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View Full Version : How long did your Jetboil canister last on a thruhike?



daylaandjasper
01-08-2010, 21:59
I am trying to plan my fuel resupplies for my thruhike- I'd like to hear from people who used a Jetboil on a thru-hike- esp if using a PCS for two people.

I do not want to hear about why I should use some other stove instead. I've used every other type of stove and the extra weight of the jetboil is worth it to me for convience/speed.

on avg how often did you cook per day? on avg how many days did you get out of a canister?

We plan to cook breakfast, hot drinks and dinner for two, using one cup in conjunction with a ziploc screw lid container cozy.

white_russian
01-08-2010, 22:13
Ours last about 10-14 days for two people in the summer. That was dinners and only coffee in the morning.

Nean
01-09-2010, 00:29
I'm thinking 5 days or so, 2-3 times a day.

ARambler
01-09-2010, 01:23
I'm thinking 5 days or so, 2-3 times a day.
It is not obvious what size cylinder anyone is referring to. Times depend on personal habits, and nobody likes to run out. I find those that are most fuel efficient like to brag about it. I would recommend carrying 1 oz per day per person, or 2 oz per day. You may be contributing stumps to the hiker boxes, but if you are doing "good" planning, why run out? (Based on the efficiency of the jet boil, and smaller second hiker, I could support 1.5 oz per day for 2). Also, don't add in town days.

I would caution against buying ahead. You have a 1 in 4 chance of finishing the trail, and maybe a 3 in 4 chance of continuing to make a hot breakfast in the summer.
Rambler

Franco
01-09-2010, 02:17
My advice would be to try it for yourself. In other words get a new canister (230g) cook your breakfast,lunch and dinner and night cup if you maybe inclined to do so,repeat a couple of times and average out.
The reason for this is that even using a Jetboil there are too many variables on the way that people cook.
An empty 230g canister is about 4.76 oz (135g) so weigh the full one and see how much you are using.
Some tips.
At half power you use about 30% less fuel than at full throttle (of course it takes a bit longer to boil...)
It takes more fuel to boil 1 quart then two halves.
If you don't need to sterilise your water you also don't need to boil it if you just want a hot drink.
So for example, someone going full blast , boiling water for morning,lunch and evening hot drink and filling the pot at night will use almost twice as much fuel as another one that only gets is water to hot enough , uses half power and boils 2 cups for dinner and then brings again another 2 cups to 'hot enough" for the evening hot drink.
Franco

rp1790
01-09-2010, 05:49
I cooked once a day (dinner) and maybe a coffee at lunchtime, sometimes in the morning. one of the small containers would last me about 10-14 days.

Most of my meals were Liptons which required about a 7-8 min simmer.

With a spare gas container in the pack, you got gas for weeks on end!

humunuku
01-09-2010, 12:04
i get 27-30 meals cooked per canister - for 1 serving meals, freezer bag style - this is a good estimate for spring/fall - warmer or cooler temps will allow some variation

white_russian
01-09-2010, 12:10
It is not obvious what size cylinder anyone is referring to.
Well if you are using the PCS then it is safe to assume the canister size is the one that fits inside the pot. That was how it was designed to be used anyway.

ARambler
01-09-2010, 12:48
Well if you are using the PCS then it is safe to assume the canister size is the one that fits inside the pot. That was how it was designed to be used anyway.
And this secret size is...4 oz? :confused: We have answers of 10 -14 meals and 27 -30 meals. In hope one is for 4 oz and one for 8 oz. Otherwise, no assumption is safe.
I think it is safe to assume that 2 people cooking twice a day are using the larger 8 oz cylinders. They are more stable and weight efficient than the small cylinders. Certainly, a significant number of couples carry 4 oz cylinders, especially as a backup cylinder. It sounds like this couple is cooking 4 meals/day and another 4 cups (2 meals) for drinks. So, the 27 - 30 meal cylinder may not last 5 cold days.
Rambler

Nean
01-09-2010, 13:00
And this secret size is...4 oz? :confused: We have answers of 10 -14 meals and 27 -30 meals. In hope one is for 4 oz and one for 8 oz. Otherwise, no assumption is safe.
I think it is safe to assume that 2 people cooking twice a day are using the larger 8 oz cylinders. They are more stable and weight efficient than the small cylinders. Certainly, a significant number of couples carry 4 oz cylinders, especially as a backup cylinder. It sounds like this couple is cooking 4 meals/day and another 4 cups (2 meals) for drinks. So, the 27 - 30 meal cylinder may not last 5 cold days.
Rambler

I be talking the mid sized.:eek: Those little ones too small, the big one too much. :p Mostly I just round up partals left behind and rarely buy.:o Lots of times I'll use my stove to heat my hands or warm up my tent or boots. :-? Maybe this person is just curious? I would not pre-buy and ship them though i have been known to keep a couple spares in me bounce box.:)

When it comes to fuel consuption, they invented a sayin: YMMV;)

white_russian
01-09-2010, 13:02
And this secret size is...4 oz? :confused: We have answers of 10 -14 meals and 27 -30 meals. In hope one is for 4 oz and one for 8 oz. Otherwise, no assumption is safe.
I think it is safe to assume that 2 people cooking twice a day are using the larger 8 oz cylinders. They are more stable and weight efficient than the small cylinders. Certainly, a significant number of couples carry 4 oz cylinders, especially as a backup cylinder. It sounds like this couple is cooking 4 meals/day and another 4 cups (2 meals) for drinks. So, the 27 - 30 meal cylinder may not last 5 cold days.
Rambler
How about some people can cook conservatively and others just put the stove on full blast. Then there are people that cook rice and those that do the baggie thing. 1 meal does not equal 1 meal. It all depends on the person. Make sense yet?

300winmag
01-10-2010, 17:35
REMAINING FUEL LEVEL HINT:

To find your "remaining fuel level" in a canister take one EMPTY canister and one FULL canister. Set the canisters one at a time in a pan of water. Mark the water level on the outside of each canister, empty and full with a permenant marker or a scratched line & arrowhead mark above it.

Then, using these two marks, empty and full, mark each remaining canister with the two marks. When using a marked canister just set it in water to see how much fuel is remaining relative to the full mark. This is cheap to do and it works.

Remember when putting the canisters in water "purge" the air from the concave bottoms by tilting them as you put them in the water.

humunuku
01-11-2010, 13:32
i get 27-30 meals cooked per canister - for 1 serving meals, freezer bag style - this is a good estimate for spring/fall - warmer or cooler temps will allow some variation

this was using a 3.88 oz snowpeak canister