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Joker4ink
04-11-2010, 22:18
What is your pack weight for a 5 day trip? Just curious to see what people are carrying. Figure spring time, 60 degree weather.

Wolf - 23000
04-11-2010, 23:40
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.

XCskiNYC
04-11-2010, 23:56
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.

I'm jealous.

For a recent section hike with food for 6-7 days, 38 pounds. The food was about 6 pounds. Water weight at time of weighing pack was only a 20-oz bottle. I'd usually have that much again in the bladder inside the packs.

The weather was very warm (past 03 to 07 April, Salisbury to Great Barrington) so I could have gone without the Duofold base layer, the rain paints, the fleece hat, the fleece gloves, the Marino wool zip-neck long-sleeve shirt, and the fleece neck ruff. But all that stuff is maybe 2 lbs. at most.

bigcranky
04-12-2010, 07:41
A five day hike requires 4 days of food and an extra lunch. Since I love food, that's about eight pounds right there. 1.5 litres of water is another three pounds. 14 pounds of gear and clothing, and my pack is right at 25 when I walk away from the trailhead.

This does not count the clothes I am wearing (shorts, t-shirt, trail runners, socks, ball cap.)

daddytwosticks
04-12-2010, 07:42
Did a recent section hike over 4.5 days...AFSP to Neels Gap. Pack weight at the visitor's center was 33 pounds ready-to-go. :)

garlic08
04-12-2010, 09:30
Depends on the water availability, expected trail conditions, and distance traveled--5-mile days or 20-mile days?

Assuming normal AT springtime conditions, lots of climbing, lots of water, say 70 miles to the next resupply, I'd carry no water, about 6-7 pounds of food on top of my 8 pound base load, so 14 to 15 pounds.

kayak karl
04-12-2010, 09:42
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.
bull.....this is why i don't ask questions on WB. heaven forbid you ask about winter camping, then ALL the idiots come out.

Raul Perez
04-12-2010, 10:00
About 30lbs with food and water. Base weight of 15lbs w/o food and water.

cowpoke
04-12-2010, 13:21
I'm heading out in a couple of weeks to walk the Deep Gap to NOC section and my pack weighs 27lbs w/o food and water...a little more than I wanted but doable. cheers.

Bear Cables
04-12-2010, 14:45
32 lbs based on 2 liters of water, food and gear.

Dow
04-12-2010, 18:14
I always wind up with 50 pounds. Thats why I don't hike much anymore. I need to train my mind and hike with less.

Kerosene
04-12-2010, 19:17
About 29 pounds with food and 2.5L of water. With Spring hiking you need to be prepared for overnight temps in the 40s or lower.

gumball
04-12-2010, 19:37
Probably around 35 or so lbs.

Skidsteer
04-12-2010, 19:47
bull.....this is why i don't ask questions on WB. heaven forbid you ask about winter camping, then ALL the idiots come out.

No Karl, 10-12 ibs is about what he carries for those temps. I don't think he's stretching the truth. I saw his pack once at Ron's.

Ox97GaMe
04-12-2010, 19:55
Im usually running 28-32 lbs. But, I also carry a bow saw and a set of hand pruners when I am out on the trail. The maintainer in me just cant seem to walk by a small blow down without getting this burning urge to get it out of the way.

kayak karl
04-12-2010, 20:12
No Karl, 10-12 ibs is about what he carries for those temps. I don't think he's stretching the truth. I saw his pack once at Ron's.
5 days of food????? that sounds like a base weight.

Skidsteer
04-12-2010, 20:19
5 days of food????? that sounds like a base weight.

Yeah, I know.

But that's how he rolls.

kayak karl
04-12-2010, 20:51
Yeah, I know.

But that's how he rolls.
but to make somebody think that they can get pack weight to 12 lb with 5 days of food is just stupid.. let Wolf - 23000 post his 5 day menu. he won't post...........

Tinker
04-12-2010, 21:02
Somewhere between 20 and 25 lbs. including a 1 lb. water purifier.

garlic08
04-13-2010, 01:31
but to make somebody think that they can get pack weight to 12 lb with 5 days of food is just stupid.. let Wolf - 23000 post his 5 day menu. he won't post...........

What's stupid to one person can be inspiring to another.

I haven't met Wolf, but I've met others like him. There are a few at the fringe of SUL who can hike with 5 to 6 pound base weights, and he's obviously there. It's not for me, either, but I've seen it and I respect it, and I've come close to it.

Hiking for days with a sub-10 pound pack is a different realm of experience that you can't understand if you haven't done it. When you carry that little, you work much less and your carbo needs are lower. The punishment on the body is much lower, so you need less protein to repair damage. A 5-day menu that weighs 6 or 7 pounds is not unrealistic. Definitely not commonplace, and not for everyone, but I believe this guy when he says he can do it.

Stir Fry
04-13-2010, 01:48
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.

If you had 1lb of food per day, That leaves 5-7 lb for water and gear. I'd be intrested in seeing your gear list. Seems kind of low to me.

Wolf - 23000
04-13-2010, 02:10
bull.....this is why i don't ask questions on WB. heaven forbid you ask about winter camping, then ALL the idiots come out.
Kayak the year is 2010; not 1970. With the newer gear out there, it is not that hard to backpack lightweight. Try not to confuse the two. OK. Just because someone doesn't backpack the same way you do, doesn't mean they're an idiot or full of bull. I could say the same thing about "hikers" that cry bull about something they know NOTHING about.

This is a straight forward form. The question that was asked is "What is your pack weight for a 5 day trip?" I answer that question. As for a menu, well rather than putting together a list of normal hiking food which I don't think would be any help at all, I'll answer is like this. The normal though is to carry 2 pound of food per/day. Well this figure is base on an average male hiker carrying around a 50 pound pack. Well the lighter pack you carry, the less your carrying around for 15 - 20 miles/day, the less food per/day is required to keep up your strength.

I'm not suggesting starving yourself. I personal stay about the same weight even after several months of hiking but I also don't burn off 4000 - 6000 calories a day either.

A little common sense goes a long way.

Wolf

schnikel
04-13-2010, 16:58
In '09 I hiked from AFSP to Hiawassee with just under 40lbs. I bought some food at MTN Crossings. My pack empty weighs in at 5.5 lbs.
That is about as good as I get without buying gear that is newer & lighter.
Schnikel

George
04-13-2010, 17:58
5 days food, first days liquids, set for 35F at night 22lbs if all dry food but if the total trip was 5 day I would start with nicer food, maybe 28lbs then

SmokeEater
04-13-2010, 18:21
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.
What is your gear list? I like to hike UL also but not that UL. Not saying I wouldnt if I could figure out a way to do so. I guess i love to eat.:D I guess im stuck now trying to figure out what to cut down on.

WILLIAM HAYES
04-13-2010, 20:49
Wolf I would be interested in seeing your gear list posted
Hillbilly

Wolf - 23000
04-15-2010, 00:33
What is your gear list? I like to hike UL also but not that UL. Not saying I wouldnt if I could figure out a way to do so. I guess i love to eat.:D I guess im stuck now trying to figure out what to cut down on.

SmokeEater,

How light you choice to travel, just like any other hiker is a personal choice. It takes just as much energy to add something inside you pack as it does to take something out.

I'm not really much into comparing gearlist. I've always found them pretty boring. I carry this pack ... someone else, oh I don't like that pack I use xyz. Does it really matter. What gear someone uses up to them besides I think it is way off topic.

Wolf

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 01:08
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.


I'm calling shenanigans, sorry. If you're hiking, you're burning lots of calories and supposed to eat around 2 lbs of food per day just to replenish the calories lost.

You would have to carry a liter of water, and that's 2 lbs. Those 2 things total 12 lbs together alone. If you sewed your own gear, your base packweight could be in the neighborhood of 5-7 lbs at the least.

Maybe you don't carry a shelter, but 10-12 lbs including food, water, and gear doesn't seem possible unless you're going to starve yourself or not protect yourself from the elements.

JAK
04-15-2010, 08:38
60 degrees is summer for us up here. The nights are longer in your spring though, so I presume a cold night could still be rough, so I would go with my spring gear but summer clothes I guess. 10 pounds skin out + 5 pounds food + water. Water I don't know down there. Up here 500ml will get you to the next, but I fill up 2 litres for camp.

15 pounds + water.

JAK
04-15-2010, 08:45
I don't think you need modern gear to do what Wolf-23000 is doing either.
60F is not that cold, and even if 40F and cold at night, that can be dealt with.
1 pound of food per day is alot if you have some body fat to burn.
Water can be 1 pound to get you from A to B, if that.

Some details were left out, like how much wind and cold rain might be had.
You have to know the temperature extremes, not the average daytime high.

JAK
04-15-2010, 08:51
I am never sure if Wolf-23000 includes his clothes and footwear. It seems silly to talk about just you pack weight when it is so little. The clothing you wear becomes a pretty important part of the equation. If the suns not too strong I can hike in a medium wool sweater and shorts, and the extra layers and shells needed for colder temps adds very little weight to my pack, but the wool sweater itself is quite heavy so it would be wrong not to include it in my total weight. Other people might hike in very light layers top to bottom, but then carry heavier layers in their pack. Total weight skin out makes so much more sense, especially when you are going light.

JAK
04-15-2010, 08:52
Why is everyone picking on Wolf 23000. He just answered straight forward, it was a pretty reasonable answer give the vagueness of the question.

seminoles
04-15-2010, 10:36
Recent 5 day in Ga. 31 lbs w/ gear, water and food....still to heavy for Blood Mtn.
But I made it section hiking 100 ft at a time....

Graywolf
04-15-2010, 11:26
Why is everyone picking on Wolf 23000. He just answered straight forward, it was a pretty reasonable answer give the vagueness of the question.


Im not picking on Wolf here, but I would like to see the contents he's carrying.. It would be interesting..Why is it such a secret not to share the pack list?? If I had mine down that low, I would be proud to share it..Others can maybe benefit from it to how to get their pack wieght lower..

To answer the OP, My trip last year to Neels Gap was 31 pounds and that was with a 6 pound backpack..This year it is half that, with the new pack..

Graywolf

SmokeEater
04-15-2010, 13:07
SmokeEater,

How light you choice to travel, just like any other hiker is a personal choice. It takes just as much energy to add something inside you pack as it does to take something out.

I'm not really much into comparing gearlist. I've always found them pretty boring. I carry this pack ... someone else, oh I don't like that pack I use xyz. Does it really matter. What gear someone uses up to them besides I think it is way off topic.

Wolf
I know its a personal choice. Just like ur personal choice not to put ur gear list online. I was just wanting to see it because I thought i might get some ideas on reducing my pack weight. I wasnt questioning ur pack weight. But why put ur weight on here knowing people are going to ask how u get it that low. We dont want to compare with u just see urs.:D

wystiria
04-15-2010, 13:38
between 18-22lbs, assuming I am out with my husband who is just slightly heavier between 20-25lbs. That also assumes I am probably carrying some fun treats in my pack to eat :)


I have seen a few hikers get as low as Wolf - pretty impressive I have to say! While I don't aspire to get that light weight I have a lot of respect for it!

I am lucky though becasue we can go out for 10 days and keep our packs reasonable, mostly becasue there are two of us and we share gear. This also allows for us to carry some comfort items and not worry as much about weight.

Llama Legs
04-15-2010, 16:28
With my current gear I could do 11 pounds with no water or shelter. That allows 500 grams of food per day for 5 days (all dehydrated). Includes cooking however.

But I need an inflatable pad for sleeping, a tent, and 1L water. Add 7 lbs.

Blissful
04-15-2010, 16:45
Did a recent section hike over 4.5 days...AFSP to Neels Gap. Pack weight at the visitor's center was 33 pounds ready-to-go. :)

That was mine for five days on a section with 6 lbs of food and nearly three liters of water to start a few days ago. But it was pretty heavy for me.

Blissful
04-15-2010, 16:49
I've seen ultralite packing using a daypack-like pack ( less than a 1lb) with sil nylon gear and a lightweight bag. They do it. I don't but that's me.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 17:13
I know they make 5 ounce packs out of Silnylon/Spinn/Cuben, but the food and water alone for 5 days would be atleast 8-10 lbs alone. I don't care what anyone says, you have to carry a liter of water, unless you're stupid or running around the lakes in Northern Minnesota, and you must have food to sustain yourself.

Llama Legs
04-15-2010, 17:26
I bust out most of the packaging and put the dry goods in paper lunch bags, which I burn as I empty every evening. Now that I'm "older" and eat less, grocery store food weighs in at 600 grams per day. Mostly dehydrated around 500 grams/day. Eat like a lion in town.

1azarus
04-15-2010, 17:32
I know they make 5 ounce packs out of Silnylon/Spinn/Cuben, but the food and water alone for 5 days would be atleast 8-10 lbs alone. I don't care what anyone says, you have to carry a liter of water, unless you're stupid or running around the lakes in Northern Minnesota, and you must have food to sustain yourself.

actually, it is very interesting that Garlic, who nobody picks on cause he knows what he's talking about, posted that he would carry no water. NONE. plenty available on the trail -- especially if you cover significant miles, as he does. I find that both interesting and inspiring. i find myself getting anxious if i have less than a 3/4 liter bottle full of water. i'm gonna work on that.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 18:08
actually, it is very interesting that Garlic, who nobody picks on cause he knows what he's talking about, posted that he would carry no water. NONE. plenty available on the trail -- especially if you cover significant miles, as he does. I find that both interesting and inspiring. i find myself getting anxious if i have less than a 3/4 liter bottle full of water. i'm gonna work on that.

When I thrued last year, I never carried more then a liter, but there are stretches that you have to carry some water. 15 miles with no water because you want to be a tough guy isn't smart. If you're forced to do it, that's ok, but it isn't wise. In the south there is plenty of water, seemed like there was a spring every 500 feet in GA.

1azarus
04-15-2010, 18:14
When I thrued last year, I never carried more then a liter, but there are stretches that you have to carry some water. 15 miles with no water because you want to be a tough guy isn't smart. If you're forced to do it, that's ok, but it isn't wise. In the south there is plenty of water, seemed like there was a spring every 500 feet in GA.
yup, i get that... but there are definitely times when i carry water when i don't need to -- not a lot, but still...

garlic08
04-15-2010, 18:51
Since Wolf won't post, and I respect that, here's a sample SUL pack for discussion.

Silnylon pack, 9 oz (lighter are available)
Z-rest, six sections, 6 oz
Gossamer Gear Spinnshelter, 12 oz with cord and stakes
Polycro ground sheet, 3 oz
Summer bag or quilt, 16 oz
Marmot Driclime jacket, 12 oz
Silnylon parka, 3 oz
Food bag, rope, cup and spoon 5 oz
First aid and hygiene 8 oz
Emergency stuff, 4 oz
Map, compass, 4 oz
Extra clothing in bag, 10 oz
Platypus and water bottle, 2 oz
Aqua mira, 3 oz
Misc, 4 oz

Just over 6 pounds. I've never gone this light, mainly because I'm usually out for more than one season and need to be ready for more severe weather. My AT summer pack was just under 8 pounds, but I carried stuff I needed for the Whites because I didn't like to mess with mail drops.

As I said in a previous post, when you hike this light, you really don't need much food for energy or recovery. I entered the 100-mile wilderness, for example, with a heavy hiker hunger and 8 pounds of food and that was plenty--I would have done it fresh and well-fed with 6 or 7. I never carried water in the HMW, since my feet were wet from walking in it all day every day. So I'll definitely back up Wolf's 12 pound load statement.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 19:01
Since Wolf won't post, and I respect that, here's a sample SUL pack for discussion.

Silnylon pack, 9 oz (lighter are available)
Z-rest, six sections, 6 oz
Gossamer Gear Spinnshelter, 12 oz with cord and stakes
Polycro ground sheet, 3 oz
Summer bag or quilt, 16 oz
Marmot Driclime jacket, 12 oz
Silnylon parka, 3 oz
Food bag, rope, cup and spoon 5 oz
First aid and hygiene 8 oz
Emergency stuff, 4 oz
Map, compass, 4 oz
Extra clothing in bag, 10 oz
Platypus and water bottle, 2 oz
Aqua mira, 3 oz
Misc, 4 oz

Just over 6 pounds. I've never gone this light, mainly because I'm usually out for more than one season and need to be ready for more severe weather. My AT summer pack was just under 8 pounds, but I carried stuff I needed for the Whites because I didn't like to mess with mail drops.

As I said in a previous post, when you hike this light, you really don't need much food for energy or recovery. I entered the 100-mile wilderness, for example, with a heavy hiker hunger and 8 pounds of food and that was plenty--I would have done it fresh and well-fed with 6 or 7. I never carried water in the HMW, since my feet were wet from walking in it all day every day. So I'll definitely back up Wolf's 12 pound load statement.

You don't cook your food? If not, that would mean you would have to eat non dehyrated food, which takes it from 2 to maybe 3 lbs of food per day.

Even if you stay with 2 lbs per day of food, that puts you at atleast 16 lbs for a 5 day hike.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 19:02
^That doesn't include any water, so your pack weight is atleast 16-18 lbs with water, or no water if you don't carry it.

bigcranky
04-15-2010, 19:08
You don't cook your food? If not, that would mean you would have to eat non dehyrated food, which takes it from 2 to maybe 3 lbs of food per day.

Even if you stay with 2 lbs per day of food, that puts you at atleast 16 lbs for a 5 day hike.

Garlic said in his post that he carried 8 pounds of food in the Hundred Mile Wilderness at the end of a thru-hike. Did you not see this, or did you not believe him?

Both Garlic and Wolf say that they don't need as much food as the typical heavy traditional hiker. Having done it both ways, I'm inclined to believe them -- when I am carrying a lightweight load, I require a lot less food. If I had a 5 pound base weight, I suspect I wouldn't need much more than 3000kcal per day, rather than the 5000 or 6000 so often thrown around for backpacking food requirements.

SGT Rock
04-15-2010, 19:09
For seeing how low I can go - 13.69 pounds with food and water. Trying that out the beginning of May.

But normally, more like 24 pounds.

JJJ
04-15-2010, 19:11
Thanks for the list, Garlic.
I will study on that.

Blissful
04-15-2010, 19:48
I can't imagine not carrying any water on your person. I have seen too many dry stream beds, and yes, on the AT. And have gotten injured enough or had a sudden bout of illness. To each his own. But I think the "how low can you go" weight thing - esp with food water and basic survival - can get downright dangerous sometimes. I wonder what was the pack weight of those slugging it through the heavy snow this Feb and March on the AT? I wouldn't want to be searching for water then. I carry water for safety reasons plus I don't want to stop and treat every few miles.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 19:52
Garlic said in his post that he carried 8 pounds of food in the Hundred Mile Wilderness at the end of a thru-hike. Did you not see this, or did you not believe him?

Both Garlic and Wolf say that they don't need as much food as the typical heavy traditional hiker. Having done it both ways, I'm inclined to believe them -- when I am carrying a lightweight load, I require a lot less food. If I had a 5 pound base weight, I suspect I wouldn't need much more than 3000kcal per day, rather than the 5000 or 6000 so often thrown around for backpacking food requirements.


I believe him, but he's saying that a 8-10 lb pack with food, water and everything is doable. My point is that according to his list, it isn't. I didn't initially see the part about 8 lbs in the HMW, but it just proves my point even more. It's a 4, maybe 5, day hike from Monson to Abol, so 8 lbs of food is about correct. Add the 6+ lbs from his baseweight to 8-10 lbs of food and throw some water in there and what do you get?

Blissful
04-15-2010, 19:55
actually, it is very interesting that Garlic, who nobody picks on cause he knows what he's talking about, posted that he would carry no water. NONE. plenty available on the trail -- especially if you cover significant miles, as he does. I find that both interesting and inspiring. i find myself getting anxious if i have less than a 3/4 liter bottle full of water. i'm gonna work on that.


I find nothing "inspiring" about carrying no water. I find that playing with fire. Dehydration is nothing to play with and everything to cause injury.

imo

njordan2
04-15-2010, 20:31
5days, 50pounds.

SGT Rock
04-15-2010, 20:36
I gotta agree with Wolf about comparing packing lists to a degree. That said, I have learned a few tricks from others by looking at their lists. What is always missing from lists is how the person uses them or solves issues with hiking strategies like cameling up with water when there is a lot around, or not carrying insulation because they stuff clothing with leaves - I've seen some of this done.

http://hikinghq.net/sul.html

That said, here is my SUL list I plan to use in Georgia in a few weeks. The trip is going to be 5 days long with the chance to eat at a dinner and buy some food on one of those days - hence only 3 days of food shown. This list isn't tested, although a lot of this gear is stuff I have used before. I also don't suggest someone go get all this stuff and start hiking with it. I'm taking some compromises, some of them I still have reservations about.

garlic08
04-15-2010, 20:36
I believe him, but he's saying that a 8-10 lb pack with food, water and everything is doable. My point is that according to his list, it isn't. I didn't initially see the part about 8 lbs in the HMW, but it just proves my point even more. It's a 4, maybe 5, day hike from Monson to Abol, so 8 lbs of food is about correct. Add the 6+ lbs from his baseweight to 8-10 lbs of food and throw some water in there and what do you get?

I don't think anyone has mentioned 8-10 lb with food and water. My personal AT summer pack was 8 pound base weight, 8 pounds food for 100 miles, and often no water carried. My "fictitious" SUL pack above was only a quick attempt to back up Wolf's "10-12-pound with food" statement.

We're getting tied up in knots, misunderstanding two pounds here and there.

As to hiking without carrying water, I wouldn't consider it either with a "normal" load of 30+ pounds. It takes so much more effort to move that load, the food and water requirements go up tremendously. But with a sub-10 pound load, it's more like a walk around town. Wouldn't you walk five miles to a park and back, say two hours, without carrying water? With the lighter load, the chance of injury is much lower, it's quick and easy to get to the next source if one is dry, and you just don't get as thirsty to begin with. Seriously, if you haven't tried it, don't knock it.

A quart of water at two pounds is the heaviest thing in my pack, including the pack, and adds 25% more weight to my load. It's noticeable at that point. Why would I carry that if I'm stepping in clean springs several times an hour?

I've recently carried up to six liters of water for a couple of 40-mile desert crossings at the southern end of the Arizona Trail. A few miles on the AT is not a big deal.

SGT Rock
04-15-2010, 20:40
And for the sake of argument, here is my "normal" list. Like I said, more like 24 pounds for that same trip. http://hikinghq.net/packing_list.html

garlic08
04-15-2010, 20:48
You don't cook your food? If not, that would mean you would have to eat non dehyrated food, which takes it from 2 to maybe 3 lbs of food per day.

Even if you stay with 2 lbs per day of food, that puts you at atleast 16 lbs for a 5 day hike.

I haven't cooked on the trail for years. Works great for me. Sure there's a small weight penalty at the outset, but I carry fatty stuff like tortillas, cheese, nuts, peanut butter to minimize it. You can't dehydrate fat, as far as I know. And the weight penalty goes away as the food bag empties. That last day is great.

I can seldom manage to eat two pounds of my rations a day. That's a lot of fat. 1.5 pounds is usually minimum for me. I don't keep track of numbers too well, but I think my calories are around 3500 per day. In easy terrain like the mid-Atlantic states on the AT, I gain weight on that.

leaftye
04-15-2010, 21:24
I'd say about 35-40 pounds for my next five days. Unfortunately I'll be carrying a ten day load of food, so my pack will actually be a little heavier. It'd be quite a bit lighter if I wasn't going to be crossing steep snow fields.

David@whiteblaze
04-15-2010, 22:10
...Wouldn't you walk five miles to a park and back, say two hours, without carrying water? With the lighter load, the chance of injury is much lower, it's quick and easy to get to the next source if one is dry, and you just don't get as thirsty to begin with. Seriously, if you haven't tried it, don't knock it.

I'm going to jump into the debate here... If you walk tto the park and back, you know where the water source that has NEVER run dry is, and you know that the next source is going to be the same never dry source... butif you plan on getting water at the fountain in the park, and they turned it off or removed it, then you are "up a creek"

OTOH, my pack weight is 25# for food and gear for five days and add 10# for my one-day supply of 4 liters of water. I beleived the second time I weighed my pack that I had lost #10 of gear... then I added water. :rolleyes:

ozt42
04-15-2010, 22:51
When I was younger and didn't mind being hungry, cold and uncomfortable I could easily do 5 days on 15lbs.

Being a middle aged fat guy who likes to eat well and sleep comfy 30-40lbs, 50 if you count the beer and steaks for the first night's dinner.

The_Saint
04-15-2010, 23:47
I have tried it, and I am not knocking it. Wolf claimed 8-10 lbs including everything, unless I read it wrong.

My summer weight this year on the AT with food and water-yes i carry water-was 22 lbs. I was carrying around 2 lbs of food per day and 2 lbs in water. As far as food goes, if 1 ounce=100 calories, 2 lbs=3200 calories. Average thruhiker burns they estimate 4-6000 calories in a day.

If I as a 200 lb male walks 8 hours a day hiking in the woods, like AT style, and burns 4300(EST) calories, how many more do you burn resting? Probably close to 5500 total for the day. If I'm consuming only 3200 calories, this isn't good. Just my take on it and if you want the science on it:

http://www.healthstatus.com/calculate/cbc

Bear in mind that this doesn't take in the fact that you're carrying additional weight and probably are working much harder then the formula this website is based on for calculating out calories burned.

If you did this indefinitely, your body would burn itself up and you would start suffering from malnutrition. Being that that is the case, it isn't healthy or safe to put your body through such shock. Also allowing your body to consume protein from it's own muscles is devastating and could cause serious long term problems. If not given enough protein and calories, your body will start consuming itself to rebuild muscles that are being used/torn and taking it from the ones that aren't being used.

garlic08
04-16-2010, 00:21
...Wolf claimed 8-10 lbs including everything, unless I read it wrong.

Read post # 2. He claimed 10-12 pounds.


...As far as food goes, if 1 ounce=100 calories, 2 lbs=3200 calories...

From what I remember, that's for carbs. Fat is about twice that. I think most hikers carry a mix of those that averages at least 130 cal/oz. I try to aim for a little higher since I don't cook and don't carry pasta, maybe 135 or 140. With that mix, 2 pounds is more like 4500 cal, way too much for me. Like I said, I gain weight on the trail if I eat 3500 cal/day if I'm not climbing Mt Moosilauke twice a day, in which case I'll burn some fat.

This is a good discussion and good thread. Quite a range of pack weights out there, and they all seem to work. I remember being surprised on the AT (late in my hiking career) that many hikers seemed to care very little about their pack weight, if they even knew what it weighed. On the long trails out West, more hikers seem know to the fraction what their pack weighs. There's a sort of "cultural" difference, which is interesting.

AeroGuyDC
04-16-2010, 01:02
31lbs with 5 days of food and 2 liters of water

Wolf - 23000
04-16-2010, 01:19
I know its a personal choice. Just like ur personal choice not to put ur gear list online. I was just wanting to see it because I thought i might get some ideas on reducing my pack weight. I wasnt questioning ur pack weight. But why put ur weight on here knowing people are going to ask how u get it that low. We dont want to compare with u just see urs.:D

SmokeEater,

The only person who can reduce your pack weight is you. The gear I used was listed several million times all over the country in a video back about 15 years ago. Back then I was carrying around 15 pounds with 5 days of food. You can see how much it has helped.:D

Gear list are boring. Here is a new flash for all you gear head. Open up a Campmor catalog. Now think about it. Almost every piece of equipment in the catalog has been used to hike the AT. How much does that help anyone? Very little.

The gear you use has to match your hiking style. If your going to spend 8 hours a day hiking and most of your time at camp, your going to carry more. If you spend more time hiking and less time at camp, you are going to normally carry less. If you are going to hike with someone, you are going to carry more. It is facts like this that a gear list doesn't show.

Wolf

Wolf - 23000
04-16-2010, 02:10
I have tried it, and I am not knocking it. Wolf claimed 8-10 lbs including everything, unless I read it wrong.

My summer weight this year on the AT with food and water-yes i carry water-was 22 lbs. I was carrying around 2 lbs of food per day and 2 lbs in water. As far as food goes, if 1 ounce=100 calories, 2 lbs=3200 calories. Average thruhiker burns they estimate 4-6000 calories in a day.

If I as a 200 lb male walks 8 hours a day hiking in the woods, like AT style, and burns 4300(EST) calories, how many more do you burn resting? Probably close to 5500 total for the day. If I'm consuming only 3200 calories, this isn't good. Just my take on it and if you want the science on it:

http://www.healthstatus.com/calculate/cbc

Bear in mind that this doesn't take in the fact that you're carrying additional weight and probably are working much harder then the formula this website is based on for calculating out calories burned.

If you did this indefinitely, your body would burn itself up and you would start suffering from malnutrition. Being that that is the case, it isn't healthy or safe to put your body through such shock. Also allowing your body to consume protein from it's own muscles is devastating and could cause serious long term problems. If not given enough protein and calories, your body will start consuming itself to rebuild muscles that are being used/torn and taking it from the ones that aren't being used.

Saint,

Where to start? First my claim is 10 - 12 lbs, not 8 - 10 lbs. I eat a good amount and yes I do carry water too included. I don't believe in starving myself sense it leaves to other problems.

The Average thruhiker may burn 4-6000 calories/day but they are also carrying a lot more weight. Also even with your calculator, it changes things depending on your speed.

As I've said many, many times. Your gear has to match your hiking style. If 22 lbs it what your carrying then go with it. If it is more than what you want to carry then lighten it up. You know better than anyone what your carrying extra.

Wolf

Wolf - 23000
04-16-2010, 02:23
Why is everyone picking on Wolf 23000. He just answered straight forward, it was a pretty reasonable answer give the vagueness of the question.

Thank you JAK.

I hate it when the gear head on this form just take over.

To answer your question on what I count, I include everything minus what I am wearing - normal shorts and a T-shirt.

I get my weights before leaving town at the Post Office. If I ask them to weigh the clothes I was wearing, I think it might freak some people out. :D

Wolf

The_Saint
04-16-2010, 02:23
Wolf-Looking at your resume, you're far more experienced then I and I don't know you, so it really doesn't matter to me.

It's true if you carry more weight, you'll burn more calories.There's an apex where those two meet and you literally can't carry enough calories to 100% sustain yourself longterm without some serious consideration.

I'm fine with what my pack weighs, I can comfortably carry 5 days of food, water and gear and be under 20 lbs and feel ready for whatever happens.

My point is that at 10 lb pack weight, I don't believe you can carry enough food, water and gear to sustain your body and be ready. That's just a personal opinion, but having messed around with food alot this past year, I just don't think with that little of weight you could be healthy long term. Carrying some water is absolutely necessary 90% of the time. Sure there were parts in Vermont where since it had been raining I knew I could walk 5-7 miles without needing a drink and didn't carry any, but for some people on here to say you don't need to carry water is just bad advice.

Wolf - 23000
04-16-2010, 02:55
My point is that at 10 lb pack weight, I don't believe you can carry enough food, water and gear to sustain your body and be ready. That's just a personal opinion, but having messed around with food alot this past year, I just don't think with that little of weight you could be healthy long term. Carrying some water is absolutely necessary 90% of the time. Sure there were parts in Vermont where since it had been raining I knew I could walk 5-7 miles without needing a drink and didn't carry any, but for some people on here to say you don't need to carry water is just bad advice.

Saint,

I agree with you about water. I have never suggested anyone not carry enough water or food. Most of my weight is food and about 2 lbs of water.

At a water source, I drink a fair amount - meaning I hydrate but I don't over do it. Water weights is the same if carry it in a water bottle or camel up and drink the same amount. The different is if you drink to much your going to piss it out faster than your body can use it affectivately.

Wolf

MelNino
04-16-2010, 06:40
When I go on longer day hikes, my pack is 18 pounds! I over pack warm weather/wet weather gear....I was caught in a nasty storm once and rather not repeat that.

Though I do want to get that weight down, my back and knees shall thank me. Ignoring the fighting, threads like these are rather helpful...I like hearing what other carry out there. This weekend seems like a good one to decide what to carry and what to leave.

SmokeEater
04-16-2010, 08:19
Wolf- Looks like you know what ur talking about by all ur experience hiking. Im trying to get my weight down under 22lbs. Do u make any of ur own gear or have it made to fit ur style?

bigcranky
04-16-2010, 09:35
The original poster asked for total pack weights for a five day hike. As should be expected, that post got a wide range of responses, from 10-12 pounds up past 50 pounds. Different hikers carry vastly different kinds and amounts of gear, food, clothing, and water, which should be obvious to anyone who has hiked any distance.

I didn't see anybody say "I call bull****" on the 50 pound packs. Lots of posts said that about the lightest packs. I wonder why that is?

The_Saint
04-16-2010, 10:27
The original poster asked for total pack weights for a five day hike. As should be expected, that post got a wide range of responses, from 10-12 pounds up past 50 pounds. Different hikers carry vastly different kinds and amounts of gear, food, clothing, and water, which should be obvious to anyone who has hiked any distance.

I didn't see anybody say "I call bull****" on the 50 pound packs. Lots of posts said that about the lightest packs. I wonder why that is?

Because it's easy to have a 50 lb pack. If you've thru hiked, you've seen people with 70+ lb packs. It/They don't last long, but every year they're out there.

Truth is, a 5 lb pack is pretty much the same weight as someone thru hiking.

bigcranky
04-16-2010, 10:51
Because it's easy to have a 50 lb pack. If you've thru hiked, you've seen people with 70+ lb packs. It/They don't last long, but every year they're out there.

Right, and that's my point. It's easy to imagine a 50 pound pack so you give those people a pass. You can't imagine a 12 pound pack, so you immediately attack the credibility of the person who posted it.

The same thing happens with miles per day, hiking speed, etc -- folks at the fringes get attacked by people who can't grasp what they are doing.

Funny thing, not long ago everyone competed to see who had the *heaviest* pack.

cowpoke
04-16-2010, 11:22
It's amazing to me how we have taken a passion we all love...put "so-called" rules and regulations upon it....sorta what the Government does....ruins everything...but I guess that is human nature....just hike and enjoy our limited time on this earth! cheers.

ps...as I posted earlier....my pack is heavy...but it's my pack and I'll deal with it.

Jaybird
04-16-2010, 11:45
What is your pack weight for a 5 day trip? Just curious to see what people are carrying. Figure spring time, 60 degree weather.




my backpack, Granite Gear Latitude Vapor will have 5 days of food, 5 days of energy bars, 2 liters of water, tent, sleep-pad, camp shoes & shorts, small first aid kit...

total: less than 25lbs


the 7 day version: abt 30lbs:D


see ya'll out there Apr 24-May 8
section-hiking Clarks Valley,PA NOBO to Greenwood Lake,NY
w/ "Jigsaw"

bulldog49
04-16-2010, 12:16
Since Wolf won't post, and I respect that, here's a sample SUL pack for discussion.

Silnylon pack, 9 oz (lighter are available)
Z-rest, six sections, 6 oz
Gossamer Gear Spinnshelter, 12 oz with cord and stakes
Polycro ground sheet, 3 oz
Summer bag or quilt, 16 oz
Marmot Driclime jacket, 12 oz
Silnylon parka, 3 oz
Food bag, rope, cup and spoon 5 oz
First aid and hygiene 8 oz
Emergency stuff, 4 oz
Map, compass, 4 oz
Extra clothing in bag, 10 oz
Platypus and water bottle, 2 oz
Aqua mira, 3 oz
Misc, 4 oz

Just over 6 pounds. I've never gone this light, mainly because I'm usually out for more than one season and need to be ready for more severe weather. My AT summer pack was just under 8 pounds, but I carried stuff I needed for the Whites because I didn't like to mess with mail drops.

As I said in a previous post, when you hike this light, you really don't need much food for energy or recovery. I entered the 100-mile wilderness, for example, with a heavy hiker hunger and 8 pounds of food and that was plenty--I would have done it fresh and well-fed with 6 or 7. I never carried water in the HMW, since my feet were wet from walking in it all day every day. So I'll definitely back up Wolf's 12 pound load statement.

I presume that means you did not treat your water? I can see doing that in springs at upper elevations, but I'm not sure I'd do that that in areas with moose and beavers.

David@whiteblaze
04-16-2010, 12:32
second to the bottom of the list: Aqua mira drops: 3 oz.

David@whiteblaze
04-16-2010, 12:33
er, aqua mira minus the drops

garlic08
04-16-2010, 13:16
I presume that means you did not treat your water? I can see doing that in springs at upper elevations, but I'm not sure I'd do that that in areas with moose and beavers.

I agree. Note the Aqua Mira in the list for treating water.

But I rarely use it, since I avoid beaver ponds and runoff in cattle country. And that relates to the earlier posts about carrying water. Once I got over my fear of drinking untreated spring water, I stopped treating all but the cleanest springs, which made collecting and drinking water "on the run" much easier. If you don't treat your water, it's much easier not to carry loads of it. That's just the way I do it, and I know it's not for everyone.

Another relevant point: I believe your pack often reflects your fears. Not always, because some really like their comfort. But for example, if you're afraid of the water or of getting thirsty, you'll carry a large filter and chemical backup and you'll treat and carry two or three liters at a time. If you're afraid of things that go "bump" or crawl in the night, you'll carry a double wall tent, a large lamp, maybe even a large knife, firearm, or other weapon. If you're afraid of the rain, you'll have three or four pounds of rain gear, pack cover, extra tarp, and goretex socks. If you're afraid of injury, you'll carry a three-pound first aid kit. If you're afraid of getting lost, a GPS, cell phone, and satellite beacon. If you're afraid of getting cold, a stove, down booties, extra fleece. I even met an organization freak who had three pounds of stuff sacks to keep stuff from getting lost in his pack--it was a real phobia of his and he had to deal with it. I think that's why some packs weigh 50 pounds (again, not all--some folks love camp comforts). If at some point you realize some of those fears are groundless, at least in certain situations, you can start leaving a lot of stuff behind.

Saffirre8
04-16-2010, 13:32
Depends on the water availability, expected trail conditions, and distance traveled--5-mile days or 20-mile days?

Assuming normal AT springtime conditions, lots of climbing, lots of water, say 70 miles to the next resupply, I'd carry no water, about 6-7 pounds of food on top of my 8 pound base load, so 14 to 15 pounds.

How do you not carry any water? I would die of thirst...
My pack weights 35 lbs, fully loaded.

beakerman
04-16-2010, 18:39
How do you not carry any water? I would die of thirst...
My pack weights 35 lbs, fully loaded.

yeah just rinning osme quick numbers for garlic I come up with 14 mile days on average.

you couldn't pay me to plan a 14 mile walk--no pack--with out carrying water...forget humping a pack.

bigcranky
04-16-2010, 20:03
You both are equating not CARRYING water with not DRINKING water. Nobody ever said that. If you are walking on a trail that has a spring every few miles, you can stop and take a drink, then keep walking. I have been on plenty of hikes where I was pretty much walking in the stuff the whole time.

garlic08
04-16-2010, 21:20
yeah just rinning osme quick numbers for garlic I come up with 14 mile days on average.

you couldn't pay me to plan a 14 mile walk--no pack--with out carrying water...forget humping a pack.

Look at my original post, #6, it says, "Assuming normal AT springtime conditions, lots of climbing, lots of water,...." I thru-hiked the AT in a wet year, 2008, and really, it was hard to avoid stepping in good clean water every few miles most of the 3.5 months I was out there. Not once did I find a dry source, so I started counting on it and was never disappointed and got thirsty only once on the whole trip, on a beastly hot day in NY (I carried water that day).

I'm starting to regret bringing it up. This is like the reaction I normally get when people ask me about my stove and I say I don't use one. "Inconceivable!"

First time I started a hike with empty water containers I was looking up at some huge snowfields in Colorado, waterfalls coming off them, about 3000' vertical above me. Why should I carry my day's water supply, three liters of chlorinated city water, up 3000' when the best water on earth, alpine snow melt, is gushing out of the hillside at the top of my climb? The light pack on that climb was really an eye-opener for me. Great water up there!

excuses
04-16-2010, 22:36
33lbs. I just hiked winding stair gap to stecoah gap. I took 3 1/2 days of food, Apple at burningtown gap gave me a soda and cookies on day one, a poptart from my food bag and a burger at NOC on day 2 then out on day 3. I carried that food bag as unneeded weight, I don't get hungry the first couple of days but just in case.

Connie
04-16-2010, 23:54
18 lbs. plus 2 lbs. if water is carried.

I am pretty "average" as a reasonably lightweight backpacker.

I will throw-in on this discussion, I have walked in part of a day fom my reaidence, at the time, the other side of Golden Gate Park, across the Golden Gate Bridge, to Basin 3 on the other side of Sausalito, CA - 18 miles, no big deal, neither hungry nor thirsty, carrying no food or water.

I completely understand mild hills, mild weather, and no pack weight to speak of (my back cannot feel the difference between 5 lbs. and 8 lbs.) especially when I have no backpack at all!

That said, I like "good food" and I cannot do more than 2-days, under any circumstances, without a "real meal".

I have also noticed, some food selections give me "better energy" and "more energy" than other food selections. I have tried, for decades, to figure that out. I have listed a "calorie dense" food list, at my website (see the Site Map, at my website, if interested) but there are two more food lists that I have identified, as having a definite "role" in "better energy" and "more energy" and therefore, less "need" for quantity and weight. One, is found is Ayurveda: the "sattvic" food items list. The second, is found in the "Eating for Your Blood Type" "highly beneficial" food selections.

I am not saying those would "work for you".

I am saying, I notice a substantial difference in "better energy" and "more energy" when I make food item selections off those two additional lists.

"Works for me".

SGT Rock
04-17-2010, 04:03
Another relevant point: I believe your pack often reflects your fears. Not always, because some really like their comfort. .... If at some point you realize some of those fears are groundless, at least in certain situations, you can start leaving a lot of stuff behind.
A lot of wisdom right there.

gregp
04-17-2010, 10:59
If I take Awol's book (which I haven't read yet) with 2 liters of water and 8 pounds of food, I'm at 26 pounds with a double wall 2 man tent and little over 23 pounds with my TT contrail.

I enjoy the camping aspect of a long hike too much to ever be truly UL.

Hikingsasquatch
04-17-2010, 18:10
35 pounds with tent, 20 degree sleeping bag, 3/4 length air mattress, stove, one pot, fuel, water filter, couple sets of hiking garb, sparse toiletries and first aid, fire kit, LED flash light, food, 2 liters of water, 22 ounces of bourbon, and 3 fine cigars.

stranger
04-18-2010, 02:32
I can't think of a situation along the AT where I would need to carry 5 days of food, but typically for me, my pack is around 23-26lbs in the conditions your mention, that's everything, including food and water

bigcranky
04-19-2010, 10:05
I enjoy the camping aspect of a long hike too much to ever be truly UL.

This is a terrific piece of advice, and shows great self-awareness. Good for you.

I don't much love the camping part, but I do love to walk.

beakerman
04-19-2010, 10:28
You both are equating not CARRYING water with not DRINKING water. Nobody ever said that. If you are walking on a trail that has a spring every few miles, you can stop and take a drink, then keep walking. I have been on plenty of hikes where I was pretty much walking in the stuff the whole time.

Actually I'm not. I NEVER SAID ANYTHING ABOUT DRINKING WATER OR NOT.

I said exactly what I mean. If I'm walking I'm walking not stopping every little bit to grab a drink out of some spring.

Even when I was younger, read that as prior to my event with water borne illness, I carried a liter or so of water just for the convinience of drinking when I wanted to not when the trail dictated. I am still that way.

babbage
04-20-2010, 21:45
but to make somebody think that they can get pack weight to 12 lb with 5 days of food is just stupid.. let Wolf - 23000 post his 5 day menu. he won't post...........

If he posted that on BPL I doubt that it would be questioned. Fringe, baby...fringe

philly
04-20-2010, 21:53
About 10 - 12 pounds total including food/water depending on what I'm eating.

10-12 pounds? is that per day

Tin Man
04-20-2010, 21:57
We like to hike in comfort and manage the weight as follows: We stopped weighing things awhile ago, but the last I checked I am usually around 32 lbs with food, water and um libations, for 2-3 days... then we stop at our cache bucket and swap trash and dirty clothes for clean unnerpants/socks and more food, water and um libations for another 2-3 days. Works well for us and we save a few pounds.

kayak karl
04-20-2010, 22:24
If he posted that on BPL I doubt that it would be questioned. Fringe, baby...fringe
i over reacted.:) i've gotten so much bad advice from wb. i saw his posts on tp and understand how he rolls now. maybe its my age, but I can't cut my food back that far. like he says, its not what you don't have. think about what you do have. wolf23000 hes changing the way i think :)

sbhikes
04-21-2010, 09:23
My pack weighs the same whether it's a 5 day trip or a one day trip, with the exception of the amount of food. For a 5 day trip, it's probably around 17-18 pounds, about 10 pounds of gear and the rest food. Add a liter of water if there's going to be a dry stretch or I'm not certain of the water.

I'm estimating the weight. I need to actually weigh my gear. I've been suspecting that now I'm below 10lbs, but I'm not sure. I mean, I can actually trail run with my backpacking gear. How's that for light?

Like Garlic, I've taken to not carrying water at all if I don't have to. I'm still learning, though. Water insecurity is hard to get over. But I did pretty well this weekend. I hiked the first two days of the PCT (Campo to Mt. Laguna, which was 2 days for us and 4 days for everybody we met) carrying no more than 1 liter of water at a time.

sbhikes
04-21-2010, 10:03
Oh hey I just remembered a story from this weekend.

My boyfriend is hiking the PCT and he told me how there was this couple laboring under heavy loads, carrying tons of water, trying to make it to a camp site about 12 miles away. There's this beautiful little surprise creek in the desert not listed on the water report. My boyfriend stops to cool his feet and wet his shirt when they go by. He tries to invite them to come cool off in the water. The woman's feet really hurts and he tells her a good soak will make them feel better. They decline saying they have enough water already and are worried about getting to the campsite in time and don't want to stop.

If their packs had been lighter and if they had carried less water, they could have taken a few minutes to stop, cool down, enjoy a pretty spot, rest their weary feet. They wouldn't be struggling and trudging on a death march to the next published water source.

My boyfriend passed them again later and went on for a 26 mile day. When he got to Warner Springs he calls me up to complain this trail is too easy. He's not sore enough to enjoy the hot spring.

I guess the way we both see it is you can either focus on enjoying the hiking or put all your attention on the camping. If you can focus on the camping and not be miserable all day, then that's great. But if you are suffering for your luxuries and the "convenience" of carrying a ton of water, then that seems silly. If you can hike easily and happily, have time to enjoy the hiking, and sleep warm, safe and dry at night, what more can you ask for?

Tilly
04-21-2010, 10:43
There is just no way I could not carry water. Hiked last year and basically drowned, but still I can't give up carrying water. I like to sip pretty frequently.


Then again, Garlic is the Jack LaLane of thruhiking:) I really can't compare what he does to what I do!


It is kind of dumb to carry 3 L out of town, though, especially since you are always going to get a climb. Unless you plan on dry camping or something.

Tilly
04-21-2010, 10:57
Well that being said I think my pack weighs around 25# fully loaded for 5 days. If I'm out for 7 or 8 days it hits 30#. 30 I don't like too much but luckily it doesn't last long. I do like being out for a week at a time though.

safn1949
04-21-2010, 17:27
Look at my original post, #6, it says, "Assuming normal AT springtime conditions, lots of climbing, lots of water,...." I thru-hiked the AT in a wet year, 2008, and really, it was hard to avoid stepping in good clean water every few miles most of the 3.5 months I was out there. Not once did I find a dry source, so I started counting on it and was never disappointed and got thirsty only once on the whole trip, on a beastly hot day in NY (I carried water that day).

I'm starting to regret bringing it up. This is like the reaction I normally get when people ask me about my stove and I say I don't use one. "Inconceivable!"

First time I started a hike with empty water containers I was looking up at some huge snowfields in Colorado, waterfalls coming off them, about 3000' vertical above me. Why should I carry my day's water supply, three liters of chlorinated city water, up 3000' when the best water on earth, alpine snow melt, is gushing out of the hillside at the top of my climb? The light pack on that climb was really an eye-opener for me. Great water up there!


Makes sense to me,I have been stumbling along here in MD at a slooow pace (knee problems) so I needed to carry water,but if you are just about swimming in the stuff,why bother.:D

The_Saint
04-21-2010, 18:26
I can't think of a situation along the AT where I would need to carry 5 days of food, but typically for me, my pack is around 23-26lbs in the conditions your mention, that's everything, including food and water


Have you hiked the entire trail? Maybe you only walk 25 mile days, but there are 75-100 mile stretches with no good resupply all over in the South.

Wolf - 23000
04-22-2010, 00:07
10-12 pounds? is that per day

No. That is for 5 days. That what the question asked and what the thread is focus on.

Wolf

Wolf - 23000
04-22-2010, 00:09
i over reacted.:) i've gotten so much bad advice from wb. i saw his posts on tp and understand how he rolls now. maybe its my age, but I can't cut my food back that far. like he says, its not what you don't have. think about what you do have. wolf23000 hes changing the way i think :)

I'm glad I could help. :D

Wolf

sbhikes
04-22-2010, 09:34
Wolf, do you have a gear list somewhere? Maybe I could learn something.

Goofy
06-19-2015, 16:04
What is your pack weight for a 5 day trip? Just curious to see what people are carrying. Figure spring time, 60 degree weather.

Hey so im doing Front Royal to Harpers Ferry WVA, mine weighs 38 pounds for a 5 days hike maybe a 3 day haha.

MuddyWaters
06-19-2015, 18:56
Id probably be 17 lbs, just because im a wuss and like bug netting, inflatable pad, and usually carry 1 L water even when dont need it.

I dont give much thought to pack wt till it tops 20 lb or so.

bangorme
06-19-2015, 19:40
There is so much play in this question. I could hike the AT for five days with NO pack. When I was a teenager we backpacked and drank water out of streams. In a survival situation I could drink any water. Same with food, it's a luxury for 5 days. So my answer would be, take all the weights given, throw out the lightest and heaviest ones, and there is the answer for probably 90% of us.

MuddyWaters
06-19-2015, 20:00
Question is not "what is the minimum you could get by with", its what would your pack actually be. No reason to throw out any answers.

I dont know why anyone worries about how their pack compares to others.
Theres no right, no wrong.
No one will make fun of you, or look down on you because your pack is heavier than theirs.
The fact you even considered pack wt puts you ahead of 75%.

bangorme
06-19-2015, 20:21
I'm assuming the OP is asking a serious question for the sake of some serious information. Anyone that hikes the AT with 5 days worth of food and some water with a 10 pound pack is doing what I said could be done in my post... just not as spartan. More of a gimmick than anything else (like the gal that ran the entire AT in a very short time... How many miles do you do a day? 100) If I came to this site, I'd use this question to try to gauge what weight range I should shoot for. But, I have no doubt that people do long trips with virtually no gear.

But we could learn from some of these 10 lb. packers if they would post their food, water, and gear list for the 5 day trip. I'd really like to lighten my pack.

Singto
06-19-2015, 22:23
No different than my thru hike pack.....about 29 pounds with 4-5 days of food. Other than maybe not carrying a few "extra" clothes (3-5 pounds) or deciding you can "rough it" (no tent, disposable rain gear, cold meals etc.) for 5 days (but not 150 days like on a thru hike) why would it be substantially much different than a thru hike pack, everything else being equal?

Sarcasm the elf
06-19-2015, 22:24
Question is not "what is the minimum you could get by with", its what would your pack actually be. No reason to throw out any answers.

I dont know why anyone worries about how their pack compares to others.
Theres no right, no wrong.
No one will make fun of you, or look down on you because your pack is heavier than theirs.
The fact you even considered pack wt puts you ahead of 75%.

Since you put it that way, my first 5 day haul, my pack was 52lbs. I don't recommend it. The next year I dropped down to 30-35lbs for a two week trip with 5-6 days between resupply. Most of the weight I dropped from the previous year was done simply by taking out a lot of what "what if's" out of my pack and being mindful of what i really needed.
My last week long trip my pack was around 23lbs, this included buying a Tarptent double rainbow, a ULA Circuit, and a lighter sleeping bag.

I could go lower, but I don't feel like spending money on another set of my big 4. Plus I hike to relax mentally more than physically, I don't obsess over my pack weight or use spreadsheets, I just throw what I know I need based on my experience into my pack, pick it up, make sure it doesn't feel excessive, and go on my way.

Singto
06-19-2015, 22:26
Question is not "what is the minimum you could get by with", its what would your pack actually be. No reason to throw out any answers.

I dont know why anyone worries about how their pack compares to others.
Theres no right, no wrong.
No one will make fun of you, or look down on you because your pack is heavier than theirs.
The fact you even considered pack wt puts you ahead of 75%.

The way to lighten your pack and possibly increase the efficiency of your pack is to worry (be concerned with) about what others pack. This is how we learn and improve, by listening to what others say and do and then deciding what is best for ourselves.

MuddyWaters
06-19-2015, 23:30
The way to lighten your pack and possibly increase the efficiency of your pack is to worry (be concerned with) about what others pack. This is how we learn and improve, by listening to what others say and do and then deciding what is best for ourselves.

Id say the way to a lighter pack would be by researching lighter gear choices that suit your needs and wants, not asking what others packs weigh.

bangorme
06-20-2015, 00:22
Last time I checked it, to really lighten my pack would cost at least $1,200. The things I could go UL would be tent, sleeping bag, pad and pack. I could probably lose 5-8 pounds if I replaced all three.

Rolex
06-20-2015, 08:24
I bust out most of the packaging and put the dry goods in paper lunch bags, which I burn as I empty every evening. Now that I'm "older" and eat less, grocery store food weighs in at 600 grams per day. Mostly dehydrated around 500 grams/day. Eat like a lion in town.

Llama... I'm just starting to get into dehydrating stuff and wondering....
What are you carrying for your 500 grams a day food list?
How many calories does it look like it works out to?
Thank you,
Rolex

kayak karl
06-20-2015, 12:24
But we could learn from some of these 10 lb. packers if they would post their food, water, and gear list for the 5 day trip. I'd really like to lighten my pack.
ultralight backpacking is a mindset, not a gear list. it takes time, but you need to figure your needs on your own.

bangorme
06-20-2015, 17:33
ultralight backpacking is a mindset, not a gear list. it takes time, but you need to figure your needs on your own.

Oh, give me a break lol. Ultra light is a technology that can be bought and paid for. Hiking the AT with a roll of Saran wrap and one pair of underpants is a personal challenge that has virtually nothing to do with backpacking. Just like running the trail with your husband driving to meet you at each night's lodging is a personal challenge that has nothing to do with backpacking. I'm not dissing it in the least, but it has virtually nothing to do with "need." If someone is genuinely backpacking the AT with a 10 pound pack, I'd like to see if I can learn something from them. I've learned a lot from some of the ultralight websites (e.g. http://www.hikelight.com/videos.html ).

MuddyWaters
06-20-2015, 18:10
Oh, give me a break lol. Ultra light is a technology that can be bought and paid for. Hiking the AT with a roll of Saran wrap and one pair of underpants is a personal challenge that has virtually nothing to do with backpacking. Just like running the trail with your husband driving to meet you at each night's lodging is a personal challenge that has nothing to do with backpacking. I'm not dissing it in the least, but it has virtually nothing to do with "need." If someone is genuinely backpacking the AT with a 10 pound pack, I'd like to see if I can learn something from them. I've learned a lot from some of the ultralight websites (e.g. http://www.hikelight.com/videos.html ).

Well, it is a mindset
You have to be conditioned to only WANT to bring exactly what you need, and only as much as is needed. If you dont think that way, its hard to get pack wt down.

You also must be willing to accept and the compromises that may accompany it.

rickb
06-20-2015, 18:25
Well, it is a mindset
You have to be conditioned to only WANT to bring exactly what you need, and only as much as is needed. If you dont think that way, its hard to get pack wt down.

You also must be willing to accept and the compromises that may accompany it.

Sure, just tell yourself:

"I'm going to live thought this and when it's all over, I'll never be hungry again"

Rolex
06-20-2015, 18:49
there ya go! Million dollar idea. Cuben fiber underpants. Bikini brief cut of course!

I'll keep mine though.

kayak karl
06-20-2015, 20:07
Oh, give me a break lol. Ultra light is a technology that can be bought and paid for. Hiking the AT with a roll of Saran wrap and one pair of underpants is a personal challenge that has virtually nothing to do with backpacking. Just like running the trail with your husband driving to meet you at each night's lodging is a personal challenge that has nothing to do with backpacking. I'm not dissing it in the least, but it has virtually nothing to do with "need." If someone is genuinely backpacking the AT with a 10 pound pack, I'd like to see if I can learn something from them. I've learned a lot from some of the ultralight websites (e.g. http://www.hikelight.com/videos.html ). people are rescued all the time with $2000 worth of gear on their back. people that think it can just be bought fail to learn how to use it. when it comes to ultra-light you either get it, or you don't.

Wolf - 23000
06-20-2015, 23:21
people are rescued all the time with $2000 worth of gear on their back. people that think it can just be bought fail to learn how to use it. when it comes to ultra-light you either get it, or you don't.

Well put! It not just the gear that is going to keep you safe, it knowing how to use it. The lightest gear is not always the best. A hiker can get a skimp tarp and save a few ounces but end up in the fetal position or worst in a bad storm. Sometimes carrying the extra ounce or two for a larger tarp can be the different between lift and death.

I've run into people like bangorme all the time. Just smile and save your breath. They are not going to get it. I'm not sure if he is serious or getting some kick back from the "ultra-light website" he is posting about, lol. If he really believe what he is selling that is all about ultra light technology, let him buy it.

Happy Hiking!

Wolf

10-K
06-21-2015, 06:51
Asking people to self-report pack weight is ...well... not likely to yield accurate information.

Wolf - 23000
06-21-2015, 09:41
Asking people to self-report pack weight is ...well... not likely to yield accurate information.

I don't know about that. On a long distance trip, I go to the P.O. all the time to weigh my pack. I can't weight the clothes I'm wearing but it gives me a good idea how much I am really carrying.

Wolf

Fredt4
06-22-2015, 19:56
When I was younger and didn't mind being hungry, cold and uncomfortable I could easily do 5 days on 15lbs.

I haven't gone for 5 days in below 70 weather with just a fanny pack, but I gone 3+ days (summer in Georgia) with just a fanny pack. No shelter (studied weather report), no sleeping bag, no first aid kit, no water filter. Just some food and a collapsible cup, spoon, classic swiss army knife, peanut butter, beef jerky, oatmeal, fishing line, hook and matches. On my 2011 AT hike I was usually around 25-30 lbs.

Wolf - 23000
06-22-2015, 21:54
I haven't gone for 5 days in below 70 weather with just a fanny pack, but I gone 3+ days (summer in Georgia) with just a fanny pack. No shelter (studied weather report), no sleeping bag, no first aid kit, no water filter. Just some food and a collapsible cup, spoon, classic swiss army knife, peanut butter, beef jerky, oatmeal, fishing line, hook and matches. On my 2011 AT hike I was usually around 25-30 lbs.

Fredt4,

I don't know how to respond to your post. I've hiked several weeks with just a fanny pack, 5 days food and yes below 50 degrees. I don't prefer it over a backpack but I've done it.

I agree with you should never have no shelter - weather reports have been wrong before. If you know what you are doing you can be completely prepare with everything with less than 15 lbs. You just have to know what you are doing.

I did not see ozt42 until now, but my guest is he have never backpack before. Just a guest but I was backpacking with 5 days on 15lbs over 25 years ago. My last thru-hike of the PCT, I loss 6 pounds. Gear is now lighter. It is too easy to travel UL now, so I'm not sure where he is coming from???

Wolf

lemon b
06-22-2015, 21:57
About 35 pounds and I eat well.

Fredt4
06-23-2015, 01:20
I guess one need to assess one's skill level, knowledge of trail, time constraints.

I've been hiking and backpacking since I was a kid. = High skill level.

Knowledge of the trail: I've hike a good part of the AT south of Central Virginia before my 2011 thru hike. = Fairly good knowledge of the trail, but was able to predict weather for the hike. Therefore carried rain gear, but just carried a bivy sack at first. I'm fairly comfortable not having lots of extra gear so no camp shoes or "unnecessary gear". Ok, looking back I guess I probably could cut 5 lbs fairly easy.

I don't remember exactly but I think I was at 12.5 lbs plus food and water. I know I carried too much water most of the time and easily could have carried less food, but that would have required longer trail breaks. I lost 45 lbs as it went.
That last few lbs of gear that I needed to lose would have required spending so money that I couldn't justify at the time.

Time constraints: I had 2,184 miles to go, so no hiding in a cave or under a ledge when it rained, which was fairly often in April and May of 2011.

I agree with the post that a lot of the weight is because of fear.

Deacon
06-23-2015, 05:48
It is indeed a mind-set. I just completed a six week section from Damascus to Harpers Ferry, which gave me ample opportunity to observe many hikers, both section and thru, complaining about their pack weight.

For example, one thru hiker had "bad knees", and commented that he needed to find a way to cut down on pack weight. At the same time he put on his camp shoes (nothing wrong with camp shoes) saying they're so comfortable at the end of a long day of hiking. OK, three quarters of a pound.

Then he pulled out his Jet Boil (nothing wrong with Jet Boils, they're great) with the large canister saying he needed to heat water quickly. Three quarters of a pound.

It's almost as though life on the trail can't exist without the required comforts and conveniences.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Five Tango
06-23-2015, 17:25
Right now I am configured at 37 pounds all total with food and water.While we are on the subject,what percent of body weight should your load be generally?
I seem to remember maybe 25% or so.What's the rule of thumb for pack to body weight ratios?

Deacon
06-23-2015, 18:55
The body begins to hunch over when the pack weight exceeds 15% of body weight. Of course this will vary with strength. By that rule a 200 lb. person will begin to physically compensate at a 30 lb load.
Again this is a very general rule with a lot of factors.

Five Tango
06-24-2015, 09:04
The body begins to hunch over when the pack weight exceeds 15% of body weight. Of course this will vary with strength. By that rule a 200 lb. person will begin to physically compensate at a 30 lb load.
Again this is a very general rule with a lot of factors.

Totally agree with that statement.That's why I have an Aarn pack which has a front pack for balance or ballast to offset the weight on the back.