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View Full Version : Under armor cold weather spandex as wicking layer?



no name20
08-11-2010, 16:59
Hello all, first time posting and a recent member but Iíve been stalking the site for awhile. Iíve tried searching previous postings to see if this specific question has already been answered but could not find it so please if I am simply repeating another thread direct me toward it. I rowed in college and already own a bunch of spandex gear I was hoping to use in my thru hike but wanted some experienced back packers take on this specific clothing item: Full length under armor cold gear bottoms 64% nylon, 22% polyester, 14% elastane I am planning to start late March/ early April and this clothing (and only this clothing as a single layer) kept me warm while soaking wet in snow and hail storms on the water. But I know thereís a big difference on the trail when you canít stand under a warm shower after you are chilled to the bone. Anyone with personal experience using this item? Let me know what you think.

Manwich
08-11-2010, 17:03
I certainly do not hike with any of it on, but I settle down in the evening with it, sometimes. Usually, you'll keep yourself warm whilst moving.

BigFoot2002
08-11-2010, 17:31
I found the heavier underarmor to be the best thing to wear while hiking in a cold rain.
It almost seems like a thin wetsuit.

BigFoot2002
08-11-2010, 17:36
Re-reading the post, the OP mentions the bottoms. I was referring to the tops.
My rain suit I use while in the rain, not hiking. Warmer rains I hike in polypro short sleeve shirt and shorts.

Cabin Fever
08-11-2010, 17:51
I have used UA Cold Gear many times and found it to be fantastic while moving, but insufficient while not moving. My personal favorite has become Patagonia's Capilene products which keep me warm, moving or still, and weight much less.

Tinker
08-11-2010, 18:15
I have used UA Cold Gear many times and found it to be fantastic while moving, but insufficient while not moving. My personal favorite has become Patagonia's Capilene products which keep me warm, moving or still, and weight much less.

And here's the rub. For a layer to wick, it must be absorbent (or treated with a chemical that is, or knit in a way which makes the most of water's cohesion). If it is absorbent it gets damp. If it gets damp and it's against your skin in cold weather and you have insufficient insulation on top you will get chilled. Wool works for me because it has hollow fibers. Some manmade fibers are hollow, too, but, for whatever reason, they don't seem to be as warm when they are damp. The upside to manmade stuff is that it seems to absorb less water than wool, so it's lighter, ounce for ounce, when wet. Why wool is warmer is a mystery to me. I've only tried Underarmour socks, which are soft but become damp rather easily.

Tinker
08-11-2010, 18:18
As an aside, weight is a noun, weigh (or weighs) is the verb (something I see here quite frequently).

mudhead
08-12-2010, 11:14
]I have used UA Cold Gear many times and found it to be fantastic while moving, but insufficient while not moving.
Agree. But great when moving. Useless when sitting.

My personal favorite has become Patagonia's Capilene products which keep me warm, moving or still, and weight much less.
[/QUOTE]
If it fits it is good.

I like powerdry fabric.

Wrangler88
08-12-2010, 14:54
I use UA as a cold weather base layer. I used to wear it while I ran. It says don't use it above 55 degrees or so. I got super hot running in about 40 - 45 degrees. However, I did wear it every night in Maine during July and I still felt a little cold while sitting still.


So just echoing what others have said ... it's plenty/too warm while moving. Not quite as warm as I'd want while sitting around. Either way, I think it's fine in at least the 40's.

no name20
08-12-2010, 19:24
Thanks for all the advice. I plan to have a fleece and then rain layer so I think I'll be plenty insulated. Mostly just interested if it would serve ok to wick some sweat. Most of the time I was simply soaking wet in it so didn't know if it would function that way. Guess its time to try it out for myself this winter to simulate. I was hoping to save money by not buying special wicking gear and instead put that cash toward a good sleeping bag. Thanks for all the input!

mkmangold
08-13-2010, 01:30
Thanks for all the advice. I plan to have a fleece and then rain layer so I think I'll be plenty insulated. Mostly just interested if it would serve ok to wick some sweat. Most of the time I was simply soaking wet in it so didn't know if it would function that way. Guess its time to try it out for myself this winter to simulate. I was hoping to save money by not buying special wicking gear and instead put that cash toward a good sleeping bag. Thanks for all the input!

I use silk, wool, or bamboo as a base layer for wicking and warmth. Polypro makes me itch.