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blantonator
01-05-2010, 15:47
I'm looking for a stove and pot for two people on two to three day hikes. I've used canister stoves and hate not knowing how much gas I have, but they work easily and can simmer. I like granularity of an alcohol stoves, but am nervous that it will have problems cooking for two, or heating something up like soup or chili.

For two people, on weekend hikes, what route should I go?

Also, I got a pinnacle dualist for xmas, it's nice, but seems like a bit of overkill. What are your thoughts on this cookset? If I wasn't given it, I was going to just pickup a Ti pot.

Thanks,

flemdawg1
01-05-2010, 15:54
Canisters are pretty much the best way to go for 2 people. Alcohol stoves have problems with fuel capacity with the amounts of water needed for 2 folks. To get around your canister level annoyance you could either carry a spare or get some gauge stickers.
http://www.opticsplanet.net/brunton-6-pack-fill-level-indicators-gauge-buta.html

warraghiyagey
01-05-2010, 16:07
Same stove as for one person, just a little bigger pot, any outfitter has a nice choice, titanium are more expensive but light and durable. . . .:)

blantonator
01-05-2010, 16:20
right but if an alcohol stoves takes 16 minutes to boil 4 cups of water, and will only burn for 15 minutes, that may not be an ideal solution right?

Nean
01-05-2010, 16:25
I like the 2 person Jetboil.:)

Mrs Baggins
01-05-2010, 16:29
Our Whisperlight works well for the 2 of us. We use a 1.3 liter pot. When it's just me I use my Pocket Rocket and a 0.9 pot.

tagg
01-05-2010, 16:49
I use a MSR SuperFly with a Snow Peak Trek titanium pot (1.4 liters) for two of us. I can boil enough water for two meals in just a few minutes, and both are lightweight. I don't like guessing about canisters either, but if you're only going out for a weekend, one of the 8oz canisters is a gracious plenty. Since they only cost about $5, you could just bring a new one for every weekend trip and not have to worry.

toegem
01-05-2010, 16:58
blantonator, I second tagg why worry an 8 oz. canister of fuel should get you 70 mins. wide open and that should be more than enough fuel for a 2 or 3 day trip.

warraghiyagey
01-05-2010, 17:00
right but if an alcohol stoves takes 16 minutes to boil 4 cups of water, and will only burn for 15 minutes, that may not be an ideal solution right?
Wrong. . .:) . . . Then you just put the lid on and let it finish cooking with it's own heat. . . done it many times. . . . :)

DAJA
01-05-2010, 17:02
I'll second the Jetboil dual cook system... Reliable and easy... An 8 oz canister will easily last you for a couple of weekend trips, even at two boils a day..

Spirit Walker
01-05-2010, 17:04
We use one of Tinman's alcohol stoves with a 1.9 l pot. Dinner consists of a Liptons dinner with a package of tuna/salmon/spam. Midhike it'll be 1 1/2 packages of pasta/rice. It doesn't take long to heat the water to boiling.

We used to use a Whisperlight, but the weight savings of the alcohol stove, plus the fact that you can fly with it more easily, made us switch.

BrianLe
01-05-2010, 17:10
Depending on the particular dynamics of your hikes, you could consider a tri-ti stove (http://www.titaniumgoat.com/TiTri.html) that will burn alcohol or esbit tablets or ... wood. A pretty efficient and fairly lightweight system that avoids the issues that cannisters have.

Not a cheap system, however, if you're not heavily into backpacking.

There are alcohol-only systems that will simmer; at least the Brasslites will via a simmer ring.

warraghiyagey
01-05-2010, 17:15
http://www.365adventure.com/reviews/data/36/MSR-Pocket-Rocket-Camp-Stove-11.jpg

warraghiyagey
01-05-2010, 17:16
Relatively inexpensive - 35$ for the stove. . . 7ish$ for the fuel. . . will last 2 weeks cooking twice a day. . . . :)

russb
01-05-2010, 17:48
the fancee feest alcohol stove is good enough to boil water for two people. it is very efficient, and quite fast for an alcohol stove. works great in sub-zero temps too.

warraghiyagey
01-05-2010, 18:15
the fancee feest alcohol stove is good enough to boil water for two people..
Also good for heating up your cat's dinner. . . .

Feral Bill
01-05-2010, 18:39
If you are going to be using it a lot, I'd recommend a white gas stove, particularly the SVEA. You can then cook for two nicely, including simmering, in all weather. The fuel is much cheaper than canisters, and for weekends, why sweat a few ounces.

bigcranky
01-05-2010, 18:45
Some couples carry two alcohol stoves and two small pots. A good alky stove can boil 2 cups of water in 6-8 minutes. With two of them:

-you can make two meals at once, and each of you can eat something different, if you like.

-each of you has a stove (and, presumably, food) in case you get separated during the day. (This has happened to me.)

-you can make a shared meal in one, and a shared hot drink in the other.

Me? I carry a canister stove when I hike with my wife. Easy and fast.

garlic08
01-05-2010, 18:59
We use one of Tinman's alcohol stoves with a 1.9 l pot. Dinner consists of a Liptons dinner with a package of tuna/salmon/spam. Midhike it'll be 1 1/2 packages of pasta/rice. It doesn't take long to heat the water to boiling.

We used to use a Whisperlight, but the weight savings of the alcohol stove, plus the fact that you can fly with it more easily, made us switch.

My wife and I will second this exactly. I made a pepsi can stove with extra holes (40 pin holes, I think) for more power and we had no problems cooking for two with it. I figured out how to simmer by adding water to the fuel, and even cooked rice a couple of times. In good weather, we could cook for two with a scant one ounce of fuel. The only better system I've ever found is not cooking at all.

300winmag
01-05-2010, 21:24
Stove> Brunton Flex.
Light, folds, and has a WIDE burner ring for evenly heating the 1.5 liter pot that two people need. (Made for Brunton by Primus, this is the Primus Crux but much improved.)

Pot> Any 1.5 L pot (1 L. is a bit too small)

or the JetBoil 1.5 L pot W/ lightening upgrades:
1.steel handles removed
2. handle attatchment panel cut away W/ Dremel tool, except for riveted area
3. center circle cut out of bottom Flux ring protector leaving the corrugated Flux Ring covered (unless you want to use this cover for one of your plates & the plastic lid for the other plate. Now THAT'S saving weight.)

I have done this to my JB 1.5 L pot and added a skeletonized aluminum pot gripper. Works great for me as a snow melting pot due to its greater heat transfer efficiency. I always use an MSR wind screen for maximum fuel efficiency.

The JB pot is the heart of the JB's fuel efficiency and buying just the pot and using it with a good windscreen is kind of cherry picking JB's system for the best features. You'll notice the Brunton Flex wide burner ring roughly matches JB's wide burner. Again, cherry picking W/O the JB burner's weight.

Eric

Red Beard
01-05-2010, 22:25
It depends on what time of year it is. If it's warm, you can get away with a Pack-a-Feather XL. If it's colder, I'd say go with a canister type stove.

Wags
01-06-2010, 02:21
homemade wood stove if you're not out in winter

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x151/wagz_pics/IMG_0550.jpg

healthymom
01-06-2010, 11:58
At one time, I saw an article here on WB that compared different stoves and stove types. I can't find it now.
It would be really helpful in answering the questions on this thread.
Anyone know where to find it?
Thanks!
Dee
healthymom

rjridgely
01-06-2010, 12:19
1, 2, 5 or more....it's the Dragonfly' for me

Mags
01-06-2010, 12:36
At one time, I saw an article here on WB that compared different stoves and stove types. I can't find it now.
It would be really helpful in answering the questions on this thread.
Anyone know where to find it?
Thanks!
Dee
healthymom

It is on my website:
http://www.pmags.com/joomla/index.php/Backpacking-and-Hiking-documents/stove_comparison.html


My take is that alcohol stoves can work for two people, it does require some discipline and patience that most hikers don't want to bother with. Esp if they are not ld hikers. :)
(OK...discipline and patience my girlfriend won't want to bother with. ;) )

zelph
01-06-2010, 14:48
the fancee feest alcohol stove is good enough to boil water for two people. it is very efficient, and quite fast for an alcohol stove. works great in sub-zero temps too.

That one would be my choice also. Will easily hold 2 ounces of fuel and can be made to simmer. "Stoviegal" thinks it's pretty nice:) easy to make.

300winmag
01-06-2010, 23:00
WOW! We have suggestions here from the sublime (MSR Pocket Rocket) to the ridiculous (Feather Fire alky) and everywhere in between. My setup of a lightened JB 1.5 L pot & Brunton Flex stove seems to be a middle ground in weight and fuss free reliability for cooking for two.

Yeah, I've tried alky in various homeade and commercial stoves, love ESBIT W/ Vargo Triad EX base in summer for arduous treks and the MSR Dragonfly for winter. But I'll take my Brunton Flex canister stove for most summer backpacks. (And alky is for afficiandos only. Not really practical. ;)

ARambler
01-07-2010, 00:20
> from the sublime (MSR Pocket Rocket)

??

Not that far in weight and performance from the recommended Bruton. Put the Pocket Rocket with a 0.9 L Ti pot, and it blows the Brunton away on weight. (and gives up some on simmering) There are lots of Pocket Rockets out there. I have the Primus knockoff. I like the larger 8 oz cyinders for stability, and the built in ignitor.

The Reactor mentioned in Mags comparison has not caught on in the thru community. too expensive and heavy.
Rambler

ARambler
01-07-2010, 00:33
In case the original poster is still alive:

I think the level gauge is of limited value for a weekender. 1) You should start by keeping records of use, some make scratch marks on the cylinder. 2) Get a good scale and weight the canister before you leave. 3) you may want to judge by shaking. It is pretty unreliable, but it is what we all do. 4) Don't be afraid to just burn the last bit to test your other indicators. This also make disposal safer (but I'm not making specific recommendations here) 5) With the above, only once in a while will you need to take a back-up canister on a weekend trip.
Rambler

Mags
01-07-2010, 01:36
Not really practical. ;)


Most of done something wrong on previous hikes. :eek:

SMSP
01-07-2010, 01:54
The Jetboil system gets the most efficient use of fuel in regards to canisters. I did a little experiment at home with my JB and Pocket Rocket with the Pinnacle Soloist. I boiled 2 cups of water in each setup. I was able to boil approx. 24 times (at 2 cups) with the JB and approx. 12 times (at 2 cups) with the PR. According to my little experiment, the JB burns twice as long than the PR. I too, was concerned about knowing how much fuel in a canister stove will last for a trip.

The Pinnacle Dualist is a little overkill? I havent use the Dualist, but do have the Soloist. The Soloist could be used for two if another cup is added. The soloist pot can hold a max of 40oz. It easily holds 32oz. with plenty room for added food. The small canister of fuel and a PR stove can fit inside. Maybe the Soloist would meet your needs?

SMSP

Sailor (The other one)
01-07-2010, 05:50
Been using a Trangia alcohol burner for the two of us for three years on trips ranging from overnights to two weeks. We use a Snowpeak 1400 titanium pot and a variation on Footsloger's modified Westwind stand (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...657#post638657) but widening it so that the burner sits on the ground. This increase in the distance of the burner from the pot bottom cut the time to boil two cups of water. The simmer cap works well and can adjust the flame for medium or slow cooking. For just simmering we use a homemade pot cozy. The Trangia is heavy as alcohol stoves go but since I am a klutz and have really, really tried to destroy it, its durability is an asset despite the weight.

BTW Wags, great picture.

Red Beard
01-07-2010, 07:38
WOW! We have suggestions here from the sublime (MSR Pocket Rocket) to the ridiculous (Feather Fire alky)

I wouldn't call it ridiculous. It just requires patience. After all I *did* qualify my suggestion by stating warmer weather. I certainly wouldn't use the stove for more than two people.

LIhikers
01-07-2010, 11:29
My wife and I use an MSR Simmerlite stove.
It's reliable, not as heavy as a whisperlite, can heat up food and water fast or slow. I don't know if you and your wife go out in winter, and need to melt snow, or even frozen water, but a white gas stove works good for that.

For a pot we use one from our set of Blacklite pots made by MSR that we bought for car camping. It's larger than we really need but gives us room to stir and flip food. One year we had an entire Thanksgiving dinner, heated up freezer bag style, and this combination of pot and stove handled it no problem.

Wags
01-07-2010, 12:39
BTW Wags, great picture.


thanks rbk :)

Serial 07
01-07-2010, 12:51
jetboil...

cheeks
01-07-2010, 14:16
^^ Hey Serial howyadoin? :)


Adding my 2 cents: you absolutely do not need anything fancy or extra for 2 people. My (now) wife and I hiked the whole AT using a big 2L pot and probably the tiniest alcohol stove on the whole trail: 1.5" diameter, made of redbull cans to Sgt Rock's specifications:

http://hikinghq.net/sgt_stove/ion_stove.html

It even had plenty of use before the trail, survived the whole trail, has survived being run over by a car (inside a pot), and we're gonna take it the whole way on the PCT! Canada or bust!

Tinker
01-07-2010, 14:21
http://www.365adventure.com/reviews/data/36/MSR-Pocket-Rocket-Camp-Stove-11.jpg
That one was ok, but I bought this one: http://www.backcountrygear.com/catalog/Stovedetail.cfm?PRODUCTS__ProductID=VRG1006&code=GF11
and like it better. Lighter, tougher, doesn't burn stuff in the middle of the pan as easily.

Yukon
01-07-2010, 14:22
http://www.365adventure.com/reviews/data/36/MSR-Pocket-Rocket-Camp-Stove-11.jpg

This is exactly what we use, absolutely no complaints with it.

Yukon
01-07-2010, 14:24
That one was ok, but I bought this one: http://www.backcountrygear.com/catalog/Stovedetail.cfm?PRODUCTS__ProductID=VRG1006&code=GF11
and like it better. Lighter, tougher, doesn't burn stuff in the middle of the pan as easily.

I have heard this before but have never had it happen to us (burn food in the middle of the pan). I like the looks of the Vargo but until our Pocket Rocket gives us a problem can't justify buying one. Looks like a sweet little stove though.

Tinker
01-07-2010, 14:36
I have heard this before but have never had it happen to us (burn food in the middle of the pan). I like the looks of the Vargo but until our Pocket Rocket gives us a problem can't justify buying one. Looks like a sweet little stove though.
It is. The pot supports are really the major diff. between the two (that and the burner head size and configuration).
For two people and a big pot of hiker sludge, I felt that my PocketRocket pot supports swayed just a little too much.
For solo hiking I use Esbit or alcohol, but neither has the efficiency (especially in cold weather - and for two people) that a cannister stove has. Cannisters are so readily available along the trail and so easy to use that most people prefer them. Price (and the fact that I eat simply when solo hiking) keep me from using mine more.

Blissful
01-07-2010, 14:43
On our hike in '07 we took the pocket rocket for 2 people with the bigger snowpeak cookset. no problems. Plan to do it again in 2011.

blantonator
01-08-2010, 15:23
I think i may try both an alcohol stove and a pocket rocket.

rjc
01-20-2010, 20:07
My wife and I backpack together and have used alcohol, cannister, and white gas. For well below freezing I use white gas, for most other trips we use a cannister. For short trips, 3-4 days, we use the alcohol.

We can cook 2 meals per day for nearly 2 weeks with 8 oz of cannister fuel. I'm reasonably careful about fuel consumption (cook on med-low output, keep out of the wind) but I don't go crazy. If you cook on high you'll burn through gas like crazy.

I have no problem cooking for 2 with alcohol in warm weather but haven't tried it when it's 20F outside. I would guess my stove wouldn't cut it for that.


For a thru-hike I think we'll use an alcohol stove.