PDA

View Full Version : Are expensive boots worth the price?



IronGutsTommy
09-23-2010, 23:25
Ive bought all my gear for a thru hike except the boots. I really liked the fit and quality of the Zampberlan 760 Steep GT, which got rave reviews and backpacker.com called the cadillac of hiking boots. They are 265.99 ive heard that it takes around three pairs of boots/runners to complete the trail, on average. so my question is, looking at a total boot cost of around 800 for a thru, is the high end boots worth it? theres a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX that caught my eye at 190.00.. is the jump from good boots to great boots (if you wear custom heat fitted SOLE inserts in both) worth the extra dough or are the differences neglidgable as long as the boots you get are decent quality?

Jester2000
09-23-2010, 23:41
Ive bought all my gear for a thru hike except the boots. I really liked the fit and quality of the Zampberlan 760 Steep GT, which got rave reviews and backpacker.com called the cadillac of hiking boots. They are 265.99 ive heard that it takes around three pairs of boots/runners to complete the trail, on average. so my question is, looking at a total boot cost of around 800 for a thru, is the high end boots worth it? theres a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX that caught my eye at 190.00.. is the jump from good boots to great boots (if you wear custom heat fitted SOLE inserts in both) worth the extra dough or are the differences neglidgable as long as the boots you get are decent quality?

I'd say not to bother with the expensive boots. Just go with a quality boot or shoe that fits your foot well.

You don't want to be a Cadillac on the trail. You want to be a Jeep. Full of cheese.

4eyedbuzzard
09-24-2010, 01:00
Ouch! That's a lot of scratch for a pair of boots, even $190 for the Asolos is a lot. Sierra Trading Post just had a 30% off sale. $139.95 - 30% and free shipping on the Fugitive GTX's - net $98 delivered. You can always get about 20% off the $139 by signing up for the email deal flyer.

IronGutsTommy
09-24-2010, 01:12
thanks, i may have to go the online route one day. i just dont like buying anything online, i like the customer service you can only get at a brick and mortar. of course the flip side of "you get what u pay for" is that you pay for what you get. an extra 60 bucks for customer service on the asolos seems excessive and has me rethinking my anti online stance. there were lots of cheaper choices, just wasnt sure if a 2174 mile hike is the right time to skimp on footwear costs. then again id never spend the money on a pair of Jordans no matter how many pickup games i played. maybe a better question is what kinds of boots are good quality at a decent price? i heard merrells wear out way to fast.

4eyedbuzzard
09-24-2010, 01:56
I prefer B&M stores too, and am willing to pay a reasonable premium. Boots / shoes are a real tough one. I'd much prefer to buy them at a B&M outfitter - but not at twice the price. There's a limit.

leaftye
09-24-2010, 03:14
Expensive boots are well worth the price if that's what it takes to get a good fit.

B&m with a good selection is best, but if you do go online, you're probably better off paying extra at Zappos so that you can keep exchanging boots at no additional cost without hassle until you find the perfect fit....or buy a bunch up front and return all but the best fitting pair.


ive heard that it takes around three pairs of boots/runners to complete the trail, on average.

Trail runners typically only last about 400 miles because the EVA foam in the midsole wears out. Expensive boots typically have a more durable foam that would probably last longer than the outsole, so they last a lot longer than trail runners.

Nean
09-24-2010, 03:21
No ...................hell no!:)

Toolshed
09-24-2010, 06:18
You have to look at what you are buying versus what you really need. Those Zamberlains are Goretex Lined Italian imports and a brand new model. There is probably a reason why BP Mag has rated them so high and it has likely nothing to do with the boot functionality.

For $265, you are not even getting Full Grain Leather, but rather Split leather and some proprietary man-made material.

You really do not need goretex -IMMHO Makes your feet hotter.

FWIW, I have no problem with spending a few hundred on a pair of great fitting boots that can be resoled and are made with Full Grain Leather - Especially when they beak in tofit your feet prefectly, but I use them for climbing peaks and bushwhacking, not for simply walking along the AT.

If, I am just walking on the AT, I want something light and flexible Like a New Balance 809.

Rocket Jones
09-24-2010, 06:33
I paid a good bit for my Asolo Fugitives and they're the best fitting and wearing boot I've ever had. The key for me was finding a person in the store who really knew how to fit boots. They'll all tell you that they can, and they've all been "trained", but there's a vast difference between that and real knowlege and experience.

Now that I've got my boots dialed in, I can order exactly what I need online and save some money.

Hooch
09-24-2010, 07:22
I'd say not to bother with the expensive boots. Just go with a quality boot or shoe that fits your foot well.Agreed. It doesn't take a high end boot or shoe to be comfortable on your feet, but do buy quality footwear. The size hiking boot/shoe you wear may not be the same size running show or casual shoe or dress shoe that you usualy wear. Make sure to get your shoes/boots fitted professionally, preferably late in the day after you've been on your feet for quite a bit and they've got that litle bit of swell to them.


You don't want to be a Cadillac on the trail. You want to be a Jeep. Full of cheese. But don't bring your whine. :D

Surplusman
09-24-2010, 07:34
Save your money. I agree that you should get a good fitting pair at a B&M store to start out with, but you don't need to spend $200+ to do so. Just remember that Italy also lays claim to Mussolini and those "ugly-assed" over-priced Bruno Magli shoes. :D

JAK
09-24-2010, 07:37
Yes and No.
If it was leather, and handmade, seriously custom fitted, built to last, yet still very light and comfortable, like 16oz per shoe/boot, and something that could be easily resoled every 2000 miles or whatever. Yeah.

But who makes something like that today? Really. Very few.
And do you really need something that weighs even just that much?

I might consider something like this though, if I had the dough...
http://quoddystore.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=47
http://quoddystore.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=42
http://quoddystore.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=41
http://quoddystore.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=57

Failing that, I think I could learn to keep myself in homemade mocs or ankle mocs, similar to the Quoddy dawson mocs or trackers. Not nearly as well made of course, or as durable, but they might be a bit lighter. Also, if you make something yourself you can repair and replace anywhere, you never have to worry about logistics, or models you like being discontinued. They wouldn't have to be as durable either, if you were repairing or replacing them yourself, right on the trail, so they could be that much lighter with that in mind.

Trailbender
09-24-2010, 07:39
You have to remember that those backpacking magazines are like outfitters. Their job is to sell you the most expensive piece of gear possible. I have learned I can actually dirtbag most of my gear. Other than shoes, I have saved hundreds buying gear off ebay or making it myself.

Manwich
09-24-2010, 07:41
I've got some nameless Ecco Vibram shoes that I bought 4 pairs of at the time because they were $30 clearance at Kohls. My first pair has 350mi on them, 40mi rocky PA ones.

JAK
09-24-2010, 07:45
To pay that much, I would have to actually go to where they were made and meet the craftsman. I could do that with Quoddy in Maine. There is this place also, in Massachsetts...
http://www.arrowmoc.com/
http://www.arrowmoc.com/mocasins.html

peakbagger
09-24-2010, 07:52
I switched from custom leather boots years ago to trailrunners and never looked back. I have very wide feet and getting a fit is tough so I use New Balances. I do have a pair of midweight New Balances for late fall and early spring in the whites (when there is snow on the ground), even though with a good pair of gaiters, I can and do wear trailrunners in spring snow conditions on packed down trails.

If high end boots have replaceable (stitched) soles, they may be worth it as if you are doing a lot of miles over a series of years, the soles could wear out. This is a nice feature but not very useful for a through hike as it takes weeks to get them resoled unless you get really lucky and find someone to turn them around quickly. I wouldnt spend a lot of bucks on boots with moulded soles as once they wear out, it usually not economical to resole them.

JAK
09-24-2010, 08:11
Good point. You can spend as much for molded soles also, and they are often heavier.
You can pay as much for a good trail runner as some good handmade mocs also.
Worth looking into a pair of mocs or ankle mocs, to give them a try.

njordan2
09-24-2010, 08:21
"Are expensive boots worth the price?"
Yes.

I can vouche for 600miles on a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX's that I will be wearing today and the forseeable future. I am sure they are good for at least 1200miles.

Do not buy moccasins or trail runners or tennis shoes. Buy a good pair of hiking boots from a major brand like Asolo, Merrel, or Vasque.

Let everyone else destroy their feet how ever they choose.

bigcranky
09-24-2010, 08:27
Well, first, a pair of leather high end boots should last most or all of a thru-hike. They might need to be re-soled at some point, but there are cobblers in some trail towns.

Other than that, only you can decide what you need on your feet. I am firmly in the Trail Runner camp, using them for 4-season hiking in the Southern Appalachians. I still have my $300 Scarpa Manta boots -- awesome, beautiful, etc., but not necessary and actually painful over the course of a longer hike.

mister krabs
09-24-2010, 08:30
How expensive? If you're really going to go cadillac, go see Randy Merrell.
Yeah, that Merrell.
http://www.merrellfootlab.com/

the goat
09-24-2010, 08:32
i bought expensive boots for my first big hike, they were montrail morraines and ran a/b $230.

i had buyers remorse until they hit the 2000 mile mark, then i thought it was a pretty good purchase.

JAK
09-24-2010, 09:33
I don't know what I paid for my leather ankle boots, or how many miles, but still got 'em.

I really enjoy wearing them too. Not for trail running. I need to resole them and I'm thinking about either a trail runner sole, or double leather like an ankle moccasin or mukluk. Trail runners are great, but you fall in love with a pair and they are discontinued. Sure their fun, but no good for a lasting relationship. :)

Anne M
09-24-2010, 12:05
Hi Iron Guts Tommy
I bought some Zampberlan a few years back after reading a review. I have to say they have been comfortable and waterproof but are heave and stiff to wear.
I decided to buy a pair of lightweight synthetic boots for a recent trip to the Indian himalaya because I did not want to carry the heavy pair or wear them on the journey from the UK in the hot lowland around Delhi, and they were great. Very comfortable with lots of support so I'll think twice about buying thick leather boots next time.

Regards
Anne
http://www.hikingwomen.net

Jester2000
09-24-2010, 12:07
Do not buy moccasins or trail runners or tennis shoes. Buy a good pair of hiking boots from a major brand like Asolo, Merrel, or Vasque.

Let everyone else destroy their feet how ever they choose.

Interesting that, all evidence to the contrary, there are still people in the world who think that it's possible to be an expert on what will work on someone else's feet.

IronGutsTommy
09-24-2010, 13:23
thanks for all the opinions guys i appreciate it

DapperD
09-25-2010, 12:51
Expensive boots are well worth the price if that's what it takes to get a good fit.

B&m with a good selection is best, but if you do go online, you're probably better off paying extra at Zappos so that you can keep exchanging boots at no additional cost without hassle until you find the perfect fit....I would agree. I would rather pay more for high quality, excellent fitting footware than to save a little and mess my feet up. See how far you will get with ill-fitting boots hiking day-after-day. And ,in my opinion, forget the mail order. Go to a reputable store and try them on to get the perfect fit.

Moose2001
09-25-2010, 13:46
Tommy - I suggest spending some time in the store trying on boots. Find something that you believe will fit and work well. Then see if you can find the same boot online. Buy the first pair where you tried them on to thank them for the business. Buy about a half size larger than normal to account for your feet growing while hiking. Then as you need boots, order online and have them shipped to you. This allows you to get boots when you need them AND allows you to size them up as needed.

gunner76
09-25-2010, 19:02
When you are like me and wear a size 14 or 15 depending on the fit, my first problem is just finding something that fits and so far I have not found a hiking boot or shoe in my size that fits. I end up at Shoe Carnival and most times have to go with New Balance (which I like) running shoes.

IronGutsTommy
09-25-2010, 22:28
yeah id do trail runners but my sobo will be a winter hike. ill go back to REI to decide on some boots, still stuck on the asolos, although some reviews, although good overall, mentioned the quick wear of the soles, and id like to keep my total footwear costs as managable as possible. damn those italian zamberlans are tempting tho. say what u will about the idiot mussolini (needed erwin rommel to come to africa to help the italians in their battles against natives with spears, for gods sake) but the italians are renowned for their master shoe craftsmanship. the reviewer from backpacker.com wore them out of the box for 500 miles with a 70 lb pack and marveled at the near immediate break in time and fit. who wears a 70 lb pACk my lord! im waiting about another week tho so any more info or opinions let me know. anyone that has good info on long lasting quality boots or boot companies, regardless of price, please weigh in

Moose2001
09-25-2010, 22:33
The key is what fits your feet. Each boot maker uses a different last to make their boots. Some makes just fit your feet better than others. For me it's Vasque. They fit perfect right out of the box. I've tried Asolos and they always rip my heels up. For others, the Asolos fit perfectly. You just need to find the right fit for you and go from there.

IronGutsTommy
09-26-2010, 00:48
ahh mark twain coined the better to regret the things you have done than regret the things u havent done phrase. good to know. my grandfather told me it when i was young, and ive tried to live by it. he said when you are lying on your death bed, itll be the move you didnt make, the chance you didnt take, that will gnaw at you. good to remember now as i finish going through my divorce. even in this tough time, im still glad i took that chance

Nean
09-26-2010, 03:26
Bottom line: its not the shoes/boots, socks or/not liners.:eek:
Snow is the exception to the rule.:-?
Fit and comfort rule.;)
You can do that on the cheap.:)

bigcranky
09-26-2010, 21:45
Hey, Tommy, you said a sobo winter hike? So, Maine and the Whites in winter? That's a whole different question. Regular hiking boots may or may not work.

Plodderman
09-26-2010, 22:30
I have given up on expensive boots and now use trail runners and usaully can find them for 50-80 dollars and they last just as long.

Nean
09-26-2010, 22:31
Winter doesn't matter. Prolonged snow does.;)

IronGutsTommy
09-26-2010, 23:03
im hoping a decent boot along with layered socks, snowshoes and crampons will be good for the whites in fall/winter. as I will be out of the whites by the time dead winter hits i trust i wont need winter boots

Nean
09-27-2010, 03:48
im hoping a decent boot along with layered socks, snowshoes and crampons will be good for the whites in fall/winter. as I will be out of the whites by the time dead winter hits i trust i wont need winter boots

Unless there's more than a little snow I'd go w/ a decent runner and good sock. All that other stuff--- more likely to be a negative than positive.

When you think you'll be there?

handlebar
09-27-2010, 11:32
The most important thing about buying footwear is fit. Since your hike will be in winter, boots make sense. I agree with recommendations of getting proper fit from brick and mortar store (or trial and error via Zamberlans) and on sizing up a half size because after long distances most feet will grow. I avoid footwear with goretex because my feet sweat a lot and it simply doesn't breathe all that well.

Whether good boots are expense is in the eye of the beholder. My LaSportiva Makalu's have over 4000 miles on them and are now on their third set of soles. Total investment in purchase and resoling: under $425, or the price of about 5 pair of trail runners. Anyone you know getting 800 miles on a pair of trail runners?

On my PCT thruhike I tried switching to trail runners (Montrail Hardrocks) in Oregon. I found my feet ached badly after my normal 20+ mile days and was really glad when I got my boots back in Sisters.

Nean
09-27-2010, 12:02
I'd like to change my runners every 500m but usually get around to it between 6 and 700. I've worn them up to 900. I've rarely pay more than 40$:eek:
Thats 300 $ more to spend on your thru.:-?

Jester2000
09-27-2010, 12:31
Anyone you know getting 800 miles on a pair of trail runners?


As a matter of fact I do. His name is Jester. Two of his four pairs of Trail Runners on the PCT went that far. He did, however, change out insoles a number of times.

He suspects that a SOBO Winter AT hike would not be the best place or time to experiment with trail runners, though, and wouldn't recommend it. But who knows?

He is currently exhausted from referring to himself in the third person, and will stop now.

jersey joe
09-27-2010, 14:12
$266 seems a little high but I did get about 2000 miles out of my $150 asolo boots, so there is something to be said for a good tough pair of boots.

IronGutsTommy
09-27-2010, 14:19
starting from katahdin october 9th, so ill likely encounter fresh snow in the whites before im out of the new england area. yeah if all soles wear pretty much the same regardless of boot cost, im better off buying solely on fit, and that can come at a variety of prices. ill eat lunch before i go to REI and make a good hour or so of it.

Nean
09-27-2010, 18:32
I'd still start in runners and have my boots waiting in Gorham.:-?

If you still don't need them there- bump 'em to Hanover.:eek:

Extra weight on your feet thru Me. and the Whites isn't the best idea.:)

IronGutsTommy
09-28-2010, 01:23
duly noted, nean. hate to incur money and timing troubles with maildrops but may just have to succumb to a couple of em just the same.

Nean
09-28-2010, 21:41
duly noted, nean. hate to incur money and timing troubles with maildrops but may just have to succumb to a couple of em just the same.

Well, you can send them priority for a standard rate, then bump them down the trail 'till you need them for free- as long as you don't open the package.
Maine can kick ones 6, starting in Me. even more so. To me, weight on your feet is more significant than the weight on your back. Best of luck & ENJOY:)

Tinker
09-28-2010, 21:52
Ive bought all my gear for a thru hike except the boots. I really liked the fit and quality of the Zampberlan 760 Steep GT, which got rave reviews and backpacker.com called the cadillac of hiking boots. They are 265.99 ive heard that it takes around three pairs of boots/runners to complete the trail, on average. so my question is, looking at a total boot cost of around 800 for a thru, is the high end boots worth it? theres a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX that caught my eye at 190.00.. is the jump from good boots to great boots (if you wear custom heat fitted SOLE inserts in both) worth the extra dough or are the differences neglidgable as long as the boots you get are decent quality?

Fit is everything (almost). Name brands, though not nothing, are not (by themselves) a reason to buy or not buy boots.
In my experiences I've been happy with cheap boots, expensive boots, high and low tops, light and heavy footwear, and, yes, sandals (I used Keen Newport H2s to finish the last 20 miles of the Hundred Mile Wilderness in 2008 as well as to hike to, up and down Katahdin, and back to my son's car on the Golden Road.
I would steer clear of Gore-tex for all but winter conditions - they're too hot and dry slowly once thoroughly wet (which they will be from your sweaty feet).
Low top Gore-tex footwear is only good until you step in a deep puddle.
Gaiters won't keep rain or water from wet bushes out of your footwear unless the top is sealed with a drysuit styled gasket (no one makes them like this as far as I know). Water will run down your legs, under the gaiters, into your socks and down into your boots.
Your feet will get wet. Buy something that dries quickly and fits well.
Traction is also very important, and you will have to rely on what others tell you in that respect until you buy and wear the footwear yourself.

IronGutsTommy
09-29-2010, 01:00
alright, who told you about my sweaty feet Tinker! I want names...

Crazy Larry #1
09-29-2010, 08:07
Ive bought all my gear for a thru hike except the boots. I really liked the fit and quality of the Zampberlan 760 Steep GT, which got rave reviews and backpacker.com called the cadillac of hiking boots. They are 265.99 ive heard that it takes around three pairs of boots/runners to complete the trail, on average. so my question is, looking at a total boot cost of around 800 for a thru, is the high end boots worth it? theres a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX that caught my eye at 190.00.. is the jump from good boots to great boots (if you wear custom heat fitted SOLE inserts in both) worth the extra dough or are the differences neglidgable as long as the boots you get are decent quality?
I hiked about 200 miles in a pair of Dunlop tennis shoes that I bought from Dollar General one time and they were a whole lot more comfortable than some of these high dollar'ed hiking boots I bought. However as far as good hiking footwear goes I would say the Vasque Sundowner or a lite weight High Tec would be a good choice......

Tinker
09-29-2010, 13:52
alright, who told you about my sweaty feet Tinker! I want names...

Brand names? :confused:
Do you have a high or low volume foot? Flat or high arches? Narrow forefoot or wide? How about the heel? Do you have hammer toes - and, btw, how long are your toes, how short is your arch, do you have bunions, etc, etc.
See what I'm saying? I take a size 11 in some brands and a 12 in some others. Depending on what insole and sock combination I happen to be wearing I may have too much, too little, or just enough volume in the forefoot. They can't make a shoe with too narrow a heel for me.
Any time a model I like is replaced or modified I find myself taking a full day and visiting several outfitters and big box stores before I find something that works. It's maddening! That, by the way, is why I don't recommend brands or models except for their durability or lack thereof. :)

Jester2000
09-29-2010, 15:57
. . . Gaiters won't keep rain or water from wet bushes out of your footwear unless the top is sealed with a drysuit styled gasket (no one makes them like this as far as I know). Water will run down your legs, under the gaiters, into your socks and down into your boots. . .


Not too many AT hikers I know carry rainpants, but if you do, and you know how to blouse them, rain doesn't go under the gaiters.

I agree with all of your other points, though.

IronGutsTommy
09-29-2010, 22:03
tinker i meant the names of the people who told u about my stinky feet.. lol just a joke

restless
09-29-2010, 22:15
All things being equal, a well fit shoe/boot is the more important thing. Given that you will be starting soon and won't have much in the way of break in time, a trail runner should suit you fine. Keep in mind these shoes are typically not built for long distance hikes, and a good pair should last 500-600 miles. Everybody is different in the way their shoes age. With a trail runner you do sacrifice ankle support in favor of light weight. I have used both a trail shoe (Keen) and a heavy boot (my current footwear of choice is Limmer).
As winter approaches, you might consider switching to a boot. I've used Asolo's in the past and have found them extremely comfortable and well built. Keep in mind though that your foot will grow 1/2 to 1-1/2 size on your hike. So if you bought a boot now, there is a chance it may not fit when you need it.

sbhikes
09-30-2010, 12:05
Did you know that cuffs on pants were originally put there to prevent water running down your pants and into your shoes? Not that cuffs would be able to handle being out in the wilderness.

Grandma Gatewood did the trail with simple Keds. I hiked 15 miles one day wearing flip-flops. I tied an extra lace around my ankle to hold them on more like shoes. I was fine. I even met a guy who always hikes in flip-flops.

I think we really make too much of a big deal about footwear, making it have to be a lot more beefy and rugged than is probably needed. A good tread with good traction and a decent fit are what is needed most. Too bad that's so darn difficult to find.

I'm so tired of the way they come out with a good shoe and then they stop making it after a year or two. I've also tried custom shoes but other people's idea of fit is a whole lot different from mine. I'm going to learn to make my own shoes and then I will not have to deal with any more of this nonsense. I hope. At the very least maybe I will learn how to resole shoes and then I can put decent tread on my Chacos and Keens. They are comfortable but I'm really tired of falling down all the time.

Old Grouse
09-30-2010, 12:23
I'm so tired of the way they come out with a good shoe and then they stop making it after a year or two.

I'm ready to start wearing an aluminum foil hat, because it drives me crazy how they can read my mind (!!!) as soon as I even think to myself, "Gee, I like this product." The moment I do that, they change it or stop making it. And do "they" talk to each other about it?:eek:

JAK
09-30-2010, 12:28
I'm so tired of the way they come out with a good shoe and then they stop making it after a year or two.

I'm ready to start wearing an aluminum foil hat, because it drives me crazy how they can read my mind (!!!) as soon as I even think to myself, "Gee, I like this product." The moment I do that, they change it or stop making it. And do "they" talk to each other about it?:eek:
Exactly! Same problem here.

"They" also think I'm paranoid, and they talk about that behind my back as well.

I would get a tinfoil hat, BUT THEY'VE BEEN DISCONTINUED! :eek:

Nean
09-30-2010, 14:19
go to running shoe sale section- usually the 39.95 section. :D
Look at soles and pick the best one.:-?
Fit for plenty of wiggle room for my toes and no slip in the heels.;)

Of the 3-4 dozen times I've done this I might of had the same pair twice.:eek:

Getting your feet trail tough is tough enough, even more so with boots.:)

SassyWindsor
09-30-2010, 19:44
I spare no expense on good boots, I prefer Italian leather crafted boots such as Scarpa, Alico or Fabiano, expensive, but you can sometimes find good deals on closeouts.

Tinker
09-30-2010, 22:52
Not too many AT hikers I know carry rainpants, but if you do, and you know how to blouse them, rain doesn't go under the gaiters.

I agree with all of your other points, though.
I was actually speaking of the number of hikers I see on rainy days with shorts and gaiters. That wasn't made clear by me. When I wear rainpants (cold weather only), I make sure that they cover the tops of my shoes or boots. Even when they do, I manage to get my feet wet. A day, weekend, or overnight hiker may be able to walk a while and keep his/her feet dry, but on long hikes with back-to-back rainy days, nothing stays dry, so gaiters and rainpants might be extra weight carried (winter is an exception when gaiters do, usually, keep snow out of your (mine too) boots.

Tinker
09-30-2010, 22:55
tinker i meant the names of the people who told u about my stinky feet.. lol just a joke

Oh, went right over my head :o.

But thanks for the advance warning on your feet!:D

Wise Old Owl
09-30-2010, 23:32
I have given up on expensive boots and now use trail runners and usaully can find them for 50-80 dollars and they last just as long.


Blow outs at REI! Plodderman, I agree with you! Beggars cant be choosy my first and best pair of boots was a Birthday gift from China, since then I am using REI Outlet.- No membership required!