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View Full Version : I am so tired of thinking about gear, save me



thunderspeedfire
12-05-2008, 21:13
It's been consuming me for weeks as I try to get ready for our prep hikes. All I can think about is gear, constantly running through the list, making sure I will have everything. But as much as I try to read about gear, it all ends so conflicting, if I am looking for good or bad reviews of any item I can find them, and it doesn't help me get closer to my goal of owning everything and not thinking about it anymore. Me and my buddy will be leaving February 15th, so cold weather is always on my mind.

The gear I am unsure of is:
My stove: Jetboil group cooking system
Water filter: We decided to use one, cant read reviews of one that sounds superior to the others, I will probably get the Katadyn Hiker.
Sleeping Bag: I will probably get the Slumberjack Latitude 0* bag, I want a synthetic and I found it for 40 dollars.


Heres the rest of my list, save me from my idiocracy.

Clothes
Pants
Midweight Techwick Long Underwear
Lightweight Techwick
Fleece 200 Pants
Gramicci Hiking Pants/Shorts
EMS Gore-Tex Rain Pants
Nylon Running Shorts
Feet
Asolo Hiking Boots
2 Pair Heavy Weight Socks
2 Pair Mid Weight Socks
2 Pair Polypro Liners
Asics Trail Running Sneakers
Torso
Poly Pro T-shirt
OXT Fleece Pullover
Midweight Techwick Long Underwear
Lightweight Techwick
EMS Base Camp Jacket
EMS 3.0 Winter Waterproof Shell
Head
Ems Lightweight Hat
Ski Goggles
Hands
Fleece Liner Gloves
Waterproof Mittens
Sleeping
Tent
MSR Hubba Hubba
Pad
Thermarest 3/4
Sleeping Bag
Slumberjack Latitude 0*
Kitchen
Stove
Jetboil Group Cooking System
Extra Fuel Canister
Cookware
Plastic Bowl
Spoon
Cup
Water
Katadyn Hiker Pro
Pack
EMS 5500
Essentials
Duct Tape
First Aid Kit
Matches/Lighter
Can Opener
Toothbrush
Waterpoof Stuff Sacks
EMS 5500 Pack Cover
Tactikka Headlamp
Allpurpose Soap
2 Pens/paper
Lightweight Folding Knife

KG4FAM
12-05-2008, 21:32
The filter might freeze up on you in Feb.

If the two of you are planning on sleeping in the Hubba Hubba you might want to reconsider. Its a bit cramped for two folks who are not a couple.

You might want to look for a better bag. Slumberjack is way low end and you want to stay warm in February. Its really not that hard to keep down dry. This will be something that you use everyday for at least one third of the hours so it is worth it to drop some cash on a good sleeping bag

Another thing to make sure of is that both you and your buddy have the equipment to do everything on your own in case one person gets pissed leaves the other on the trail. I carry my jetboil, but my dad carries a pot that he can build a fire and cook with. That kind of thing.

Mags
12-05-2008, 21:36
Honestly, while having the right gear is certainly part of the planning...it is also one of the least important part of the hikes.

You have a lot of heavy gear that is probably overkill for the AT, but you'll find out what works for you as you hump it up the trail.

I was 24 yo when I hiked the AT with an EMS 5500 as well.

You'll be fine.

If you want, here is some Q&D guides that may help if you want to lighten up:

http://www.pmags.com/joomla/index.php/Backpacking-and-Hiking-documents/Backpacking-A-Beginners-Primer.html

http://www.pmags.com/joomla/index.php/Backpacking-and-Hiking-documents/lwbp101.html



ps. I'd drop the ski goggles, though. ;)

bigboots
12-05-2008, 21:37
KG - good points but I don't think the sleeping bag will be that big of an issue. It is a 0 bag and I have spent many night is single degree temps in a 20 bag.
The other thing I would do is bring a pencil in place of one of the pens.

Serial 07
12-05-2008, 21:47
i've used the jetboit...it's good, in cold temps, i hear that you should try and keep the fuel "warm"...in the summer, you can use the jetboil cup (minus the insulator) with a alcohol fuel stove to save weight...there seems to be a lot of cup, bowl, jetbowl things there...if you are carrying a jetboil for yourself and need extra bowl and cup (for the other guy), my suggestion is to look at the orikoso stuff...very light weight and durable and good...good luck...

thunderspeedfire
12-05-2008, 21:57
I'm a very hot sleeper, and I heard Slumberjacks are not as warm as advertised, so I thought it might all work out if got the 0.

Lellers
12-05-2008, 22:05
If the two of you are planning on sleeping in the Hubba Hubba you might want to reconsider. Its a bit cramped for two folks who are not a couple.



I agree with everything posted so far in this thread. Just wanted to add my 2 cents to the lines above. I shared a Hubba Hubba during a week-long hike with a friend of mine. We are two good sized women, both of us over 200 lbs. She is 6' tall, and I'm 5'6". We were pretty comfortable sleeping head-to-feet. I think that the Hubba Hubba is pretty cold in the winter, tho. I own a Hubba, and i don't use in the winter. All that mesh and just the fly to keep me warm! But I sleep cold, really cold. I have a decent down bag, generally wear silks to sleep in, and sometimes add a liner, and I'll still feel cold. Maybe it's in my head. I really hate to be cold. If you've been comfortable in a 20-degree bag in single digits, it sounds like you sleep pretty warm. Maybe the lack of a warmer tent won't bother you.

saimyoji
12-05-2008, 22:06
its important to get passed the gear comparisons, and get to why you've amassed all that stuff: to enjoy the woods. don't be a slave to your gear... :cool:

jethro
12-05-2008, 22:10
My son has a Slumberjack 0* bag. I've borrowed it as well. We've both been very comfortable to about 10*, but we both sleep warm.

One caution, though: I'm not sure if you have the same model, but his bag weighs close to 7 lb! :eek: He's packed it very short distances, but it's really a car camping bag.

Tinker
12-05-2008, 22:37
I had a Slumberjack mummy bag a long time ago. Rated at 20 degrees, it barely kept me warm at 35 (and I am a VERY warm sleeper).
If you're using a tent, you need not be fearful of using a down bag. Look at Campmor's private label bags for a good price and fairly accurate temp. ratings.
One word of note. The Hubba series of tents is designed for warm weather. The mesh will let some cold wind underneath. Prepare for some breezy sleeping.

BookBurner
12-06-2008, 10:12
IMO, You are not going to enjoy carrying all that gear for too long. If you've not tried the pack on yet, here's a preview - crunch! That was your spine.

Think about getting rid of some of the duplicative gear:
2 weights of thermal underwear pants and fleece pants?
Running shorts and Gramicci zip-offs?
Boots and trailrunners?
2 pairs of heavy and 2 pairs of mid-weight socks?
Fleeze Pullover and Base Camp Jacket?
Bowl and Jet Boil Cup?
Ski goggles?

You've been very thoughtful about the conditions you will encounter and that's good. But start considering how some of your gear can pull double-duty. On a thru-hike, you just can't afford to carry an outfit for every occassion. You might try for a few days (so be wary of the apparent success of overnight shake-down hikes). But soon enough, the extra stuff is going home. Spare yourself the expense and first few days of discomfort and start separating the wheat from the chaff now. Good luck.

smaaax
12-07-2008, 10:42
I wouldn't carry a filter that early. They are useless if frozen. I started with one Feb. 16 this year and sent it home at Neels Gap.

MOWGLI
12-07-2008, 10:50
My son has a Slumberjack 0* bag. I've borrowed it as well. We've both been very comfortable to about 10*, but we both sleep warm.

One caution, though: I'm not sure if you have the same model, but his bag weighs close to 7 lb! :eek: He's packed it very short distances, but it's really a car camping bag.

A zero degree bag is probably overkill on the AT unless you's doing the Smokies or New England in the dead of winter.

jethro
12-07-2008, 17:43
A zero degree bag is probably overkill on the AT unless you's doing the Smokies or New England in the dead of winter.

Sorry to hijack the thread, but what the lowest temperature bag would you recommend for three-season hiking on the AT? We have a collection of car camping bags and warm-weather backpacking bags, but I'd like to buy a really good 3 or 4 season bag. Since they're spendy, I want to get the right one. (I'm not looking for brand recommendations, just how warm I should go.)

Doctari
12-07-2008, 19:24
When are you starting?
NOBO or SOBO?

I think the key phrase in your request is "get ready for our prep hikes." Take what you have, on your prep hikes, after a few trips you will sort most of it out. If youare going NOBO, after that, in the first 30 miles on the AT, you can always change gear, drop off gear, etc. at the Yi.

Looks like you are about 4 - 5 hrs from the AT, do a few weekend hikes there, your gear will sort itself out in short order: when you get home from each trip, if you did not use it, or even see a use for it, leave it at home. Keep the rain gear & first aid stuff tho. :p

Do not, as a friend of mine does, use something just so you can keep it in your pack! Friend still carries a full size Axe, "uses" it, but only so he can justify carring it, and admits to that. :rolleyes:

Mocs123
12-07-2008, 19:40
I would go with a 15-20* FULL zip bag

BarFight
12-18-2008, 20:03
I would get some sort of full-length pad if I was starting in February. I started in March and had to trade in my 3/4 length pretty quickly. Heat leeches out through your feet.

Runsalone
12-26-2008, 21:37
The gear I am unsure of is:
My stove: Jetboil group cooking system
Water filter: We decided to use one, cant read reviews of one that sounds superior to the others, I will probably get the Katadyn Hiker.
Sleeping Bag: I will probably get the Slumberjack Latitude 0* bag, I want a synthetic and I found it for 40 dollars.


I actually wrote a big long response then sort of felt like mr. knowitall so Ill just answer this question.

the jetboil is a little heivier than you could get away with but I saw alot of them in 08 and the owners seemed to be quite pleased with them, they certainly seemed fast!!

You could experience some filter freezing problems but if youre decided already, as filters go the hiker should be great! I had one back when they were still made by Pure and it was very reliable and light enough as filters go. not teribly bulky either. Just dont mix the hoses(leave it connected while yer out) and wash the tubing out when in town to gaurd against mold/bacteria as well take the components apart to let them dry while in town might be a good idea . course theres always aqua mira @ 4 oz.

Runsalone
12-26-2008, 21:52
Oops pressed the answer button before I was done. The only thing I feel the need to wax critical on is the slleeping bag. Do yourself a favor and buy the best bag you can afford!!! Especially because of the time of year your going out. Your bag could very well be your most important piece of gear(besides your brain) dont skimp here if you can help it. I dont have any experience with the slumber jack brand so I cant comment there but it seems Sleeping bags are one of those catagories where you get what you pay for. I felt like a fool when I dropped the cash for my Western mountaineering bag, but I felt like a genious when the temps dipped into the low teens repeatedly and others were shivering the night away. Not saying you have to buy the most expensive bag, but maybe focuse more of your research in this area and make sure youre all set . On that note, while Im on it.....as one of the above posters mentioned the best bag in the world wont help if yer feet are on the ground, use your pack, a piece of closed cell foam, get a longer pad, (use your pack!!!) do something to insulate your feet from the ground (((use your pack!!!adds no OZ.s)))

above all, dont sweat any of this too hard itll work itself out. Have a GREAT HIKE!!