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BigAl
11-14-2009, 12:27
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.

mikec
11-14-2009, 12:39
I'm also 55, over weight and a slow hiker. It's always best to hike with someone else for safety's sake. But I have hiked a good portion of the AT solo and have had no problems. Sometimes, you run into someone along the way and end up hiking with them. Sometimes, you meet people at shelters, hostels or towns. It varies. My advice is to take it slow, hike your own hike and don't try and keep up with groups or others. You will enjoy your hike a lot more.

neighbor dave
11-14-2009, 12:41
do it, don't wait, you'll wish you had. life's short, soon you'll be dead:sun

BigAl
11-14-2009, 12:48
I also forgot to mention i have sleep apnea am i trying to bite off more than i can chew?

Spirit Walker
11-14-2009, 13:00
There are a lot of hikers in their 50's and '60s on the trail. There are a lot of overweight hikers. There are a lot of inexperienced hikers. No reason you can't do it. IT won't be easy, but it is possible.

If you intend to attempt a thruhike next year, you have five months to prepare. Start today. Go for a walk. Tomorrow go for another one. Try to walk a few miles every day. Once a week go for a longer hike. Then go out overnight. There is time to get in shape and to get some experience before you start the trail. You live in the south, which helps. Snow shouldn't be much of a problem. But get out in all weathers so you find out what hiking in an all day rain is like. It will be part of the trail experience.

If you are still slow starting out, don't worry about it. You will get in better shape as you go. A mile an hour, 12 hours a day - you'll get to Katahdin in less than six months. If necessary, you can flip flop - take a bus to Maine and hike south.

As to the sleep apnea: as you lose weight, the apnea should improve. In any case, bring a tent.

Kerosene
11-14-2009, 13:01
I suggest that you get the sleep apnea under control before you start. Otherwise, you run the risk of not having enough energy to work out day-after-day. On the other hand, the hike will help you reduce your weight, which will likely help the apnea.

As a newbie, it's probably better if you hike with someone for the first month or so, but if you start at Spring in April I'm sure you'll be able to hook up with someone at some point.

Red Hat
11-14-2009, 14:27
I recommend that you read Big Red's journal from 2002 http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=598. He did the whole thing, lost weight, and wrote a great journal.

Pacific Tortuga
11-14-2009, 14:51
I was 51, two year's after a quad by-pass when I attempted. I'm here to say it was the best adventure I have had, up to now, by-pass or not you should go for it. It seemed to have meant more to me at the time due to the surgery, but in retrospect it was a great time no matter what.
I too lean towards the gut myself and if you take it slow and steady, you'll be real happy to see and feel how the trail changes you, mentally, spiritually and physically.
,

grayfox
11-14-2009, 15:15
Just want to echo Spirit Walker and others.

"as you lose weight, the apnea should improve" possibly but not a given-my mom has sleep apnea. I can tell when my mom has had a bad night because she has less energy the next day. No doubt this will make some hiking days harder. But, on the other hand, If you quit breathing and die some night, where would you rather be dead at?

And: "Start today. Go for a walk. Tomorrow go for another one."

sbhikes
11-14-2009, 15:24
Just start hiking. Hike where you live, take walks around town (walking to run errands is a great way to get yourself to do it.) I call my city walks "urban hikes" so that I feel more like I'm hiking.

I have an overweight friend who aspires to hike the PCT. So far he just does weekend section hikes. He loves it. Hiking has made him so happy. He's lost only a little weight so far, but that doesn't stop him from enjoying the outdoors. Don't let it stop you.

Wise Old Owl
11-14-2009, 16:00
Well you are close to Bankhead NF and you need to work up from 5 milers per day to 10-15 miles. It means you need to get on thetrail and work off some of the weight. I would also recommend getting some help with a professional service to improve habits. Because with Apnea, you are going to be more doggone tired each morning. I have been there, You have to work it off and make sure your doctor is there to help you all the way.

white_russian
11-14-2009, 16:22
Just start making arrangements for next spring. Lots of old fat slow hikers out there. Lots of young fat slow hikers. Lots of just slow hikers out there. Just show up towards the end of March and you will see folks come in all shapes and sizes out there and after a while there will be a few that turn into your brothers and sisters. You will not be alone even if you show up that way.

Don't doubt yourself, start making preparations now.

Jack Tarlin
11-14-2009, 17:07
Hell, I'm past fifty, am overweight, hike alone, and in recent years, hike a lot slower than I used to.

And I think you'll be fine. :D

Seriously, be smart with your gear; keep your pack weight down; get in as good shape as you can before you start your trip; and start slow for the first few weeks, build yourself up, have realistic daily goals and expectations.

But I think you'll be fine.

wrongway_08
11-14-2009, 17:14
Just do it.

Just walking.

Cookerhiker
11-14-2009, 17:28
I know of a guy who successfully thruhiked in '04 and lost 75 pounds. I'm sure you can hike as long as your start slowly, have good gear, maintain a positive attitude, and (hopefully) enjoy support from home.

One book you might find instructive and inspirational is Robert Rubin's On the Beaten Path. Being overweight and out-of-shape at the start, he completed his thruhike and helped resolve some life issues. You can order it from the ATC (https://www.atctrailstore.org/catalog/iteminfo.cfm?itemid=246&compid=1).

WILLIAM HAYES
11-14-2009, 19:39
age is only a number Take it slow and hike your own hike I am in my 60's and hike alone most of the time keep your pack weight between 30-35 lbs or less you will be fine

juma
11-14-2009, 19:45
I also forgot to mention i have sleep apnea am i trying to bite off more than i can chew?

best you get a good tent and use that. also, they make mouthpieces that pull you lower jaw out and let you breath without a CPAP - get one of those too.

juma

Crazy Larry #1
11-14-2009, 20:10
I also forgot to mention i have sleep apnea am i trying to bite off more than i can chew?
Find someone to hike with and you'll be okay....

Blissful
11-14-2009, 20:30
Why not? Go for it. But be sure you are cleared by an MD first. He might want you to take a stress test, etc., but he'll probably be cheering you on.

And it's rare you solo the AT. All kinds of hikers around to pair up with.

Blue Jay
11-14-2009, 20:37
I've always felt being somewhat overweight is a good thing for several reasons. One you are not tempted to over do it in the beginning like so many young mile slaves. Two, your overall weight will drop quite quickly even if you do not lighten your pack weight. Three, since you were not in good shape to begin with once you start to get in shape you will feel soooo good you'll keep going no matter what just to keep the endorphins coming. As for your age that's not a problem at all. Congratulations you are perfect for this.:welcome

simon
11-14-2009, 20:54
I'm 54 and with health issues. My advice would be to try some long overnight weekend hikes. I think most see it as a long camping trip instead of the actual walking daily. Set a goal to do a twenty mile three day hike and see if you like it before you commit anything else.

Shutterbug
11-14-2009, 20:57
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.

Being 55 isn't an issue. Being overweight may be an issue depending on how much you are overweight. My advice is to start working on the weight issue before your hike.

It has been my observation that the most frequent problem for overweight hikers is knee pain. Start several months before your hike to condition your knees by taking a daily walk. If you can include some hills in our daily walks. I walk 3 miles a day, 5 days a week.

Trailweaver
11-14-2009, 21:16
So far, no one has discouraged you from going. . . that looks like a "sign" to me! I'm also a little older than some, I also hike slowly, and so what? I still get there! Go out and do it - you'll come back here and thank us all later! It will be the time of your life.

BigAl
11-15-2009, 14:11
What about cell phone reception on the AT and whats your opinion of packing heat while hiking on the AT?

Jack Tarlin
11-15-2009, 14:27
Bring a phone if you like, tho it won't work everywhere.

Leave the gun at home. Even if you did posess the legal ability to carry it everywhere on the A.T. (which you probably don't), you simply don't need it.

buff_jeff
11-15-2009, 15:12
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.

Your prospects are fine; grab some gear and start walking.

BrianLe
11-15-2009, 15:40
I like Shutterbug's answer, but would also say that rather than focusing on losing weight, I'd focus on getting into the proper physical conditioning that allows you to walk all day long --- if you lose weight doing that, so be it, but similar to what Shutterbug said, get out and do increasingly long walks around your neighborhood, at some point try to do an occasional longer hike on a weekend with some weight in a backpack.

Do your local walks rain or shine (or sleet or hail ...), just get appropriate clothing to deal with conditions.

To put it another way, I wouldn't worry if your weight is still higher than you like (within reason ...) if you feel like you can go out and do arbitrarily long walks.

Also I strongly suggest that if you don't already use them that you get and become comfortable using a pair of trekking poles (not for local walks but for any rougher terrain hikes or backpacking). And invest some serious time in making sure your overall pack weight (base weight) is as low as you can reasonably get it. If successful, you'll burn off body fat on the trip, but your base weight doesn't go down unless you explicitly swap out gear (or lose something ... :-)).

reddenbacher
11-15-2009, 15:47
one foot in front of the other.take all the time you want.camp walk a little more,your flab will disperse in time and you too will be a hiking machine.have fun.i was a mess when i started.

Spokes
11-15-2009, 16:13
BigAl, don't over analyze it. Read some journals, get some equipment, and do some shake down hikes. You'll be amazed how quickly you'll adapt to the hiking culture.

Snowleopard
11-15-2009, 16:16
Just want to echo Spirit Walker and others.

"as you lose weight, the apnea should improve" possibly but not a given-my mom has sleep apnea. I can tell when my mom has had a bad night because she has less energy the next day. No doubt this will make some hiking days harder. But, on the other hand, If you quit breathing and die some night, where would you rather be dead at?

And: "Start today. Go for a walk. Tomorrow go for another one."
For BigAl and grayfox's mom: If you haven't already, get your sleep apnea evaluated medically. It can potentially cause serious problems and sure does sap your energy. I've had mild sleep apnea that got better when I lost weight. I came close to falling asleep while driving a couple of times -- scary. My cousin had more severe sleep apnea and got really heavy. He was prescribed a CPAP and that helped a lot for losing weight. It gave him the energy to exercise and diet. Now he is fit and svelte.

As others have said, just start getting out there and walk every day; don't over do it at first.

Hikes in Rain
11-15-2009, 17:20
It's been hinted at, alluded to, and mentioned in passing, BigAl, but one thing to remember when you start, don't worry about making miles! Even if you only make five miles a day (and you'll do better, trust me), that's five miles farther down the trail than you were when you started. Remember, this is supposed to be fun. Sometimes, we tend to overlook that when we're out there.

Frankly, I'm envious that you have a shot at doing it. I'm 55 as well, and not in the shape I'd like to be, due to spending way too much time creating a new program for Florida that eats into my exercise time, plus a beer brewing hobby. (It has to be quality controlled, doesn't it? That means tasting. Lots of tasting.) I'm choosing to finish the program I started, rather than do any long distance hiking. You're choosing to hike, and bless you for it!

As Spokes said, don't overanalyze. Read stuff, get some gear (doesn't have to be expensive, the very best, or for that matter even new), and go out there to try it out.

Did I mention this should be fun? If it isn't, you're doing it wrong.

fredmugs
11-16-2009, 13:48
I prefer the term mileage whore.

I think being a hiking newbie is going to be your biggest obstacle to overcome. We've all made the rookie mistakes of backing too much, the wrong stuff, etc. If you're planning a thru-hike or just going out next year and doing as much as you can I highly recommend trying some 4 - 5 day hike anywhere as long as you are carrying everything you need for the entire trip. No staying in a park. Hit the trail and don't come back.

Spending a couple of nights outdoors where you have to setup your own campsite every night will give you valuable lessons on what to bring and, more importantly, what not to bring.



I've always felt being somewhat overweight is a good thing for several reasons. One you are not tempted to over do it in the beginning like so many young mile slaves. Two, your overall weight will drop quite quickly even if you do not lighten your pack weight. Three, since you were not in good shape to begin with once you start to get in shape you will feel soooo good you'll keep going no matter what just to keep the endorphins coming. As for your age that's not a problem at all. Congratulations you are perfect for this.:welcome

ShelterLeopard
11-16-2009, 13:51
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.

I'm 19, and a bit overweight, and I have young joints, but I'm gonna give you advice anyway.

Do it. Start slow. If you want, stay slow. Listen to your body. Don't push if it hurts too much. You'll get in shape. Get good gear, and break in your boots before you leave.

Bobbo
11-16-2009, 13:56
you will not be alone - tons of people out there during the spring, summer and fall. if sleep apena doesn't kill you at home - probably will not kill you in the woods. Hiking and getting in shape can only help.

flemdawg1
11-16-2009, 19:30
Well you are close to Bankhead NF and you need to work up from 5 milers per day to 10-15 miles. It means you need to get on thetrail and work off some of the weight. I would also recommend getting some help with a professional service to improve habits. Because with Apnea, you are going to be more doggone tired each morning. I have been there, You have to work it off and make sure your doctor is there to help you all the way.

I second the reccomendation for hiking in Bankhead NF. Try some overnights in the Sipsey Wilderness. See the waterfalls and the Big Tree in Bee Branch Canyon. This time of year just be aware of dates and regs regarding hunting. http://www.outdooralabama.com/hunting/wildlife-areas/wmamaps/Black%20Warrior%202010%20Map.pdf

That being said there's not much hunting going on deep in the Sipsey. No vehicles allowed and rough terrain means anything killed has to be hand carried out. Check out alatrails.com for detailed Sipsey topics.

sheepdog
11-16-2009, 20:04
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.
Start out slow and when in doubt, slow down. You should be fine. There are lots of people on the trail.
I carry a deck of cards. When I need help I sit down and play solitair. Sooner of later some clown comes by and says the red 7 goes on the black 8. Then I ask them for what I need. :D

TimeSnake
11-16-2009, 20:14
do just go out on a visionquest. do the research and get your legs in shape before you go out. preporation is key.

TimeSnake
11-16-2009, 20:15
do not just go out on a visionquest*

Marta
11-16-2009, 20:31
As Spiritwalker said, you've got five months to prepare. Walk every day around home, and backpack weekends, starting with state park campgrounds and progressing to harder, more remote trails as you gain skill and confidence.

I would strongly recommend hiking alone. If you have a hiking partner, you will be forever compromising what is best for you in favor of what is best for the team. That's great if you're with a significant other, or close family member. It's less than ideal if making the hike is going to be a dicey proposition at best.

This past weekend I hiked with a guy who was given a "shape up or else" ultimatum by his doctor. In five months he has backpacked 500 miles and lost quite a lot of weight. It's working wonderfully for him.

But first you have to take that first step out the door...

Another thought--a training log is a useful reality check. On a calendar note down how much time you spend walking every day. Typically one thinks about exercising quite often, but actually does it much less frequently. Looking at the calendar at the end of the month and counting up those checkmarks will tell you whether you are really getting out there, or mostly just exercising your imagination.

SunnyWalker
12-16-2009, 19:53
I'm planning on hiking a thru hike on CDT this 2013 and will be 60 and overweight. Go for it.

mweinstone
12-16-2009, 22:16
pay me to go with you. i require 35000.00 to insure your safe passage .in can have you hikeing the perfect hike by tonight at 11.

fiddlehead
12-16-2009, 22:32
How much do you like to walk?
That's probably the main thing that matters here.

Mongoose2
12-16-2009, 22:34
pay me to go with you. i require 35000.00 to insure your safe passage .in can have you hikeing the perfect hike by tonight at 11.

He'll do it man. I've seen him do it, and it's amazing!!

Montana AT05
12-17-2009, 01:24
I was 35 yrs old on my 2005 AT thru. In decent shape, average to low weight for my height, had always been active.

Thirty miles in, I was laid up with a bad knee and asking all sorts of guys in their 50's and older, many "overweight", if they knew anything about knees. They gave me what they new and continued up the trail while I sat dejected.

So, yes, you can hike it. It is tough! Keep your packweight as light as possible and keep your mileage expectations low. And stay hydrated...it helps. Don't overdue the beginning, go in slow. It's a long trail.

Prior to your hike, go to a gym, work out. Work on leg strength, ask a trainer about hip flexor exercises. Get on the treadmill, stationary bike, stairmaster. You don't need to go crazy--just get your body used to exertion.

I don't know anything about sleep apnea.

But I think you can do it.

Oh yes, I met a thru-hiker named Greenbush in VA. He had an old fashioned external pack. I'd see him the morning--then I would run up the trail all day--showing myself how bad I was, and after a few hours in camp, Greenbush would saunter in. He was 70 years old.

weary
12-17-2009, 02:03
do it, don't wait, you'll wish you had. life's short, soon you'll be dead:sun
Are you sure. I was 64 in 1993 when I walked from Georgia to Maine. I'm still not dead. I wasn't particularly fat. But neither was I especially physically fit.

I guess it involves how soon is "soon." By geological standards, we'll all "soon" be dead.Just for some of us, a bit sooner than for others.

But you are right. Life is short. If you have the opportunity to do the trail, do it. Otherwise infirmities, or maybe just the challenges of living, are likely to interfere.

Recognize, however, the trail won't be what you have imagined. There is no easy way to walk a couple of thousand miles. Don't let anyone tell you differently. Even if physical problems don't get you, mental ones may.

Weary

jombo22
12-23-2009, 21:10
I recommend that you read Big Red's journal from 2002 http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=598. He did the whole thing, lost weight, and wrote a great journal.

I just want to second this. I am not a novice hiker, not overweight and not middle-aged (at least, not in my mind :rolleyes:), but after I read the first few entries in his log I was hooked and read the whole thing in one sitting! Warning: this may instill an unshakable desire to go hiking in you. Read at your own risk.

As a teaser, here is the first entry:


Today I decided to hike the Appalachian Trail.Several weeks ago I started a list of the things I wanted to do/see/accomplish in my lifetime. The first thing I wrote down was "Hike the Appalachian Trail." I wrote a few other things down (nothing significant or earth shattering), but my mind kept coming back to hiking the AT. I don't know when I first heard of the AT, or why it was the first goal that came to mind. At first I sort of dismissed the idea as impractical or silly. But it just kept nagging at me.
I did a little research about the trail. I learned about its history. I started reading journals and accounts of those who had hiked the trail. I read accounts of hikers as young as twelve and those seventy or older. I read of hikers with years of experience and first time hikers. Some were in excellent physical shape, some very overweight and out of shape.
Gradually, I came to the realization that this is something that I could do.
The writings of those who have completed the hike indicate that it is nothing short of a life defining experience. The rewards include the beautiful and many vistas, slowly witnessing the coming of spring in the mountains and viewing bears and moose in their environment. In addition, virtually every thru-hiker writes of the hundreds of helping hands they receive along the way and their renewed faith in mankind.
I knew that there was no way I could undertake this project without the full support of Teresa, my wife. I've been talking about the AT in general terms with her for the past few days. Her reaction when I told her I wanted to hike the whole thing next year was "Hey, go for it!" I actually expected her to say that, but I was also fully prepared for "Are you nuts?"
I probably am, but I'm going for it.
-Big Red

prain4u
12-24-2009, 05:51
Whether you begin your proposed thru hike two weeks from now--or two years from now--use the time between now and your hike to:

1) Lose weight and get in better cardio-vascular shape. Every pound dropped between now and the start of your hike will most likely help you on the trail.

2) Walk (and/or hike with a pack) 4-5 days per week--in all kinds of weather. Walk up and down staircases and hills whenever possible. Ultimately, there is only one really good way to train for hiking up and down hills--that is to hike up and down hills (preferably with a full pack)! Treadmills, tracks, and bicycles are all "O.K."--but they are not as good as actually hiking on hills and staircases.

Surplusman
12-25-2009, 05:54
I second the advice that if you want to do a lot of hiking...practice doing a lot of hiking. As for exercises, do ones that emphasize the back and legs. I do kettlebell swings and they have made a difference in my stamina. At the tender age of 63, I use knee braces and trekking poles for all my hiking. For me, they make all the difference in the world. And you can be in the best shape in the world, but if you wind up eating artery-clogging and salty crap like Spam and ramen noodles (with the chemical soup packet) on the trail, you can still leave yourself wide open to medical problems, especially if you're older. I know. Lifting weights, hiking, and bicycling 4 miles back and forth to work every day didn't prevent me from having a stroke. Although they could never pinpoint the cause, my blood pressure and cholesterol levels were off the charts. I regained the use of my right arm and leg very quickly, because, as the doctor said, I was in such good shape when the stroke happened. But that's not a hell of a lot of comfort.

It doesn't really matter if your first practice hikes are rather short. Progress will come gradually but faster than you think.

Best wishes!

atraildreamer
12-25-2009, 10:55
I know of a guy who successfully thruhiked in '04 and lost 75 pounds. I'm sure you can hike as long as your start slowly, have good gear, maintain a positive attitude, and (hopefully) enjoy support from home.

One book you might find instructive and inspirational is Robert Rubin's On the Beaten Path. Being overweight and out-of-shape at the start, he completed his thruhike and helped resolve some life issues. You can order it from the ATC (https://www.atctrailstore.org/catalog/iteminfo.cfm?itemid=246&compid=1).

Reading it now...good book! :clap

weary
12-25-2009, 12:19
One bit of advice that every experienced hiker gives is to "go slow at the beginning." It's also the advice that most never take. Try to be the exception.

Wolfmaan
12-25-2009, 13:31
Like most people have said you have two options:

1) Hike yourself thin: This is the worst option but chosen by many people. Just get to your start point and huff it through. The down side is you are in for a world of hurt and many short days. (The latter not being a bad thing)

2) Build yourself up: When I hiked the Bruce Trail in Summer 2009 I started training in January to start in June. I started with low-impact but high-fun stuff like cycling and then progressed to running 2km per day a month or two before the trip.

It's the trip of a lifetime and you'll make friends and memories which will last forever. Don't pass up the chance!

Tenderheart
12-25-2009, 14:02
If you lose the weight while preparing for your hike, then the sleep apnea will possibly take care of itself. Go for it!!! Good luck!!!


litefoot 2000

mweinstone
12-25-2009, 14:51
i know crap. no one listens to me cause im the courts fool. but i know crap. crap that could save you all. one day youll be fat and i wont. wait. im not and you are! todays the day! im gonna have to eat you when the world ends. you know that dont you fatty? so diet if you want to live. i aint eatin no boney mfer.

double d
12-25-2009, 16:04
By reading your first post BigAl, you don't seem to have much trust in your hiking abilities, so go out and do some weekend hikes in your area. Also, cut your food intake and lose 30 pounds before your hike and I think you will be ready to go. Life is short my friend and remember,"pain is only weakness leaving the body."

mweinstone
12-25-2009, 16:09
when ya got questions for plaine old knuckelheads,....gimmmy a call.

Desert Reprobate
12-26-2009, 22:36
Just losing the weight might not take care of the apnea problem. I am taking a dental device that forces the lower jaw forward to sleep with. This will help some. I'm also going to try a cervical collar when I am sleeping to keep any kink out of my neck. It will also help keep my neck warm so it'll be double duty. Be sure to talk to your doctor before you hike and see what he has to say. Mine tried to put me into a 40 lb portable device that needed to be recharged every couple of nights. I would think there would be more information out there about this problem. Good Luck

Tinker
12-26-2009, 22:57
Im soon to be 55 and overweight. What do you think about me trying to hike the AT alone? I'm a slow walker and i sure wont be in a hurry and a hiking rookie to boot. What kinda advice have you got for me and i know i need some hiker training.
Hey, Al.
I've waited to weigh in on this one, but I'll give my advice:
I'm 56 and slightly overweight (see my pictures here). I'm active but I eat too much. If you're inactive and overweight, see your doctor before undergoing any strenuous hike, and pick something that folks consider easy for a weekend hike. If it takes the wind out of your sails I'd say that a thruhike is up to you, but you'd better start off slowly and pack wisely so your pack weight doesn't add to your biological burden so much.
I forgot what my latest blood pressure was, but the doctor said it was very good considering my age and weight. My resting pulse in the morning averages in the low 60s. That might tell you something about me that you can use to gauge your fitness by. I'm 5'10-1/2" and 210 lbs.

Caboose
12-26-2009, 23:35
o the sleep apnea: as you lose weight, the apnea should improve. In any case, bring a tent.[/QUOTE]

I lost 60 lbs and don't use my C-Pap anymore