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View Full Version : Yukon Quest trail, 420 miles, no resupply



John B
02-08-2010, 09:57
From the Fairbanks News, 2-08-10

FAIRBANKS ó When someone gives you a ticket to Fairbanks and tells you to take a hike, itís not likely to be a positive thing.

But Joachim Rinsten happily accepted the bus ticket so he could walk the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest trail from Fairbanks to Whitehorse, Yukon. It was a present from his wife for his 50th birthday.

Rinsten, of Germany, is one of a group of people who walk the 420-mile route of the Arctic Ultra Run every other year. The walk follows the Quest trail from Whitehorse to Dawson City, and it doesnít occur when the Quest runs from Fairbanks because the walkers and dog teams run into each other.

Rinstenís birthday walk will last four to five weeks. He was on day six when he arrived at the Quest checkpoint at Steese Highway Mile 101 on Sunday morning.

Speaking through a translator, Rinsten said he loves the adventure of the area and the challenge of the walk.

Rinsten arrived at Mile 101 as many Quest mushers were still serving their mandatory two-hour layover there. He was dragging a sled full of supplies, including all the food he expects to need, survival gear and a bivouac sleeping sack. (ea)

For drinking water, he fills a Camelbak with snow and lets his body heat melt it.

Rinsten wears standard hiking shoes on much of the hard-packed trail, but he keeps a pairs of rubber and neoprene boots on hand for overflow ó which he said is his greatest peril. He also avoids sweating in any amount because of the dangers of moisture in the cold.

The precautions have already paid off. Rinsten was walking through a storm Thursday and had to seal up in the bivouac for 12 hours.

In case he is injured or otherwise incapacitated, he carries an emergency locator with two buttons ó one for immediate help and one for when he is immobilized but can survive for a day or so.
(daaaaammmmnnnn :eek:)

fiddlehead
02-08-2010, 10:58
Don't tell Mrs Baggins about this guy.
Please.

DavidNH
02-08-2010, 11:10
From the Fairbanks News, 2-08-10

FAIRBANKS ó When someone gives you a ticket to Fairbanks and tells you to take a hike, itís not likely to be a positive thing.

But Joachim Rinsten happily accepted the bus ticket so he could walk the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest trail from Fairbanks to Whitehorse, Yukon. It was a present from his wife for his 50th birthday.

Rinsten, of Germany, is one of a group of people who walk the 420-mile route of the Arctic Ultra Run every other year. The walk follows the Quest trail from Whitehorse to Dawson City, and it doesnít occur when the Quest runs from Fairbanks because the walkers and dog teams run into each other.

Rinstenís birthday walk will last four to five weeks. He was on day six when he arrived at the Quest checkpoint at Steese Highway Mile 101 on Sunday morning.

Speaking through a translator, Rinsten said he loves the adventure of the area and the challenge of the walk.

Rinsten arrived at Mile 101 as many Quest mushers were still serving their mandatory two-hour layover there. He was dragging a sled full of supplies, including all the food he expects to need, survival gear and a bivouac sleeping sack. (ea)

For drinking water, he fills a Camelbak with snow and lets his body heat melt it.

Rinsten wears standard hiking shoes on much of the hard-packed trail, but he keeps a pairs of rubber and neoprene boots on hand for overflow ó which he said is his greatest peril. He also avoids sweating in any amount because of the dangers of moisture in the cold.

The precautions have already paid off. Rinsten was walking through a storm Thursday and had to seal up in the bivouac for 12 hours.

In case he is injured or otherwise incapacitated, he carries an emergency locator with two buttons ó one for immediate help and one for when he is immobilized but can survive for a day or so.
(daaaaammmmnnnn :eek:)

Good thing the guy had a sled. How do you carry 450 days worth of food? answer, you don't!

Toolshed
02-08-2010, 12:18
Good thing the guy had a sled. How do you carry 450 days worth of food? answer, you don't! 450 days? Pretty slow walker - at just over 2 miles per day...:rolleyes:

John B
02-08-2010, 15:49
The hike is to take 28-35 days.

I keep trying to think of a situation in which I wouldn't push the "save my sorry butt now" button when I'm incapacitated but likely to survive another 48 hrs but instead would push the "really, take your time, I'll probably live" button.

thelowend
02-08-2010, 16:36
yeah, its 420 miles not days. that would be amazing. i wonder how heavy the sled is.

JustaTouron
02-08-2010, 16:39
The hike is to take 28-35 days.

I keep trying to think of a situation in which I wouldn't push the "save my sorry butt now" button when I'm incapacitated but likely to survive another 48 hrs but instead would push the "really, take your time, I'll probably live" button.

During a blizzard when you can't travel because the weather is really horrible but you don't want others risking their own lives to try and get to you when it is unsafe for them to travel.

max patch
02-08-2010, 17:18
450 days? Pretty slow walker - at just over 2 miles per day...:rolleyes:

If you've got 450 days of food on your back then 2 miles a day is f-a-s-t.

The Solemates
02-08-2010, 19:55
http://www.yukonquest.com/site/yukon-quest-trail-map/

I don't read the article as stating "no resupply". It just says he is carrying a full sled of supplies.

The trail goes through towns - of course he is going to resupply in the towns.

skinewmexico
02-08-2010, 21:58
Some people look at hiking a little differently. Heck, Andrew Skurka is planning a Yukon-Alaska hike this summer that is a little under 5,000 miles. I can't relate to that.

yappy
02-08-2010, 22:47
The dogs are what is amazing on the Quest . I live here in fairbanks and I did read that article. it would be cool to hike cuz the trail is smooth and fast.. snow machines are on it has some steep though . The towns aren't like the AT that is for sure.. in fact town may be the wrong word.. they are check points often with nothing in them. This state is REMOTE... at least most of it.

DAJA
02-08-2010, 23:18
I once spent a winter living in an abandoned logging camp in Northern Ontario, while building my own log cabin.. I canoe'd in stashes of food and supplies during the fall.

These supplies lasted two months.. For the remainder of the winter I snowshoed 70 kms each way, once a month, to the nearest northern outpost for supplies.. I pulled supplies back on a sled, with a weight of approx 60lbs.. Pulling a 60lbs sled is much much easier than carrying a 30lbs pack on your back..

If you can ski, pulling a sled becomes even easier. I just could never get the hang of it, rendering me inefficent and wasting energy, so I stuck with snowshoes..

At least this fellow is following a well groomed hard pack trail.. Much easier than blazing a trail.. Hmmm, this story is making me consider another winter in the north...

danahy
02-09-2010, 00:55
IMHO, pulling a sled of supplies, in the dead of winter, up and down uneven terrain seems a bit arduous. I'd rather wear a pack. Just my opinion.

DAJA
02-09-2010, 10:15
IMHO, pulling a sled of supplies, in the dead of winter, up and down uneven terrain seems a bit arduous. I'd rather wear a pack. Just my opinion.

Keep in mind a sled is not attached to you using a rope allowing it to chase you down hills, but rather fixed with solid metal rods, keeping the sled firmly and consistantly behind you. I made mine out of a cheap plastic kids sled and modified a harness too it.. All said it probably cost me $40.00 and works great, I still use it on winter trips rather than carry a pack. Unfortunately this winter has been lame and we've never had enough snow for a good sled pull..

That said, I wouldn't pull a sled through the AT or on challenging mountain terrain, but certainly on flat lands and lakes, which was the terrain in Northern Ontario. Even better if you have skidoo trails or dog sled trails to use..

Even when breaking trail I could average 3kms/hr..

tzbrown
02-09-2010, 10:42
We just completed a recent weekend in the snow.
overnight temps near zero, daytime about 15.
The sleds averaged around 50 to 70 lbs but we ate like kings, all day long in between making water and building "quinzies" to sleep in

yappy
02-09-2010, 10:47
Sometimes on the ididarod there are some folks that walk the first 200 miles or so. The trails are so hard that you can use hiking boots often depending on the temps. The Quest is also a 1000 mile dog race like the Idid. it is considered the toughest race in the world. The races run roughly back to back with the Quest first... Of late the winner has won them BOTH with mostly the same dog team. I know most of the folks here are not interested in this but that is AMAZING and he is a cancer survivor... whippet lean and kinda frail looking. Unreal outdoorsmen and athlete. The dogs though they are astounding !

DAJA
02-09-2010, 10:48
Nothing beats a quinzy or snowcave for winter warmth..

Looks like you guys had a lot of fun!

John B
02-09-2010, 12:05
http://www.yukonquest.com/site/yukon-quest-trail-map/

I don't read the article as stating "no resupply". It just says he is carrying a full sled of supplies.

The trail goes through towns - of course he is going to resupply in the towns.

I wrote the reporter, Josh Armstrong, this morning to ask about resupply. He wrote back that Mr. Rinsten is carrying with him everything that he expects to need, including food; however, and to quote the reporter, because the Quest trail crosses populated areas, he will have the opportunity to resupply some items if there is a need.

The Solemates
02-09-2010, 12:18
I wrote the reporter, Josh Armstrong, this morning to ask about resupply. He wrote back that Mr. Rinsten is carrying with him everything that he expects to need, including food; however, and to quote the reporter, because the Quest trail crosses populated areas, he will have the opportunity to resupply some items if there is a need.

wow. why?

John B
02-09-2010, 12:25
wow. why?

Absolutely no clue. It would be interesting to email the guy after he's done to hear about the trip, and why, for example, he'd carry a bivy when a tent would be just a couple of ounces more, but I gather that he only speaks German. That said, I'll give it a try and report back if he responds.

Mags
02-09-2010, 12:56
At first, I thought he was not resupplying to be self-supported. But, then I see he is picking up supplies in towns as needed. Not sure why...Hmm... If my trip did not have a "self-supported" angle to it, I'd definitely resupply int he very towns I am going through! :)

yappy
02-09-2010, 17:33
It goes thru some small towns but the resupply would be spendy and even more so the farther he heads up. I am not sure how far he is going and if he gets into canada and I am too lazy to read the article again ..haha. he is having nice weather right now with temps about 0 in the day and maybe 10- 25 below at night. The quest goes right by our cabin and it is fun to watch the mushers head outta town and into the wilderness. Hey John B we have a friend moving from here to Lexington..should be quite an adjustment !

John B
02-09-2010, 19:23
Only a looney Alaskan would describe 25 below as "nice weather." :)

Yappy, if you come across updated info on his progress, please post it. I think that many of us are interested in people such as that guy.

I'm going to PM you my email. Feel free to share it with your friends coming to Lexington. I'd be happy to help them. Right now it's 30 degrees and we have well over 2 inches of snow on the ground -- hope they can handle it!

yappy
02-09-2010, 21:27
Lol hey thanks John ! will let them know . She can't wait to grow a garden with all that rich soil you guys have..:)

LeeAllure
02-09-2010, 23:33
There used to be, last time I was in Alaska, many tiny towns which had virtually no services like stores. If they wanted to eat, there was a long sled ride (usually) or vehicle ride to a town which did stock groceries. It's conceivable that he could be going through many towns, none of which were good resupply points.

Lee

yappy
02-10-2010, 11:04
This morning the top 4 mushers are nose to nose heading into Dawson Creek . The town closes in the winter ( I think ) and just opens for this race. The first musher in gets 4 oz of gold. It is a mandatory 36 our rest and then lookout.... they burst outta there like furry 4 legged rockets. The race in truely on baby !