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ted holdridge
06-09-2004, 17:12
I was curious to find out views on shelter etiquette. I personally don't stay in them unless I have to but I try to abide by the following. When I get to the shelter I immediately get my spot ready, eat some food, then get ready to go to bed. That doesn't mean I'm going to bed, but that when it is time, bam, I'm in with the least amount of bother. I also don't try to get in a shelter once it gets dark. I keep all conversation outside the shelter and try to be completely quiet once 10 rolls around. These are just my personal guidelines and I understand that other people think differently. If you are there, you have to put up with what is coming. Just curious to other people thoughts on the matter. Oh, and if it is raining, throw all the rules out and jump in. There is always room for another. Happy Hiking!

Hammock Hanger
06-09-2004, 17:33
try to be completely quiet once 10 rolls around.
not sure I have ever been awake when 10 rolled in....

not much of a shelter rat myself but I was always willing to let the shelter fill up as long as the hiker could find a piece of floor to claim, spooned many a night...

it was hard to shleter in the begining because I was a light sleeper and couldn't stand all the talking and moving around, after a few hard days it no longer mattered I could zonk out whenever I needed.

My self imposed rules when in a shelter:

-all are welcome
-take up as little space as needed
-cook outside if at all possible
-keep the talk down to a minimum if a hiker is sleeping early
-wind down the conversation with the sun
-pack up OUTSIDE and AWAY from the shelter when leaving early
- eat away from the shelter if most are still asleep
-NO alarm clock/watch!!
- no pissing right behind or beside the shelter
-pack out my trash
- if it is late find a campsite

---- better yet have dinner with friends at the shelter, water up and move on up the trail a bit.

Just some of my thoughts... I'm sure I missed some. I can tell you these are NOT everyone's guidelines!! :bse Sue/Hammock Hanger

Mountain Dew
06-10-2004, 02:06
People that snore obscenely loud shouldn't sleep in shelters.
Don't walk into a shelter after dark and make all kinds of noise getting into the shelter. Better yet, stay in your tent.

ted holdridge
06-10-2004, 11:32
Hammock Hanger, I believe you hit it right on the head. The reason I say 10 is that I understand that alot of section/weekend hikers aren't tired at 8 as we usually are. Mountain Dew, I wish I could say the same about loud snorers, but they have a right to use them also. That is the main reason I tarp out. It is funny, but it seems that everybody who snores always use the shelters. I can't ever remember being beside a tent and hearing someone snore. I've been hiking with the Texas Kid and he brings extra earplugs for people to use b/c he's so loud. Thanks for the input. Happy Hiking.

Rain Man
06-10-2004, 11:44
People that snore obscenely loud shouldn't sleep in shelters.

Says who??!!! LOL Actually, I agree with the "obscenely loud" ANYTHING.

However, I would reverse the perspective and say people who can't sleep through normal noise shouldn't sleep in shelters.

In some families, when there's a newborn, everybody has to walk on eggshells while the baby is snoozing. In other families, it's the baby that has to adjust to the normal sounds of an active household. That's the way we raised our kids. They "can sleep through anything" as the saying goes.

The trail is not for folks who need to be coddled, and that includes acting like they're in a 5-star hotel on a deserted island. I think snoring is a normal, common night-time noise.

Anyway, that's my vote. Will I be sorry I cast it?
:)
I do imagine that "majority rules" is often the rule in shelters,anyway? Or, is it, "squeaky wheel" gets their way? I honestly don't have enough experience to say.

P.S. Let's talk about some UNCOMMON night-time noises. I once stayed in a shelter with a jerk who poked me if I snored, while HE tried to SMACK mice on the wood floor (LOUDLY!!!!) throughout the night with his large wooden hiking stick. Finally Lilredmg told him if he did it again, she was going to break his stick. LOL

That guy had his head and noise-o-meter screwed on backwards. He was self-absorbed in his own little world of what noises were okay. His were. Others' weren't. So, that experience has skewed my opinion about those who complain about normal snoring.

I'll give you "obscenely loud" snoring, however!
:sun
Rain Man

.

smokymtnsteve
06-10-2004, 12:02
I am almost deaf,,so make all the noise you like..shelters are like bus stations...people get up all the time to go pee,,people read with headlights, toss and turn,,,if you can't tolerate this maybe you need to tent,

TankHiker
06-10-2004, 13:54
I was always the first one in at night, and the first one out in the morning. At night I would always leave my stuff close to the open end so I could pack up outside quietly in the morning. However, being the first one in, my foodbag would always end up on bottom of the pile hanging from the mouse-proof bags. So it would always be a challenge removing everyone's foodbags in the morning to get to mine without waking anyone up.

As far as snoring goes, it is expected that everyone will need to tolerate some shelter snoring. However, there was one hiker last year who had some sort of sleeping disorder. He snored like a chainsaw. He had no problems with sleeping in a crowded shelter (in fact, I think he sent his tent home for a while). But would often find that others left the shelter in the middle of the night to tent out (even in horrible rain). Hikers went out of their way to be off-schedule from him. Sure, he has a right to the shelter like everyone else, but it's probably not that nice to put everyone else though that.

-Tank

smokymtnsteve
06-10-2004, 13:56
you could and should be hanging your food bag outside the shelter

Hammock Hanger
06-10-2004, 13:57
the baby that has to adjust to the normal sounds of an active household. That's the way we raised our kids. They "can sleep through anything" as the saying goes.
ME, too!!!


Anyway, that's my vote. Will I be sorry I cast it?
:)
.
Of course not! We're all very friendly here... :o Well most times!
Sue/Hammock Hanger

minnesotasmith
06-10-2004, 13:59
1) Tobacco use only OUTSIDE (and at least 20' downwind of) of a shelter.

2) No wet dogs inside a shelter; really, no dogs inside a shelter, even for a moment, is preferred. If the pooch is loose, it really shouldn't come near a shelter at all IMO, especially while it is a) unmuzzled, and b) people are cooking and eating food.

3) No eating nasty-smelling food in the shelter. That means I can't chow down on my smoked oysters or sardines in there; it means you can't bring hot Mexican or Indian food in there while I'm there.

4) No claiming shelter space for anyone who hasn't made it to the shelter yet; you can only claim space for yourself.

5) Hikers have priority over nonhikers in the shelter.

6) Screaming kids probably belong out of earshot of shelters, unless someone has some duct tape for their maws.

7) Not having the foresight to lug a tent/poncho/bivy does NOT give you any enhanced right to a shelter space over someone who DID bring one, but got to the shelter before you.

torch
06-10-2004, 14:05
5) Hikers have priority over nonhikers in the shelter.


I may be wrong about this, but since you have to hike to a shelter, just by making it to the shelter, aren't you therefore a "hiker"?

Lone Wolf
06-10-2004, 14:07
What's a non-hiker? He/she had to hike to get to a shelter

jersey joe
06-10-2004, 14:20
3) No eating nasty-smelling food in the shelter. That means I can't chow down on my smoked oysters or sardines in there; it means you can't bring hot Mexican or Indian food in there while I'm there.
After a sweaty 25 mile day the last thing you'll be worrying about smelling is my dinner. :)

pvtmorriscsa
06-10-2004, 14:20
3) No eating nasty-smelling food in the shelter. That means I can't chow down on my smoked oysters or sardines in there; it means you can't bring hot Mexican or Indian food in there while I'm there.

Howdy all,
I thought that eating any food in the shelters was a no-no. After all does that not attract our ursoid friends?
I thought the rule was to cook/eat at least 50 feet from a tent or shelter.

Just wondering.

minnesotasmith
06-10-2004, 14:21
Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I remember reading that in the Central states there are places where shelters are a stone's throw from a road or houses. I figure that someone who hiked all day (regardless of whether they are a thru-, a section-, or overnight weekend hiker) has greater call to use a shelter than some 11th-graders from the neighborhood 1/2 mile away need it to smoke some weed or pack away some beer out of the rain and away from the cops and their parents.

torch
06-10-2004, 22:17
Well, if that is the case, I tend to agree. They can find their own place to drink their beer and smoke their weed. I thought you were trying to establish a priority of thru-hikers vs. section hikers vs. weekend campers. My apologies.

Mountain Dew
06-11-2004, 01:01
Loud Snoring is o.k. in shelters ? hhmmmm That's like farting on an elevator. Don't say you HAVE to use the elevator either.

MOWGLI
06-11-2004, 06:36
Shelters are first come, first served, period. It doesn't matter if you snore, fart, or if you are a section, thru, or weekend hiker.

In 2000, some of us saw a few young hikers intimidating a 70+ y.o. thru-hiker (Moses) because he snored and had the audacity to want to stay in the shelters. That behavior was absolutely disgraceful.

If you don't want to be subjected to odd sites, sounds and smells, I suggest you carry a tent and use it. I got in the habit of asking folks if they snored when I was at a shelter. If someone self-identified themselves as a snorer, I would setup my tent.

My pet peeve about shelters is hikers who want to spread their crap out all over the shelter floor, and then not move it when another hiker enters the shelter. That is bad form.

Pencil Pusher
06-11-2004, 06:43
Loud Snoring is o.k. in shelters ? hhmmmm That's like farting on an elevator. Don't say you HAVE to use the elevator either.
Bring earplugs. Supposedly I snore, though I've never heard it. Farting on elevators is okay so long as you make it 'silent but deadly' and there are more than two people.

Hammock Hanger
06-11-2004, 06:51
Howdy all,
I thought that eating any food in the shelters was a no-no. After all does that not attract our ursoid friends?
I thought the rule was to cook/eat at least 50 feet from a tent or shelter.

Just wondering.

:bse Well that may be the basic rule... but it sure isn't happening on the AT. A good 30% or more hikers cook in the shelters. For the few shelters that have a picnic table to cook on I can assure you it is NOT 50 feet away, more like 3-4.

The hiker funk over rides the food smells to keep the critters at bay...

Sue/Hammock Hanger

Skeemer
06-11-2004, 08:04
The principle, "I will treat others like I would like to be treated." doesn't always work on the Trail. Snorers want to be left alone. People with dogs often resent anyone who doesn't think their pooch should be treated the same as humans, and smokers...well, that's a whole nother thread.

BTW, earplugs don't always work for me...can still hear loud snorers. Even had one guy tenting nearby that woke me up when I was using earplugs. In the shelter, I tell others to wake me up if I snore. I know this can be a sensitive issue because most people can't help it. If they can prevent it, but chose not to, then stay out.

At the risk of pissing off those that hike with their dogs, pets in shelters drive me crazy, especially when the place is full of hikers. I just don't think it's right. You may not believe it but I love dogs.

When it's raining, you have to allow cooking in the shelter. When it's dry go outside.

During my thru-hike I had very few problems in sheters which I used at least a fourth of the time as it was a wet year. I did get a little pissed off once when 4 weekend hikers had their gear strewn all over a 6 person shelter. Then they acted like they were doing me a big favor when they "made room for me." Another thru-hiking couple came along and had to tent as they would't squeeze them in.

Jaybird
06-11-2004, 08:14
[QUOTE=MOWGLI16]Shelters are first come, first served, period. It doesn't matter if you snore, fart, or if you are a section, thru, or weekend hiker.




i've always heard that "thru-hikers" get a few spots in the shelter no matter how crowded.....maybe this thinking has changed over the years.



i enjoy sleeping in the shelters...for the "people experience"...
BUT, i still carry a tent for occasions when the shelter is too full. :D

Floops
06-11-2004, 16:41
I can't ever remember being beside a tent and hearing someone snore.
I've read in a shelter journal that I snore loud enough in a tent to keep people in the nearby shelter awake...

smokymtnsteve
06-11-2004, 17:07
I've read in a shelter journal that I snore loud enough in a tent to keep people in the nearby shelter awake...

they say our whiteblaze member HACKSAW snores very loudly too, I was there at plum orchard the night he got trailnamed HACKSAW, but as how I don't hear very well , I didn't understand the humor in the trail name, I guess I was the only other one besides HACKSAW that slept any that night. :jump

Mountain Dew
06-11-2004, 17:09
The hypocrisy in this argument amuses me. I found that eraplugs worked very well for me when people snored really loud as well for people that were loud late/early in the shelters.

I agree that shelters are first come first serve like several have said here on this thread. I only hope that you remember that when you sleep next to a person that farts really loud all night long and the smell makes you wanna vomit. Please remember what you said about first come first serve and don't be a hypocrite. While first come first serve is VERY true it doesn't eliminate manners and the rights of others. In America we have the right to free speech, but that right stops when it infringes on the rights of others.

Hypocrisy test for those that say first come first serve is an absolute: Would you be offended on an elevator if the person next to you kept farting really loud ?

My only wish is that people who know they snore very loud may get the sleeping spot right next to somebody that has loud gas problems all night long.

smokymtnsteve
06-11-2004, 17:22
We all have some gas, esp. here in ga in the spring,,everybody is starting thier hike and thier eating a "new" diet ...so i guess the question is ..was this a "one time" occassional gas passer(can you say MTN HOUSE meal) or was this on going chronic episodes? :)

Mountain Dew
06-11-2004, 17:46
SmokeymtnSteve... Nice entry ! :) I remember how bad the new hiker diet affected me. Terrible. The worst "gasmen" on the trail in 2003 that i experienced were Greenman and Greymatter. Greenman could "sound off" on command and was very loud while Greymatter would make you wanna vomit with his. They would often team up on me by hiking in front of me as they could both hike faster than me. It was like a sport to them I think. "Lets see who can make Dew vomit first" While very amusing even to me I did "hurl" several times thanks to the Dynamic Gas Duo !

smokymtnsteve
06-11-2004, 18:12
SmokeymtnSteve... Nice entry ! :) I remember how bad the new hiker diet affected me. Terrible. The worst "gasmen" on the trail in 2003 that i experienced were Greenman and Greymatter. Greenman could "sound off" on command and was very loud while Greymatter would make you wanna vomit with his. They would often team up on me by hiking in front of me as they could both hike faster than me. It was like a sport to them I think. "Lets see who can make Dew vomit first" While very amusing even to me I did "hurl" several times thanks to the Dynamic Gas Duo !

sounds like on going chronic episodes... so I guess we could assume that the same rules and ethics apply here as to chronic snorers...as I have no sense of smell.. chemo destroyed it...this would not bother me eithier. How ever Greenman and Greymatter sound like quite a "duo".

they could fart that loud so loud enoughas to wake you?..
I couldn't hear eithier if I had been there...so which aspect of thier farts were worse? smell or sound?

Mountain Dew
06-11-2004, 18:19
Greenman's volume was hilarious and Greymatter's smell was only funny when it affected others. YES, Greenman could fart loud enough to wake people from their sleep. Like THUNDER !

Frosty
06-11-2004, 20:04
Hypocrisy test for those that say first come first serve is an absolute: Would you be offended on an elevator if the person next to you kept farting really loud ?
Well, being offended or annoyed has nothing to do with whether first come first served is right or not.

I get annoyed in the Post Office when there are two tellers and the two people in front of me both have passport applications, and I have to wait five minutes. Yeah, so? I'm annoyed, but first come first served is still right.

Just because I'm annoyed doesn't mean people with passport applications don't have the right to be served first if they got in line first.

Those who are saying that first come first served in shelters (or anywhere else) doesn't count for snorers or farters or masturbaters are really saying, "It's okay for people to be in shelters as long as their behavior is acceptable to me."

Well, they don't need you to approve of their behavior. Wear ear plugs, breathe through your mouth, pretend it's the wind rocking the shelter.

THis is only my opinion, but I'm right, as Max Kellerman says.

smokymtnsteve
06-11-2004, 20:23
THE WOODS OF ABBEY

"Farting is such sweet sorrow."

"I wait. Now the night flows back, the mighty stillness embraces and includes me; I can see the stars again and the world of starlight. I am twenty miles or more from the nearest fellow human, but instead of lonliness I feel loveliness. Loveliness and a quiet exultation."

THANKS BE TO ABBEY

Lone Wolf
06-11-2004, 20:31
If you hike all day thru thousands of acres of forest and at the end of the day you are dumb enough to want to cram into a box wih a dozen other stinky, snoring, burping, farting, sleep talking/walking hikers, DEAL WITH IT. Like Sgt. Rock says, "No whining". The majority of folks using shelters aren't comfortable being in the woods.

smokymtnsteve
06-11-2004, 20:41
I spent the night this spring at tri-corner knob shelter with 20 people including the "offensive six" . It came such a storm I was gald to be in there

Mountain Dew
06-12-2004, 05:44
Frosty... ofcourse I totally disagree with you and think your analogy is weak, BUT what you had to say was funny and you are allowed to have an opinion I suppose. :sun

Lone Wolf... " If you hike all day thru thousands of acres of forest and at the end of the day you are dumb enough to want to cram into a box wih a dozen other stinky, snoring, burping, farting, sleep talking/walking hikers, DEAL WITH IT. Like Sgt. Rock says, "No whining". The majority of folks using shelters aren't comfortable being in the woods. " --- All people who stay in shelters are dumb ? You have gotten pretty good about offending mass groups of people on whiteblaze. Hats off to you. Oh and... I did DEAL WITH IT with the help of ear plugs. You think the majority of hikers aren't comfortable in the woods ? HAHAHA ....o.k. that's pretty funny...and people that use hunting stands don't like being in the woods either right ? Overall I give your entry even par compared to your other ones.

Lone Wolf
06-12-2004, 06:07
Don't really give a s**t what ya think Dewey. :D

Mountain Dew
06-12-2004, 06:23
L. Wolf "I Don't really give a s**t what ya think Dewey." --- is that why you always comment on what I say on just about every thread I post on ? Is it that I have pointed out the fact that you somehow always bash almost every group of hiker that frequents this site including it's owners ? Just a retired bitter hiker with a biker problem huh ?

Lone Wolf
06-12-2004, 06:26
Like I said. Don't really give a s**t what ya think. Go hike some more miles. You're still a newbie. :D

Mountain Dew
06-12-2004, 06:54
A newbie that has reading comprehension skills, thinks before he types, and has common sense. Oh, and doesn't verbally insult just about every hiker on whiteblaze with giardia of the mouth comments. Hike some more miles ? Thanks for the concern. I plan on hiking more miles so that I don't get fat and out of shape looking. hhmm Have you done much hiking in the past few years ? :clap

Lone Wolf
06-12-2004, 07:06
Was that an attempt to make me upset? I'm hurt. I bet you wouldn't say that about your God Baltimore. :D Giardia mouth. I like that one. :) Grow up kid. And get back on topic. Shelters pretty much suck.

Pencil Pusher
06-12-2004, 16:29
I bet you two would actually like each other if you met on the trail, without knowing who the other was here on Whiteblaze. Maybe you wouldn't hold hands and run naked through the forest together, but you get the idea...

Lone Wolf
06-12-2004, 16:54
We met at Dot's during Trail Days. Nice guy. I am too . :)

Chip
06-12-2004, 20:13
Hello Skeemer,

Your statement about dogs in shelters did not get me "fired up". When my wife and I hike by ourselves we somtimes tent or stay in a shelter ,just depends. When we hike with our dogs we always tent ! Sometimes go stealth or stay about 50 yards away from the shelter when the dogs are with us.Our dogs are trained, stay on a leash, we clean up after them, they do not drink
from water sources. There are about 6 threads regarding dogs. Most replies are pretty negative about dogs and I understand why and have no problems with the various pros and cons about dogs on the trail. There are very few of us that know how to hike with dogs and also respect the fact that other hikers are on the trail too. I wish more people who hike with dogs would get their act together. They give those who do a bad rep !
Dogs don't belong in shelters ! Dog owners "use common sense!"

Happy Trails,
Chip :)

Frosty
06-12-2004, 20:45
Frosty... ofcourse I totally disagree with you and think your analogy is weak, BUT what you had to say was funny and you are allowed to have an opinion I suppose. :sun.
I don't understand what you disagree with.

Your question implied implied that it would be hypocritical to subscribe to first in first served and be annoyed at rude behavior. I don't see that the two actions (believing in First COme First Served and Being Annoyed) are mutally exlusive.

I thought the waiting in line analogy was comparable to getting a spot in a shelter, but perhaps I missed. Let me try this? How about the French Philosopher Francois Voltaire who said, "I may not agree with what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it."

Votaire - hypocritical or not? You make the call.

Skeemer
06-12-2004, 21:37
Chip writes:
Dogs don't belong in shelters ! Dog owners "use common sense!"

Thanks Chip for having some class. Since the topic is shelter etiquette I thought it was appropriate to mention it in my response along with the other items...I know "dogs on the Trail" has been rehashed over and over. Actually, I like dogs (most of the time better than people) I even try to make over them on the Trail. I just can't see them taking up shelter space. I have a hard time avoiding being a hypocrite on this...if I had a dog with me that I loved I would want him next to me in the shelter out of the weather too, But when it comes to etiquette, it's hikers first. I'd buy a tent big enough for me and my dog.

On another note. I can see Mountain Dew's points...people can really be rude thinking only of themselves. and caring less about everyone else around them. But I think he takes LW much too seriously...Perhaps LW gets a kick out of being somewhat of a contrarian with his whit and sarcasim. I don't see him attacking individuals unless they attack him first. His sharp remarks are usually made against groups of people who think or act alike, He's not mean spirited...just a little abrupt. As someone else pointed out, both these guys would most likely get along face to face. Things we say in forums have a way of putting people on the defensive now and then.

Bonehead
06-12-2004, 21:38
I don't understand what you disagree with.

Your question implied implied that it would be hypocritical to subscribe to first in first served and be annoyed at rude behavior. I don't see that the two actions (believing in First COme First Served and Being Annoyed) are mutally exlusive.

I thought the waiting in line analogy was comparable to getting a spot in a shelter, but perhaps I missed. Let me try this? How about the French Philosopher Francois Voltaire who said, "I may not agree with what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it."

Votaire - hypocritical or not? You make the call.

Hey Frosty you seem like kin, isn't Becky Sue your sister?

Kozmic Zian
06-13-2004, 14:40
Yea......Etiquette. The problem with all of this is that nobody's out there (or anywhere) writtin' down the 'be nice' rules and passing out demerits for failure to comply. In my experience, the best way to deal with all of this, is to be as tolerent as possible. It's very difficult to deal with inconsiderate people, on the Trail or off, but without a set of written and enforced regs regarding all of this, our best bet is to be tolerent of people's misgivings and inadequacies. I mean, what would we do, kick the **** of of someone for farting too much, or snoring. Best bets to just go get in your tent, hammock or whathaveyou and [email protected];)

Jack Tarlin
06-13-2004, 15:09
Damn, this thread is getting silly.

It's really simple. Staying in a shelter means you have to put up with other people......it means putting up with loud people, obnoxious people, stinky people, inconsiderate people. It means putting up with people who snore, talk in their sleep, pass wind, take up extra space, arrive late, leave early, get up five times in the night, thrash around, rattle their gear at five AM, play cards when you want to sleep, bitch about excessive noise at 7 pm.

If you see yourself in any of these descriptions, well, there's a simple remedy: Don't stay in shelters. Likewise, if this sort of thing bothers you, well, don't stay in shelters. You don' wanna deal with the 49 human interactive things that come along with sleeping in a box with nine other strangers? Well, simple solution: Don't stay there. If you DO stay there, well don't complain. If you don't want to be in a situation where you feel the need to complain, then don't stay there. End of story. But whining isn't going to change anything. If the behavior of of other people is likely to upset you.... then keep your own company. At the very least, you'll sleep better.

Kerosene
06-13-2004, 16:37
Well said, Jack, but I would still prefer to see hikers with better manners. (Of course, why should hikers been any better than the rest of the population?) If someone's actions are bothersome -- at a shelter or walking along the trail -- I may let them know what I think, but I'm just as likely to keep walking.

Jack Tarlin
06-13-2004, 19:41
Kerosene---you're right! I would also prefer to see hikers have better manners.

Regrettably, I've come to realize that I don't have four hundred spare years to wait for this to happen.

Rather than wait, or rather than be upset while waiting, ther's a simple expedient: I stay in shelters when they're empty, or when they have only a few folks in 'em, preferably folks I know, or when the weather is so horrible (or threatening to be) that whatever awaits within the shelter is better than the conditions that await without.

Otherwise I avoid them like the plague, and if more folks did likewsie, they'd discover fewer things to complain about.

Pencil Pusher
06-13-2004, 21:36
I hear ya' KZ, tolerance helps.

Mountain Dew
06-14-2004, 04:51
Lone Wolf... Baltimore Jack isn't my god and we tease one another all the time. We don't agree on all things either. Funny how you bring his name up in an attempt to defend youself. Like crying "moma moma". Tell me....are the the founding member of his fan club or an obsessive stalker ?

Frosty... Well said !

Pencil Pusher ..Funny stuff. I got a mental image of us actually holding hands, naked , and running in the woods like you said. Horrific mental image thanks alot ! People often disagree on here and fight, but don't brothers do the same ? I'd most likely get his back in an altercation because on some level I respect what he's done and contrary to this and many other post...we agree on many things. I just look at him as the bully big brother and picks fights on whiteblaze for his entertainment.

For those that say people that stay in shelters should know how things are and thus except it and not stay there I say this: Have you ever gotten mad at another driver on the road ? You know that not every driver is a good driver, BUT you drive anyways and have gotten mad at another driven when that person did something you took offense to right ? HYPOCRISY !!!

If I don't like somebody actions on the trail am I then to avoid the trail ?

Pencil Pusher
06-14-2004, 05:17
I got a mental image of us actually holding hands, naked , and running in the woods like you said.
You got a purdy smile, boy. [Cue Dueling Banjos]

Lone Wolf
06-14-2004, 07:25
That's cute how y'all tease each other all the time, 7-UP. ;) You're a lousy debater and arguer.

Floops
06-14-2004, 15:14
Don't really give a s**t what ya think Dewey. :D
If that were true, you wouldn't have replied! :cool:

Lone Wolf
06-14-2004, 15:55
Yeah okay there armchair psychoanalyst. :rolleyes:

3oz
06-14-2004, 17:59
While hiking the Long Trail, I had a run in with someone who had no etiquette. I forget the shelter name, but it had been pooring so there was wet clothing hanging all about. It was a shelter with four 2-person bunks. I was hiking alone but there were 3 other hikers sharing the shelter with me. At dark we each took one of the 4 spots, thinking no one else would show up. Around 11 PM a gray hair couple bust through the door(It was an enclosed shelter) and started making all sorts of noise. The women was trying to be quiet but the man seemed to be hard of hearing, and yell back at the women, "What!" Aside from the yelling the shined their hedlamps in our eyes, and asked us if we would move so that they didn't have to sleep seperately. Looking back it seems almost to comic for it to actually to have happened, but it did.

smokymtnsteve
06-14-2004, 18:06
While hiking the Long Trail, I had a run in with someone who had no etiquette. I forget the shelter name, but it had been pooring so there was wet clothing hanging all about. It was a shelter with four 2-person bunks. I was hiking alone but there were 3 other hikers sharing the shelter with me. At dark we each took one of the 4 spots, thinking no one else would show up. Around 11 PM a gray hair couple bust through the door(It was an enclosed shelter) and started making all sorts of noise. The women was trying to be quiet but the man seemed to be hard of hearing, and yell back at the women, "What!" Aside from the yelling the shined their hedlamps in our eyes, and asked us if we would move so that they didn't have to sleep seperately. Looking back it seems almost to comic for it to actually to have happened, but it did.


oh how traumatic that must have been for you...

Percival
06-14-2004, 18:46
You got a purdy smile, boy.
Whats that you say thar?

...... bend over that log thar.
(twisting Pencil Pusher's ear) now let's hear you squeeel like a pig

eeeeeeeee

eeeeeeeEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE !!!!!!!

Pencil Pusher
06-14-2004, 19:01
Quentin Tarantino did such a good job with this type of scene in Pulp Fiction. Definitely twisted, but in a good way.

You should resurrect or bump your tree-sitter thread. If it's something you believe in, don't let others deter you. Now quit twisting my ear;)

Frosty
06-14-2004, 21:28
oh how traumatic that must have been for you...
Yeah, just goes to show how rude and insensitive hikers can be. The elderly couple, I mean.

wacocelt
07-08-2004, 16:29
Mountain Dew, quit harrsassing people on here and give me a call cracka!

Yes, shelters suck during peak season, but when neccessity dictates, you must overcome adversity with an open heart and an open mind, or simply hike on...

Be well folks!