recent economic situation shows how fragile 'security' really is. Be loyal to yourself. If hiking the AT is on your 'bucket list" then take the opportunity to cross that one off and then head for the next.
Thats my opinion :banana:jump

BearII
11-10-2008, 05:20
I am 49 and am going to spend my 50th B-Day thru-hiking the AT. I have had numerous jobs - but my goal in life is not to get enough accumulated to retire some day, it is to see things and experience things - not get thins. I have siblings who are so tied to their 'career' that they can't even take a weeks vacation without stressing out over being away from their security blanket. I have had jobs that i thought were 'the one' only to realize that there is no security or loyalty when it comes to business.
It all comes down to what is important to you in life- which of course has no guarantees (not even tomorrow). Do you want experience, security, or try to get both. Some do get both - but the recent economic situation shows how fragile 'security' really is. Be loyal to yourself. If hiking the AT is on your 'bucket list" then take the opportunity to cross that one off and then head for the next.
Thats my opinion :banana:jump


+1 well said Moose, well said! :sun

chief
11-10-2008, 12:28
So I've been planning an '09 NOBO thru for the best part of 6 or 7 months now, buying my gear and saving money with a temp position at a respectable company (I just graduated from college in May, so I decided to hike before getting a "real job"). Today, however, the company I work for offered me a very decent job that I would start full time next month.

Given the economy, I'm a little worried about not accepting this position, going for a six month hike (that I might not even finish) and coming back to a bleak job market with no money. But it's hard to just give up on an adventure that I've been looking forward to and planning for so much.

Is anyone else in a similar position / time in your life? What are your plans?

I'm not in a similar position nor time in my life, but at the risk of being off topic...

(1) It's good that you graduated.
(2) It's good that you are working to fund your hike.
(3) It's good that your employer thinks enough of you to offer a permanent position.
(4) It's MOST good that you're 22!

Dude, you have the world by the nads! Go hiking or take the job!

If you hike, the goodness will still be around when you finish, IF YOU WANT IT TO BE! Even in bleak times, losers are losers and winners are winners.

canoehead
11-10-2008, 14:14
I own Tekoa Mountain Outdoors. www.tekoamountainoutdoors.com (http://www.tekoamountainoutdoors.com)
Today I was doing an Environmental Ed class with 5th graders, turning over logs checking out decompsoer bugs and leraning about adaptations. I was back home for noon. Great day. My point is if you have to work then do what you love to do, or you'll be changing that job soon.
I have hired 3 thru hikers and the reason for that is simple.
Commitment to see something through. As an employer thats hard to find these days. Do your hike, enjoy your hike, learn from your hike. Then apply it to the world

mudhead
11-10-2008, 14:31
I'm not in a similar position nor time in my life, but at the risk of being off topic...

(1) It's good that you graduated.
(2) It's good that you are working to fund your hike.
(3) It's good that your employer thinks enough of you to offer a permanent position.
(4) It's MOST good that you're 22!

Dude, you have the world by the nads!

I agree. Next thing you know, he will see a smiling face that will stop him in his tracks.

Sloth71
11-17-2008, 16:49
Opinions are like bunbgholes. Everyone's got 'em. Your heart and head will tell you if this is the job for you or if you should go be a Rolling Stone. Listen to people's advice, it's your life and only you are responsible to yourself.