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Spot In The Sky
02-21-2010, 13:03
I keep seeing how expensive the resupply in Abol Bridge is- so for going southbound, is there any way to avoid it, or do I start the trip with like 11 days worth of food, if thats even possible?
What has worked for anyone who has done it before?

Thanks team!

Mountain Wildman
02-21-2010, 13:26
Not sure what most people do but this might help, It is a page from Bearwalkers Trail Journal, He did a SOBO. This page talks about the Abol store and 100 mile Wilderness.
I read his whole journal. Maybe it will help you.

http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?id=242859

white_russian
02-21-2010, 13:37
Abol bridge is not a good spot to supply for the 100 mile wilderness. Their prices are high and the selection is geared to RV campers. The mostly have stuff like cans of beans, potato chips, and hot dogs. If you stay the night there you can buy those kinds of things and eat well so you don't have to pack that nights dinner. They also have pay showers so you can get at least a couple of days funk off of you before you start the 100 miles.

CrumbSnatcher
02-21-2010, 13:46
you buy food in millinocket at the grocery store before heading to baxter state park or you go into town to resupply after reaching the golden road/abol bridge camp store! the abol bridge camp store is better at just pigging out before or after the 100 mile wilderness

Rockhound
02-21-2010, 13:52
Actually it's about 115 miles to Monson. Day 1)Summit Mt K, enjoy the view then hike about 5 mi. to the Birches Lean-to. Day 2)Abol Bridge campground about 10 miles. You can get lunch,supper and the next days breakfast while you're there. Day 3)Hike about 15 mi. to Rainbow Stream Lean-to. Day 4)Hike 17 miles to White House Landing. Get a fantastic supper and breakfast the next morning. Day 5) Hike 15 miles to Cooper brook falls Lean-to. Day 6) 11 miles to Logan Brook Lean-to. Day 7) hike 17 mi. to Chairback Gap Lean-to Day 8) hike 16 miles to Wilson Valley Lean-to Day 8) Hike 10 miles to Monson. Day 8 you just need a breakfast. Two other days are basically taken care of at WHL and Abol campground. All you really need to get through the 100 miles is a weeks worth of food. Most of the 100 miles is relatively flat so you should make good time. Depending on how wet it is, mud should be the only thing that might slow you down.

weary
02-21-2010, 14:34
When I'm going southbound through the 100-mile-wilderness, I drive into Katahdin Stream with 11 days of food, enjoy the campsite, maybe climb the owl or doubletop the first afternoon. The next morning I climb Katahdin, return to Katahdin Stream, eat, and spend the night.

The second morning I eat a hearty breakfast of fresh eggs, sausage and such and then head south. Since the stuff all arrived by automobile, iincluding the cooler full of cold beers, it hadn't added anything to my pack weight. Heading south from Katahdin Stream, I always stop to snack at the Abol Bridge Store, mostly to learn of any trail rumors or special difficulties to the south.

By then I have only nine days of food left -- enough for a liesurely walk through a magnificent wild country. I've never stayed at Whitehouse Landing. But reports say opportunities for resupply there are also skimpy -- and expensive -- something like Abol Bridge. But if you want to spend the bucks a visit certainly eliminates another day of food needs.

But stopping also interupts an increasingly rare opportunity to walk for nine days in the eastern forests and hills without any great intrusions by civilization. Though the several logging road crossings cause many hikers to disparage the claim of "wildrness" for the 100 miles. The trail between Monson and Abol Bridge is as wild as one can find in the east. I choose to enjoy it in its entirety, rather than stopping midway just to save a couple of pounds of pack weight.

I know I can do the 100 miles in less than nine days. But I never rush. I visit the side trails to remote ponds, climb to the top of interesting ridges, try a worm or two in some of the wild trout streams, photograph gulf hagas again .... And wish I had planned even more time so I could explore even longer.

Weary

Spot In The Sky
02-21-2010, 14:39
Actually it's about 115 miles to Monson. Day 1)Summit Mt K, enjoy the view then hike about 5 mi. to the Birches Lean-to. Day 2)Abol Bridge campground about 10 miles. You can get lunch,supper and the next days breakfast while you're there. Day 3)Hike about 15 mi. to Rainbow Stream Lean-to. Day 4)Hike 17 miles to White House Landing. Get a fantastic supper and breakfast the next morning. Day 5) Hike 15 miles to Cooper brook falls Lean-to. Day 6) 11 miles to Logan Brook Lean-to. Day 7) hike 17 mi. to Chairback Gap Lean-to Day 8) hike 16 miles to Wilson Valley Lean-to Day 8) Hike 10 miles to Monson. Day 8 you just need a breakfast. Two other days are basically taken care of at WHL and Abol campground. All you really need to get through the 100 miles is a weeks worth of food. Most of the 100 miles is relatively flat so you should make good time. Depending on how wet it is, mud should be the only thing that might slow you down.
Well this sounds like everything I need to know! Thanks mister!

Rockhound
02-21-2010, 14:59
When I'm going southbound through the 100-mile-wilderness, I drive into Katahdin Stream with 11 days of food, enjoy the campsite, maybe climb the owl or doubletop the first afternoon. The next morning I climb Katahdin, return to Katahdin Stream, eat, and spend the night.

The second morning I eat a hearty breakfast of fresh eggs, sausage and such and then head south. Since the stuff all arrived by automobile, iincluding the cooler full of cold beers, it hadn't added anything to my pack weight. Heading south from Katahdin Stream, I always stop to snack at the Abol Bridge Store, mostly to learn of any trail rumors or special difficulties to the south.

By then I have only nine days of food left -- enough for a liesurely walk through a magnificent wild country. I've never stayed at Whitehouse Landing. But reports say opportunities for resupply there are also skimpy -- and expensive -- something like Abol Bridge. But if you want to spend the bucks a visit certainly eliminates another day of food needs.

But stopping also interupts an increasingly rare opportunity to walk for nine days in the eastern forests and hills without any great intrusions by civilization. Though the several logging road crossings cause many hikers to disparage the claim of "wildrness" for the 100 miles. The trail between Monson and Abol Bridge is as wild as one can find in the east. I choose to enjoy it in its entirety, rather than stopping midway just to save a couple of pounds of pack weight.

I know I can do the 100 miles in less than nine days. But I never rush. I visit the side trails to remote ponds, climb to the top of interesting ridges, try a worm or two in some of the wild trout streams, photograph gulf hagas again .... And wish I had planned even more time so I could explore even longer.

Weary
White House Landing is not exactly what i would call civilization. I think a little time out to canoe on a gorgeous lake looking for moose, turtles and heron, away from TVs and computers and other distractions of the real world, not exactly life in the big city. As far as for the meals and prices at WHL you could not get a better deal. Both the food and the portions are fantastic, but then again you would not know having never been there. As far as the pace goes I would consider 8 days certainly not leisurely but steady. It can and has been done in less time. Add a day or two to the schedule to make it leisurely and you are still only looking at 7 or 8 days worth of food, keeping in mind you'll be eating at a couple of spots along the way.

trailangelbronco
02-21-2010, 15:11
I used to live in Maine and hiked the section in 84. Not exactly the best hiking in Maine, but part of the AT. I just carried 9 days worth of food, that's how long it took me.

I used to think it was extreme wilderness, but then I moved out west.

weary
02-21-2010, 18:20
White House Landing is not exactly what i would call civilization. I think a little time out to canoe on a gorgeous lake looking for moose, turtles and heron, away from TVs and computers and other distractions of the real world, not exactly life in the big city. As far as for the meals and prices at WHL you could not get a better deal. Both the food and the portions are fantastic, but then again you would not know having never been there. As far as the pace goes I would consider 8 days certainly not leisurely but steady. It can and has been done in less time. Add a day or two to the schedule to make it leisurely and you are still only looking at 7 or 8 days worth of food, keeping in mind you'll be eating at a couple of spots along the way.
I'm not sure of your point, Pebble. I was just reporting on how I go through the wilderness for what value that may have for other hikers. I know White House isn't exactly civilization. It's just not what I'm seeking when I'm walking the wildest long section of the entire Appalachian Trail.

I also think I have a pretty good perspective on what White House Landing offers, since I have no reason to question the dozens of reports over the months on Whiteblaze. I'm not sure where the second place to eat may be. Is there an eatery besides White House Landing?

Weary

Rockhound
02-21-2010, 19:22
I'm not sure of your point, Pebble. I was just reporting on how I go through the wilderness for what value that may have for other hikers. I know White House isn't exactly civilization. It's just not what I'm seeking when I'm walking the wildest long section of the entire Appalachian Trail.

I also think I have a pretty good perspective on what White House Landing offers, since I have no reason to question the dozens of reports over the months on Whiteblaze. I'm not sure where the second place to eat may be. Is there an eatery besides White House Landing?

Weary
You referred to WHL as a "great intrusion of civilization". I say it's not. In fact I suspect you might see more hikers with their Ipods and cell pones etc on the trail than paddling around a beautiful serene lake. If the fact that you can grab a shower there and the best hamburger on the trail makes it a "great intrusion of civilization" then so be it. Weary, I think you need to hike out west. The A.T. (even the 100 mile "wilderness") is no place to escape civilization.

Rockhound
02-21-2010, 19:28
The 2nd place to eat is.... try to keep up.... Abol bridge campground. Combine that with WHL and there is 2 days of food you need not carry. Campground food is not the worlds most sought sfter delicacy I know, but you can get 3 meals there you wont have to carry in your pack. Abol Bridge Campground + WHL = 2 places to eat.

mweinstone
02-21-2010, 19:29
ive hiked the 100 mi wilderness over a hundred times in both directions with nothing more than wild foraged foods and stuff mermaids and unicorns brought me ,..in , my ... dreams.

stop talking about crap i cant do.



yet.

Rockhound
02-21-2010, 19:35
The mermaids are fine but unicorns!? You should know better Matty. Pack animals are'nt allowed on the A.T.

Treefingers
02-22-2010, 00:27
millinocket would probably be the closest grocery store option though it is a haul to get there. White house landing is a great place to great place to get a huge burger, pizza, and some resupply option such as candy bars, crackers, and lipton meals and mac and cheese. A bit expensive only because the must carry all supplies in on ATVs. Also the only place you'll get a hitch in a boat other than across the kennebec. White house landing also excepts credit and debit cards.

hope this helps

shoe
02-22-2010, 07:30
You could also check with boarstone here on Whiteblaze. She used to do food drops in the middle of the wilderness. Not sure of she is still doing this or not.

mudhead
02-22-2010, 09:37
Weary, I think you need to hike out west.

You lead the way. I'll follow.

weary
02-22-2010, 11:07
....Weary, I think you need to hike out west. The A.T. (even the 100 mile "wilderness") is no place to escape civilization.
Well, I've walked quite a bit in the west over the years. I've wandered to the Colorado River from the rim of the Grand Canyon, spent a week in Yosemite, spent time in the foothills around Rainier, and three months in the desert north of Yuma, AZ.

A couple of years ago my wife and I spent six weeks exploring all the northern tier of National Parks and Forests from Maine to Washoington State. We camped most nights and I walked many days.

My concludion: A North Maine Woods National Park would be equal to any of them, and wilder than most. The Maine terrain is certainly different. But not inferior.

Weary

naturejunkie
02-22-2010, 11:16
In 2008 I carried four days of food into the wilderness. I grabbed a bite to eat at Abol, but didn't resupply there. I planned on and did resupply at White House Landing. They had plenty of options to get me the rest of the way to Monson.

I didn't need four days heading into the wilderness, but I wanted to give myself a margin of error, because I wasn't sure how far I would be hiking each day. I would do it the same way again.

Some of the other Sobos had prearranged food drops along one of the logging roads, which is probably about a half day South of WHL.

TJ aka Teej
02-22-2010, 12:52
"I keep seeing how expensive the resupply in Abol Bridge is"
Actually, Linda's store is pretty reasonable. She's mostly a chips/candy/soda/beer/souvenir camp store. Grab a fresh sub and big bag of chips to eat a few miles into the 100 Mile. But don't plan on any resupply there. She'll have mac&cheese and liptons, beef jerky, instant potatoes and such, and canned things for the campground, but not much else.
Contact Kathy Preble, aka Boarstone here on WB. Nothing better than a nice heavy food bag waiting for you on the other side of Whitecap!
Check the ALDHA Companion or AWOL's Southbound guide, and take a look at the southbounder's forum here on WB.

CrumbSnatcher
02-22-2010, 13:16
the prices at WHL and ABOL BRIDGE STORE are what they are! i enjoy both of these places whenever i go thru the 100 miles. last sept. the $1.00 for 3 minutes pay phone at the abol store was worth every penny at the time.

weary
02-22-2010, 14:14
.....Contact Kathy Preble, aka Boarstone here on WB. Nothing better than a nice heavy food bag waiting for you on the other side of Whitecap!
Check the ALDHA Companion or AWOL's Southbound guide, and take a look at the southbounder's forum here on WB.
Sometimes when I plan on climbing Katahdin and then heading south through the 100 miles, I'll stash food along the trail, usually at the AT crossing of the Jo Mary Campground road. I pack it in one of those 12 quart plastic buckets that every hardware store sells. Wrap the cover on tight with duct tape, and put the whole thing in a black plastic garbage bag. I stash it behind bushes, a big log, or a big tree at least 100 feet from the trail. So far the stashes have always been there when I arrive a few days later, unmolested by neither man nor beast.

Just follow the Jo Mary Campground road from Route 11, north of Brownville. Go past the campground another few miles. There are signs and a turnout at the trail crossing.

An alternative drop off can be reached from the Katahdin Iron Works Road, which also branches from Route 11, north of Brownville. Follow the signs to Gulf Hagas. The trail crosses a few hundred yards north of the Gulf Hagas Parking lot. A drawback to stashing food it that you have to go back after a hike and remove the empty container.

But mostly, unless there is a special reason, like hiking with kids, or newcomers to the trail, I usually just stuff my pack with an extra 10 pounds of food. I eat the heaviest food first so the extra weight disappears quickly.

Weary

Blissful
02-22-2010, 14:31
Yeah I was sad you can't get a maildrop at WHL. Is there enough to resupply ok? We skipped it in '07.

Rockhound
02-22-2010, 15:16
Extremely limited and expensive for resupply. The sit down food there is to die for and a great value for the dollar. I recommend the 1 lb burger and fries and purchasing a bottle of wine to enjoy in a canoe near sunset.

Johnny Swank
02-22-2010, 15:51
If I SOBO'd again, I'd pack extra food and take a nearo beside one of the lakes along the way. Some friends did that, and I was too jealous for words! There aren't that many places on the trail that you can go swimming all day and chill on shore out in the middle of nowhere.

boarstone
02-22-2010, 19:39
You can get off the trail at Cooper Brook/AT trail crossing, go over the bridge and hitch or hike down the dirt road, 6mi, to the Jo-Mary campground. Limited resupply but are getting better and they are very hiker friendly and love you guys and gals! They have a register just for the hikers who come thru...do sign if you go. Depending upon when you start SOBO, they should be open by 2nd week in May. Check on here for any updates as I keep up on goings on in this area or e-mail me for updates at: chair_back_mt@yahoo.com. They carry HEET, instant potatoes, lipton, have cold sodas, lunch counter for breakfast and lunch. Great food! And oh so reasonable! And yes, you can send me your resupply and I'll deliver to Cooper or Gulf Hagas.

weary
02-22-2010, 22:14
You can get off the trail at Cooper Brook/AT trail crossing, go over the bridge and hitch or hike down the dirt road, 6mi, to the Jo-Mary campground. Limited resupply but are getting better and they are very hiker friendly and love you guys and gals! They have a register just for the hikers who come thru...do sign if you go. Depending upon when you start SOBO, they should be open by 2nd week in May. Check on here for any updates as I keep up on goings on in this area or e-mail me for updates at: chair_back_mt@yahoo.com. They carry HEET, instant potatoes, lipton, have cold sodas, lunch counter for breakfast and lunch. Great food! And oh so reasonable! And yes, you can send me your resupply and I'll deliver to Cooper or Gulf Hagas.
I know they are there. That's why I walked to their store a few years ago. No car or truck came by, so I walked the whole six or seven miles -- and found the place closed and no indication about when, or if ever -- the store might open.

So I walked back, and continued on my hike to Katahdin, after having done 12 or 14 miles of worthless miles on a dusty road.

My advice is: do not rely on the campground store -- at least until you have solid evidence that the campground and its store is going to be open. It's not a particularly pleasant walk as Maine walks go.

Weary

quasarr
02-25-2010, 23:56
Actually it's about 115 miles to Monson. Day 1)Summit Mt K, enjoy the view then hike about 5 mi. to the Birches Lean-to. Day 2)Abol Bridge campground about 10 miles. You can get lunch,supper and the next days breakfast while you're there. Day 3)Hike about 15 mi. to Rainbow Stream Lean-to. Day 4)Hike 17 miles to White House Landing. Get a fantastic supper and breakfast the next morning. Day 5) Hike 15 miles to Cooper brook falls Lean-to. Day 6) 11 miles to Logan Brook Lean-to. Day 7) hike 17 mi. to Chairback Gap Lean-to Day 8) hike 16 miles to Wilson Valley Lean-to Day 8) Hike 10 miles to Monson. Day 8 you just need a breakfast.

I was nowhere close to this schedule! Katahdin is a hard first day! Forget making it to the Birches. I was so pooped I could barely move when I got back to Katahdin Stream.

Doing 15-17 mile days right out of the gate is tough - I know I couldn't have done it and I was in pretty good shape before starting the trail. Sure there are studs out there, and if that's you then go for it. If not it's best to stick to 10-15 miles until you get your legs.

DawnTreader
02-26-2010, 00:16
Well this sounds like everything I need to know! Thanks mister!
Be careful with that advice.. Have you ever hiked the 100 mile wilderness SOBO in early June during black fly season at the start of a hike??? I would carry 10 days of food.. then there is no pressure. The 15 plus mile days the above poster mentioned may not be practiacable, nor safe, for someone just begining a SOBO thru... Take 10 days of food, Take it easy... 10 miles a day to start... Unless your superman, then disregard the previous ramble...

quasarr
02-26-2010, 08:20
And Maine is so beautiful! We stopped for lunch at a small lakeside beach and ended up staying for a couple hours just swimming and sitting in the sun. There are so few opportunities to swim outside of Maine, I would take all you can get!

Jeff
02-26-2010, 08:39
There are so few opportunities to swim outside of Maine, I would take all you can get!

I agree with this. But, southern Vermont has three wonderful lakes for swimming.

Rockhound
02-26-2010, 10:13
Be careful with that advice.. Have you ever hiked the 100 mile wilderness SOBO in early June during black fly season at the start of a hike??? I would carry 10 days of food.. then there is no pressure. The 15 plus mile days the above poster mentioned may not be practiacable, nor safe, for someone just begining a SOBO thru... Take 10 days of food, Take it easy... 10 miles a day to start... Unless your superman, then disregard the previous ramble...
I don't think it would take Superman to hike that schedule. People do the 100 miles in 4 or 5 days every year. My schedule, as I mentioned is steady but certainly more than doable for your average hiker. 8 days of food + 2 days at WHL & Abol bridge. + the last day when all you might need is an energy bar to get you to Monson for lunch gives you as much as 11 days to do it without going hungry. Average, a little over 10 miles a day. Please explain why you feel it would take Superman to stick to a pace that, if maintained throughout a thru-hike, would take over 200 days to complete with no zero days? I feel the schedule I posted, through the relatively flat 100 miles, is simply a good warm up for someone attempting a thru. If it's going to take you much longer than that, chances are you wont make it to GA.

Blissful
02-26-2010, 10:28
I don't think it would take Superman to hike that schedule. People do the 100 miles in 4 or 5 days every year. My schedule, as I mentioned is steady but certainly more than doable for your average hiker. 8 days of food + 2 days at WHL & Abol bridge. + the last day when all you might need is an energy bar to get you to Monson for lunch gives you as much as 11 days to do it without going hungry. Average, a little over 10 miles a day. Please explain why you feel it would take Superman to stick to a pace that, if maintained throughout a thru-hike, would take over 200 days to complete with no zero days? I feel the schedule I posted, through the relatively flat 100 miles, is simply a good warm up for someone attempting a thru. If it's going to take you much longer than that, chances are you wont make it to GA.


(Just jumping in here) Personally I would never plan to hike 15-17 mile days with a fully loaded pack just starting out SOBO or to get ready for a thru. Whats the rush anyway, with such a gorgeous area? But that's my 40 year old ligaments and mind talking. And the 100 mile wilderness is not flat. Also plenty of roots and other impediments to ankles not in condition. The Chairback Range was hard, and I was in condition going NOBO (and also did a 20 miler through there, UGH). Not sure why, if you take your time in the 100 mile wilderness, means you won't make the whole trail? Taking it easy, to me, is common sense starting out. I would go slow as molasses until I got to Hanover to preserve myself. Then 20 mile days if I wanted 'cause the tough stuff is behind me, for the most part. There should also be common sense in hiking. I have to tell myself that a lot or I overdo it, get injured and then that's really the end of the trail.

Ramble~On
02-26-2010, 10:41
(Just jumping in here) Personally I would never plan to hike 15-17 mile days with a fully loaded pack just starting out SOBO or to get ready for a thru. Whats the rush anyway, with such a gorgeous area? But that's my 40 year old ligaments and mind talking. And the 100 mile wilderness is not flat. Also plenty of roots and other impediments to ankles not in condition. The Chairback Range was hard, and I was in condition going NOBO (and also did a 20 miler through there, UGH). Not sure why, if you take your time in the 100 mile wilderness, means you won't make the whole trail? Taking it easy, to me, is common sense starting out. I would go slow as molasses until I got to Hanover to preserve myself. Then 20 mile days if I wanted 'casue the tough stuff is behind me, for the most part. There should also be common sense in hiking. I have to tell myself that a lot or I overdo it, get injured and then that's really the end of the trail.

I agree...totally.

I didn't hike SOBO and I didn't arrange a food drop. When I do it again, I'm gonna have a food drop worked out and take my time through the 100 Mile. I'd take my time with menu plannng too so that this part of the trail would be indulgent.

DawnTreader
02-26-2010, 12:52
I don't think it would take Superman to hike that schedule. People do the 100 miles in 4 or 5 days every year. My schedule, as I mentioned is steady but certainly more than doable for your average hiker. 8 days of food + 2 days at WHL & Abol bridge. + the last day when all you might need is an energy bar to get you to Monson for lunch gives you as much as 11 days to do it without going hungry. Average, a little over 10 miles a day. Please explain why you feel it would take Superman to stick to a pace that, if maintained throughout a thru-hike, would take over 200 days to complete with no zero days? I feel the schedule I posted, through the relatively flat 100 miles, is simply a good warm up for someone attempting a thru. If it's going to take you much longer than that, chances are you wont make it to GA.
Pebbles,
your first post on this thread dosn't jive with your 2nd.. I can't figure out how a 15,10,15,17,15,11,17,16, and a 10 mile day average a little over 10 miles a day??
"Actually it's about 115 miles to Monson. Day 1)Summit Mt K, enjoy the view then hike about 5 mi. to the Birches Lean-to. Day 2)Abol Bridge campground about 10 miles. You can get lunch,supper and the next days breakfast while you're there. Day 3)Hike about 15 mi. to Rainbow Stream Lean-to. Day 4)Hike 17 miles to White House Landing. Get a fantastic supper and breakfast the next morning. Day 5) Hike 15 miles to Cooper brook falls Lean-to. Day 6) 11 miles to Logan Brook Lean-to. Day 7) hike 17 mi. to Chairback Gap Lean-to Day 8) hike 16 miles to Wilson Valley Lean-to Day 8) Hike 10 miles to Monson. Day 8 you just need a breakfast. Two other days are basically taken care of at WHL and Abol campground. All you really need to get through the 100 miles is a weeks worth of food. Most of the 100 miles is relatively flat so you should make good time. Depending on how wet it is, mud should be the only thing that might slow you down."- Pebbles
"Mud should be the only thing that might slow you down." Don't ever count on that. Plenty of things should slow you down. Out of the gate fatigue, weather, The views, Gulf Hagas, ect. ect. Listen, all I'm sayin', is that it took me 10 days, and you shouldn't question peoples chances of making it to Georgia based on their "stats" through the 100 mile wilderness.. thats just silly. The sign says "Carry 10 days worth of food." So I did, and I also advise other SOBO starters to do the same.. Thats all..

Rockhound
02-26-2010, 15:11
For Petes' sake. A weeks worth of food is enough to get through 100 miles. The 100 miles is RELATIVELY flat as compared to the rest of the trail. Yes I know there are a couple of hills along the way. I hiked it last year. If the 20 something kid who started this thread is not using a walker, crutches, Hoverround or is extremely obese and out of shape he should have no problem sticking to the schedule I laid out. Also if there is a sign that says carry 10 days worth of food one might reason that they can drop 2 of those days if they will be getting food at Abol Bridge and WHL. I stick by my original post. Really people. You are trying to make this a lot harder than it is. IT'S ONLY WALKING!

DawnTreader
02-26-2010, 15:59
A weeks worth of food is enough for YOU to get through the 100 miles. I am not contesting your stance that it is a relatively flat section, i concur, but since we know little to nothing about this '20 something kid', more factors will effect this little 'walk'. Has he ever been on a long distance trip before? Has he found a comfortable gear kit that will allow him to walk 15+ mile days at the begining of a thru hike without hurting himself and ruining the rest of his hike? White House Landing can be an expensive stop ..bunk/food/resupply. We need more info on the thread starter, and his hiking motives before assuming he/she would be up for your schedule.
p.s.
I am a '20 something kid' who is not using a walker, crutches, hoverround and I am extremely fit. If I stuck to your schedule during the 100 mile wilderness, between the rain, mud, blackflies ect. I probabbly would have been even more discouraged than I already was. Looking back, one of the many joys I can recollect from that trip was the night before monson, I think it was at Wilson Lean to, handing out my extra food to sobo thrus i was hiking with that ran out of food one day early (they packed for 7 days).. Some of my fondest memories were gorging extra food the night before a town stop.. point? food is good, carry lots of it... especially if you have no clue as to how long it will take YOU to hike a certain section.

Rockhound
02-26-2010, 16:39
So I guess that means you are a camper who enjoys hiking and I'm a hiker who enjoys camping. I honesty consider myself to be an average hiker. Many many many people, even new to the trail and hiking, average more miles per day than I do and of course some average less. The schedule I laid out would be very doable by the average hiker. I also mentioned the mud might slow you down and of course weather is implied with that. Can't have mud without rain. As for black flies. They may irritate but slow a person down? I don't really see the logic there. When reading my post one might say "well I'm a below average hiker so I will add a day or two to that. If I was a megamiler I might even drop a day or two of food. Also, maybe you could have made it a little quicker if you were'nt carrying so much food. Then again the first time I hiked the 100 miles I listened to advice like yours and got to Monson with 3 days worth of food left over. My bad. Like anyones advice, you should filter it and take into account your own desires and abilities. Yes you are a slowpoke. I get it, but don't expect everyone else in the world to hike at a snails pace just because you choose to.

Rockhound
02-26-2010, 16:43
Also If you ate and camped at ABOL & ate and stayed at WHL, by the time you got to Monson you would have only averaged about $1 per mile.

DawnTreader
02-26-2010, 18:31
Okay, as long as you think its a good idea to start a thru-hike doing 15+mile days.... thats good for you.. but the majority of the hikers I meet going south in early june through Maine do not start out that fast. I don't think I'm alone on this.. I pack light enough for extra food. no harm... no race to the finish.. no above average below average nonsense.. I don't have to list my "stats" to prove anything.. I just like food, and think others should carry enough... and we still don't know anything about the hiker in question... we are talking about our personal hiking styles, not knowing his/hers, so we arn't getting anywhere anyway...
p.s. I bet you were glad you had leftover food instead being hungry for two days before town..

warraghiyagey
02-26-2010, 22:24
Okay, as long as you think its a good idea to start a thru-hike doing 15+mile days.... thats good for you.. but the majority of the hikers I meet going south in early june through Maine do not start out that fast. I don't think I'm alone on this.. I pack light enough for extra food. no harm... no race to the finish.. no above average below average nonsense.. I don't have to list my "stats" to prove anything.. I just like food, and think others should carry enough... and we still don't know anything about the hiker in question... we are talking about our personal hiking styles, not knowing his/hers, so we arn't getting anywhere anyway...
p.s. I bet you were glad you had leftover food instead being hungry for two days before town..

Well said. . . :sun:sun:sun

weary
02-27-2010, 00:57
For Petes' sake. A weeks worth of food is enough to get through 100 miles. The 100 miles is RELATIVELY flat as compared to the rest of the trail. Yes I know there are a couple of hills along the way. I hiked it last year. If the 20 something kid who started this thread is not using a walker, crutches, Hoverround or is extremely obese and out of shape he should have no problem sticking to the schedule I laid out. Also if there is a sign that says carry 10 days worth of food one might reason that they can drop 2 of those days if they will be getting food at Abol Bridge and WHL. I stick by my original post. Really people. You are trying to make this a lot harder than it is. IT'S ONLY WALKING!
A weeks worth of food will get you through most of the trail, but we are not talking 100 miles here. We are talking a minimum of 115 miles if you are planning to add Katahdin to your walk. A walk through Gulf Hagas and its numerous side trails to overlooks adds another six or so. Add another mile to visit the two high elevation Chairback ponds. It would be silly not to.

And unless you are really rushed, once leaving the park take another mile and a half round trip to the summit of Rainbow Mountain, and especially take an equally long excursion to Potaywadjo Ridge with its supurb views of Maine's wild lake country.

The above side trails should be added to every walk through the wilderness unless time is very limited, or one's goal is simply the pleasure of saying you "did it" and you are oblivious to the attractions that make it a special place.

If you are not doing Katahdin, then Abol Bridge does not even figure as part of the 100-mile-wilderness walk. It's just a store and campground a quarter mile or so before the trail leaves a paved road and begins the wilderness. The bridge just gets one across the Penobscot River. Nearby is a store and commercial campground, and a place to park a car.

As for me, I prefer to saunter through the amazing system of trails that link Katahdin and Monson. Ten days is hardly long enough.

Weary

kayak karl
02-27-2010, 04:56
Okay, as long as you think its a good idea to start a thru-hike doing 15+mile days.... thats good for you.. but the majority of the hikers I meet going south in early june through Maine do not start out that fast. I don't think I'm alone on this.. I pack light enough for extra food. no harm... no race to the finish.. no above average below average nonsense.. I don't have to list my "stats" to prove anything.. I just like food, and think others should carry enough... and we still don't know anything about the hiker in question... we are talking about our personal hiking styles, not knowing his/hers, so we arn't getting anywhere anyway...
p.s. I bet you were glad you had leftover food instead being hungry for two days before town..
warraghiyagey your right. well said:)
only advice i can give is i took 10 days of food, but packed very light weight food. i had misc left at monson, but so what. took my time and swam in every lake.
nobody mentioned Jo-Mary campground. they have a GREAT little restaurant. camped and ate 3 meals there.

Spot In The Sky
02-27-2010, 10:32
Thanks guys for all the additional input-
So the MAIN goal here is that I am starting June 27th and have to make it to Gorham, NH by July 22 to pick up my rental car and get to my brothers wedding. Based on mileages listed on some of the sheets on whiteblaze, thats about an average of 13 miles per day.
I dont have a lot of experience camping, but a few long distance hikes, and am a long distance runner (yes i know, different muscles blah blah blah)- im saying Im used to the strain on the body and a week before I start my thru Ill be doing the Anchorage, AK marathon and should be in decent shape by then, used to running 18-20 miles on a regular basis.
I dont have a problem bring some extra food with me, just in case, I was just trying to get a realistic idea of the process.
Also- shortly Ill be posting my gear list and asking for advice so hopefully you guys will take this thread into account if/when you review it.
Thanks again for everyones help- probably couldnt do this without this site.
One more thing...all those side trails Weary was talking about...how would I know they were there or where to find them? Are they clearly marked? I dont believe they are listed in the AT Data Pages.

weary
02-27-2010, 11:33
.....Thanks again for everyones help- probably couldnt do this without this site.
One more thing...all those side trails Weary was talking about...how would I know they were there or where to find them? Are they clearly marked? I dont believe they are listed in the AT Data Pages.
The side trails are all listed on the back of the Maine maps, along with a mile by mile description of AT through the state. SEnd me a PM with a snail mail address and I'll try to find you some older versions of the current maps that you will need between Katahdin and MOnson. The maps haven't changed significantly over the years. I get free copies of the the latest versions whenever an edition runs out and we have to print new ones because I usually contribute in some way to the guide book committee.

hOWEVER, all the side trails are marked with signs.

Weary

DawnTreader
02-27-2010, 12:24
Spots-
I completed this section hike in the same time frame... Kahtadin to Gorham in about a month.. This is PLENTY of time to finish, I didn't need that much time, so I did a lot of blue blazing and swimming:). Especially if you are indeed stopping in Gorham. You might find that your really truckin' by Andover and decide that you might make it a bit further than Gorham, it shouldn't be hard to get a ride back up the trail.. Check the AMC shuttle schedules when you get to the area. It sounds like you will be in shape to start the hike, which can be a definet plus!
p.s. don't miss.. Gulf Hagas, Sugarloaf side trail, MT. Abraham side trail, swimming at East Carry (or west,can't remember), and Peirce Ponds, Hang out in Caratunk one morning.. and if you do have extra time when you get to Gorham, grab the rental car anyway, and you can do some excellent yellow blazing in the area.. Try a prezi traverse.. drive the 113 S. through Evans Notch and hike the Baldface Circle Trail..

weary
02-27-2010, 12:31
Spots-
I completed this section hike in the same time frame... Kahtadin to Gorham in about a month.. This is PLENTY of time to finish, I didn't need that much time, so I did a lot of blue blazing and swimming:). Especially if you are indeed stopping in Gorham. You might find that your really truckin' by Andover and decide that you might make it a bit further than Gorham, it shouldn't be hard to get a ride back up the trail.. Check the AMC shuttle schedules when you get to the area. It sounds like you will be in shape to start the hike, which can be a definet plus!
p.s. don't miss.. Gulf Hagas, Sugarloaf side trail, MT. Abraham side trail, swimming at East Carry (or west,can't remember), and Peirce Ponds, Hang out in Caratunk one morning.. and if you do have extra time when you get to Gorham, grab the rental car anyway, and you can do some excellent yellow blazing in the area.. Try a prezi traverse.. drive the 113 S. through Evans Notch and hike the Baldface Circle Trail..
All great suggestions!