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Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 11:54
Well, after viewing some trail running threads on WB & researching the topic online. I decided a few weeks ago to start trail running. I figured it would help keep me in better shape b/c I could be training more often for a half/marathon/ultra. Therefore when I did hit the AT for a section hike a few times a year, I'd be in much better shape than I normally am.

So, off I go, running my local trails for the past few weeks. I even found a local half/full marathon on 2/20/10 (Pilot Mountain Pay Back, NC) to train for. I was really getting stoked about trail running.

Then,,, I began yesterday's run on a local trail, and I was about a 1/4 mile into it when I must have stubbed my shoe on a rock or root and went flying to the ground. Because I had just started my run, I was moving pretty fast, & when I crashed to the ground, my lower shin must have grabbed hold & dug into a sharp protruding root. I immediately got up from the fall & glanced down to see what minor scrape I had received, & to my astonishment,,, a gaping hole in my right leg - front shin/ankle area. I was transported to the emergency room, & it required 20 stitches. I'm in some major pain, even w/ oxycodone. I'm pretty agile and used to rock/root hoping while hiking, so I'm somewhat dumbfounded at the extent of my injury. My right chest took a pounding as well, but no broken ribs,,, just very very sore. I can't believe this. I had even read an article recently on how to fall while trail running. Although this was information I had known and used a few times while hiking. This fall technique must have not been programmed enough in my brain to respond to a quicker pace.

Anyway, just thought I'd share my experience. WB trail runners,,, feel free to give me a good ribbing on this one. What a doofuss move on my part.

How many trail runners use poles? Maybe they would have saved my a$$ on this fall? haha, mostly kidding. My feelings are mixed on whether to continue this trail running thing one I heal. I have NEVER had this type of injury while hiking, especially w/ my 2 extra limbs (poles) to catch a fall. I'll probably be back out there running once I heal though, but just feeling a bit shaken on this one.

Later...

Lone Wolf
12-08-2009, 11:57
running with poles? kinda like running with scissors

Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 12:04
running with poles? kinda like running with scissors

classic Lone Wolf response... :rolleyes:

Alligator
12-08-2009, 12:18
I was trying to figure out what type of pack might be useful for longer runs so I ran through a bunch of trail running photos. I do remember seeing one fellow using them in a race I was looking at but it seemed very rare. It might be something seen on the longest races a little more often? Just a thought, as the average speed declines they might be more useful.

I've gone flying forward from stubbing my toes a few times but fortunately haven't gone down. I found that since I use trail runners most of the time that I am pretty good at foot placement. You kind of said that too so I'll try to remember to get same tape and gauze into my pack:D.

I don't know a lot about it but I've seen it mentioned that for trail running good core muscles help for balance and also that road racers may not have these as much. So transitioning to trails balance might be an issue that needs attention if one is more of a road runner. That may not apply to you or other hikers.

bigcranky
12-08-2009, 12:19
Sorry to hear about the fall, BD. Hope you recover quickly.

neighbor dave
12-08-2009, 12:26
:-? running with poles?.......mmmmmmm.......... might be a good thing :sun
http://www.faniq.com/images/blog/491680094_c7a8d6a518.jpg

Pedaling Fool
12-08-2009, 12:28
To me it's just a "lessons learned" moment. Regardless of what activity you choose you're going to have them, even driving a vehicle.

I remember my first "lessons learned" moment when I first started riding a bike. I was cruising along a two lane road somewhere between ~15-20 mph when all of a sudden I veered off the road simply due to inattention. I instinctively readjusted to get back on the road, but the road was raised above the ground by about 3-4 inches at a very steep angle. Therefore when my front wheel hit that pavement it stopped my forward momentum in a fraction of a second. It was so fast that I had no memory of flying through the air Ė one minute I was riding my bike the next I was lying on the ground. Time never slowed down, I was just down at the speed of light Ė it seemed.

I sustained no injuries from that incident, but luckily something (and I donít know what) made me realize a car was less than 100 feet from me, I instinctively jumped up out of the road, with my bike in hand and ran off to the side. To this day, thoughts of that incident still play in my head when I slightly veer off the road. It took a long time for me to stay calm in that situation, especially in high-traffic conditions with no paved shoulder.

Iíve had many more "lessons learned" moments since then, like not exclusively using the front brake, which can be really :o, but all you can do is live and learn.

maxpatch67
12-08-2009, 12:39
Man, thats a bummer. Don't let it get you down. Get out there and get back to it. Proabably should get back out there to it and you'll be glad you are back out there running the trails. It certainly does make a difference in the trail experience when running. You basically have to spend %100 of your time concentrating on the trail in front of you. Seems like if I look up for a moment, something bad happens. :)

John B
12-08-2009, 12:52
Personally I think that you have a great attitude about it, which is always 9/10ths the battle. You'll be up and running again in no time, so don't let it get you down.

I'm curious about the article on 'how to fall.' If you happen to remember the source, please share. Serious injury from falling is one that I haven't done (yet), but I think about it everytime I run at night. I also agree with MaxPatch67 -- the second your focus strays, that's when it happens.

Good luck and don't give up, although I can tell by your tone that you're not the quitting type.

Kerosene
12-08-2009, 13:40
Bad things can happen, anytime and anywhere, which is why it is always a good idea to let someone know where you are and your itinerary. Thankfully it sounds as if your injury will only leave a good scar.

Trail running isn't always about max speed, but pacing yourself to the terrain as well as the trailbed, which is partly why the winning times for long-distance trail runs are nowhere near as fast as a road run. You can't let yourself get injured if you want to finish the race!

Of course, now your significant other will be pushing you to wear soccer shinguards when you get back out there, which might result in a new trailname!

Kerosene
12-08-2009, 13:46
I'm curious about the article on 'how to fall.'I learned some of the techniques on how to fall without hurting yourself as a kid playing goalie in soccer and downhill skiing.

Ultimate Runner How to Fall Thread (http://www.ultrunr.com/how2fall.html)

Professional Wrestling Training on How to Fall (http://video.about.com/prowrestling/How-to-Fall-Safely.htm)

How to Fall in Stillettos (http://nymag.com/guides/everything/shoes/27323/) :D

ShelterLeopard
12-08-2009, 14:01
running with poles? kinda like running with scissors

Actually, I agree with Wolf on this one. I love poles for hiking, but if you're really moving at a good clip (you have to understand, I have only ever do "trail running" if there's food somewhere, so I don't know how fast average real trail runners go), they'll just get in the way- think about it, you'd be running with four legs, two of which are fake and not used to running. I think it'd make it worse.

JJJ
12-08-2009, 14:01
I've seen poles used at trail races, but being on the clumsy side and a fan of not being impaled, I think I'll pass.

Sorry to here about your laceration.

I like trail running and backpacking, but they really are two different diseases.
Even road running and trail running don't have as much in common as most people think.
Road running encourages steady-state, even-paced, mindless, fluid movement.
Trail running is the opposite of that.
Road runners get side stitches sometimes, trail runners just get stitches.
Welcome to the club
jjj

Tipi Walter
12-08-2009, 14:22
I've got a couple trails you can run in my neck of the woods, either up or down, won't matter. One's called The Nutbuster and comes up from Slickrock Creek to a high gap. The other's the North Fork Citico trail which if it doesn't kill you will surely break your heart.:)

Mags
12-08-2009, 14:28
Not quite the same as trai lrunning, but many adventure racers use poles. There is quite a bit of trail running/fast hiking in these races FWIW.

As a side note, it can be argued that the spur for lightweight backpacking equipment was not so much our extremely small niche (long distance hiking) but the larger "adventure sports" community. Ultra trail running, adventure racing, mountaineering, climbing, etc.

Lots of cross pollination among our little groups. :)

Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 14:39
:-? running with poles?.......mmmmmmm.......... might be a good thing :sun
http://www.faniq.com/images/blog/491680094_c7a8d6a518.jpg



now that link brought a smile to my face!! :D

Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 14:40
I'm curious about the article on 'how to fall.' If you happen to remember the source, please share.

I believe I saw it on trailrunnermag.com

mudhead
12-08-2009, 14:41
Were you looking at girls?

Some doofi will do anything for painkillers.:)

Heal well. Glad you didn't whack your head.

Stuff that might help. Slow down. Exaggerate lifting the feet. Sidestepping to line up the next step is allowed. Train your eye to look at the second and third step before placing the first.

Hike fast instead of run. You can crank your tempo, but still not be jogging. Especially uphill or on rough terrain.

Once you get feeling good about yourself/pace, that is when the roots defy gravity.:)

Keep what you did in the back of your mind. Could have been worse.:sun

But then I like to day hike, so ignore me.

Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 14:49
Actually, I agree with Wolf on this one. I love poles for hiking, but if you're really moving at a good clip (you have to understand, I have only ever do "trail running" if there's food somewhere, so I don't know how fast average real trail runners go), they'll just get in the way- think about it, you'd be running with four legs, two of which are fake and not used to running. I think it'd make it worse.

yea, that's why I said "mostly kidding".

"mostly" (b/c of exceptions).... I agree w/ mags that I've seen poles used in adventure racing,

& "kidding" b/c I personally can't imagine using them while traveling at a high rate of speed.

The Solemates
12-08-2009, 15:21
we gotta see pictures...

BobTheBuilder
12-08-2009, 15:43
Remember, it is much safer to stay home on the couch and watch infomercials all of your life. That's probably for the best. :rolleyes:

Bidwell
12-08-2009, 16:22
That was a good story...everyone falls from time to time. The fact that your fall was that bad was pure bad luck. Hope you get back out there once you recover.

On my long runs, depending on the terrain, I'll use poles. I carry them along on 20+ mile runs where I am climbing some steep terrain. When I finish with the climb, I just carry them the rest of the way... you can get poles that are light enough where you forget you're carrying them.

sherrill
12-08-2009, 16:39
Sorry about your injury. I hope you heal fast and well.

I'm lucky in that one neighbor has huge tracts of land (that was on purpose for you Monty Python nuts), he put in trails that I run on. These also intersect with the roads for a local development that has dirt roads that I use as connectors between his trails.

I find that my style of running and also my level of attention most definitely change between the two. On the trails I take a much shorter stride and go much slower than on the dirt roads. However I find it much more fun.

Skidsteer
12-08-2009, 17:15
:-? running with poles?.......mmmmmmm.......... might be a good thing :sun
http://www.faniq.com/images/blog/491680094_c7a8d6a518.jpg

That's just wrong on so many levels.

Thanks for posting it!

Big Dawg
12-08-2009, 17:42
we gotta see pictures... Are you serious?... it's gruesome. I took a pic on my phone, but am not sure how to transfer pics to the computer for upload to WB. Not sure I'd want to anyway, as it might offend some faint hearted viewers. If you're serious, send me a PM w/ your mobile phone#, and I'll send it via pic message.

Pedaling Fool
12-08-2009, 18:24
I've seen poles used at trail races, but being on the clumsy side and a fan of not being impaled, I think I'll pass.

Sorry to here about your laceration.

I like trail running and backpacking, but they really are two different diseases.
Even road running and trail running don't have as much in common as most people think.
Road running encourages steady-state, even-paced, mindless, fluid movement.
Trail running is the opposite of that.
Road runners get side stitches sometimes, trail runners just get stitches.
Welcome to the club
jjj
I agree, road running isn't real running.

Mags
12-08-2009, 19:24
I agree, road running isn't real running.

Is that like a certain other user saying day hikes don't count? :D

Egads
12-08-2009, 19:52
I agree, road running isn't real running.


Is that like a certain other user saying day hikes don't count? :D

talk about elitism

Mags
12-08-2009, 19:57
talk about elitism


Just for the record it is not me saying day hikes don't count! :)

Hell..I have trouble counting to 20 if I don't take off my shoes and socks.:banana

mudhead
12-09-2009, 07:57
Does it itch yet?

Take a deep breath and let us know how that feels.:eek: