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Trail Trooper
12-04-2009, 09:54
What is the better tent, the Gossamer Gear, The One or the Tarp Tent , Rainbow any pros or cons.
I am looking for something light weight but will stand up to bad weather as well as blood sucking bugs and will hold up for lots of miles

ShelterLeopard
12-04-2009, 10:02
I've never slept in either, but it looks (from the statistics, photos, and things I've heard) as though the Gossamer Gear is the way to go. I've heard that it holds up better than the rainbow.

Lyle
12-04-2009, 10:42
I use The One. Had it for a couple of years now. The only thing I don't like about it is that the roof line, sloping to both head and foot, tends to drop heavy condensation right onto your face. Good thing is that this wakes you up, so you can wipe down the inside of the tent. :D

This only happens on fairly rare occasions, when condensation problems are very high - cold, very damp, very still night.

The counterpoint to the above complaint is that the ventilation is fantastic, so that if their is any breeze at all, condensation is virtually non-existent.

I LOVE the lack of weight and the fact that it provides full protection. Easy to pitch, once you get your method down - watch the videos online, it's not entirely intuitive.

Good shelter, kept me dry in hard, all-night rains, light snow, and heavy winds. Definitely Recommended.

I have no personal experience with the Rainbow. From having seen them set up, they strike me as having a very large footprint, and thus could be more difficult to find a place to set up in some situations.

Another option to consider is the Six Moon Design Lunar (solo or duo). I have a Six Moon Wild Oasis that is a great little (key word) shelter.

Mango
12-04-2009, 10:53
You might also look at the Lunar Solo from Six Moons Design. It's light and will keep the bugs off. Similar condensation issues to the others mentioned. Not yet sure about its long-term durability; ask me in September.

ShelterLeopard
12-04-2009, 11:22
I almost got the Lunar- but I can't stand the fact that you can't sit up at all. And I love bathtub floors. (I stuck with my old tent- it had everything I need, even though if would make UL hikers flinch)

bulldog49
12-04-2009, 11:26
I have the Lunar Solo and have it used it for winter AT trips. Encountered wind, rain and wet snow. It's worked fine in all conditions. Really happy with it.

Doooglas
12-05-2009, 12:04
Stephenson's Warmlite

Red Hat
12-05-2009, 12:06
The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.

CrumbSnatcher
12-05-2009, 12:23
never had a drop of water get into my MSR zoid2

skinewmexico
12-05-2009, 12:35
The Lunar Solo has a footprint as large as the TT Double Rainbow, so I wouldn't get that unless you're aware of that. I could sit up in my Lunar Solo, so I was surprised to see a previous poster say you couldn't. And you might look into the new Tarptent Moment. Slightly heavier, but nicely evolved.

wyominglostandfound
12-05-2009, 12:37
how do the coffin tents compare to the tipi? i would think the steep slope of the tipi wall would shed water and snow alot better.......

ShelterLeopard
12-05-2009, 13:46
The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.

I have been very close to changing to a hammock for that very reason. (But, I like sleeping on solid ground. For now, anyway.)

Hooch
12-05-2009, 13:55
The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.Watch out for the hammock haters, Red Hat. But I do agree with you. :D

BrianLe
12-05-2009, 15:28
I'm not a hammock hater (I have an HH, use it occasionally), but I think it depends (among other things) on the anticipated overall weather --- not just rain but cold.

Bottom line for me is that when it's sufficiently cold out, the weight hit to be warm enough in terms of both above and underneath insulation leaves me with a significantly heavier set of sleeping gear. For example, starting on the AT in late Feb I'll be using a very lightweight (not waterproof) bivy combined with a Gatewood cape used as both tarp/tent & raingear. I can't get close to that weight package with my HH and sufficient insulation (JRB or whatever). And starting that early makes "drying out and/or sleeping in" a shelter a good option (at least I'm guessing the shelters won't be as full for a thru-hiker starting in Feb ...).

In other seasons and/or on other trails where there are enough of the right kinds of trees, a hammock is without doubt a great shelter, not least for the ability to stealth camp and in the right conditions to greatly expand the options for finding a campsite, and for at least many people, the comfort and consistency of the experience (no roots, rocks, to sleep on).

W.r.t. the original thread (!), I've spent many a night in my Tarptent Contrail --- a very roomy solo single wall tent. Between that and the Gatewood Cape and my Gossamer Gear pack I would feel very comfortable buying any product from any of these three companies (tarptent.com, sixmoondesigns.com, gossamergear.com). I love these cottage industry companies that keep pushing the limits of what gear can do for us.

FamilyGuy
12-05-2009, 17:19
From the ones you mentioned, definitely the Rainbow. With the two side grommets for vertical trekking poles, the long center pole and multiple tieouts, none of the other ones come close.

The One's vestibule does not come down far enough and will let in wind driven rain. That sucked BTW.

Red Hat
12-05-2009, 18:06
I own a both a Zoid 1 and a Tarptent. Both are fine on even ground with small amounts of rain. But should you end up in a less than desirable location in heavy rains, like I did several times, water can pour in. I ended up floating on my Thermarest... not fun...

Montana AT05
12-05-2009, 18:36
Hammock tents are wonderful, especially if your trips are out east where it's easier to find good trees. Other than that, consider a tarp instead of a tarptent, etc.

Easier to set up, generally more spacious, properly position you stay dry.

Only downside is bugs, consider a small bug net or bivy.

I am not a fan of tarp tents after using one for a season. If I pack a tent, it'll be a real tent.

DapperD
12-05-2009, 21:17
What is the better tent, the Gossamer Gear, The One or the Tarp Tent , Rainbow any pros or cons.
I am looking for something light weight but will stand up to bad weather as well as blood sucking bugs and will hold up for lots of milesI know from reading about it the Hilleberg Akto has many favorable reviews as a lightweight solo tent, of tunnel-like design, that is very good at stormy, cold-wet weather. When it gets warmer I think it becomes uncomfortable to use do to it not having a lot of ventilation. Another excellent tent, though somewhat heavier is the Hilleberg Solo, which is freestanding. Both of these are pricey, but of good quality.

Tinker
12-06-2009, 15:50
I have been very close to changing to a hammock for that very reason. (But, I like sleeping on solid ground. For now, anyway.)

There's never a wet floor in a hammock.............;)
Shalom.

Tinker
12-06-2009, 15:53
I know from reading about it the Hilleberg Akto has many favorable reviews as a lightweight solo tent, of tunnel-like design, that is very good at stormy, cold-wet weather. When it gets warmer I think it becomes uncomfortable to use do to it not having a lot of ventilation. Another excellent tent, though somewhat heavier is the Hilleberg Solo, which is freestanding. Both of these are pricey, but of good quality.

I have an Akto. Keep the door partially open or you'll be wringing out your soaked shirt every time you exit the vestibule. It does not do a very good job of minimizing condensation. The fly goes all the way to the ground all the way around except at the ends.
If you want a very light solo tent that will handle high winds, though, the Akto is absolutely worth a good, long look. With the optional mesh inner, it could be all things to all (solo hikers, that is).

Doooglas
12-06-2009, 16:07
Watch out for the hammock haters, Red Hat. But I do agree with you. :D
The last time I slept in a tent was in 1995 or so in Olympia
I've grown up since then. My dogs sleep on the 'floor"
Clarks Tropical for this ole boy.
Justa swingin":cool:

KarmaGurl
12-09-2009, 05:38
I have to say my Rainbow Tarptent-actually a Double Rainbow, has been a great tent for me. I've had several other tents, although none of those listed-although I did look at them all.
If pitched correctly, the Rainbow does a fantastic job keepin the weather out, and shedding snow too. It also has extra points where you can tie off into or use your trekking poles to hook into, to add extra stabilization in bad weather. The Double Rainbow comes with an optional inside fly that takes seconds to put up, needs to never be taken down, and helps considerably with condensation, misting, and adds a bit of insulation to the inside of your tent. Dual entry and spacious vestibules only add to its appeal for me. That is my go-to tent when I think the weather may be iffy. For good weather trips, I take my Contrail. :)

Tipi Walter
12-09-2009, 09:16
The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.

Water pours in the sides of a tent? Which tent is this? Never had it happen to me.

Tarp Bails: On my last trip(Nov 22 to Dec 6), I ran into 3 backpackers from Chattanooga who got caught in a mean snowstorm at 5,300 feet and one guy had a tarp with everything covered underneath in blown snow. See fotogs below. He later lowered it but then bailed before the second night, an even colder night at 7F.

The last fotog shows a typical winter windstorm and the effects of spindrift on a tent. Ergo, no tent should have unsealable mesh if you expect to keep blown snow out.

The best tent for bad weather? When I think of really bad conditions, I think of 60mph winter blizzards or summer thunderstorm windstorms at 5-6,000 feet on an open bald or mountaintop. Like with staying warm, security in such conditions requires weight: more poles, more stakes, more guylines, beefier shelter, double walled preferably. And enough living space to keep your sleeping bag dry and not touching any part of the tent. Most of the tents listed will touch the foot of a lofted down bag, including the highly vaunted Akto.

It's all about head and foot tent angles and if the fabric touches the sleeping bag. With any touching will come a wet bag. Very few tents have vertical head and foot ends, and Hilleberg has this problem too. In fact, in their Tent Handbook they recommend covering your sleeping bag with a rain jacket before you go to sleep. Why? Cuz their tents are too short and too angled.

Lyle
12-09-2009, 09:41
The One's vestibule does not come down far enough and will let in wind driven rain. That sucked BTW.

Have never had that problem and have been out in some pretty windy/rainy weather.

As with any of the ultra-light shelters, it's best to set up in a relatively protected area, and with The One, place your tent so that the back wall is into the prevailing wind. The tent height can be adjusted so that three walls are right at ground level. It also contains extra guy loops so that it can be very securely pitched. The bottom edge of the vestibule will be within about 5 or 6 inches of the ground in this lowered position and plenty far enough away from the tent proper that you will stay dry. This space is needed to assure some ventilation, which is extremely important in single wall tents.I have had no problem with wind-driven rain entering the shelter.

FamilyGuy
12-10-2009, 00:03
Have never had that problem and have been out in some pretty windy/rainy weather.

As with any of the ultra-light shelters, it's best to set up in a relatively protected area, and with The One, place your tent so that the back wall is into the prevailing wind. The tent height can be adjusted so that three walls are right at ground level. It also contains extra guy loops so that it can be very securely pitched. The bottom edge of the vestibule will be within about 5 or 6 inches of the ground in this lowered position and plenty far enough away from the tent proper that you will stay dry. This space is needed to assure some ventilation, which is extremely important in single wall tents.I have had no problem with wind-driven rain entering the shelter.

Yes - I was quite exposed in the Rocky Mountains. I would not have had the same issue in a more sheltered (i.e. treed) area. Nevertheless, I was wet.:(

FamilyGuy
12-10-2009, 00:04
Water pours in the sides of a tent? Which tent is this? Never had it happen to me.

Tarp Bails: On my last trip(Nov 22 to Dec 6), I ran into 3 backpackers from Chattanooga who got caught in a mean snowstorm at 5,300 feet and one guy had a tarp with everything covered underneath in blown snow. See fotogs below. He later lowered it but then bailed before the second night, an even colder night at 7F.

The last fotog shows a typical winter windstorm and the effects of spindrift on a tent. Ergo, no tent should have unsealable mesh if you expect to keep blown snow out.

The best tent for bad weather? When I think of really bad conditions, I think of 60mph winter blizzards or summer thunderstorm windstorms at 5-6,000 feet on an open bald or mountaintop. Like with staying warm, security in such conditions requires weight: more poles, more stakes, more guylines, beefier shelter, double walled preferably. And enough living space to keep your sleeping bag dry and not touching any part of the tent. Most of the tents listed will touch the foot of a lofted down bag, including the highly vaunted Akto.

It's all about head and foot tent angles and if the fabric touches the sleeping bag. With any touching will come a wet bag. Very few tents have vertical head and foot ends, and Hilleberg has this problem too. In fact, in their Tent Handbook they recommend covering your sleeping bag with a rain jacket before you go to sleep. Why? Cuz their tents are too short and too angled.

Except the little Akto - with 87" vertical ends, I never had any issue with touching the walls when laying down. Just don't ask me about sitting up.

Okie Dokie
12-10-2009, 00:51
Have never considered a single wall tent for the reasons listed numerous times above - tent wall touching a sleeping bag, or condensation problems....outside surfaces of things touching inside surfacing of things = a conduit for water....mesh tents (or any tent for that matter) with a properly designed rain fly should never have a fly that touches any part of the tent, much less anything inside it...have carried a Kelty Windfoil Breeze for years (don't even Google it, it's long gone) and it's the best tent I've ever seen...16 hours of wind-driven rain, no problems...all the condensation, if any, will be on the inside of the fly, and will never be a consideration....shake out the fly before packing and the 1/2 pound of condensation that flys off it is but a memory and doesn't have to be packed down the trail...a real full-coverage fly on a tent that is properly pitched (in a good location) will not allow water to splash in even by stong wind-driven rain...if your fly is not totally independent of your tent and your tent can't breathe freely to allow condensation to settle on your fly you'll eventually get wet...

lazy river road
12-10-2009, 09:11
Marmot Aura 2p, I have the Aeros 3p which is just the bigger version. The 2p is smaller but is just as bomb proff, the bug netting is excellent, super roomey due to 90 degree angle corners, It withstood golf ball size hail this summer in Yellow Stone for two nights. Super roomey, not the lightest but very weather proff,

wyominglostandfound
12-10-2009, 14:11
this would have to be my choice for severe winter.....

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u309/elkantler75/100_6705.jpg

sbennett
12-10-2009, 17:03
Water pours in the sides of a tent? Which tent is this? Never had it happen to me.

Tarp Bails: On my last trip(Nov 22 to Dec 6), I ran into 3 backpackers from Chattanooga who got caught in a mean snowstorm at 5,300 feet and one guy had a tarp with everything covered underneath in blown snow. See fotogs below. He later lowered it but then bailed before the second night, an even colder night at 7F.

The last fotog shows a typical winter windstorm and the effects of spindrift on a tent. Ergo, no tent should have unsealable mesh if you expect to keep blown snow out.

The best tent for bad weather? When I think of really bad conditions, I think of 60mph winter blizzards or summer thunderstorm windstorms at 5-6,000 feet on an open bald or mountaintop. Like with staying warm, security in such conditions requires weight: more poles, more stakes, more guylines, beefier shelter, double walled preferably. And enough living space to keep your sleeping bag dry and not touching any part of the tent. Most of the tents listed will touch the foot of a lofted down bag, including the highly vaunted Akto.

It's all about head and foot tent angles and if the fabric touches the sleeping bag. With any touching will come a wet bag. Very few tents have vertical head and foot ends, and Hilleberg has this problem too. In fact, in their Tent Handbook they recommend covering your sleeping bag with a rain jacket before you go to sleep. Why? Cuz their tents are too short and too angled.

So what tent would you recommend for the original poster to get instead?

Tipi Walter
12-10-2009, 17:37
So what tent would you recommend for the original poster to get instead?

This question could best be answered by finding out where he wants to camp and for what part of the year. I've done a lot of research and field testng of "four season tents" and here's the problem: Generally speaking, with more weight comes more protection. There's a reason mountaineers look for bombproof tents like the North Face Mountain or the Mt Hardwear Trango, and you'd think they'd be overkill for the southeast. And they are very heavy. But if you're perched atop a 6,000 foot peak in a January blizzard, they start to make more sense. Throw into this mix the Hilleberg domes and tunnels. And several other makes and models.

Franco is the expert on TarpTents, I know they make a new four season thing with two outside wedge poles, something to consider. Me? I'd go for something with no open mesh and double walls and a lot of guylines. For me this means something in the 8lb range, if I'm lucky, but way beyond what the normal crowd would carry.

XCskiNYC
12-10-2009, 18:16
Have you considered the TT Moment? It's a newer design so would benefit from customer feedback since the Rainbow. It sells for $10 less, weighs 4.5 ozs less (though if you add the additional overarching pole needed to make it freestanding, it'd weight a few ounces more than the Rainbow). The Rainbow is a bit higher (3 inches) and has somewhat more floor space (18 sq ft for the Moment, "23-30" for the Rainbow). Both are pretty sharp looking.

Franco
12-10-2009, 20:56
This is mostly theoretical since the comments will be about design rather than practical use.
( but I do own a Rainbow and a mate had The One...)
Tipi of course is right about his comments on tent weight (providing we discuss well made tents...)
the more poles you have the lesser the risk. The converse is also true and at some point we need to decide what is an acceptable risk.
(any tent can be flattened, see the Everest Base Camp tent cemetery...)
Based on the way the OP question was asked I would also suggest the Moment. The reason is that it is more aerodynamically (read wind-resistant) designed than the Rainbow and The One.
Essentially the bigger the flat area to the wind you have the more likely it will behave like a sail.
The Moment has a lot of features built in that to help overcome some of the weak points of lightweight shelters.
Easy to set up (2 pegs only but you can use more if required)
Full bathtub floor that can be lifted on the side to deflect wind ingress.
Fully covered supported vestibule that offers a somewhat protected entry. You can also slide up the vestibule to increase ventilation.
Bottom end vents that can also be closed up.
With the optional pole it becomes freestanding and will offer some snow support.
See this pic of the Moment under 10" of snow.
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e389/Francophoto/Moment/snow-Moment-1.jpg

Franco
(some of those comments are based on users feedback in other forums. Note that many do not post here due to the rather common ad hominem attacks)

ShelterLeopard
12-11-2009, 00:53
Wow- that is an awesome picture Franco! Where was this picture taken? (And to think, I was excited with the 7" I got last week...)

Wags
12-11-2009, 01:00
the real question is what were the conditions inside that like during that picture? nobody will know b/c you weren't in it. just set it up to take a picture of the outside :(

Wags
12-11-2009, 01:01
and wyominglostandfound THAT is an awesome looking shelter. if i lived in a colder environment i'd definitely be scooping up one of your tipis

Franco
12-11-2009, 01:12
That was from Henry's backyard.
This is what the inside looked like . Of course if he were inside he could have knocked some snow off the shelter.
Keep in mind that the OP was asking about The One vs the Rainbow , not about expedition/high mountain tents...
Franco
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e389/Francophoto/Moment/Snow-Moment-2.jpg

JoshStover
12-11-2009, 01:24
Is there a reason that I am NOT seeing any of the pics people are posting?

ShelterLeopard
12-11-2009, 02:28
Computor problems- I can't always see photos, and I can never see what I post.

ShelterLeopard
12-11-2009, 02:28
The photos I post, I mean.

JoshStover
12-11-2009, 02:49
Well that blows. I have never had that problem before...

Franco
12-11-2009, 03:29
some possible fixes
Firefox
1- Open Mozilla Firefox
2- Click on Tools ==> Options ==> Content ==> then see if the case “load images automatically” is checked
Explorer
click tools===>internt options===>advanced===>scroll down to multimedia settings===>make sure the “Show Pictures” box is checked.

JoshStover
12-11-2009, 03:52
Franco, Thanks. I checked all that and it seemed to be correct. Not sure why it is doing this. This is my work computer. I never have this problem at home...

Franco
12-12-2009, 18:52
Feet First has posted about 60 pics of his Moment.
Most of them show details of the inside.
http://picasaweb.google.com/awallace1980/TarpTentMoment?feat=embedwebsite (http://picasaweb.google.com/awallace1980/TarpTentMoment?feat=embedwebsite)#
From this thread at Backpackers :

http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forums/ikonboard.cgi?act=ST;f=832107219;t=9991124959;st=3 0 (http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forums/ikonboard.cgi?act=ST;f=832107219;t=9991124959;st=3 0)
Franco