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Pedaling Fool
09-22-2009, 15:09
I've seen threads about this, but didn't know there were actual manufactured packs on wheels. I'm very skeptical about the use of these things and know it wouldn't work in rocky areas that require a hand-scramble. http://dixonrollerpack.com/

Nevertheless, just wondering if anyone used one of these and curious of your thoughts.

Manwich
09-22-2009, 15:21
brb, laughing

Six-Six
09-22-2009, 15:24
oh, puhleeeeze. Now the packhorse in both pictures looks nice.

ShoelessWanderer
09-22-2009, 15:28
http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-laughing001.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php) Just too funny! I'm sorry, I can't help but laugh. And I would so die of laughter if I EVER so someone on this trail with one of those.

Tennessee Viking
09-22-2009, 15:32
Where's the infomercial for this?

Arizona
09-22-2009, 15:43
I have never seen anyone use these. The only practical use I can see would be for hiking on paved roads with an ultra heavy pack.

Yukon
09-22-2009, 15:47
There's an add for that thing in the back of Backpacker magazine each month...I'm sure it would work in some places :-?

wyominglostandfound
09-22-2009, 16:09
yeah... i would be slow to knock it. winter backcountry guys here in the rockies use sleds of the same nature behind them when they ski into the mtns. i think that if fitted and rigged correctly, the benefits would outweigh the negatives.

beakerman
09-22-2009, 16:12
I jsut couldn't imagine traversing any difficult terrain like deep gullies, river crossings or the rocky parts of the AT with that beastie draggin behind me.

those are some nice pack horses though...

Mags
09-22-2009, 16:17
All kidding aside, anything with a wheel would not be allowed in designated Wilderness Areas. For similar reasons, I doubt this contraption would be allowed on the AT (or the PCT for that matter).


yeah... i would be slow to knock it. winter backcountry guys here in the rockies use sleds of the same nature behind them when they ski into the mtns. i think that if fitted and rigged correctly, the benefits would outweigh the negatives.

Sleds work because they distribute the weight over snow...and only on mellow grades at that. Tightly switchbacked trails and steep terrain? Not so much. I've used a sled on mellow winter backpacks and hut trips. I would not want to take a sled on some of my ski tours. :O

sheepdog
09-22-2009, 16:26
http://www.womenofthefurtrade.com/images/Flying_M__05-2.jpg
wheels you get wheels? I want wheels on mine

Jester2000
09-22-2009, 16:31
All kidding aside, anything with a wheel would not be allowed in designated Wilderness Areas. For similar reasons, I doubt this contraption would be allowed on the AT (or the PCT for that matter).

We actually had a debate about that when we saw a pack on wheels at the kickoff. Signs on the PCT say "no mechanical vehicles," which includes bikes, but I didn't see any signs that said "no wheels."

Maybe 'cause then those folks I see with measuring wheels would get in trouble.

mrhughes1982
09-22-2009, 16:41
I wonder if it has breaks :-?

Mags
09-22-2009, 16:50
We actually had a debate about that when we saw a pack on wheels at the kickoff. Signs on the PCT say "no mechanical vehicles," which includes bikes, but I didn't see any signs that said "no wheels."




http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/hoosier/recreation/ccdw.htm

The pertinent photo:

http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/hoosier/images/historical/ruthie_rod_land.gif

The caption from the USFS wilderness website:

Ruthie, the Forest Service mule, and Rod Fahl maintain trails in the Wilderness with a sled, since Wilderness regulations forbid the use of wheeled vehicles.

If a wilderness area forbids wheeled carts (with a USFS mule no less), I think there is a good chance they will ban a wheeled pack, too.


Another USFS Wilderness site:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/ltbmu/recreation/wilderness/

"Travel in the wilderness is restricted to hikers and packstock. No motorized, mechanized, or wheeled equipment such as bicycles, motorcycles, snowmobiles or game carts are allowed."


Also,
From http://www.wildernessbicycling.org/bikesbelong/exceptions_in_wild.html

Other human-powered wheeled devices that are not allowed in Wilderness: hunters’ game carts and game carriers [1] (http://www.wildernessbicycling.org/bikesbelong/exceptions_in_wild.html#_edn1), baby strollers, and wheelbarrows.
1. See, regarding game carriers in BLM Wilderness, 43 C.F.R. 6301.5, 4th par., 6302.20(d)),


I don't think a wheeled pack would be allowed based on the above. A wheeled pack seems awfully close to a game cart (and is about the same size, too) . But, the district head will be the one to ask. The only exception appears to be wheel chairs. Seems ADA regs apply more than wilderness regs, here.


As for the PCT/AT, I don't know..but I suspect similar rules may apply. For the AT (which does not allow horses..never mind bikes), there is a ranger who is in charge; he or she would be the one to ask. The PCT is under the USFS jurisdiction and my gut feeling is similar rules may apply esp since mtbikes are forbidden on the PCT. With all the scattered wilderness areas on the PCT, using a wheeled pack would be impractical for logistic reasons.


As for the measurement wheel, they are probably allowed because it is more of a tool than a carrying device..and one that has been historically "grandfathered" in at that. But, (as you can tell), I don't know for sure. :)

Pedaling Fool
09-22-2009, 17:43
There's an add for that thing in the back of Backpacker magazine each month...I'm sure it would work in some places :-?
That's where I saw it; I was paging through it at the gym.

Pedaling Fool
09-22-2009, 17:45
You bring up an interesting point Mags, kinda makes me want to call the ATC...:-?

sheepdog
09-22-2009, 19:57
how about the wheels on my walker???

mrhughes1982
09-22-2009, 20:10
This is what you need with that pack!

drastic_quench
09-22-2009, 21:22
Perfect!

(for most sidewalks)

kolokolo
09-22-2009, 22:00
I'd say that if you need a rolling pack, then you have too much stuff.:datz

Slo-go'en
09-23-2009, 09:58
Well, that wheeled pack would be ideal for walking the ADT, which is 80-90% road/bike path. Getting the pack off your back would keep you cooler in the hot sun and make it a lot easier to carry a ton of water in the desert areas.

Pedaling Fool
09-23-2009, 10:09
Well, that wheeled pack would be ideal for walking the ADT, which is 80-90% road/bike path. Getting the pack off your back would keep you cooler in the hot sun and make it a lot easier to carry a ton of water in the desert areas.
Yeah, I'm sure it does have some use; I'm just surprised I've never seen one used before or even knew they existed, yet there's a company that sells them. Must be someone out there, if not ever used one, at least has seen them:-? I wonder how many they sell per year? Maybe it's just an out-west thing.

Gray Blazer
09-23-2009, 10:13
Google Mormon Handcart Pioneers.

brooklynkayak
09-23-2009, 10:51
All kidding aside, anything with a wheel would not be allowed in designated Wilderness Areas. For similar reasons, I doubt this contraption would be allowed on the AT (or the PCT for that matter).


I think I remember a CDT thru-hiker who used wheels, Don't know if he completed. It was a baby buggy kind of contraption. He needed the wheels as he was carrying a load of video gear for a documentary. Of course he had to unpack and carry stuff on his back a lot.

winger
09-23-2009, 18:11
I think its appropriate that the "Full Throttle Douche Bag" is on the same You Tube page.

Franco
09-23-2009, 18:31
There is at least another company that makes them, Carrix in Switzerland
http://carrix.ch.tripod.com/ (http://carrix.ch.tripod.com/)
Obviously a niche market but as pointed out by Slo-go'en in some areas it could be useful. I know someone did a long desert crossing (dirt roads) with one of them here in Australia.
Franco

Mags
09-23-2009, 18:57
I think I remember a CDT thru-hiker who used wheels, Don't know if he completed. It was a baby buggy kind of contraption. He needed the wheels as he was carrying a load of video gear for a documentary. Of course he had to unpack and carry stuff on his back a lot.

Ah..but the CDT (other than designated Wilderness Areas) does allow MTBiking. That is true of most Western trails (again, other than designated Wilderness Areas). As an example, the Colorado Trail guidebook has alt routes around the WAs for MTBikers.

YoungMoose
09-23-2009, 19:01
lol i cant believe people make these things. THats not backpacking or hiking. Whats next they have a backpack that can carry you

redick1955
09-23-2009, 20:28
That's really funny !!!

nox
09-23-2009, 20:38
i just had shoulder surgery yesterday. I won't be able to work for 3-6 months. if i can't find a friend to carry my pack for me i might just have to get one of these.. haha

ShoelessWanderer
09-24-2009, 14:58
I'd say that if you need a rolling pack, then you have too much stuff.:datz

I have to agree with that!

Besides, backpacking isn't suppose to be easy. Wheels on the trail is just wrong!

Foyt20
09-24-2009, 15:03
Mehhh... Looks interesting I guess.

garlic08
09-24-2009, 15:13
I actually met a guy who tried one on the CDT in NM in '05. It lasted about 300 miles before completely breaking, after multiple minor failures. Not worth it, according to him.

Franco
09-24-2009, 22:46
As far as I am concerned, if a product has even one satisfied customer (never mind what I like...) it has a reason for existing.

Maybe it could do well for elite hobos, the ones that are not on strict budget (....) and prefer not to have the weight of their world on their shoulders.
Next time I see one, I'll ask.
Franco
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e389/Francophoto/hobo-and-dog.jpg

Tinker
09-25-2009, 00:15
I keep looking at the photo, wondering where the golf clubs are :D :p

Redfish
09-25-2009, 09:15
I use a pack with 4 wheels. It also converts to a stove at camp.


http://thereifixedit.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/evabbq.jpg

faarside
09-25-2009, 10:13
An absolute must for the URBAN HIKER. Next time i'm in Manhattan i'll have to keep my eyes peeled for one! :rolleyes:

yaduck9
09-25-2009, 11:50
I like that photo in that ad.

I think the reason why "they" won't allow wheeled "vehicles" on trails is because of the small ruts that are created, which enhances erosion during heavy rain.

I would think someone who has a lot of experience in trail maintenance would have an opinion on this.

Tipi Walter
09-25-2009, 11:57
http://www.womenofthefurtrade.com/images/Flying_M__05-2.jpg
wheels you get wheels? I want wheels on mine

Ah, the old dog travois. This was the main Indian form of hauling before the arrival of horses. Worked pretty good for about 20,000 years.


I think I remember a CDT thru-hiker who used wheels, Don't know if he completed. It was a baby buggy kind of contraption. He needed the wheels as he was carrying a load of video gear for a documentary. Of course he had to unpack and carry stuff on his back a lot.

There was a guy who walked 19,000 miles from the bottom of South America to the top of Alaska, George something or other, and he pulled a pack on wheels. Took him seven years.

mudhead
09-25-2009, 12:02
I use a pack with 4 wheels. It also converts to a stove at camp.


http://thereifixedit.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/evabbq.jpg

If anyone young is reading this, ask a science teacher about the health issues involved in using something like this as a grill.

It is amusing.

Tipi Walter
09-25-2009, 12:05
If anyone young is reading this, ask a science teacher about the health issues involved in using something like this as a grill.

It is amusing.

This reminds me of a few homeless folks I knew back in the early 1980s.

mudhead
09-25-2009, 12:09
Oven rack might work, too. I don't recall...

berninbush
09-25-2009, 17:31
I remember at some point on here there was a lady with back problems asking about something like this. (I think maybe she was going to build one?) She was able to hike comfortably but not with a full pack for long distances... she was hoping that reducing the weight and shifting it to her lower back would allow her to hike the AT, even knowing that there would be sections where she had to carry the whole thing on her back. For people with that particular situation, I can see how this would be worth it. I also suspect the USFS might accomodate them if they produced proper medical documentation of their condition... of course I don't know that for sure.

berninbush
09-25-2009, 17:35
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=2971&highlight=wheel

Yeah, there's the thread I was thinking of if anyone's curious. Started in 2003, but somehow the conversation kept getting resurrected until 2008. No word on whether the original poster ever made her hike or not.

Pedaling Fool
06-20-2011, 17:11
Saw this pic in the gallery from LimpsAlong. Curious of your take on how the pack did on that hike?

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/2/3/8/4/4/goodone.jpg (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=47024&original=1&c=newimages&cutoffdate=1)

Superdave0002
07-24-2012, 11:23
Seems like a person using one would be able to hike with there head up more of the time. I think it could be improved considerable too. MAke it so it is quick to convert back to a regular backpack. So a lot of time isnt wasted when you get to a place that it wont go.

LimpsAlong
03-02-2013, 18:37
Yup, thats my wife. Lower back problems so almost all the weight on her hips worked like a charm. Started at Woody and went 6 miles past Neels with that contraption. I did a little repair replacement of the wheel and skid material but other than that all worked as advertised. We got a lot of grief from posters here about it but as my wife said, HYOFH! I put a couple of short videos on youtube..google cheri a.t. hike. You'll see how it worked out. As a bonus I got to share expresso with her and take a hot shower because of the goodies she was able to tote.

T.S.Kobzol
03-02-2013, 19:26
I wonder how it could work adapted to travel on snow with replacing the wheel with a small ski?



I've seen threads about this, but didn't know there were actual manufactured packs on wheels. I'm very skeptical about the use of these things and know it wouldn't work in rocky areas that require a hand-scramble. http://dixonrollerpack.com/

Nevertheless, just wondering if anyone used one of these and curious of your thoughts.



Sent from my SGH-T889 using Tapatalk 2

pelenaka
03-02-2013, 19:39
This would be good for hiking around the sections of the AT that doesn't allow my dog. Of course there will be a huge learning curve getting him to go back to actually hiking instead of mooching the ride.

kayak karl
03-02-2013, 20:24
I wonder how it could work adapted to travel on snow with replacing the wheel with a small ski? Sent from my SGH-T889 using Tapatalk 2

YES a ski is an option with it.

This is my DIY version of the roller pack.

20099

speedbump
03-02-2013, 22:10
I see many negative comments, but if someone has a bad back, hip, knee, etc. and the only way to carry the weight is on wheels, then why not ? Hike your own hike, using wheels to hike is better than not hiking at all. When and if I ever get the chance to do the entire trail, I will do whatever it takes to do it, wheels included.


I've seen threads about this, but didn't know there were actual manufactured packs on wheels. I'm very skeptical about the use of these things and know it wouldn't work in rocky areas that require a hand-scramble. http://dixonrollerpack.com/

Nevertheless, just wondering if anyone used one of these and curious of your thoughts.

T.S.Kobzol
03-02-2013, 22:14
Interesting, so can it theoretically replace/improve a pulk while bc skiing?


YES a ski is an option with it.

This is my DIY version of the roller pack.

20099



Sent from my SGH-T889 using Tapatalk 2

Train Wreck
03-02-2013, 23:00
Would they let you haul that thing through the Smokies?

Slo-go'en
03-02-2013, 23:27
I see many negative comments, but if someone has a bad back, hip, knee, etc. and the only way to carry the weight is on wheels, then why not ? Hike your own hike, using wheels to hike is better than not hiking at all. When and if I ever get the chance to do the entire trail, I will do whatever it takes to do it, wheels included.

In theory, anything with wheels is prohibited on the AT. Anyway, your not going to get far in New England with that contraption. I'd consider it for a long road walk, but not on the AT even though there are some sections where it would work.