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nawlunz
08-20-2010, 19:39
for a ten day backpack trip and I will have no re-supply point!! So, I need lightweight items and some variety....I generally have gone with instant oatmeal or cream of wheat, or even granola with dehydrated milk....But, that gets old quick!!

Am I missing anything? Or, just limited on what I can take for this meal!!
The coffee idea is already included..

HELP!!

Hikes in Rain
08-20-2010, 20:01
Glad you remembered the coffee! One of my favorites is bacon cheese grits, with bacon. Oh, and cheese. Really sticks with you. I'll also take bagels (they don't crush easily and stay relatively fresh for a while) with summer sausage and cheese.

mateozzz
08-20-2010, 20:02
I've been doing the oatmeal thing like you for several section hikes and I think I'm going to try something else, too. It doesn't keep me full very long. At home I like Grape Nuts and I only need 1/2 cup to feel full and I feel full a long time. Kind of crunchy even in milk, so I think I'll try pouring in a little of my hot chocolate when on the trail.

John B
08-20-2010, 20:30
99% of my hiking breakfasts are (1) Starbucks Via Instant coffee mixed with Nestle's hot chocolate mix, and (2) protein bars, nearly always 2 peanut butter South Beach Diet bars.

HOWEVER, last year when I was doing my fall hike, I saw a lady pull out a ziplock baggie filled with Kellogg's Frosted Flakes and a correct amount of powdered milk. She added water, zipped the baggie closed, gave it a shake, opened it, and dug in with a spoon. That looked so damned good that I would have given her $20 for it if I thought she'd take it.

Edited to say that I never eat that type of food (junk cereal). Never. Not since I was maybe 8 yrs old. But somehow at the time, it looked incredibly delicious.

Tuckahoe
08-20-2010, 20:30
Not quite home made, but I do like cream chipped beef...

McCormick has a 2.64 ounce packet of "Original Country Gravy" mix that makes two cups. I like to spilt this up to use for two breakfasts.

Get a small jar of Hormel or Armour dried beef and take out however much you like, cut into quarters, then place into the mix.

To cook combine the mix, beef and 1 cup of water and bring to a boil and turn down to simmer until thickened. I like to pour over toast or biscuits that were toasted/cooked before the start of a trip.

Many Walks
08-20-2010, 20:37
I recently tried Earth Grains thin buns and believe they will be great for hiking because they're light and already flat. Add some pb&j to the buns with a cup of coffee and it's a quick and easy start for the day. A little twist taking a bit more cooking and time would be bacon or sausage, egg and cheese on the buns.

budforester
08-20-2010, 22:55
Grits with butter, bacon bits, or gravy
Couscous or rice can become a savory or sweet dish
Cereal, as John said, with milk (I like raisin bran and prefer Nido milk)
Frequent for me is peanut butter and honey on flour tortilla; also substitute Nutella, jelly, flavored or plain bagels; graham crackers fig newtons, other cookies (sometimes eaten with a spoon).

Tinker
08-20-2010, 23:02
I just tested several types of granola for the Hundred Mile Wilderness trip I did in 2008. I finally decided on the one with the highest caloric content per oz. I never got tired of it. I used dry Nido milk for the extra fat content and had it both cold and hot. A lack of variety won't kill you for a 10 day trip! :)

J5man
08-20-2010, 23:04
Hormel's precooked bacon will last a couple of days for variety. I've tried the mountain house dehydrated bacon and eggs dish and didn't care for it. Try a combination of all the suggestions you get for variety. I also do Clif Bars for breakfast when I don't want to cook.

Crotalus
08-20-2010, 23:19
as a substitute to the hot cocoa try something like Optimum Nutrition chocolate protein powder mixed with coffee, tastes like cappuccino and more nutritious that the hot chocolate

Old Hiker
08-20-2010, 23:20
Got a 6.5 inch IMUSA pan from Wally - used it to cook pancakes for the wife and me on our section hike. Used 1/2 of a large container of shake-and-pour pancake mix for both of us. Made about 8 pancakes. Pan did not need oil, just seasoning beforehand in the oven. Surprised her with real maple syrup, but that was VERY heavy. Pan wil also cook eggs really well. I used a Pocket-Rocket for the stove. I used a couple of jelly packs or honey packs per pancake. Nutella is good as well. I did the same thing with the flat breads as well, for lunch.

ChinMusic
08-21-2010, 01:01
Crushed Frosted Cinnamon Pop Tarts.

I guess that wasn't very original...........

slovakiasteph
08-21-2010, 01:14
I'll take any form of grain: oatmeal, bulgur, grits, cream of wheat. However, it's all about what you put in it: vary any type of dried fruit, cinnamon, brown sugar, dried milk, spices, jello mix, and of course, add a type of NUT for more protein. I have lots of recipes if you need some ideas. :)

BigFoot2002
08-21-2010, 10:54
I shave about a half inch of pepperoni into the salted water as I bring it to a boil for my grits. I use the blue label box, as I don't care for the price or texture of those grits that come in envelopes. I serve them with olive oil, which I use in my other foods also.

Lyle
08-21-2010, 11:00
Cup of coffee and any of the following:

- granola bar
- Carnation breakfast bar
- handful or two of gorp
- cookies
- pop tarts
- cheese and crackers
- salami and crackers
- peanut butter on a totilla
- fruit roll-ups
- etc.

My point is that more and more, my breakfast is the same as my snacks or lunch. The thing that distinguishes it is the cup of coffee!!!!!

There are no rules you have to follow, it's all energy.

daddytwosticks
08-21-2010, 18:04
Fried fruit pies (apple is my favorite). This may be a southern thing. Works great for the first morning or two. Also bring along a couple of hard boiled eggs for the first few days if it isn't too hot. :)

Country Roads
08-21-2010, 18:52
If you don't mind some home prep work, you can get really good recipes from a book called The Backpack Gourmet. The food, including some pretty awesome breakfasts, is homemade and then dehydrated. In camp you simply put in your pot add water, bring to a boil, turn off and let sit for about 5 minutes (book does not add the 5 minute stand time, but I have found that it is necessary for most foods).

I made up several meals for a GA section hike: Ate homemade lasagna, linguine in mushroom sauce, Grits, eggs and bacon (This one is very good!), etc.

Miner
08-21-2010, 19:46
You don't have to just eat granola ceral. Any high calorie type works. Many of us just eat cold Pop Tarts, danishes, or Hostess Fruit Pies for breakfast. Eat one as you are packing up or eat it while hiking on the trail can save some time when you want to get going in a hurry.

ChinMusic
08-21-2010, 19:53
You don't have to just eat granola ceral. Any high calorie type works. Many of us just eat cold Pop Tarts, danishes, or Hostess Fruit Pies for breakfast. Eat one as you are packing up or eat it while hiking on the trail can save some time when you want to get going in a hurry.
Many folks like the ritual of cooking breakfast. I don't. My group is generally faster than me and it works out just fine. They cook, have their coffee, while I'm gone. It's all good as they catch me by late morning or early afternoon. If it were the other way around I would never see them.....;)

I think folks first need to decide which camp they are in. Can they eat cold and move on or do they need the cooked breakfast, the hot coffee, or cocoa. I'm glad I prefer cold.

nawlunz
08-21-2010, 21:54
You don't have to just eat granola ceral. Any high calorie type works. Many of us just eat cold Pop Tarts, danishes, or Hostess Fruit Pies for breakfast. Eat one as you are packing up or eat it while hiking on the trail can save some time when you want to get going in a hurry.


I'm planning to do the JMT, so at least one segment has no resupply for over ten days...So, I would have thought pop tarts and other pastries would not be practical.

ChinMusic
08-21-2010, 22:00
I'm planning to do the JMT, so at least one segment has no resupply for over ten days...So, I would have thought pop tarts and other pastries would not be practical.
Pop Tarts pack pretty tight in a bear can. If you don't mind em broken up a bit they pack ever better.

A very efficient use of space are fajitas. If you can get em the same diameter as the can it's perfect.

Go comfort foods that are bulky for day 1 since day one doesn't have to go in the can.

Wise Old Owl
08-21-2010, 22:15
Granola
Hard boiled egg
All-Bran
Bran Buds
Grape Nuts
Instant Oatmeal
Quick Oatmeal
Cream of Wheat
Cream of Rice
Malt-o-Meal
Quick Cooking Cereal
Ralston
Roman Meal
Zoom
Wheat Hearts
Quick Grits
Quick Rice
Toasted Wheat Germ
English muffins
Muffin mix
Raisins
Dried fruit
Fruit leathers
Pancake mix (water only)
Honey
Jam-Jellies
Brown sugar
Butter Chilled in a small container
Meat or jerky
Canned bacon or Spam
Smoked sausage link
Eggs
Cheese
Dried hash browns
Instant dry milk (Carnation tastes best)
Non-dairy creamer
Instant Cocoa (just water)
Ovaltine
Instant Coffee
Powdered Spiced Apple Cider Drink
Tea or Tang
Knorrs Tomato/Basil powdered sauce mix & Parmesan cheese

apple /orange

Miner
08-22-2010, 00:16
The danishes should get eatten first. The same goes for those donut packages/boxes since they squish easy. Hostess Fruit Pies have a good shelf life, though don't let them get too squished or they may leak fruit filling out of the package

However, Pop Tarts are very practical. They sit on the shelf at the store for months! Why would a week in your pack be a problem? The worse thing that can happen is they get broken inside the package I've carried them on 10day supply sections in the Sierra Nevada without trouble. Actually, I carried them 80% of the time when I hiked the PCT without issues; even in the hot desert sections. And there are several flavors to choose from; choose the higher calorie ones and some of those new higher fiber versions.

nawlunz
08-22-2010, 09:22
The danishes should get eatten first. The same goes for those donut packages/boxes since they squish easy. Hostess Fruit Pies have a good shelf life, though don't let them get too squished or they may leak fruit filling out of the package

However, Pop Tarts are very practical. They sit on the shelf at the store for months! Why would a week in your pack be a problem? The worse thing that can happen is they get broken inside the package I've carried them on 10day supply sections in the Sierra Nevada without trouble. Actually, I carried them 80% of the time when I hiked the PCT without issues; even in the hot desert sections. And there are several flavors to choose from; choose the higher calorie ones and some of those new higher fiber versions.

had never given thought to bringing them backpacking because of the fact that my "perception" were that they were too bulky and would get crushed...So, it seems the reality of the situation from others is different from my perception. I am very happy to hear others do that, and will add poptarts to my list...to me, I would have never thought of that...THANKS

Lyle
08-22-2010, 09:36
had never given thought to bringing them backpacking because of the fact that my "perception" were that they were too bulky and would get crushed...So, it seems the reality of the situation from others is different from my perception. I am very happy to hear others do that, and will add poptarts to my list...to me, I would have never thought of that...THANKS


You do sometimes end up pouring the Pop Tart crumbs into your mouth from the Mylar pack, despite your best efforts. Does not affect the high nutritious value though. :D

Wise Old Owl
08-22-2010, 12:39
I've been doing the oatmeal thing like you for several section hikes and I think I'm going to try something else, too. It doesn't keep me full very long. At home I like Grape Nuts and I only need 1/2 cup to feel full and I feel full a long time. Kind of crunchy even in milk, so I think I'll try pouring in a little of my hot chocolate when on the trail.


Use two oatmeal packets - try not to mix them up. After making it dollup a spoon of Simply Fruit on top.

Ok some of you are worn out so here are other ideas

Assorted Deli Muffins
SCONES
Toasty Bagel & Cream Cheese ( Requires Radient Heat )
Cinnamon Buns with nuts & Rasins
Sour Dough - instead of regular bread
English Muffin with Lox or Salmon & Butter.
English Muffin with Ham Cheese ( Munster or Spicy Green Pepper Cheese) and dried fully cooked bacon. or bacon bits.

Greek
Omelet fixings ( Freeze dried) add Spinich, Feta, Tomatos, favorite cheese,

Mexican
Omelet fixings ( Freeze dried) salsa, peppers, favorite cheese,

You get the idea....

Western, Broccoli & cheese ETC>

Peaches, apples, orange


How about a stack of precooked French toast (Flattened) in a Vacume Boil Bag and a seperate packet of Maple Syrup or Chocolate syrup?

Harley&Me
08-23-2010, 16:11
tortilla with peanut butter and honey gets me going in the morning.

ChinMusic
08-23-2010, 17:05
tortilla with peanut butter and honey gets me going in the morning.
Simple, compact.....good stuff.

johnnybgood
08-23-2010, 21:15
Breakfast for me comes after about an hour of hiking when I take my first water break. I just feel the need to get started down the trail more than I do eating.
Now I should reemphasize that I might break open a trail mix bar and eat while I'm hiking , but to actually sit down and have breakfast , hot or cold --won't be first thing in the morning.
I usually eat the same crap :: my cold meal options are ; banana with lots of peanut butter on it. Clif bars , Stingers , and Fig Newtons. * anything high in carbs to jump start my metabolism.

Hot meal options ; Oatmeal , Mountain House Egg & Bacon meal .

**I like grits so that would work for me . Pancakes ...I dunno ... they sound good -but I don't want to spend too much time on breakfast when I could be hikin'. :jump

inabag
12-03-2010, 17:25
How do you all carry your peanut butter and honey?

mweinstone
12-06-2010, 21:52
boil water with lid inverted. into lid crumble bagel or two.when water boils and bread warmed, stir pack of country white gravy and add bagels. now you have some rib stickin warm stuff in you. this was taught to me by red b and lp.add bacon and cheese if your

Trailweaver
12-07-2010, 00:28
I have also seen Packitgourmet has an energy drink like a milkshake that they recommend for breakfast. That sounds good with maybe fruit or some kind of bread - bagel, pop-tart, etc.

ocourse
12-11-2010, 21:50
How do you all carry your peanut butter and honey?

I use squeeze tubes that are open on the bottom for easy loading/cleaning, and that have clips that secure the bottom with no air inside, whither you fill completely or partially. PB in one, and honey, jelly, or Nutella in the other. Mine are similar to these http://www.coghlans.com/products/squeeze-tubes-7605a

Mountain Mike
03-24-2011, 23:33
One of my favorite cook books is Cooking one burner Way. available thru amazon.com or good outdoor stores. Hot sweet rice made with honey & milk for breakfast is yummie. Some really good easy to gourmet recipies in it. My other standby cookbook is NOLS Cookery. Lots of great ideas. Like dried hash brown breakfasts.

Croft
03-25-2011, 08:12
One of my favorite "finds" was powdered peanut butter--super lightweight. Add a little water and it was very good--add a bit of olive oil and it was over-the-top delicious (and also replaced some of the fat that is removed when they dry it). http://bellplantation.com/

Favorite oatmeal breakfast which I still eat a couple times a week at home adds slivered almonds, shredded coconut, dried mangos, cinnamon and a tablespoon of Nido dried whole milk. If you like it creamy, use instant oats; if you like it chewy, use old-fashioned--you don't have to cook it, just add boiling water and let it sit for 5 minutes (while you're sipping your chocolate coffee).

Land_Shark
03-25-2011, 08:22
Giant snikers bar with the coffee. At least 3 mornings.

sixguns01
03-25-2011, 11:54
for a ten day backpack trip and I will have no re-supply point!! So, I need lightweight items and some variety....I generally have gone with instant oatmeal or cream of wheat, or even granola with dehydrated milk....But, that gets old quick!!

Am I missing anything? Or, just limited on what I can take for this meal!!
The coffee idea is already included..

HELP!!

Check out Trailcooking.com. Great recipes

ShelterLeopard
03-25-2011, 11:56
boil water with lid inverted. into lid crumble bagel or two.when water boils and bread warmed, stir pack of country white gravy and add bagels. now you have some rib stickin warm stuff in you. this was taught to me by red b and lp.add bacon and cheese if your

I remember when you made me these Matthewski- those were to die for!!!

harryfred
03-25-2011, 17:20
boil water with lid inverted. into lid crumble bagel or two.when water boils and bread warmed, stir pack of country white gravy and add bagels. now you have some rib stickin warm stuff in you. this was taught to me by red b and lp.add bacon and cheese if your
Matty I have never had the pleasure but others that have tell me you are the king of hot breakfast on the trail. Maybe you need to write a "Hiker Trash" cook book. I did see you make pancakes over an alcohol stove with a simple cook set.

harryfred
03-25-2011, 17:33
Breakfast for me comes after about an hour of hiking when I take my first water break. I just feel the need to get started down the trail more than I do eating.
Now I should reemphasize that I might break open a trail mix bar and eat while I'm hiking , but to actually sit down and have breakfast , hot or cold --won't be first thing in the morning.
I usually eat the same crap :: my cold meal options are ; banana with lots of peanut butter on it. Clif bars , Stingers , and Fig Newtons. * anything high in carbs to jump start my metabolism.

Hot meal options ; Oatmeal , Mountain House Egg & Bacon meal .

**I like grits so that would work for me . Pancakes ...I dunno ... they sound good -but I don't want to spend too much time on breakfast when I could be hikin'. :jump
Pancakes are quick. I have mixed them up in my coffee cup. I love grits they are easy to cook and can be sweet or savory.

harryfred
03-25-2011, 17:36
How do you all carry your peanut butter and honey?
In the same PLASTIC container it came in note looking for smaller plastic containers of jelly.

harryfred
03-25-2011, 17:46
Not quite home made, but I do like cream chipped beef...

McCormick has a 2.64 ounce packet of "Original Country Gravy" mix that makes two cups. I like to spilt this up to use for two breakfasts.

Get a small jar of Hormel or Armour dried beef and take out however much you like, cut into quarters, then place into the mix.

To cook combine the mix, beef and 1 cup of water and bring to a boil and turn down to simmer until thickened. I like to pour over toast or biscuits that were toasted/cooked before the start of a trip.
Works good over a flat bagel. Note the premade stuff might be worth the weight to eat on the 4th or 5th day

harryfred
03-25-2011, 17:59
Got a 6.5 inch IMUSA pan from Wally - used it to cook pancakes for the wife and me on our section hike. Used 1/2 of a large container of shake-and-pour pancake mix for both of us. Made about 8 pancakes. Pan did not need oil, just seasoning beforehand in the oven. Surprised her with real maple syrup, but that was VERY heavy. Pan wil also cook eggs really well. I used a Pocket-Rocket for the stove. I used a couple of jelly packs or honey packs per pancake. Nutella is good as well. I did the same thing with the flat breads as well, for lunch.
That skillet works great If you don't mind the weight It has a lot of uses For breakfast you can cook scrambled Powdered eggs (google search). Add Oscar Meyer Real Bacon and cheese if you wish, also a little hot sauce:sun or Ketchup:eek:

harryfred
03-25-2011, 18:02
Granola
Hard boiled egg
All-Bran
Bran Buds
Grape Nuts
Instant Oatmeal
Quick Oatmeal
Cream of Wheat
Cream of Rice
Malt-o-Meal
Quick Cooking Cereal
Ralston
Roman Meal
Zoom
Wheat Hearts
Quick Grits
Quick Rice
Toasted Wheat Germ
English muffins
Muffin mix
Raisins
Dried fruit
Fruit leathers
Pancake mix (water only)
Honey
Jam-Jellies
Brown sugar
Butter Chilled in a small container
Meat or jerky
Canned bacon or Spam
Smoked sausage link
Eggs
Cheese
Dried hash browns
Instant dry milk (Carnation tastes best)
Non-dairy creamer
Instant Cocoa (just water)
Ovaltine
Instant Coffee
Powdered Spiced Apple Cider Drink
Tea or Tang
Knorrs Tomato/Basil powdered sauce mix & Parmesan cheese

apple /orange
Damn good list with a little imagination you could make anything you want.

mweinstone
03-25-2011, 18:14
wake up and make coffie. make bacon and set in inverted lid covered with cozy on hot coffie. now make pancakes. mix complete mix in a ziplock with water and dry blueberrys.get nonstick pan hot and smokey without oil. pour a cake. before flipping lay bacon strips on wet side . now flip and finnish. searve with still hot coffie.
people please, putting crap like syrups and extra butter and jams and such on pancakes just isnt done. not in my trailkitch.no outside condiments!

sjd0397
03-25-2011, 18:29
I usually take pancake mix and then only mix what Iím going to eat with water. Then put either peanut butter or nutella on top

mweinstone
03-25-2011, 18:33
it does read like maby i mix the water at home. sorry. that would be stupid.

rsmout
03-26-2011, 20:38
Someone on TJ suggested using powdered baby formula as a milk/creamer substitute. Makes sense, but that first taste is going to seem a little strange.

Papa D
03-26-2011, 20:58
pre-mix granola and dried freeze dried fruit from Trader Joe's with powdered milk in a zip lock - add water, shake and eat.

instant grits with spike and tabasco

instant oatmeal with peanut butter

pop tarts (really a true staple)

granola bars with peanut butter

almond butter and nutella with about anything - english muffins?

mountain-house eggs and veggie scrambler thing - $$

this one is a little complex and heavy but great for a few folks:

cut up a block of cheese
mix bisquick and water - keep it REAL dry
add the cheese and make into buscuits
fry them in butter or olive oil

and while you're frying stuff - BEIGNETS - with powdered sugar

maybe clem
03-27-2011, 00:57
Usually I get up and mix a protein shake and drink it as I start walking. If I cook a meal in the morning I like to toast a bagel in a dry pot as it warms up, then add a little EVOO and cook a Morningstar Farms patty (my favorite is their Grillers Prime (http://www.morningstarfarms.com/products_grillers-prime-veggie-burgers.aspx)). A slice of cheese melts nicely on it. Add a dash of Tabasco and it's a tasty breakfast.

GreasePot
03-27-2011, 07:48
How about old fashioned oats, instead of those expensive pulverized packets of oats. Add raisins, nuts, cinnamon, coconut, powdered milk - whatever you like to it.

I don't like oatmeal cooked - I just eat it dry.

doritotex
03-27-2011, 08:29
Ummm...he asked about a 10 day supply of food. How much are hard boiled eggs, bagels and Hostess Fruit pies going to weigh? Anybody can make a list of food that they love to eat! He needs help with light weight food!!

Papa D
03-27-2011, 09:41
For a ten day supply, I would stick to that which gives you the most calories and the least amount of weight -
4 x instant oatmeal with peanut butter
2 x granola and powdered milk
1 x mountain-house egg scramblers
1 x pop-tarts
2 x bagels with cream cheese
eat this first since it's the heaviest - the cream cheese should last for a few days (get the spreadable kind)
The peanut butter is heavy but you will probably make some lunches with it too.

Rocket Jones
03-27-2011, 09:43
I'm eating a bowl of tasty FBC rice pudding (http://www.trailcooking.com/recipes/rice-pudding) made from the recipe on Sarbar's wonderful Trail Cooking site. I love oatmeal, but this will make a welcome change for breakfast.

Papa D
03-27-2011, 10:38
Dried fruit is really good for you too and pretty light - if you have a Trader Joes, you can get bags of strawberries and blueberries that weigh 1.2 oz each - mix them with your granola or with cream cheese on your bagels

Papa D
03-27-2011, 10:41
I guess Rocket Jones is pre-mixing instant rice, brown sugar, and powdered milk, cinnamon, nutmeg, etc. and cooking it - I've done that and its tasty but I really like the powdered milk and cereal with dried fruit so much better for your 10 day trip - it's lighter, non-cook, and has more calories - save the fuel Hot coffee water and Starbucks VIAS

Papa D
03-27-2011, 10:45
hey Maybe Clem - how long do those do those MorningStar Soy patties last out of the fridge - I like those things but have never backpacked with them - a few weeks ago, on a winter trip, I packed in some "Tofurky Polish Soysages" and added them to some cous-cous which was really good, but let's say it's 70 degrees outside, do you have to eat it on the first day? thx.

Espero
03-28-2011, 01:35
I usually have Starbucks Via with a Coffee Mate single; a handful of dried apricots and a Quaker Oatmeal to Go square.

Skid.
03-28-2011, 15:01
I know the point of this thread is how to get away from just oatmeal, however a thru-hiker gave me the idea to carry the instant kind, and save it for warm days when you want to get a fast start. Use water straight out of your bottle without heating it, let it sit in the bowl while you pack. You don't have to set up a stove, if, like me, you don't need coffee.

JAK
03-28-2011, 15:58
A 10 day trip without resupply sounds quite challenging, especially if doing 10-20 miles per day, as this would require more food, and more insentive to keeping the weight down. I know this is an old thread, but here are some suggestions for keeping things interesting while minimizing weight.

1. Pack in bulk, rather than pre-planned meals. This can save packaging weight, and allow you more flexibility in how you prepare each meal.

2. Pack food items that can be mixed and matched in different ways.

3. Pack food items that can be prepared in different ways, and can be prepared both quickly, even without heat, but also with more time and attention when you want to do so to pass the time.

4. Make sure the total calories, and macronutrients, and micronutrients, are a good balance for the trip, but don't worry so much about making sure each day is ideal. It will all average out by the time you run out of food.

5. Make sure you have enough for delays or miscalculations, or better yet, make sure you have multiple exit points so you can finish the trip before the food runs out.

6. If it's no oats, it's CRAP. ;-)

pcasebere
03-29-2011, 18:30
Somewhere in this thread the book Backpack Gourmet was mentioned, and (though I am neutral on what you choose to do with this information) I found that it has been seeded as a torrent.. if you are against this, you just might be able to find it at your local library. ;o) I did, and I'm toying with the idea of lasagna, but truth be told, I'm a bit skeptical.. maybe I'll make lasagna for dinner this weekend..

Bronk
03-30-2011, 01:44
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d6/Babybel.jpg&imgrefurl=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Babybel.jpg&h=2448&w=3264&sz=940&tbnid=16pZz_8zfa4N-M:&tbnh=113&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dbabybel&zoom=1&q=babybel&hl=en&usg=__bbT8jY3Tu0fk-06y0TImsFFC3oo=&sa=X&ei=psKSTbygL5PAgQfJk4wZ&sqi=2&ved=0CE4Q9QEwCA

maybe clem
03-30-2011, 09:40
hey Maybe Clem - how long do those do those MorningStar Soy patties last out of the fridge - I like those things but have never backpacked with them - a few weeks ago, on a winter trip, I packed in some "Tofurky Polish Soysages" and added them to some cous-cous which was really good, but let's say it's 70 degrees outside, do you have to eat it on the first day? thx.

The Grillers Prime come packaged in twos inside the box (which I throw away before getting on the trail). I put those plastic packages inside a ziplock baggie with the package of sliced cheese and they all keep pretty well. The Grillers have lasted 3-4 days in any temp I've hiked in. I've never carried them longer than that because I've eaten them by then.

pcasebere
04-03-2011, 21:38
Okay, so about that dehydrated lasagna.. it turned out to be good, though not quite the same as lasagna at home, but still good.. even with the extra "broth." I can see this being incorporated in upcoming trips, for a flavor packed hot meal.

Bonjour
04-03-2011, 22:36
Consider pretoasting bagels, put them in a bag and squish them flat to save space. I've flattened them with the car.
It is also good to throw some chopped up dried fruit into the water as you heat it for instant oatmeal.
I like to mix two different oatmeal packets to create a little variety.
Make your own trail bars, eat them plain or throw them into hot water to make a sort of oatmeal.