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nawlunz
07-11-2010, 21:22
2nd pair of sneakers while also wearing boots? I've read a lot about the "camp sandals", and great idea to off load the feet at night...but, on western trails where you have to cross streams that may be ankle to knee deep, to be honest, I find myself switching to an old pair of sneakers in order to keep the boots dry...and those serve as my "camp shoes"...I hate the weight of the sneakers, almost two pounds...but what choice is there..

What does everyone else do when there are obvious water crossings on your trek?

10-K
07-11-2010, 21:33
What does everyone else do when there are obvious water crossings on your trek?

Non-goretex trail runners and keep moving. Walk 'em dry.

burger
07-11-2010, 21:59
Non-goretex trail runners and keep moving. Walk 'em dry.
Ditto. Trail runners dry fast and aren't uncomfortable to walk in when they're wet.

I know it's sort of scary to go from the perceived comfort and safety of boots, but hiking in trail runners is better in every respect. Give it a try.

DLANOIE
07-11-2010, 23:04
I hike primarily in trail runners, even in the dead of winter with 5 feet of snow. When it comes to fording, I wear crocs and they make excellent camp shoes. Worth there weight to me.

garlic08
07-11-2010, 23:55
Ditto the above. Wear the sneakers and you won't need camp shoes or water shoes.

Mike Way
07-12-2010, 09:29
I love the trail runners and they do dry quickly but I have wally world croc knockoffs that are great around the camp.

ki0eh
07-12-2010, 10:01
In PA where the rocks in the footway make for heavy boot country then if there's a stream crossing the ten year old Tevas get strapped to the pack. Sometimes the rocks in the streambed are sharp too. :D

bigcranky
07-12-2010, 10:55
Trail runners for hiking, Waldies clogs for camp (old version of Crocs.) In the summer, a light pair of flip flops.

I've tried leaving the camp shoes at home to save weight, and every time I do that I miss them.

SGT Rock
07-12-2010, 10:59
I'm the opposite. I started hiking in the 70's using boots and carrying running shoes for camp shoes. When I started wearing runners for hiking I figured why bring a second pair of shoes? I wear them gangsta' style in camp.

In 2008 I ended up letting people talk me into taking some camp shoes on my thru-hike (attempt) and I found I never wanted or needed them despite carrying them for 800 miles. I think in 800 miles I could count the times I used them on one hand and have change left over - and the times I did use them, the thought was "I brought these darn things, I guess I better use them at some point to justify bringing them."

trailangelbronco
07-12-2010, 11:03
I bring a pair of Sanucks for Wading/camp shoes. They are very light, and are much more stable than flip flops.

Ender
07-12-2010, 11:07
I use these for camp shoes...
http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=901

I used them on the PCT, and they worked great for river crossings as well. Surprisingly durable. One pair lasted me the 1000+ miles I hikes.

I didn't always use them for river crossings, some times I'd just hike through in my boots and wear them wet. But usually I'd change into the camp shoes for the crossings... just depended on my mood for the day. Usually I looked forward to the small break that changing shoes provided.

Llama Legs
07-12-2010, 11:13
Easy enough to live without a second pair of footwear. With that said, I'm known in the shelters for my one-pound, totally non-waterproof houndstooth slippers. It's part of my comfortable "Dean Martin" image... :cool:

Kerosene
07-12-2010, 11:23
I use these for camp shoes...
http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=901
I tried these for one AT section but there is so little padding underfoot that any rock or root I encountered was uncomfortable. They were great "shelter slippers" though, and weighed about 4 ounces total for a men's size 10 if I recall.

Ender
07-12-2010, 13:04
I tried these for one AT section but there is so little padding underfoot that any rock or root I encountered was uncomfortable. They were great "shelter slippers" though, and weighed about 4 ounces total for a men's size 10 if I recall.

Yeah, not sure if I'd hike in them, but for river crossings they worked well for me. And had better grip than my boots on the wet river rocks too.

Mine weighed in at just about 2 ounces for the pair, size 11. Super light.

couscous
07-12-2010, 13:48
I take a pair of LL Bean Explorer Sandals (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/63136?parentCategory=503401&feat=503401-tn&cat4=503381) .. sometimes as my camp/water footwear .. sometimes as my only footwear.

on_the_GOEZ
07-12-2010, 13:55
Wearing chacos for my 140 mile trip tomorrow. They will double as camp shoes and hiking shoes. No need to worry about water crossings...it will be dry here =/

Doctari
07-12-2010, 14:28
I carry what I use for "shower shoes" to avoid athletes foot & planter's warts in the showers. They also do double duty for in camp, but like Rock, I don't use them that often. Don't even use them crossing streams cause I fear they won't stay on in a flowing stream. If I can't rock hop, I'll stop & take off my socks, wade across & put the socks back on when the boots aren't full of water. If I have back-to-back stream crossings, I have been known to go sock-less all day. 14 thigh to knee deep streams in about 7.5 miles, boy were my toes wrinkled. Took 2 days, at home, for my boots to dry fully.

300winmag
09-12-2010, 15:31
This summer I backpacked Uta's Coyote Gulch, mostly in Coyote River (really a stream). I my light Merrill Moab Mid GTX boots spent 90% of the time on my pack while I wore some El Cheapo Walgreen's Croc-like sandals that I kept on W/ an added nylon strap and q-r buckle.

Worked great, they were feather light but held up to 5 days of hiking in the water & rocks. (One day of exploring was W/ the boots) My feet were fine with Thor-Lo Hiker socks in the plastic sandals. Amazingly the soles of the sandals held up fine too. Now they will be my "camp sandals" for easier trips. I won't haul them up my western mountains or the Grand Canyon trails though! And for future water trips I will try my new Merrill Moab Ventilator low cut trail shoes.

Eric

Mongoose2
09-12-2010, 18:35
On longer hikes I use Croc like slip-ons also bought at Walgreens. Cost like $4.00 weighs nearly nothing, clips to the back of my pack. It feels good at the end of the day to change out.

Windcatcher
09-12-2010, 18:47
Low-cut hikers with good socks, gaiters when necessary, and Crocs for water crossings and camp shoes. Combined they weigh less than or only just as much as a pair of hiking boots and cover all types of terrain & needs.

Old Grouse
09-12-2010, 18:48
I don't get Crocs. Do you people all have wide feet like the AFLAC duck?

Mongoose2
09-12-2010, 18:53
I don't get Crocs. Do you people all have wide feet like the AFLAC duck?

That's why I got the slip on type, it molds to my foot and stays on. The Crocs, dont stay on tight enough for my liking.

SouthMark
09-12-2010, 19:01
I have always carried a pair of Crocs knockoffs for camp and water crossings. For doing the 100 mile wilderness last month I left them at home to save weight. Just used my trail runners. For water crossings I just took off my socks and removed the insoles. Never felt like I had wet feet. Wore them unlaced in camp. Never missed the Crocs.

ZeroLozen
09-13-2010, 12:27
Agreed on trail runners...i just go with a pair of crocs

Mismatch
09-29-2010, 17:29
I'm a fan of my vibram five finger classics. Light weight, great for creek crossings and wearing around camp. The downside of course is the price. I bought them originally for running but they double as my go to camp shoes.

Don H
09-29-2010, 20:40
I always carry Crocs, it worth the 10 oz. they weigh for the comfort after hiking all day. In the event that my trail runners would have a failure the Crocs can do duty as hiking shoes. Ask Phoenix, he thru hiked in Crocs.

sbhikes
09-30-2010, 14:16
Non-goretex trail runners and keep moving. Walk 'em dry.
Me, too, plus sometimes I hike in sandals. I hiked an 80 mile portion of the JMT in sandals (during a snow-free time of year--August).

But if you are married to the idea of camp shoes, Crocs (knockoffs) are good.

Nean
09-30-2010, 14:39
I like the croc.:eek:
in winter the ones w/o holes.:-?

Fastest drying shoe in the world- i'm pretty sure.:confused:

Easy on / off. W/ strap they stay on. Never freeze. lighter than sandals and comfortable. easily worn with socks- unlike flipflops. Cheap. last/love you long time:)

max patch
09-30-2010, 14:47
Back when I wore boots I took a pair of running shoes as my camp shoe.

Now that I hike in running shoes I don't see the need for a camp shoe.

Wags
10-10-2010, 00:56
i hated crocs, they hurt my feet. so i wear a pair of toeless nike sandals. they are nice, comfy, and light

yari
10-10-2010, 08:50
I don't get Crocs. Do you people all have wide feet like the AFLAC duck?

Well, yes, actually I do. :D

Cookerhiker
10-10-2010, 15:16
If I'm facing rocky stream crossings e.g. Maine, I bring Keens with closed-toe fronts to protect the feet. Othewise, it's croc knockoffs.

jethro
10-11-2010, 10:59
I had the same problem with fit until I found a pair of "offroad" crocs on sale. The back strap is attached with velcro, so it's adjustable. They're definitely my go-to camp shoes now.

phobos
10-11-2010, 15:23
i hated crocs, they hurt my feet. so i wear a pair of toeless nike sandals. they are nice, comfy, and light


I like my crocs :D

sbhikes
10-11-2010, 15:32
I don't get Crocs. Do you people all have wide feet like the AFLAC duck?


Well, yes, actually I do. :D

Me, too.

I actually made a tracing of my foot and compared it to the outline of a sole of a sandal and the toe area of my foot hangs over by close to an inch. That certainly explains a whole lot of the foot misery I've experienced over my lifetime.

Tinker
10-11-2010, 19:03
I have always carried a pair of Crocs knockoffs for camp and water crossings. For doing the 100 mile wilderness last month I left them at home to save weight. Just used my trail runners. For water crossings I just took off my socks and removed the insoles. Never felt like I had wet feet. Wore them unlaced in camp. Never missed the Crocs.


Smart man, this one.:)

Appalachian Tater
10-11-2010, 20:36
Use 99 cent beach flip flops. They are light, durable if you reinforce the hole for the piece that goes between your toes with duct tape, allow your feet to air out, and make great shower shoes in some of the nasty showers along the trail if you are prone to athlete's foot.

Big Dawg
12-24-2010, 11:22
.UGG Women's Delaine1886
http://www.shoeshoppingmall.com/productlist.asp?nsort_id=1698&class_id=48&sort_id=419
http://cid-b2adf4e715eb022c.photos.live.com/browse.aspx/UGG




http://lh4.ggpht.com/_xwuaqLTPSjU/TMaxvQfEpSI/AAAAAAAAAKc/n684LrWawEA/3.jpg



http://www.shoeshoppingmall.com
MSN: [email protected]
E-mail: [email protected]
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Skype:ailsachen08
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Uhhhh,,, is someone trying to market their business or what? Newbie... :rolleyes:

Can you see it now,,, someone cruising the AT in the above boots. What a hoot!!

skinewmexico
12-24-2010, 11:28
Boots? Nah. A pound on the feet equals..............

10-K
12-24-2010, 11:36
I've been hiking around in my trail runners through snow and slush the past few weeks and a pair of goretex socks over merino mid-weight hikers really is the ticket.

My feet stay dry and warm no matter how wet my shoes get.

Sugarfoot
12-24-2010, 12:40
I carry a pair of New Balance sliders -- 9.6 oz for the pair, which I think is lighter than Crocs that don't work on my narrow feet anyway. They are a luxury, for town and for getting up at night to pee without having to struggle getting my feet into wet shoes.

Pioneer Spirit
12-24-2010, 17:33
I typically wear mid-top boots so that the lacing will keep the shoes from sliding around on my heels but I carried a mesh-sided sneaker from Wal-Mart that I wore for many miles on the North-South LBTL trail. Typical of many stores, the model was only out for about a year and can no longer be found.

I found most of PA's LHHT too rocky for anything other than ankle support boots.

A replacement for the mesh shoes was a closed toe sandal that got a big workout this year across the top of Ohio on the BT in the wet spring. I found that while they dry quickly, they seem to pick up every rock and stick that ends up inside under my feet. I only got blisters after getting wet boots so I carry them. Came in handy wading across the old canal. The sometimes give tired feet a break when alternating between the two on a long walk

Doc Mike
12-25-2010, 08:09
Crocs no socks its nice to let the feet breath.

doc mike

Rocket Jones
12-25-2010, 09:03
I have both crocs and a pair of cheap flip flops that weigh almost nothing. I'll take either of those, or sometimes nothing at all. Depends on if I know what the trail is like, the weather or just a whim.

Llama Legs
12-25-2010, 10:01
For last several years I've been using houndstooth slippers...

TheChop
12-25-2010, 11:08
http://www.extremecostumes.com/COMBAT-208c.jpg

I like to strap on a nice set of these after a good long hike. Sure they're five pounds a piece but you can't beat comfort!


No seriously I bought some cheap o water/shower shoes at Academy. They worked well but wore out after about three weeks of hiking.

Wise Old Owl
12-25-2010, 11:53
I take a pair of LL Bean Explorer Sandals (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/63136?parentCategory=503401&feat=503401-tn&cat4=503381) .. sometimes as my camp/water footwear .. sometimes as my only footwear.

I have hiked in simmilar Teva sandals some 80 + miles and they are great! I would look for something lighter for camp.- Although I have never carried a second pair.

Trailbender
01-01-2011, 17:33
I made a pair of camp shoes out of my old ridgerest and some paracord.

LoneRidgeRunner
01-01-2011, 18:15
Once when I was hiking in the GSMNP in June, which is extremely rare for me as I almost always hit the trails in the dead of Winter or at the latest early Spring, while going on a trout fishing trip from Clingman's Dome to Hazel Creek I was sitting on the far side of a stream replacing my crossing sneakers with my hiking boots there was a group of hikers came slosshing across the knee deep stream in their hiking boots. Then they complained about their boots being wet. LOL..They said "Our boots have been wet for 4 days and we can't get em dry." Well, duh.....your boots will never dry as long as you wear them crossing streams. At this elevation in the Smoky Mountains you cross a stream every 15 minutes or less and they were wondering why their feet were wet.
Some people may rather have wet feet than carry a 2 pound pair of sneakers and this is entirely up to the individuals but I just gotta keep my feet dry even if it means a few extra pounds and I'm certainy not gonna sit around my camp in wet shoes or boots in 0 degree weather which is my preferred hiking, camping weather.
I carry down booties for lounging around my camp to get out of the boots and let em air out. They weigh practically nothing for the comfort they provide at night. They're also good to sleep in if your feet get cold like mine do. I mean I can be in a 0 bag toasty warm from the knees up but if I don't wake up at least once a night with cold feet I would think I had died...lol..

fanlynne
02-09-2011, 22:13
Low-cut hikers with good socks, gaiters when necessary, and Crocs for water crossings and camp shoes. Combined they weigh less than or only just as much as a pair of hiking boots and cover all types of terrain & needs.
What you said is really reasonable.........i can't agree with you more.......

maybe clem
02-09-2011, 23:11
Waldies for stream crossings and camp, trail runners for hiking.

mweinstone
02-10-2011, 06:53
weather i bring crocks or not, i cross water in my boots. and in the winter, but with sox removed. safty first.

hikerinnc
02-11-2011, 00:00
ok, gore tex socks with my trail runners sounds like a awesome idea for winter. Where is the best place to obtain some gore tex socks?

Spirit Walker
02-11-2011, 00:07
I have a pair of lightweight fake tevas I bought for $4 a decade ago. I wear them purely for camp and town, because I hate sitting around in wet shoes. For stream crossings I just wear whatever shoes/boots I'm wearing to hike. I usually hike in trailrunners these days, except in snow. I prefer leather boots for hiking in snow.

AUhiker90
02-11-2011, 00:16
A good pair of asics works well for me usually good for camp chores and i tend to avoid shelters so at the end of the day i just walk on the forest floor its like a massage.

NiteRaven
02-12-2011, 06:03
I'm going to give these a try for water crossings and camp shoe:

http://shop.zemgear.com/round-toe-low/original-round-toe-high-black-black.html

Price: $30.
Weight: ~5oz for the pair.

Tenderheart
02-12-2011, 11:27
Ditto. Trail runners dry fast and aren't uncomfortable to walk in when they're wet.

I know it's sort of scary to go from the perceived comfort and safety of boots, but hiking in trail runners is better in every respect. Give it a try.


Now that's good advice. And you don't need extra camp shoes. You've been walking in them all day.

litefoot 2000

JohnEbner
02-13-2011, 04:53
I normally hike in a trail runner and use cheap flip flops for camp shoes. I don't usually have to worry about water crossings but have a trip planned that will have many. I plan on taking my Teva Hurricanes or an old pair of water shoes instead of flip flops.

RockDoc
03-23-2011, 01:20
I bought em, they're in my pack now! Seems like a good product for camp wear. Sort of like glorified socks with rubber soles, but that's good enough. Much better than the much esteemed VFF which I tried out, found unsuitable, and returned to REI.



I'm going to give these a try for water crossings and camp shoe:

http://shop.zemgear.com/round-toe-low/original-round-toe-high-black-black.html

Price: $30.
Weight: ~5oz for the pair.

PennyPincher
04-10-2011, 20:51
I'm a fan of my vibram five finger classics. Light weight, great for creek crossings and wearing around camp. The downside of course is the price. I bought them originally for running but they double as my go to camp shoes.


I love my VFFs. I own 2 pair. 1 for summer - no room for socks and 1 for winter - larger pair with room for socks. Trying to decide which pair I will bring next weekend. Thinking winter pair.

88BlueGT
04-18-2011, 15:03
I used to bring a pair of LW slipper/shoe kind of deals but after realizing that I only used them once or twice in over a year I ditched them. I'm talking about regular trips though, not multiple week trips, river crossings, etc. Than I may bring an extra pair depending on what you wear while you hike.