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SunnyWalker
05-12-2010, 23:03
OK! I heading over to Columbus (only a few hours from my home) to start going north for just two weeks June 11th. I will post a list of my equipment and all here soonest. Hope you folks will weigh in. Using J. Leys maps and Wolf books. Will be going lighter then I ever have before in backpacking. Will come home after 15 days. Work for a week or two and return to where I left off to carry on for another two weeks. I wonder what the weather will be like in NM in June from border North? I wonder how far I'll get. (No schedule, no nothing - vacation). Going solo. I'll bet water will be harder to find during June. Or is it the rainy season?
:sun :banana :welcome:-? -Chaplain (formerly SunnyWalker)

garlic08
05-13-2010, 09:14
Mid-June in the Chihuahua Desert? Please be careful out there! I see you're from TX so you'll be acclimated to the heat. Water sources should generally be OK since it's been a very wet winter. The monsoon generally starts around that time, increasing relative humidity (and discomfort). You'll have the CDT to yourself, I bet.

I did some hiking on the AZT in the Sonoran Desert last June in 100F heat and it was among the most challenging hiking I've done.

Graywolf
05-14-2010, 21:24
OK! I heading over to Columbus (only a few hours from my home) to start going north for just two weeks June 11th. I will post a list of my equipment and all here soonest. Hope you folks will weigh in. Using J. Leys maps and Wolf books. Will be going lighter then I ever have before in backpacking. Will come home after 15 days. Work for a week or two and return to where I left off to carry on for another two weeks. I wonder what the weather will be like in NM in June from border North? I wonder how far I'll get. (No schedule, no nothing - vacation). Going solo. I'll bet water will be harder to find during June. Or is it the rainy season?
:sun :banana :welcome:-? -Chaplain (formerly SunnyWalker)

WoW1!! In June..That is going to be a scorcher..I hiked some of Big Bend in the Summer. Not again..I will wait till Fall or Spring, early Spring at that. Good luck, besides the heat, could be a fantastic trip!!

SunnyWalker
05-15-2010, 21:59
I usually do my hiking in Big Bend in the Spring. The hot season in Chi desert really starts in Aug, July though I know it will be warm. Rainy season not til later. It'll be fun. Probably won' see to many folk. Not using GPS, just map and compass. I am waiting right now on the Wolf books. I am going to try to find a place in Amarillo that will print the Ley maps of NM on maybe larger then 8 1/2 by 11. Like the size of a regular topo map.

SunnyWalker
05-15-2010, 22:01
I might bump a GPS unit ahead and pick the box up the second week. If I am doing fine I was thinking then I'd just send it home. The only toy I have so far is a 9.2 oz set of Brunton Binocs.

SunnyWalker
05-23-2010, 21:24
This date is getting closer and it is still a go. Starting to gather food.

fiddlehead
05-23-2010, 21:39
I think one of the biggest problems in NM besides water availibity, is: finding shade.
I would think about one of those umbrella hats or at the least, a big straw hat (but tie it down to your chin for wind)
There will be almost no shade.
I have gotten used to hiking in the heat. It takes more water and a slower pace, but my body is now used to it.

I wouldn't venture out of a shady spot between noon and about 4 PM if I were doing this.
And if possible, make that shady spot near water. And drink lots of it while you are sitting/lying there for 4 hours after cooking your main meal of the day and relaxing.
Good luck.

Connie
05-25-2010, 14:11
This is pretty cool:

HyperKewl Evaporative Cooling insert for Baseball Cap (http://www.gofastandlight.com/HyperKewl-Evaporative-Cooling-insert-for-Baseball-Cap/productinfo/CL-T-KEWL/)
Camo Evaporative Cooling Headband (http://www.gofastandlight.com/Camo-Evaporative-Cooling-Headband/productinfo/C-6536/)
Evaporative Cooling Sun Activity Hat (http://www.gofastandlight.com/Evaporative-Cooling-Sun-Activity-Hat/productinfo/CL-BBSUN/)
BluBandoo Cooling Neckband - Evaporative Cool Effect (http://www.gofastandlight.com/BluBandoo-Cooling-Neckband-Evaporative-Cool-Effect/productinfo/CL-BBNECK/)

Quest Outdoor Fabrics has the cooling product "Crystal Cool" (http://www.questoutfitters.com/miscelaneous-cart.htm#CRYSTAL%20COOL) you can sew in a pocket you have.

PolarWrap insoles (http://polarwrap.com/default.aspx?pid=1&sid=37&show=) are supposed to insulate your feet, including insulating from the desert sand heat.

SunnyWalker
05-25-2010, 23:33
Thanks for all the tips and etc.! If you'd like to follow my "journal" and see a gear list go to postholer.com There my user name is my old "SunnyWalker". My list of gear is generic. If you wish to know what brand somethng is or the maker email me. Otherwise it is like this: "stove" for Pocket Rocket stove. I felt that a journal does not really belong here on WB. It's not really a journal thingy. Please read and let me know. Thanks.

Dogwood
05-26-2010, 00:31
Interesting products Connie for the hot desert hiker.

I'm guessing the co-polymer powders/crystals mentioned are similiar to what I use in the landscaping industry. I buy them at the big box home stores under names like Moisture Miser. The size I get look like coarse rock salt. They work by absorbing H2O molecules, expanding considerably to resemble clear pieces of Jello, and then release the water over an extended period of time. I mix the crystals into backfill soil when planting trees, shrubs, flower containers, and vegetable gardens to extend the periods between waterings.

It never dawned on me that the crystals or powderized forms of the crystals could be embedded or encased in clothing for their cooling effect.

Connie
05-27-2010, 08:35
That is what it looks like. Quest Outdoor Products is selling it. Here is their neckerchief pattern instructions: http://www.questoutfitters.com/tips_and_hints.htm#INSTRUCTIONS:%20CRYSTAL%20%20%2 0%20%20COOL%20NECKERCHIEF recommending supplex fabric and 2 teaspoons!

I think it may well be the same thing. I know it works. A bicycle racer told me he puts it in his bicycle cap. Before that he soaked a fat cabbage leaf, or several. I am not kidding.

He is a professional bicycle racer, in the veterans class now.


EDIT: The agricultural product is not the same: explanation here (http://www.kooltie.com/polymer.html).

SunnyWalker
05-27-2010, 08:54
Decided to not send ahead the GPS Unit. Don't need it and don't want to lug it with me. It is one repetitive piece of equipment.

Connie
05-27-2010, 09:06
Maybe "lug" some "Crystal Cool" product?

SunnyWalker
05-27-2010, 09:09
One won't stay cool in the Chi. You just work with it, smartly. Take L-o-n-g lunches and get a beauty rest during the stop. If you can make yourself stop hiking-that's the hard part. I hope you'll go to postholer.com and look over my equpment list and journal. It's under my trail name: "SunnyWalker". Love to receive any comments you might have.

Sly
05-27-2010, 14:39
Weather for Columbus, NM

91F | C (http://www.google.com/setprefs?fheit=0&sig=0_AjvH1nSfwtK42COsDK9ona0z3cI=&prev=http://www.google.com/search%3Fsource%3Dig%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1G1GGLQ_ENU S248%26q%3Dcolumbus,%2Bn%2Bm%2Bweather%26aq%3Df%26 aqi%3D%26oq%3D%26gs_rfai%3DC_dWlH7z-S9zhEJ-yMeqlscUHAAAAqgQFT9Ag3Tc&ei=H7z-S5DkJMH68AaemeXBDQ&sa=X&oi=iweather&ct=tu&ved=0CBIQwwQ)
Current: Sunny
Wind: S at 11 mph
Humidity: 17%


Thu
http://www.google.com/images/weather/partly_cloudy.gif
94F | 64F
Fri
http://www.google.com/images/weather/partly_cloudy.gif
92F | 63F
Sat
http://www.google.com/images/weather/partly_cloudy.gif
92F | 59F
Sun
http://www.google.com/images/weather/partly_cloudy.gif
94F | 59F
Detailed forecast: The Weather Channel (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.weather.com/weather/local/88029%3Fpar%3Digoogle%26site%3Dwww.google.com%26pr omo%3Dcurrrentconditions%26cm_ven%3Digoogle%26cm_c at%3Dwww.google.com%26cm_pla%3Dforecastpage%26cm_i te%3DCityPage&ei=H7z-S5DkJMH68AaemeXBDQ&sa=X&oi=iweather&ct=dl&cd=1&ved=0CBMQrAUoAA&usg=AFQjCNErCHrMt6SjmQGBr-VykhnYO5Oymg)

Connie
05-27-2010, 16:45
Okay, I read your gear list smarty.

Chi? Let's see, chinese chi energy?

The things I mentioned are for evaporative cooling: soak, cools by evaporative cooling more effective than simply wetting the cloth flap on the back of the hat, if you ever did that.

The only high desert experience I have had has all been good.

I am trying out this stuff, because it is cheap, lightweight, and because it is supposed to provide the evaporative cooling much longer.

I wore my neckerchief to REI, today, just to make a fashion statement.

Connie
05-27-2010, 17:08
I carry the Brunton BAK-4 monocular, instead of the heavier binocular.

I have never carried 50' of rope or 10' of clothesline. I use two different weights of lightweight spectra (also known as dyneema) I purchase at West Marine, but can be purchased online over at Hammock Forum. I did have to learn knots that do not slip out of it.

Nylon supplex is great fabric for hot weather.

I always have an inner windshirt available and the supplex nylon long pants because it can be windy. I wear an oversize nylon supplex fisherman's shirt with ventilation netting in the side panels for hot country, but I also like an oversize shirt made of rayon. I wear an open highly breatheable knit-weave silk camisole, for modesty: I am a girl. Men like cotton string "muscle" t-shirts or those string strap deep neck opening t-shirts to sweat into and have evaporative cooling happening inside the ventilation netting over-size "fisherman's shirt". Otherwise, the evaporation of sweat is all "insensible" water loss.

Insensible water loss is sneaky dangerous: dehydration sneaks up and overtakes you with a little disorientation and silliness (giddiness). Then, it gets worse, because your judgement is impaired. The practical definition of impaired judgement is: you do not know your judgement is impaired.

Remember: to drink water on purpose.

Did anyone say lotion, with SPF?

I have something to cover my mouth, nose and face (and eyes, like full wrap sunglasses) for blown sand. If really bad, I shelter. I think my OR bug bivy could be more lightweight and breatheable on the solid side, but I like it best for most other places I travel. It keeps the crawlies out. I have flopped it over and put the solid side up to cover up as much as possible, propping it off me a bit and leaving a small place to breathe well.

I like the Sawyer in-line filter because it can be used as an in-line gravity filter, used as a drinking straw, and it can be backflushed. I don't know if the Sweetwater filter you have can be backflushed, but some "available" water is real yucky. Prefilter, a lot.

I don't carry a memo pad and pencil. I carry laminated emergency instructions to pin to my outer clothing, if I am impaired like going semi-conscious or like that. Hasn't happened.

I use the Silva wrist compass, to avoid fumbling around, but many people are happy with the zipper-pull model with the thermometer on it. I have that one, too, but I usually go places I want the zipper-pull model compass with the windchill chart on the back.

edit: I use the Suunto M-9 Wrist Compass, review (http://www.trailspace.com/gear/suunto/m-9-wrist-compass/) here. I think both brands are same, however I have had this compass since it first came out. I think the Silva is under license. I only need more compass on the ocean.

SunnyWalker
05-27-2010, 18:09
Thanks Connie. I'll probably cut the rope down. It's real lightweight small rope, I can't remember the diameter (prob 1/8), nylon. Used for bear bagging and I'll prob bounce a head of me. I have tried out different binoculars and this will be the first trip for these. If you read my equip list I think I have on there a tube of sun tan lotion.
Sly-hey those links are great! Thanks.
My only regret so far is I wish I could change my pack for a lighter one. It weighs 7 bldg., so I am behind from the start. I love the old thing but can't get another right now. Next year though for sure.
Keeping cool in the desert like the Chi (my abbreviation for the Chihuahan (sp?) desert) is a combo of light clothing, covering up, sun tan lotion, hat, wetness, and cunsumable water.
connie the Sweetwater filter system has been around quite a while. The One cleans the filter after each operation. I believe this helps it to last longer.

SunnyWalker
05-27-2010, 20:01
OK-no 15 ft clothesline! I can use rocks or bushes and etc., as a clothesline. The 50 ft., rope is for bear bagging. I will bounce it ahead as there are not many trees out north of Columbus for awhile.

Connie
05-27-2010, 20:52
I meant I couldn't tell the model Sweetwater you have.

The marked water resupply points on the CDT have been reported, and photographed, to be really gross: cow-water is a polite term and better than some out there. For example, filthy water in what looks like an abandoned tractor tire.

Re-consider more pre-filter, than their Prefilter, the Siltstopper and the Sweetwater filter brush.

I know I had a Sweetwater filter system and the pre-filter.

I would pre-filter the pre-filter with a totally expendable bandana, or better, strong and tough coffee filters. But a small amount of powdered alum will settle out solids, if you can have water "stand" in a dirty water container overnight.

The cooling product I mentioned is by wetting and it evaporates slowly, so slowly apparently it outlasts other passive evaporative cooling.

I found another brand, Kool Tie (http://www.kooltie.com/index.html) and REI has it.

fiddlehead
05-27-2010, 20:54
OK-no 15 ft clothesline! I can use rocks or bushes and etc., as a clothesline. The 50 ft., rope is for bear bagging. I will bounce it ahead as there are not many trees out north of Columbus for awhile.

You can use barbed wire fencing as a washline.
There is always one handy on the CDT in NM.

Also, not a bad idea to carry a piece of Tyvek to hand on this fencing to create yourself some shade sometimes.

SunnyWalker
05-29-2010, 22:27
Thanks Fiddle. I just ordered a ULA Catalyst Backpack. Wow, get a load of this-from 7 lb. pack to a 48 oz pack! Hey, hey, hey, I'm starting to like this lighter thingy!

SunnyWalker
05-29-2010, 22:37
Oh, by the way-I use a (sorry cannot remember tech name) pre-filter filter on the Sweetwater. It kinda looks like a cylindrical anchor. I am also planning on coffee filters to wrap around it. Had a lot of rain this year out there. One other change is my long sleeve shirt is a silk shirt.
Someone mentioned hiking Big Bend in Summer . . . . Summer is kind of the down season there. I'd go in the Spring or Fall. There is always winter too. I have been down there at Thanksgiving and it was terrific. T-shirt weather. Just remember if you hike in BB-need to carry water, at least a gallon a day per person.
Sleeping out in BB under the stars has got to marvel anything I have ever done. BB is unique-it is the only Nat'l Park with its own self contained Mtn range. It is the least visited of all Nat'l Parks.
thanks one an all-Chaplain (SunnyWalker on Postholer.com)

SunnyWalker
05-29-2010, 22:39
Oh sorry-I wanted to mention Jonathan Ley's maps. I printed all of NM on 11X17 inch paper. Wow, pretty neat. That and the guidebooks I am figuring will do me for NM as far as I am going to get on this trip. -Chaplain (Sunnywalker on Postholer.com)

SunnyWalker
06-01-2010, 03:59
Another neat thing happened. My wife and I have been looking in local thrift stores for a silk shirt. I pretty much gave up last week, I mean who in Amarillo TX buys long sleeved silk shirts!??!?!! Well . . . lo and behold my wife found one! It only cost a couple of bucks! Talk about lightweight! Great for warm weather and for coverage of arms and etc.

SunnyWalker
06-10-2010, 17:12
Leaving here for Columbus will be there tomorrow (6/11/10). Take care all. Thanks for the help.

fiddlehead
06-10-2010, 20:17
I don't know how good silk is in warm weather.
Silk keeps you warm. (not cool)
Let us know how that works out for you.

Nean
06-10-2010, 21:01
I picked up a long sleeve silk shirt on our hike- in Cuba- Fh. Worked great, though it was white and a womans. :o

fiddlehead
06-10-2010, 21:14
I agree that silk is a great material.
Strong and warm for it's weight and stylish too.
I just never heard of people using it to keep cool.
They don't here in Thailand and that is where much of the silk comes from.

I agree that it is a great coverup for your arms.
You retain more moisture when covered and white is best to keep the sun off of you.
But he claims it is great for warm weather. That's where I disagree.

fiddlehead
06-10-2010, 21:15
If I remember right, you have some pretty good silk long johns too Nean.

Nean
06-10-2010, 21:23
I agree that silk is a great material.
Strong and warm for it's weight and stylish too.
I just never heard of people using it to keep cool.
They don't here in Thailand and that is where much of the silk comes from.

I agree that it is a great coverup for your arms.
You retain more moisture when covered and white is best to keep the sun off of you.
But he claims it is great for warm weather. That's where I disagree.

Well it was summer when I wore mine and I didn't overheat. It was very thin and loose(and didn't last to long) but it felt great and cool.

Those silk long johns I got from you are warm but fit tight and I use as a base layer. Light yet warm!

Dogwood
06-10-2010, 21:51
Have a great hike Chappy. Don't get torched out there in NM.

I'd say I'd buy you a cold one when I saw you, because I'll be on the CDT in less than 2 wks too , but I'll be about 2600 miles north in Glacier/Waterton NPs heading SOBO in patchy snow and ice.

Nean
06-11-2010, 18:39
I might be around Pagosa some this summer. When I am, I do have a free hostel for hikers.:)

SunnyWalker
10-01-2010, 22:05
Yeeeeeaaaaaah . . . . well. the silk shirt felt fine though the weather was hot. But it did not last long. Too lightweight and all. Had fun. The pack worked out great. It was neat to use. Saw a rattlesnake right in the trail where I was. I came close to walking into it. Can't say I was close to stepping on it. I stopped before I got that close. I can't rememer the name of the type it was right now. Sorry. Seemeed big-about 1 foot in diameter and 20 feet long! (smile). About 3 feet long and over an inch thick, maybe two inches or little less. It was green with white rings on its tail. I'll have to look at my trail notes, but I think it had two of these rings. It was so green it stood out. Many the thing reared up and hissed at me real good and then moved to the side of the road. I am glad I had seen it cuz it curled up in launch mode and wiggled its tail. I could not really hear the rattles. I threw six rocks its way before it moved off. Whew. Fun city. Ha, ha, the only thing i could think of (and I guess this shows my age) was the medical bill I'd have if It got to me!

SunnyWalker
12-03-2010, 23:59
OK, it was a Mojave Rattlesnake-so claimed two ranchers that I met a few days later.

garlic08
12-04-2010, 09:41
OK, it was a Mojave Rattlesnake-so claimed two ranchers that I met a few days later.

Holy crap! You saw a Mojave Green? You lucky dog--lucky that you are alive, too. That is often regarded as the most toxic snake in this hemisphere. I've only seen one, behind glass, at the Desert Museum in Tucson. Count yourself lucky for that unique encounter.

SunnyWalker
12-09-2010, 22:22
Yeah, I was told they are real aggressive. Will chase you down the trail etc. I did not have that experience. But like I said he reared up with open mouth hissing and all. I was real surprised and the color of the snake was quite striking. I remember thinking that the color was not what I expected, and green???? That seemed way off. What is funny is that I ended up camping only about 50 feet from where I saw the snake.

SunnyWalker
04-29-2012, 19:32
Okay, now its April 2013 and a year from now I wish to being the thru hike of his wonderful "trail". I just hope I don't meet up with any more Mojave Rattlesnakes as I will start over again at the (this time) official start of the CDT (Geronimo marker here I come).

SunnyWalker
07-08-2012, 19:10
It is now July 8, 2013 and I am planning on starting either NB in April (2013) or in July SB from the North. Some changes: No more silk shirts in the heat. I honestly did not feel hot in the shirt but it was so lightweight it ripped on the 3rd day. Ditched the Binocs. Love to have them but every ounce counts. Caldera Cone but will use Pocket Rocket in CO if I have to (currently alcohol stoves banned I guess). I gave away my Walmart hiking poles and now have two ski poles from an Amarillo Thrift Store I bought for $3.00 -perfect height. There was plenty of water while I was out (in the stock tanks) and shade was available once in a while. The stars were bright.

Sly
07-08-2012, 19:45
Up in the higher altitudes may be a good bet now, around Mt Taylor or San Pedro Parks Wilderness. Here's one of me north of San Pedro Parks. (the tent is a 2nd gen NomadLite)

16515

If you're speaking of a thru-hike, leaving too early in April will get you to southern Colorado, when there's still a ton of snow. Lots miss the Weminuche Wilderness because of it, which is arguably the best part of Colorado. First week of May is a better date. It should get you to Colorado mid June, with less snow. You'll have to beat feet from there but after a couple weeks in CO, you'll be ready to go.

If you mozy a round and take your time through NM, you may be OK, but seriously, unless it's a real low snow year in CO, if it looks like you're going to get to soCO before mid June, slow down even further.

SunnyWalker
07-10-2012, 15:06
Thanks, Sly. If I go NB, May it is. And yes, I am speaking of a thru hike. Looks like you had a real nice camp spot in that photo. Neato. Nothing like it, is there?

SunnyWalker
10-18-2012, 20:58
Oct 2012 and all systems are still go for May of 2013, NB on CDT.

SunnyWalker
02-24-2013, 16:53
OK, RESURRECTION THREAD TIME!!! I am moving out onto the CDT this April 15-20 (2013) to take on the CDT NOBO. For all you CDTers, maybe I'll see you down the trail. What I did hike that is referred to in this thread was awesome. Awfully beautiful. Will now walk the official CDT route. Using Bearcreek maps with waypoints.