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creaky bones
10-25-2004, 19:22
I have come to backpacking rather recently, and enjoy it immensely. I do find myself concerned about my personal safety on the trail- particularly because when I backpack, it is with another middle aged woman like myself. We've had a couple of situations that were not comfortable (camping within a few hundred yards of an ATV trail and hearing them 'play' into the wee hours of the morning; meeting other hikers who literally made the hair on my arms stand on end with uneasiness) and made me aware of my vulnerability. I do such things as being vague when other hikers ask us questions about our itinerary, and making sure all of our equipment blends in to the environment (no blaze orange tarp). We always leave an itinerary with family. We do not camp within sight of the tail. We probably also do other things which escape me at the moment.

The main thing is I want to enjoy backpacking without fear. I want to make sure I'm doing everything sensible to keep myself safe and then relax and enjoy myself. The problem is--what is everything sensible?

steve hiker
10-25-2004, 19:27
www.glock.com (http://www.glock.com)

steve hiker
10-25-2004, 19:31
Seriously, I don't think you have much to worry about. Seems you're practicing a fair degree of common sense already, which is your best defense. Thousands of women have hiked the AT all the way from GA to ME without incident. From everything I've read and seen, you're not in much more danger from other humans than the men. Which is practically nil.

Maybe carry a key jiggy of pepper spray, if for nothing more than peace of mind.

Jack Tarlin
10-25-2004, 19:35
What you're doing so far is smart and sensible. Here are a few more ideas:

1. Work on your outdoor skills so you can better handle unforeseen
situations: I.e., learn how to use map and compass, so you can get
outta the woods fast if necessary.

2. Avoid staying ANYWHERE that's too close to a road; most folks who are
looking to make trouble in the backcountry don't go far from their cars.

3. Learn to figure out who "belongs" out there by their clothing, gear, con-
versation, demeanor, etc.

4. If you get bad vibes about folks you're with, move on. Trust your
instincts.

5. Consider taking a personal self-defense course. It's very useful stuff, as
well as being a great confidence builder.

6. Spend MORE time in the woods and mountains, not less. The more time
you spend out there, the more comfortable you'll be.

7. Travel with company until you feel comfortable travelling alone.

8. Remember that while you're wise to be aware of risks and perceived
dangers, don't go too far overboard to the point that these worries
interfere with your enjoyment of the outdoors. You're far safer on
the Trail than you are in your home, your workplace, or walking down
the street of your hometown. Keep your fears reasonable and in
proportion to the actual risk.....it's great that this subject concerns you,
but it'd be a shame if you let it keep you out of the woods.

bearbait2k4
10-25-2004, 19:52
I've had 2 long distance hikes on the AT for the past 2 years now, and have been in the circumstance where I felt I was taking a risk once. A bad hitch to where I knew better before I got in the car, but I did so anyway. Things could have gone seriously wrong, but I made it out okay, a little wiser, and more trusting of my gut feelings.

It's a rare situation for a person's life to be at risk on the AT. More often than not, it is a case of just being in the wrong place at the wrong time, which can happen ANYWHERE. Being a female can make you feel more vulnerable to crime, especially if you are traveling alone. Of course, most of it is just head games.

It sounds like you already make some very reasonable choices in regards to personal safety in the wilderness. Stay away from road crossings, off the trail, and keep people informed of where you are and where you will be. Educate yourself with proper behavior around wildlife as well, so you know what to do if you come up to a mama and baby bear - for instance.

Good luck!

creaky bones
10-25-2004, 22:10
Thanks to you all for your good advice and encouragement. I'm listening. I'm not interested in packing any firearms, but I did run into a very rude pit bull whose owner had even fewer manners and had thought of carrying pepper spray for situations such as that...And I have discovered that the further away from civilization, the more civilized the people. Thanks:)

Hammock Hanger
10-25-2004, 22:14
All the advice posted is good. I have been out on the trail alone for the past 4 years and have felt very comfortable.

I agreed that having a comfort level in you environment is very helpful It is also good to ALWAYS listen to you rinner voice even if it seems stupid or over kill... I listen to the hairs on the back of my neck. Luckily I have had very little scary moments. Sue/HH

Rocalousas
10-25-2004, 22:26
I wonder if pepper spray would stop a pit bull? I'd rather have a .44 with a mutt like that.

manzana
10-26-2004, 08:59
I think a cell phone is great too. It doesnt even have to work. If you act like you are talking to someone it can make a big impression. I even talk into my GPS sometimes if I feel uncomfortable. Watch out if it becomes a habit, though!

APPLE in AUSTIN :)

Dharma
10-26-2004, 13:33
The main thing is I want to enjoy backpacking without fear.
If that's true, you seemed to have dealt with everything EXCEPT the fear. Fear is an emotional response to the mind going into the future and creating the image of something undesireable. Your mind sees you as potentially victimized by everything out there. Your mind's response is to cover up the fear with things like stealthing in the woods, giving false itinerary, pepper spray, etc. rather than deal with the emotions.


I want to make sure I'm doing everything sensible to keep myself safe and then relax and enjoy myself.
How to dispell you fear? The next time you feel it, that tightening of the muscles, that gut feeling, increased hear rate... stay present, breath and really feel what's going on inside, then say to yourself, "I'm creating this fear now." After you own the creation of the fear, see what happens.

You and your hiking partner could remind each other to try this the next time you're feeling vulnerable and not at ease.

By all means, keep doing what you're doing (stealthing, false itinerary...) but add dealing with your fear to your list of things to keep you safe.

creaky bones
10-26-2004, 13:59
Okay, Dr. Phil,:) I'll give it a try. I'll own my own demons :dance I'm usually one who takes only calculated risks, and then I got spooked from a couple of experiences early on. Nothing is guaranteed, but I'd rather be out there huffing up a mountain with all the potential experiences, than be sitting at home having none.

AbeHikes
01-17-2005, 14:59
I wonder if pepper spray would stop a pit bull? I'd rather have a .44 with a mutt like that.
It has for every one I've had to spray. I'm an ex-cop.

dp the wonder dog
01-17-2005, 18:31
here is a very good website that will help you

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/

it's not a pro-gun site (or anti-gun)...neutral on 2A issues. Main emphasis on safety is via "situational awareness"-- being aware of your surroundings, knowing what makes some people targets, how to react if you feel targeted, etc.

Well worth a couple of hours reading time for male or female.

Whether you choose to carry or not (don't ask, don't tell), do a google search on the "Tueller drill". You will get an idea of how close is "too close" -- it's farther than you think.

Pooja Blue
01-18-2005, 05:14
I second the idea of a self-defense class. Something like Model Mugging would be excellent. They teach you awareness and give you self-confidence in addition teaching you how to defend yourself and not freeze up.

FWIW, I was alone on the trail for most of the second half of my flipflip thruhike and I felt very comfortable out there. I'm also a former triathlete, had 6 months of self-defense training in college, and I'm bigger than most men - all factors that have something to do with confidence levels, too.

Mouse
01-18-2005, 19:07
I am a middle aged woman and thruhiked without a cell phone or whatever. Like others have said, it is mostly common sense.

hikerjohnd
02-03-2005, 20:06
Keep you legs closed and you won't have a problem.
Of all the issues to be an ass about, someone asking about personal safety is not one of them. I support your right to have your say, but don't you think being flippant about someones fear is wrong?

The Old Fhart
02-03-2005, 20:19
Boston's comments display a prepubescent mentality and lack of intellect that says all we need to know about him.

steve hiker
02-04-2005, 01:24
A woman's place is in the home, caring for her husband and children. Not roaming the wilds like a loose woman and harlot.

The Old Fhart
02-04-2005, 07:58
A woman's place is in the home, caring for her husband and children. Not roaming the wilds like a loose woman and harlot. And a manís place is in the home, honoring his wife and children. Not roaming the wilds like a loose canon and hermit. :D
(p.s.-I do mean canon [a rule or church law], not cannon-pun intended)

java
02-04-2005, 10:20
A woman's place is in the home, caring for her husband and children. Not roaming the wilds like a loose woman and harlot.
Willk meet Minnesotasmith, Minnesotasmith meet Willk. I think you two will get along just fine. Now, go play by yourselves.

art to linda
02-04-2005, 12:00
A woman's place is in the home, caring for her husband and children. Not roaming the wilds like a loose woman and harlot.


Cheee, not another one of these guys !!! :eek:

The Weasel
02-05-2005, 22:31
As I read the recent posts in this thread, I was minded of a post to the AT-L I made a few years back. At the risk of combining pomposity with repetition, I'll repost it now, slightly edited...

If there is ANY indication that someone is "watching" people on the AT surrepitiously, IT IS CRITICAL THAT THE NEAREST LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES BE TOLD. This is not "cute" or "harmless" behavior, and it is not something that is judged as "just a little bit" of a problem. It's illegal. It's that simple. "Stalking" doesn't have to be of just one person, or even one location. And it is, literally, terrifying for many, and not just women but hairy guys (ed. note: To the regret of a few, and the pleasure of many, The Weasel is now shaven) like me. These concerns are very real to me; my Godmother's daughter's body has never been found from her murder on the PCT.)

If one comes across this kind of behavior, at the first telephone opportunity, contact the nearest State Police Post. If there are ominous words in a Shelter Register, TAKE THE REGISTER WITH YOU for the police. (Yeah, I know...they're important. But it's important to have the book to show the cops. And you'll make someone else's load lighter when they can leave a blank one.)

The Police/Sting's song, "Every Move You Make" isn't a love song. As Gordy has always said, "It's the stalker's song." And it isn't funny, and we as members of the Trail Community have to take steps to protect each other.

Lumberjack
02-06-2005, 14:47
If your gonna go to the trouble of carrying spray get bear spray instead. It is far more powerfull and effective on both animals and humans.

And if you meet some strange creepy looking guy in the woods with long hair ... I dont bite. :) Well ok, that was only the one time.

saimyoji
02-06-2005, 15:58
..........

ncmtns
02-24-2005, 19:04
http://gorp.away.com/gorp/publishers/wildernesspress/trailsafe/trailsafe.htm

Nightwalker
02-24-2005, 20:18
FWIW, I was alone on the trail for most of the second half of my flipflip thruhike and I felt very comfortable out there. I'm also a former triathlete, had 6 months of self-defense training in college, and I'm bigger than most men - all factors that have something to do with confidence levels, too.
Maybe I could hike with you and let you take care of me for awhile. :)

But seriously, I showed my wife some very basic, very serious hand-to-hand stuff early on in our marriage, and then made her practice it with me. That chickadee is a bell-ringer. You'd be surprised how many people have no idea how to deliver even a moderately effective blow.

I pity the average joe that tries to back Squeaky into a corner. Shelly and Dawg and anyone else that's heard "the rest of the story" would just be saying "duh-huh" right about now.

Of course, the point of this thread is, or should be, how to avoid such situations.

Lumberjack
02-26-2005, 12:47
http://gorp.away.com/gorp/publishers/wildernesspress/trailsafe/trailsafe.htm

A MOST EXCELLENT ARTICLE....

art to linda
02-26-2005, 13:30
Lumberjack.... thanks for the link, lots of good info :)

rmtjr
03-07-2005, 20:03
Articles that I read on WB seem to lean toward using common sense regarding safety. I also get the idea from the threads that there is not a lot of physical violence on the Trail. However .... my wife's doc, who says he has hiked the northern half of the Trail, reports that there is a lot of violence on the AT. He specifically mentioned rape and assault. Opinions? Thanks for your comments. Bob

rickb
03-07-2005, 21:20
Before the internet, I might have been inclined to believe that doctor.

Now, I am convinced that any report of a crime along the Trail as serious as rape would become known to the larger community very quickly. It may be impossible to prove a negative, but the net allows us to come close.

The suggestion that there is alot of such crime is, well, crazy. If a doctor told me that, I'd find a new one.

Dances with Mice
03-07-2005, 21:41
If a doctor told me that, I'd find a new one.Not really. If my plumber told me that I'd say "Uh huh, yeah right, I hear you", whatever.

But he still fixes leaks pretty well. No need to get another one.

One Thing
03-08-2005, 14:16
Articles that I read on WB seem to lean toward using common sense regarding safety. I also get the idea from the threads that there is not a lot of physical violence on the Trail. However .... my wife's doc, who says he has hiked the northern half of the Trail, reports that there is a lot of violence on the AT. He specifically mentioned rape and assault. Opinions? Thanks for your comments. Bob To make this brief, I believe a woman is much safer on the main Appalachian Trail then her own home. This is not to say; a woman should ever let her guard down and not be aware. Unfortunately, from the time a woman is born, to the time she dies, she will always be the target of a small percentage of the male population. Itís just a fact that every woman must accept. Yes, on the AT, there have been rapes and murders over the years. However, if you want to put it in percentages, then I would be more worried about being stuck by lighting then being attacked. There are many so-called experts who give out misleading or false advice due to a lack of education and experience. Thereís a lot of advice of what to do and what not to do if ever attacked. For the most part, much of the advice posted in this thread has given the basic information or links needed for trail safety. However, I advise each woman to do at lease a basic research on rape prevention. Most web sites today have collected a pretty good list of the basics. As far as basic self-defense techniques on the trail goes, each woman has to decide how much time she wants to spend learning realistic techniques.

Gary

Semi-retired Chief Instructor of W.A.R., Women Against Rape and The Womenís Self-Defense Center.

weary
03-08-2005, 14:39
I am a middle aged woman and thruhiked without a cell phone or whatever. Like others have said, it is mostly common sense.
I have two sisters who have hiked together for years -- probably both have more trail time than I do. They have never spoken of a feeling of being threatened.

On my walk north in 1993 I would ask single women hikers who I had gotten to know if they had ever felt threatened. The answer was always ,"no." One woman was a bit nervous about hiking alone and sort of fell into my pace. We camped together for a couple of months.

I sense she thought of me as "safe." I sometimes wonder if that was a compliment.

Weary

CynJ
09-15-2005, 23:34
I think that as I woman we always have to be a little cautious. But you can't can't let that escalate into a fear that will overwhelm you.
I go hiking by myself in some very isolated areas and I used to go out walking for hours all over the city when I used to get out of work at midnight. I never felt afraid of "what might happen"

And don't always immedately judge men on their appearance/demeanor. I learned this lesson when I was 21. I used to hang out a this bar that had some bikers/construction workers et al - and some local college kids used to come in. Well there was this guy that used to go sit in the corner every Friday night - he was big, mean looking, dirty from construction work, and he never spoke to anyone - just sort of a creepy guy. Well one night at closing time I went to go get in my car and one of the preppy college guys tried to force me into his car when all of a sudden he was picked up and slammed against the car- by the creepy guy! Preppy kid wet his pants (he really did! :D) and I made a new friend named Rick. Turns out my big creepy friend had lost his wife to cancer the year before and really just didn't want to be home by himself on Friday nights so he went to the bar. Fast forward a few years and he remarried - to a wonderful girl I introduced him to! :)

Listen to your internal radar- it will really warn you about true creeps vs. just creepy acting folks.

frieden
09-16-2005, 00:32
I hoped that we could look out for eachother out on the trail.

I ride my bike to work, and I have to ride home at 12 or 1 a.m. The other night, a van with a bunch of guys drove by, and one of them yelled, "Gimme your bike, bitch!" He hit the brakes. I pulled out my cell phone, and they drove off. Apparently, the cell phone thing works.

At first I was concerned about my safety. Then it hit me - Gimme your bike? Gosh, in my day, it was "hey baby"; now it's gimme your bike? Either guys' priorities are messed up, or I'm getting really old! ;)

Seriously, this type of thing can happen anywhere, but I feel safer on the trail, than in a town. I don't plan on camping anywhere near a road, and will try to limit my town stops as much as possible. That's where I anticipate my problems - going in and out of towns.

I agree about the self defense class. If nothing else, it gives you self confidence. With self confidence, you won't seem a likely target. I don't have anything against guns, but I can't see packing one on the trail. I'm not carrying any more weight than I have to!

Doctari
09-27-2005, 13:32
One thing towards safety I havn't seen mentioned is: first aid skills. Learn basic first aid skills before you go, learn to recognize & treat minor injuries (Or at least learn that a tourniquet is an ABSOLUTLY LAST RESORT thing) In my perspective, that is about the only increase in dangers on the AT as opposed to at home / in town. Lots of places to: fall, get stung / bit, cut, etc. The Red Cross* offers a rather good basic first aid class for a reasonable cost & only 2 days worth of time, check it out. Sometimes local fire departments or schools offer a basic first aid class.

As to personal safety: as mentioned above, trust your feelings, if someone "creeps you out" get away from them, even if it means backtracking. Even if you are nice & comfy in a shelter (etc.) & you get that bad vibes feeling, pack up & leave, yes, even in the rain. I havn't had to do this yet, but the one time I was going to, the person in question left, so I didn't have to.

The AT is a wonderful place, I feel safer there than any other place I have ever been. As we are similar ages, I believe you made it that far by much learning & being aware of things around you, just keep doing what you have been, & safe you will be on the trail.

* Iím not affiliated with the Red Cross, in fact I have issues with them (Much as I do any other bureaucracy), but they do offer a nice class.

Doctari.

soulrebel
09-27-2005, 14:14
https://store.udap.com/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=P&Product_Code=4CO&Category_Code=PS


high enough concentration=that it's qualified for bears, but the 8 foot shot probably isn't that great of a distance like the 40foot foggers, but @ 2.5ozs it's not that heavy.

They have a pen version that I got for my lil sister who is now in college...

Frosty
09-27-2005, 16:57
The other night, a van with a bunch of guys drove by, and one of them yelled, "Gimme your bike, bitch!"
That's mean!



That's where I anticipate my problems - going in and out of towns.
One thing you can do about going into/out of towns, is to hitch in with a guy that has been hiking and that you've met in shelter and seems fairly normal (as normal as a thruhiker can be, anyway). Male/female pairing off is a nice symbiotic relationship. It's is a lot easier for a guy to get a ride if he is with a woman, and it is safer for a woman to get a ride if she is with a man. Once in town you can go your separate ways, planning to meet inthe morning for the hitch back to the trailhead.

Also, if someone does creep you out in a shelter, don't be afraid to ask someone to hike with you for a little bit.

nellplucy
09-30-2005, 23:57
As a survivor of rape on the Appalachian trail and survivor of a pathetic trial, and horrific media coverage afterwards, I do want to say that rape does happen on the trail. Yes it is less often than rapes that happen off the trail, and probably less often than rapes that occur in Walmart parking lots. But please don't assume that it doesn't happen, or that it must be some freak anomaly that could have been prevented if the victim had just known the right thing to do. This silences those of us who have survived this type of attack. Sometimes bad people are just determined to do bad things to other people...even on the AT.

Plus I have to say until the last couple of years we (I was with 3 friends) were shunned by the AT Conference for bringing bad press onto the trail. An official silent treatment was the response chosen by the AT officials back when the attacks occurred, (I even have a memo about it). They rerouted the trail, but then acted like nothing happened. So while we were being crucified in court and in the media for somehow being "different", since we were 4 women out hiking and therefor possibly deserving of what happened, not one person from the AT community came to our support. Even one quote to the press explaining that it is perfectly normal and acceptable for four women to want to go on a two week backpacking trip would have helped. The silence just added to the pain.

The current officials at the AT office in Harpers Ferry have worked hard on trying to right this. One way was by publishing an article this past july in the AT Journeys magazine. It was written by one of my fellow survivors who recently went back and solo thru hiked the trail. She describes how much her thru hike empowered and affected her, especially concerning our past experience. Plus a few years back Brian King (from the AT Conference) along with the Tennessee Eastman Hiking and Canoeing Club helped me locate the old AT trail, so we could hike back into the site where the attacks occured. Brian's support during that time and the help we received from him and the TEHCC did more to restore my faith in the trail community than I can explain.

Anyway, I guess I'm trying to say that yes, the majority of people will be 100% safe on their hikes, just please don't deny the existence of people like us who weren't so lucky. Otherwise the image is given that if something does happen, it must have been a freak accident that could have been avoided. And as far as having a cell phone or pepper spray, well I doubt that would have done much good against 5 men armed with guns and knives. One safety tip I do agree with is camping as far away as you can from roads, and I would add that doing a little research into the various areas you will be hiking through would give you a heads up on how cautious you need to be. The area where our assaults occurred is still troubled to this day. Bitter End is about eight miles trail north of U.S. 19E. This area is known locally as Buck Mountain (of the 5 men who raped us, only one is back in prison for a recent crime, the rest still live in the area). Back then they were all well known by officials and feared by the locals in the area. I just wish we would have been aware that we were not taking a Sunday stroll through a perfectly safe area. If you go on most local AT trail maintenance websites they will list alerts for their areas, telling you how safe it is to leave your car, etc. This link is from the current Tennessee Eastman Hiking and Canoeing Club web site. http://www.tehcc.org/Alerts.htm#safety (http://www.tehcc.org/Alerts.htm#safety)

So yes, I still love the AT and the mountains, and have gone back and hiked sections of the AT numerous times (I still even keep my dream of maybe one day doing a thru hike). But I just couldn't stay silent on this board any longer. Please know that this post is not directed towards anyone in particular and I'm sorry if it came off too strong, I guess I just wanted my experience to be acknowledged and heard.
nellplucy

frieden
10-01-2005, 12:28
nellplucy, I saw the article in the AT Journeys magazine, and have adjusted my town stops because of it. Please, don't feel badly about speaking out. I am grateful. Potential thru hikers should want to know where the potential trouble spots are. I don't want to linger in a non-hiker-friendly area! Unfortunately, things haven't changed too much in this country. The abuser is still treated like the victim, and visa versa. I hope hikers have learned from your story, and will look out and stand up for eachother.

Smile
10-01-2005, 12:40
Why isn't this listed under their "crimes" section on their website? Should be.
Thanks for sharing your story, I agree, it's good to know ahead of time about problem areas, and I think it's better not not hike alone - especially in areas that have a history of problems. Your incident may have been the exception, but there is usually strength in numbers.

Hammock Hanger
10-04-2005, 08:23
I never heard about this.... So it is a well kept secret. I guess I missed that article in the AT mag.

From what I am getting from you post is that you were not alone. I too was a rape victim but not on the AT and I was not alone. Mom always said there was safety in numbers but that is not always true.

I am sorry to hear that this happened to you. And I can see how alone and misunderstood you must have felt in court. I always get weird looks and comments when I say I hike the AT alone. Everyday people think it is crazy and foolish.

I will say that my first solo hike on the AT from Damascus to Pearisburg was done as a personal therapy to rid myself of the fear and anger that I as a woman could not hike alone. I made it safely and was able to finally get past some of my residule anger (not all) from the rape.

Youi have my understanding and hope that you are able to move on from this event.

Sue Turner - Hammock Hanger

billdnc
10-10-2005, 22:30
the pain.

The area where our assaults occurred is still troubled to this day. Bitter End is about eight miles trail north of U.S. 19E. nellplucy
I just met my 19 y.o. son "wanderer" at the 19E crossing this past weekend. He is SOBO and is now hiking alone and seeing very few others on the trail. While I waited for him to show up where the trail crosses Bear Branch Road right before it crosses 19E it looked like someone had dumped a whole truck load of trash and smelly garbage right where the trail came out. It actually blocked the trail. My son said that he had not seen such a mess in his nearly 1,800 miles on the trail. I also noticed the warnings posted about vandalism to cars. I also remember telling my wife that Bear Branch ( which leads up Buck Mountian) must be hillbilly heaven because of all the jacked up trucks with no mufflers that kept barrelling up and down the road. Maybe this area still has some problems and extra caution should be exercised. My son has had no problems on the trail so far and he is a long-haired kid wearing a kilt. I hope that he makes it to Georgia ok.

grumpymutt
10-26-2005, 06:48
I train police officers in hand to hand, OC Spray and firearms. The best advice is self confidence. learn what you can do best. If OC Spray gives you all the confidence you need then pack it. All the guides and Game Wardens in Grizzly country say to carry it.
It does not work on all dogs no more than it works on all people. I've been sprayed so much that I can even shoot a qualification round with a face full. But it will still work well enough to give an advantage. My daughters are very good with thier hands and feet. Not so much to stand and fight but to buy a quick seperation and run like hell. It sounds like you are doing everything right tome though!

shades of blue
10-26-2005, 08:01
Your advice is sound, and needed. No where is safe all the time, for all people. It was perfectly normal for you and your group to be hiking, and you did nothing to inccur these animals to hurt you and your friends.

I noticed in your post that you still dream about thru-hiking the AT. I hiked it in sections, but still completed the whole trail. It is a feeling that is indescribable. If it is still in your soul to do this thing...I would say to go for it. You are a much stronger individual for having to overcome these horrible things. Hiking the AT is mainly mental discipline anyway, and I'm sure you can do it. Katahdin is an awesome place, as is the White mountains, Vermont....Plan it and do it! I'm sorry so many were quiet back then....we won't be quiet now.
Peace

bfitz
10-26-2005, 10:07
Also, just remember that all us well meaning weirdos are out here, and while our social skills and looks may make your hair stand up, we're harmless, just strange. Thats why we come out to the woods. Some of the scariest looking people I've met out here turned out to be the kindest souls I have ever known. And Jack is right, people looking to do harm don't put in too many miles, or get into the hiker culture, so much. The worst I've ever encountered were petty thieves, and even they were fairly harmless, and ran off never to come back once confronted. After I while you'll meet some hiker trash, and as they charm you with their vagrantness and worldview you'll realize you may have been misjudging a bit. It's a place for misfits.

Sly
10-26-2005, 12:07
I remember a short road walk in Bitter End area that had me on edge One barn did have an ATC emblem on it but otherwise it was spooky with rotweilers or pit bulls on thick chains within striking distance of the "trail".

That entire area from Carvers Gap to 19E and beyond has the worst reputation on the trail for violence and vandals and if I'm not mistaken was where fish hooks were strung across the trail.

It seems never ending, I'd like to see them set up remote cameras fixed on the parking at 19E. A few long stretches in jail and heavy fines may help cure the perps.

Ridge
05-01-2006, 20:37
http://www.cumberlink.com/articles/2006/05/01/news/news27.txt


Article with saftey tips

Pest
08-30-2006, 01:22
Keep you legs closed and you won't have a problem.

Are you speaking from experience?

HIKER7s
08-30-2006, 08:27
Keep you legs closed and you won't have a problem.



:-? Real smooth http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/icons/icon13.gif