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kcol27
10-11-2009, 19:57
Hello all,

I'm sure this topic has been discussed in the past, I just haven't been able to find a thread about it.

I will be NOBO 2010, and am interested in trying hammock camping as I've heard so many great things about it regarding light weight, comfort etc. My question is with regard to hammock camping in cold weather at the beginning and end of the hike .. obviously there is a lot more airflow beneath you to make lower temps uncomfortable. Having an underquilt in addition to your sleeping pad and bag sound like they fix this problem, but there is also a large additional cost with investing in an underquilt as well as additional weight / pack space it takes up... does this decrease some of the benefits of carrying hammock over a tent?

And for those of you who have thru'd before, do people somtimes switch out tents for hammocks when swapping out cold weather clothes / sleeping bags to save on weight during the warm months?

Sorry if thats a lot of questions for one post. Thanks for the advice!

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:03
I'd go with a ground tent if it were me because not only am I already on the ground with the wind being deflected from me but if i have to get up in a hurry it would be much easier I would think to roll out and stand up instead of rolling on out and stepping down and trying to put my boots on. I mean I can put my boots on inside of my tent instead of the hassle of doing it in a hammock......

Hammocks are meant for back yards.....

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:08
Hello all,

I'm sure this topic has been discussed in the past, I just haven't been able to find a thread about it.

I will be NOBO 2010, and am interested in trying hammock camping as I've heard so many great things about it regarding light weight, comfort etc. My question is with regard to hammock camping in cold weather at the beginning and end of the hike .. obviously there is a lot more airflow beneath you to make lower temps uncomfortable. Having an underquilt in addition to your sleeping pad and bag sound like they fix this problem, but there is also a large additional cost with investing in an underquilt as well as additional weight / pack space it takes up... does this decrease some of the benefits of carrying hammock over a tent?

And for those of you who have thru'd before, do people somtimes switch out tents for hammocks when swapping out cold weather clothes / sleeping bags to save on weight during the warm months?

Sorry if thats a lot of questions for one post. Thanks for the advice!Ah, hammocks. A subject so near and dear to my heart. First, there are hammock haters aplenty here, so don't let the detractors steer you away from your interest. Their disdain for hanging is usually born from ignorance, having either no or very little experience in one.

That said, if you have a good quality underquilt, sufficent topside insulation and a good base layer, you rarely have to supplement a full length underquilt with a pad. Later on, after temps warm up a bit, you may be able to ditch the underquilt and just go with a pad. A good quality underquilt will run you a few bucks, definitely. But it's an investment, just like a good quality sleeping bag is. It's one of those pieces of gear that, if well cared for, will last you quite a while and suit your needs for years to come.

When you're carrying a hammock with a cold weather setup, you'll probably pay a little bit of a weight penalty. However, IMO, the comfort factor far offsets that weight penalty by a longshot.

If you have other hammocking questions, feel free to go and visit us over on Hammock Forums (http://www.hammockforums.net). Your home on the net for all things related to hammocking. Good luck!

dreamsoftrails
10-11-2009, 20:08
i left this past march, starting out camping on ground under tarp. at one point i had my hammock mailed to me and i used just a large prolite 4 for warmth in the hammock and i was fine. i decided to use the hammock only for a week before i sent it home because i switched to a lighter approach all around. (i was constantly tinkering with items and even switched packs at one point.) so yes, you can switch at some point.

you are correct about the extra cost. however, weight is hard to say, because it depends on what we are contrasting to. for me, it was the same tarp i would use, regardless of hammock or not. so the extra weight was the hammock and the larger pad i needed for the hammock. 3 lbs for me.

if you are comparing a hammock to a normal three season tent, you will find you can have a hammock set up at about the same weight if you customize your hammock and make wise, expensive choices on insulation. maybe a little more weight in the end, but the comfort will be great.

dreamsoftrails
10-11-2009, 20:11
I'd go with a ground tent if it were me because not only am I already on the ground with the wind being deflected from me but if i have to get up in a hurry it would be much easier I would think to roll out and stand up instead of rolling on out and stepping down and trying to put my boots on. I mean I can put my boots on inside of my tent instead of the hassle of doing it in a hammock......

Hammocks are meant for back yards.....

if the hammock is hung at an appropriate level, it acts as a chair to help with boots on. and, when in a hammock, of course, there is no getting up in the middle of the night because you can pee right out of the thing. just pick a spot accordingly to this strategy.

the wind is a potential factor for the hammock, no doubt. site selection, the type of tarp (speer winter tarp for example) and other gear selections determine what factor it will be.

your last point is being shattered in the backcountry. :)

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:13
I'd go with a ground tent if it were me because not only am I already on the ground with the wind being deflected from me but if i have to get up in a hurry it would be much easier I would think to roll out and stand up instead of rolling on out and stepping down and trying to put my boots on. I mean I can put my boots on inside of my tent instead of the hassle of doing it in a hammock......

Hammocks are meant for back yards.....


.......there are hammock haters aplenty here, so don't let the detractors steer you away from your interest. Their disdain for hanging is usually born from ignorance, having either no or very little experience in one....... See what I mean?

BTW, TOW, one can easily put on their boots/shoes/trail runners while seated on the side/edge of a hammock without any difficulty whatsoever. :rolleyes:

To the OP, this really isn't the best place for hammock info, especially with the haters jumping on the bandwagon so quickly. Go over to Ahmmock Forums and we'll be all to happy to help you out over there, drama free. :D

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:18
your last point is being shattered in the backcountry. :)He'd understand that if he was ever actually in the backcountry. :rolleyes:

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:19
I am not a hater, it just does not make sense to me. But if you guys with the experience says it is so, then so be it.

But my question is why would you want to pee right below where you lay? If you do not want to get up in the middle of the night in a tent then carry a pee bottle with you..

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:20
He'd understand that if he was ever actually in the backcountry. :rolleyes:
Okay, I can see you know no more of my biz as much as your crew does......

saimyoji
10-11-2009, 20:23
But my question is why would you want to pee right below where you lay? If you do not want to get up in the middle of the night in a tent then carry a pee bottle with you..

what the hell are you talking about? who said anything about peeing?

Bulldawg
10-11-2009, 20:23
Okay, I can see you know no more of my biz as much as your crew does......


What does a crew have to do with hiking and backpacking?

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:24
My point, TOW, is don't put down hammocks when you obviously know nothing of them, especially as fast as the dynamics of hammocking change. If you're gonna dump on hammocks, then at least do your homework first. The OP asked for hammocking advice, not deterrents.

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:27
My point, TOW, is don't put down hammocks when you obviously know nothing of them, especially as fast as the dynamics of hammocking change. If you're gonna dump on hammocks, then at least do your homework first. The OP asked for hammocking advice, not deterrents.
Excuse me my dear sir, i was not putting them down, I was just simply and clearly stating that I would go with a tent. And the OP's header very clearly stated that he wanted an opinion on both......

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:28
what the hell are you talking about? who said anything about peeing?
go back and read before you sound off......

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:29
Excuse me my dear sir, i was not putting them down, I was just simply and clearly stating that I would go with a tent. And the OP's header very clearly stated that he wanted an opinion on both......Don't call me dear, I ain't your style. :rolleyes: How can you tell him to go with a tent instead of a hammock, when you know nothing of hammocks? Personally, I used to be a ground dweller and evolved off the ground, so I've used both in the backcountry. I'd be willing to bet you can't say the same.

Pacific Tortuga
10-11-2009, 20:29
TOW, your back. Hard to stay away.

modiyooch
10-11-2009, 20:33
tow, have you tried a hammock?

Bulldawg
10-11-2009, 20:33
Don't call me dear, I ain't your style. :rolleyes:

Why do you say that Hooch, a little long in the tooth perhaps?:eek:


How can you tell him to go with a tent instead of a hammock, when you know nothing of hammocks? Personally, I used to be a ground dweller and evolved off the ground, so I've used both in the backcountry. I'd be willing to bet you can't say the same.

I've used both and prefer not waking up sore. That and I happen to prefer sleeping all night long. Something I can't seem to do on the ground!:D

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:34
Don't call me dear, I ain't your style. :rolleyes: How can you tell him to go with a tent instead of a hammock, when you know nothing of hammocks? Personally, I used to be a ground dweller and evolved off the ground, so I've used both in the backcountry. I'd be willing to bet you can't say the same.You are right, I cannot say the same and you are doing your best to stir up an argument. I have no argument with you but you certainly seem to have one with me. I have an opinion and I am sticking to it until I find out otherwise for I never professed of knowing anything about hammocking nor will I ever profess to know anything because I will never get into one.....but I have plenty of experience with a tent......

And by the way just what is my style?

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:36
TOW, your back. Hard to stay away.
yeah, i am addicted......but not for long, got a buyer for this thing next week, i'll be heading to the library every so often just to conduct biz.....

dreamsoftrails
10-11-2009, 20:37
I am not a hater, it just does not make sense to me. But if you guys with the experience says it is so, then so be it.

But my question is why would you want to pee right below where you lay? If you do not want to get up in the middle of the night in a tent then carry a pee bottle with you..
not a bad question. the way i set up, my hammock is not perfectly under center of my tarp. the wider side to me, is where the gear goes. when i pee, pee the other way, to the short side, and usually i get it out past the bottom of the tarp. i usually set up to where this is downhill.

lets face it, when you eat steaks, drink whiskey, crash in your hammock, wake up needing to pee, there is no more kingly feeling than just leaning on one's side and lettin it go.

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:38
You are right, I cannot say the same and you are doing your best to stir up an argument....... It's nothing personal, but don't offer an opinion on hammocks, when, as you've stated yourself, you know nothing of them.

Crazy Larry #1
10-11-2009, 20:39
It's nothing personal, but don't offer an opinion on hammocks, when, as you've stated yourself, you know nothing of them.okay.......

modiyooch
10-11-2009, 20:40
but if i have to get up in a hurry it would be much easier I would think to roll out and stand up instead of rolling on out and stepping down and trying to put my boots on. I mean I can put my boots on inside of my tent instead of the hassle of doing it in a hammock......

Hammocks are meant for back yards..... It's not as complicated as you make it. In fact, it's probably easier than a tent. But, that wasn't the question. Athough, I can't answer the question in regards to cold weather, I did like several of the advantages that the hammock offered.

MintakaCat
10-11-2009, 20:48
Hammocks are meant for back yards.....

I disagree, I've got both and find that each (hammocks & tents) have advantages and disadvantages. I've ended up using hammocks 50% of the time and tents 50% of the time. I'm one of the few that like both.

modiyooch
10-11-2009, 20:50
I like both as well. My only concern now, is how to decide which one to pack??

bigcranky
10-11-2009, 20:52
Before this thread gets locked or deleted, let me say that I regularly use both a tent and a hammock. I love my hammock in warm weather, and use it often on summer solo hikes. My summer hammock setup is heavier than my lightest tarp/bivy kit, but the comfort and ease of finding campsites make it worthwhile.

However, in cold weather I use a tarp or a tarptent. I just find it easier to stay warm for less weight using a tarptent and a sleeping pad. No, it's not as comfortable (though I am quite comfy, thanks.)

Horses for courses, as they say.

Hooch
10-11-2009, 20:54
I like both as well. My only concern now, is how to decide which one to pack??It's all a matter of personal preference and informed decision making. Personally, I've used both and had a real issue not only getting to sleep, but staying asleep. It was a simple matter of comfort for me. I have nothing against tents, they're just not for me. That's ok if everyone doesn't use hammocks, more trees for me. :D

saimyoji
10-11-2009, 21:11
Racial slur, post reported. :rolleyes:

y'know, i had no idea that was a meaning for it (i had to google it). i've honestly never been called sambo before, and just wanted to play it off.....

...TOW, i hope that is not what you meant by it. :(

nox
10-11-2009, 21:16
do the tenters and hammockers fight like this on the trail? I'll carry both so i don't get beat up... or will i be beaten by both groups? I'll just use downed branches and sleep in a tipi each night. problem solved.. maybe.

Hooch
10-11-2009, 21:23
do the tenters and hammockers fight like this on the trail? I'll carry both so i don't get beat up... or will i be beaten by both groups? I'll just use downed branches and sleep in a tipi each night. problem solved.. maybe.Nah, it's just the internet here. Some folks who don't know anything about hammocking like to stick their nose where they don't understand. Like I said, their opinions are usually fueled by ignorance and inexperience.

kcol27
10-11-2009, 21:31
Thanks for your input everyone! I didn't mean to start off a hammock vs tent war- I'm sure its all just a matter of personal preference. Have heard great things about hammocks so am eager to give them a try. Am just reluctant to make such a big investment for cold weather add-ons until I'm sure that hammocks are for me- so was curious as to other people's opinions and weighing up the options.

Also, I'm also a she (as opposed to a he) so it might make the peeing issue slightly more complicated! :)

Hooch
10-11-2009, 21:36
Thanks for your input everyone! I didn't mean to start off a hammock vs tent war- I'm sure its all just a matter of personal preference. Have heard great things about hammocks so am eager to give them a try. Am just reluctant to make such a big investment for cold weather add-ons until I'm sure that hammocks are for me- so was curious as to other people's opinions and weighing up the options.

Also, I'm also a she (as opposed to a he) so it might make the peeing issue slightly more complicated! :)No worries. Go over to Hammock Forums (http://www.hammockforums.net) for any info you need on hammocking. We're hater-free over there. A big website of hammocking goodness. :D

nox
10-11-2009, 21:36
kcol, go buy a cheep hammock like a byer's moskito. to see if you like hanging before you drop a bunch of money on an expensive set up. spend the $40 and try it out a couple of times on nice days.

dreamsoftrails
10-11-2009, 21:38
Thanks for your input everyone! I didn't mean to start off a hammock vs tent war- I'm sure its all just a matter of personal preference. Have heard great things about hammocks so am eager to give them a try. Am just reluctant to make such a big investment for cold weather add-ons until I'm sure that hammocks are for me- so was curious as to other people's opinions and weighing up the options.

Also, I'm also a she (as opposed to a he) so it might make the peeing issue slightly more complicated! :)
ahh, sorry for the sexism. i don't think it will be quite as easy to pee out the hammock that way.

you are right about the cost. however, if you get a wide insulated pad, you can use that in the hammock and if you don't like the hammock you can use it on the ground. for a big guy like me, that meant a full prolite 4, weighing in at 2 lbs. i guess a lot depends on when you are starting.

and nevermind the hammock/tent warriors. some debate more gear than they use. There was nothing wrong with what TOW said, just stated his opinion.

RichardD
10-11-2009, 21:40
I used a Hammock for the first time this Summer, prior to that I used a Tarptent Rainbow with either an Exped downmat or Big Agnes inulated Air Mat. Both setups have been very good. The hammock definitely wins out on sleeping comfort. The comment about difficulty on getting up in the night is way off the mark. It is far easier the get up and out of a Hennesy hammock than the tent..
I experimented with a pad and a supershelter for the hammock but spent the money on an underquilt and have found it to be excellent. The supershelter worked but was too much trouble, the underquilt no trouble at all (its worth the investment, if you can afford it).
I have not been in seriously cold conditions in the hammock, the coldest was in Colorado, strong winds, rain/sleet and about 34 degrees. I have a 20 degree WM bag and was quite comfortable. My hiking companions, in tents with good down 20 degree bags were apparently a little chilled.
I experienced much wet weather on the AT this Summer and the hammock was clearly the better solution in those conditions with a large dry area in which to eat and pack.
The tent definitely provides more room to organise gear inside, in the hammock you must suspend anything you want inside and have to leave your pack outside. I did not find this to be a major disadvantage after I got used to it.
The hammock can be a little claustophobic but it did not bother me.
The reassuring, but entirely false, feeling of a nylon fortress was no different with a hammock vs tent once you are inside.
Pitching options are more numerous for the hammock than the tent, at least in Virginia on the AT, less so in the desert southwest.
A bonus for the hammock is that you have a supremely comfortable seat for eating dinner and breakfast and a superb recliner for reading prior to sleep.
Incidently, I have not yet through hiked the AT, I will do that when I retire in a year or two, I did hike most of Virginia AT this Summer. The hammock will be my choice when I through hike.

Hooch
10-11-2009, 21:47
.......There was nothing wrong with what TOW said.......Other than being wrong. :rolleyes:

dreamsoftrails
10-11-2009, 21:58
Other than being wrong. :rolleyes:
maybe so, but he didn't need to be exorcised. :D

Hooch
10-11-2009, 22:02
maybe so, but he didn't need to be exorcised. :DTrust me, if anyone needs exorcism, it's TOW. :rolleyes:

JTCruiser
10-11-2009, 22:03
I used a Hammock for the first time this Summer, prior to that I used a Tarptent Rainbow with either an Exped downmat or Big Agnes inulated Air Mat. Both setups have been very good. The hammock definitely wins out on sleeping comfort. The comment about difficulty on getting up in the night is way off the mark. It is far easier the get up and out of a Hennesy hammock than the tent..
I experimented with a pad and a supershelter for the hammock but spent the money on an underquilt and have found it to be excellent. The supershelter worked but was too much trouble, the underquilt no trouble at all (its worth the investment, if you can afford it).
I have not been in seriously cold conditions in the hammock, the coldest was in Colorado, strong winds, rain/sleet and about 34 degrees. I have a 20 degree WM bag and was quite comfortable. My hiking companions, in tents with good down 20 degree bags were apparently a little chilled.
I experienced much wet weather on the AT this Summer and the hammock was clearly the better solution in those conditions with a large dry area in which to eat and pack.
The tent definitely provides more room to organise gear inside, in the hammock you must suspend anything you want inside and have to leave your pack outside. I did not find this to be a major disadvantage after I got used to it.
The hammock can be a little claustophobic but it did not bother me.
The reassuring, but entirely false, feeling of a nylon fortress was no different with a hammock vs tent once you are inside.
Pitching options are more numerous for the hammock than the tent, at least in Virginia on the AT, less so in the desert southwest.
A bonus for the hammock is that you have a supremely comfortable seat for eating dinner and breakfast and a superb recliner for reading prior to sleep.
Incidently, I have not yet through hiked the AT, I will do that when I retire in a year or two, I did hike most of Virginia AT this Summer. The hammock will be my choice when I through hike.

Very nice recap, RichardD. Thanks.

Tin Man
10-12-2009, 04:26
I am not sure why people think another person's choice of shelter is something to deride... unless of course we are talking about wooden boxes. :p

I was always curious about hammocking, finally tried it this summer, and became a real believer. Now, I am trying to figure out the cold weather question because even though I own perfectly good tents, I don't want to go back to the ground or buy an expensive quilt just for a couple of short scout trips, which is all of my cold weather camping - no AT overnights planned until warm weather returns. I will probably just use a second sleeping bag underneath for now.

Peeing from the hammock or in a bottle in the tent as some do is gross and just plain lazy. Okay, getting out of a warm spot is not fun, but if you do it quick getting back into a warm spot feels good and is much cleaner. And who knows, you may experience a little of the dark night stars or critters. I saw a fawn on one such occasion, not 10 feet from my tent and I never heard it come into camp. How cool is that?

I am happy the hammockers post here, and not just hammock forums, or I would never have given it another thought. Hammocking is definitely worth a try - much more comfortable than the ground, and I am now the coolest scouter on trips. Can't wait to see the reaction from the district folks at the camporee this weekend. :cool:

KMACK
10-12-2009, 05:02
I use a hammock mostly but will go to the ground in the winter. I enjoy the 360 degree view from my hammock when waking. Give it an honest try, you just might like like it.

Crazy Larry #1
10-12-2009, 06:56
y'know, i had no idea that was a meaning for it (i had to google it). i've honestly never been called sambo before, and just wanted to play it off.....

...TOW, i hope that is not what you meant by it. :(it was just a play on words, if it is used as a racial slur in some circles then i did not know it......

Bulldawg
10-12-2009, 07:30
Thanks for your input everyone! I didn't mean to start off a hammock vs tent war- I'm sure its all just a matter of personal preference. Have heard great things about hammocks so am eager to give them a try. Am just reluctant to make such a big investment for cold weather add-ons until I'm sure that hammocks are for me- so was curious as to other people's opinions and weighing up the options.

Also, I'm also a she (as opposed to a he) so it might make the peeing issue slightly more complicated! :)

Like someone said, grab a cheap one and try it out a few times. If you like it and find it worth it, then spend the money. If not, you're out 50 or 60 dollars.


No worries. Go over to Hammock Forums (http://www.hammockforums.net) for any info you need on hammocking. We're hater-free over there. A big website of hammocking goodness. :D

Yep, yep. Not any drama queens over there that I have seen.


kcol, go buy a cheep hammock like a byer's moskito. to see if you like hanging before you drop a bunch of money on an expensive set up. spend the $40 and try it out a couple of times on nice days.

DITTO



I am not sure why people think another person's choice of shelter is something to deride... unless of course we are talking about wooden boxes. :p

I was always curious about hammocking, finally tried it this summer, and became a real believer. Now, I am trying to figure out the cold weather question because even though I own perfectly good tents, I don't want to go back to the ground or buy an expensive quilt just for a couple of short scout trips, which is all of my cold weather camping - no AT overnights planned until warm weather returns. I will probably just use a second sleeping bag underneath for now.

Peeing from the hammock or in a bottle in the tent as some do is gross and just plain lazy. Okay, getting out of a warm spot is not fun, but if you do it quick getting back into a warm spot feels good and is much cleaner. And who knows, you may experience a little of the dark night stars or critters. I saw a fawn on one such occasion, not 10 feet from my tent and I never heard it come into camp. How cool is that?

I am happy the hammockers post here, and not just hammock forums, or I would never have given it another thought. Hammocking is definitely worth a try - much more comfortable than the ground, and I am now the coolest scouter on trips. Can't wait to see the reaction from the district folks at the camporee this weekend. :cool:

And who finally convinced you it was the way to go??

scooterdogma
10-12-2009, 07:56
Hey, I have switched from the ground to hammocks and I am, also, a female who is hiking the AT in 2010. RichardD covered all the great points for a hammock. I, personally, will never go back. The winter weight for hammock & quilts is not much different than tent, sleeping bag & pad. The comfort and a great nights sleep is well worth it! You can buy used gear over at hammockforum. That is how I started out. I, also, attended a group hang and everyone was very friendly and let me try out their set ups. Hammock people are very friendly and will answer any questions you have about their choice. Happy trails, whatever your choice!

Tin Man
10-12-2009, 08:12
And who finally convinced you it was the way to go??

lone wolf :D

Hooch
10-12-2009, 08:26
lone wolf :D
http://i374.photobucket.com/albums/oo188/HoochNC/100_0531.jpg
http://i374.photobucket.com/albums/oo188/HoochNC/100_0532.jpg

Doctari
10-12-2009, 09:09
There are pros & cons to either choice;
Tent Pros: Traditional way to camp. Near unlimited choices as to design, size & color. Can set up with no trees. Minimal learning curve to set up / use.
Tent cons: Must (should) set up at near level site. Many designs allow the tent interior to get wet as setting up during rain storm. MUST be sure of a site clear of sticks & rocks. Should watch for drainage problems. Likely should carry a ground cover (added weight). Minimal "extra space" in most designs. You have to sleep on the ground.

Tarp pros: Ease of set up. Multiple ways to configure. The rest of your gear (Incl your ground cover) stays dry in your pack as you set up. easy to use as a "Lunch shelter" on rainy days. Depending on size of tarp, ample room to socialize.
Tarp cons: Must (should) set up at near level site. MUST be sure of a site clear of sticks & rocks. Should watch for drainage problems. Should carry a ground cover (added weight). No bug protection (unless you carry a bug net, extra weight, can be hard to deploy). You have to sleep on the ground.

Hammock Pros (bear in mind I'm prejudiced :p ): Ease of set up. Like a tarp only; set tarp up first during rain, the rest of your gear stays dry. Depending on size of tarp, ample room to socialize. Hammock doubles as chair. Provided you have 2 suitable attachment points, you can hang over any terrain. No need to clear the ground of rocks & roots. Some set ups CAN go to ground if need be.
Hammock cons: HUGE learning curve for setting up the hammock! CAN be expensive to start up, especially for cold weather hanging. Can be difficult to go to ground. Can be difficult to find suitable "trees" (I have never had any trouble, but it is possible,,, I guess).

If you are in a tent & your partner has a hammock or vice verse, finding suitable sites for both can be, , , , , challenging. :D

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:26
so why is it colder in the hammock? are you guys & gals buying quilts to replace your sleeping bag or in addition to your bag? I just don't understand how hammock gear can weigh more than tent gear as some has posted. I was so impressed by the lightweight, compact and ease of hammocking. When the skeeters were attacking me in MA this suimmer it was only a matter of a few minutes to break camp and get moving.
Gear in my tent is not an issue whereas it never comes in anyway. I just throw a garbage bag over my external pack and lean it against a tree. I do have to figure out the logistics of storing needed items in my hammock so I can find them, or so they don't slip out the exit.

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:31
There are pros & cons to either choice;
Tent Pros: Traditional way to camp. Near unlimited choices as to design, size & color. Can set up with no trees. Minimal learning curve to set up / use.
Tent cons: Must (should) set up at near level site. Many designs allow the tent interior to get wet as setting up during rain storm. MUST be sure of a site clear of sticks & rocks. Should watch for drainage problems. Likely should carry a ground cover (added weight). Minimal "extra space" in most designs. You have to sleep on the ground.

Tarp pros: Ease of set up. Multiple ways to configure. The rest of your gear (Incl your ground cover) stays dry in your pack as you set up. easy to use as a "Lunch shelter" on rainy days. Depending on size of tarp, ample room to socialize.
Tarp cons: Must (should) set up at near level site. MUST be sure of a site clear of sticks & rocks. Should watch for drainage problems. Should carry a ground cover (added weight). No bug protection (unless you carry a bug net, extra weight, can be hard to deploy). You have to sleep on the ground.

Hammock Pros (bear in mind I'm prejudiced :p ): Ease of set up. Like a tarp only; set tarp up first during rain, the rest of your gear stays dry. Depending on size of tarp, ample room to socialize. Hammock doubles as chair. Provided you have 2 suitable attachment points, you can hang over any terrain. No need to clear the ground of rocks & roots. Some set ups CAN go to ground if need be.
Hammock cons: HUGE learning curve for setting up the hammock! CAN be expensive to start up, especially for cold weather hanging. Can be difficult to go to ground. Can be difficult to find suitable "trees" (I have never had any trouble, but it is possible,,, I guess).

If you are in a tent & your partner has a hammock or vice verse, finding suitable sites for both can be, , , , , challenging. :D

my investment in hammocking at this point is $100. My tent cost far more than that.

my tent tarp and tent go up at the same time, therefore my tent stays dry.

what is the learning curve for setting up a hammock? Granted I can't tie a knot correctly, but I get the job done.

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:34
I happen to prefer sleeping all night long. :D until you have to pee.....

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:38
. Okay, getting out of a warm spot is not fun, but if you do it quick getting back into a warm spot feels good and is much cleaner. And who knows, you may experience a little of the dark night stars or critters.
Fortunately, I can sleep thru the night, but I do remember having to get up in SNP one evening and the sky was amazingly vibrant.

Tin Man
10-12-2009, 09:38
so why is it colder in the hammock? are you guys & gals buying quilts to replace your sleeping bag or in addition to your bag? I just don't understand how hammock gear can weigh more than tent gear as some has posted. I was so impressed by the lightweight, compact and ease of hammocking. When the skeeters were attacking me in MA this suimmer it was only a matter of a few minutes to break camp and get moving.
Gear in my tent is not an issue whereas it never comes in anyway. I just throw a garbage bag over my external pack and lean it against a tree. I do have to figure out the logistics of storing needed items in my hammock so I can find them, or so they don't slip out the exit.

you know the signs... bridge freezes before road surface... air under the hammock makes it colder, whereas the ground is an insulator to trap heat in a tent, you need something under you in a hammock, many use the quilt for this

Bulldawg
10-12-2009, 09:49
until you have to pee.....


You can't hold your pee all night long??

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:51
you know the signs... bridge freezes before road surface... air under the hammock makes it colder, whereas the ground is an insulator to trap heat in a tent, you need something under you in a hammock, many use the quilt for this ok that makes sense, but I know that contact with the cold, wet ground is very uncomfortable. Is it warmer or colder than a tent when we are just talking wetness? Not
looking forward to be any colder. Is there a certain temperature range when this becomes apparent? As you can see, I'm not a science major.

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 09:53
You can't hold your pee all night long??
yep, I'm female and I'm lazy.

Hooch
10-12-2009, 09:54
you know the signs... bridge freezes before road surface... air under the hammock makes it colder, whereas the ground is an insulator to trap heat in a tent, you need something under you in a hammock, many use the quilt for thisI think what TinMan is saying is that you lose more heat by convection while in a hammock than you do to the cold ground. This is why proper underside insulation in a hammock is so critical to staying warm, especially in cold weather.

Hooch
10-12-2009, 09:56
ok that makes sense, but I know that contact with the cold, wet ground is very uncomfortable. Is it warmer or colder than a tent when we are just talking wetness? Not
looking forward to be any colder. Is there a certain temperature range when this becomes apparent? As you can see, I'm not a science major.Most folskwho hammock need some kind of bottom insulation, be it a pad or underquilt below about 65-70 degrees. Personally, I need soemthing under me below about 70, but I'm a cold sleeper. My Speer SnugFit (made in Marion, NC) fits the bill quite nicely for this. :D

Lyle
10-12-2009, 10:06
I've used both.
I stick with tents most of the time.
In my experience, tent set-ups are lighter for equal warmth.
Also in my experience, hammocks are MUCH more comfortable.
Try both, then decide for yourself. You can make a real cheap test hammock from everyday materials to try out the concept, no need to spend a bunch up front.

Highly recommend Hammock Forums for further information.

Lyle
10-12-2009, 10:09
Most folskwho hammock need some kind of bottom insulation, be it a pad or underquilt below about 65-70 degrees. Personally, I need soemthing under me below about 70, but I'm a cold sleeper. My Speer SnugFit (made in Marion, NC) fits the bill quite nicely for this. :D

How low can you go with the SnugFit? Just wondering. Also, what is the weight? What do you use for top?

I have a Speer hammock and an early PeaPod, but it doesn't go real low without a pad too.

Ok, guess I should take my own advice and head on over to HF. :D

modiyooch
10-12-2009, 10:15
Wow, now I understand the expense. Too rich for my blood. I already have the money invested in my tent and bags.

I will carry the hammock in the warmer season, and my tent in the colder. There will be no more investments in my gear.

Tin Man
10-12-2009, 10:23
Wow, now I understand the expense. Too rich for my blood. I already have the money invested in my tent and bags.

I will carry the hammock in the warmer season, and my tent in the colder. There will be no more investments in my gear.

yeah, i am kind of leaning this way myself... gear is not an investment... it has no chance of increasing in value... just sayin'

dreamsoftrails
10-12-2009, 10:50
Peeing from the hammock or in a bottle in the tent as some do is gross and just plain lazy. Okay, getting out of a warm spot is not fun, but if you do it quick getting back into a warm spot feels good and is much cleaner. And who knows, you may experience a little of the dark night stars or critters. I saw a fawn on one such occasion, not 10 feet from my tent and I never heard it come into camp. How cool is that?

speak for yourself. :) it is potentially gross to pee out of one's hammock, but using the methods i described earlier, the grossness is avoidable. i can pee out into an area that is away from my things and will run downhill and away. plus it seems most of the time i do this it is raining, so that feels better. for me, there comes a point in cold weather where staying under the sleeping bag is not just a lazy luxury.

and i also like to experience the night sky and wildlife from my hammock as well. do you see a pattern? :)

Captn
10-12-2009, 11:10
I've been a tent camper all my life and just recently changed over to a Hammock. I had my second back surgery this year so I'm looking for a more comfortable way to sleep.

Here are a few observations.

1.) You can go lighter with a tarp, foam pad, and a bivy on the ground. No tent or hammock will get close. If lightness is your highest value, this is a hard thing to beat and you can use shelters if you wish. I snore like a freight train so I personally don't sleep in shelters .... I like to hike until dark anyway, so it's easier for me to toss up a stealth camp just before dark with a hammock and hit the trail at first light munching a granola bar along the way. I usually stop at the next shelter to have breakfast and use the privy around 9 or 10 am.

Of course, if I'm feeling the need for company, I'll camp near the shelter and hang out during the evening with the crowd.

2.) For the amount of comfort per ounce of weight I think the Hammock will win right down to just below freezing temps with careful selection of gear. That's just my opinion, however and I'm sure that others would argue that point.

My Hennesey and supershelter setup is good down to at least the high 20's with a good quilt and weighs in at 3 lbs or so, there are lighter options in hammocks, this is just the setup I use. It sure is a good nights sleep, however.

3.) Somewhere below freezing it's just plain easier to stay warm on the ground, so you'll need to carry some extra insulation for a hammock. Depending on how warm or cold you sleep is the determining factor for how much.
Of course, many hammocks can be set up on the ground as a bivy (called "going to ground") if it gets colder than the insulation you're carrying. So if you get a sudden cold snap you can still stay warm even if you don't have enough insulation as long as you have a soft place to sleep.

Using a Hammock is a personal choice which, for most, really won't result in a difference in weight, unless your into super ultra light hiking, which can be a much bigger challenge with a hammock.

Don't let the knots and ropes confuse you into not going that direction either, there are a lot of options that don't require knots at all. For example, I'm retrofitting my Hennessey with "dutch clips" and decending rings for a ultra quick setup with NO knots at all. Clip the strap to one tree, unroll the hammock, clip the strap to the other tree, pull on the ropes to adjust. Done.

Two stakes and my fly and hammock are up ... takes about a minute.

So ... in summary. If comfort is something you value, and for me it's no longer an option, the hammock is worth it's weight in gold. If weight is your most compelling value, then you can probably save a pound or two being a ground dweller.

Two pounds was the difference in my kit weight from my 6 lb baseweight pack to 8 lbs with a hammock.

That made it a no brainer for me.

And Hammock Forums is a fantastic place to learn all about becoming a hammocker, I highly recommend it.

Walkie Talkie
03-09-2010, 10:59
I've been a tent camper all my life and just recently changed over to a Hammock. I had my second back surgery this year so I'm looking for a more comfortable way to sleep.

Here are a few observations.

1.) You can go lighter with a tarp, foam pad, and a bivy on the ground. No tent or hammock will get close. If lightness is your highest value, this is a hard thing to beat and you can use shelters if you wish. I snore like a freight train so I personally don't sleep in shelters .... I like to hike until dark anyway, so it's easier for me to toss up a stealth camp just before dark with a hammock and hit the trail at first light munching a granola bar along the way. I usually stop at the next shelter to have breakfast and use the privy around 9 or 10 am.

Of course, if I'm feeling the need for company, I'll camp near the shelter and hang out during the evening with the crowd.

2.) For the amount of comfort per ounce of weight I think the Hammock will win right down to just below freezing temps with careful selection of gear. That's just my opinion, however and I'm sure that others would argue that point.

My Hennesey and supershelter setup is good down to at least the high 20's with a good quilt and weighs in at 3 lbs or so, there are lighter options in hammocks, this is just the setup I use. It sure is a good nights sleep, however.

3.) Somewhere below freezing it's just plain easier to stay warm on the ground, so you'll need to carry some extra insulation for a hammock. Depending on how warm or cold you sleep is the determining factor for how much.
Of course, many hammocks can be set up on the ground as a bivy (called "going to ground") if it gets colder than the insulation you're carrying. So if you get a sudden cold snap you can still stay warm even if you don't have enough insulation as long as you have a soft place to sleep.

Using a Hammock is a personal choice which, for most, really won't result in a difference in weight, unless your into super ultra light hiking, which can be a much bigger challenge with a hammock.

Don't let the knots and ropes confuse you into not going that direction either, there are a lot of options that don't require knots at all. For example, I'm retrofitting my Hennessey with "dutch clips" and decending rings for a ultra quick setup with NO knots at all. Clip the strap to one tree, unroll the hammock, clip the strap to the other tree, pull on the ropes to adjust. Done.

Two stakes and my fly and hammock are up ... takes about a minute.

So ... in summary. If comfort is something you value, and for me it's no longer an option, the hammock is worth it's weight in gold. If weight is your most compelling value, then you can probably save a pound or two being a ground dweller.

Two pounds was the difference in my kit weight from my 6 lb baseweight pack to 8 lbs with a hammock.

That made it a no brainer for me.

And Hammock Forums is a fantastic place to learn all about becoming a hammocker, I highly recommend it.

What is this "dutch clip' you speak fondly of? I never heard of sucha thing a ma bob. Where can I get them?

WILLIAM HAYES
03-09-2010, 11:44
used both like hammocks better-great sleep quick setup if you do it right check out hammock forums for cold weather options

10-K
03-09-2010, 11:54
Having just finished hiking the Foothills Trail using a hammock for the first time I have to say that, overall, for warm weather a hammock is a much better option than a tent.

For cold weather, I think for now I'll stick with the Lunar Duo, but I'm open to learning more about cold weather hammocking - it's the weight penalty that's the problem for me.

The best of both worlds of course (if you can afford it) is to have both.

skinny minnie
03-09-2010, 12:19
and, when in a hammock, of course, there is no getting up in the middle of the night because you can pee right out of the thing. just pick a spot accordingly to this strategy.

As a female who refuses to carry any sort of device to aid peeing... I can only say I WISH! :eek::rolleyes:

Also in terms of learning curve: depends on the hammock/set up. I'm a dummy when it comes to knots but I've only had to learn a couple simple variations and only because I am experimenting with suspension.

I think the hammock is wonderful and in terms of expense you can lurk on hammockforum.com and snag a deal on used gear. Most of the pros and cons have already been stated. I love the comfort and the flexibility it provides.

The one con I have not seen mentioned is that there is a bit of shoulder squeeze, it affects how your body lays, and for some people there is a claustrophobic effect. Depends on you, the hammock you choose, and how you sleep.

I have a jacks r better bear mountain bridge hammock and it is an amazingly flat lay. But the shoulders do get a bit of squeeze and I think you have to be a back sleeper or a non-fetal position side sleeper to enjoy it. Or course there are a few rare people out there who stomeache sleep and claim to love it - I know I couldn't handle it. if you buy one of the more popular hammocks and dislike it, it'd be an easy resell. Definitely something I rec. trying though.

Check out hammockforum - there is an overwhelming amount of info and a lot of great video tutorials.

h. hastings
03-09-2010, 15:43
What is this "dutch clip' you speak fondly of? I never heard of sucha thing a ma bob. Where can I get them?

they are a small U-shaped piece of aluminum that is used to clip a strap around a tree that can be attached to your hammock suspension. Lightweight, easy to use, and bomb-proof!

Get them here - http://www.hammockforums.net/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=65&products_id=204&zenid=44f3e592d04cb27fa6cf3171ffe76571

Walkie Talkie
03-09-2010, 19:37
So the link you provided for the Dutch clip is sold out. Is there any other place I can get them? Is this one of those items that are perminately sold out? Are they really as great as they appear?

Tinker
03-09-2010, 21:32
Check out some of my hammock images. Hammocking doesn't need to be expensive.
In my case, the hammock was $20, the tarp about $80, the sleeping bag (lucky find - about $170) another sleeping bag to go inside it for colder weather (used down to +5 degrees inside "tent" made from tarp - see pictures - about $160). The summer bug net was around $50.
The very best thing, imo about hammocking which you just can't get in a tent is the wonderful cool breezes all around your body on a summer night. Most sleeping pads are coated to keep the air in, so they make you sweat in the summer. If they have insulation in them, they are that much hotter.
Swinging your legs over the side and standing up is something I love, too. No more crawling through a muddy vestibule while the condensation from the fly gives you a shower.
Leaky floor? Not in a hammock.
Of course you need trees, and a tent is probably a plus in extreme weather (wind driven sleet and snow), but I've been comfortable in my hammock every night I've been out in it.
Oh, pictures - http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/browseimages.php?do=member&catid=member&imageuser=2502

h. hastings
03-10-2010, 17:18
So the link you provided for the Dutch clip is sold out. Is there any other place I can get them? Is this one of those items that are perminately sold out? Are they really as great as they appear?

There is no where else to get them aside from making your own (which is how they came to be to begin with). The Hammock Forum Store will stock them occasionally but they tend to sell out quickly.

They are as great as they appear! Lightweight, no moving parts, nothing to break .....