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alverhootzt
10-18-2010, 22:51
I see some very cheap 6-in-1 thermometer/barometer/altimeter etc. in a compact size so hopefully also light. Does anyone know if these things will last more than a week?

http://www.ambientweather.com/amws108.html

http://www.goldengadgets.com/gadgets/compact-6-in-1-altimeter-barometer-thermometer-compass-weather.html

http://www.goldengadgets.com/6-in-1-altimeter-barometer-thermometer-compass-weather.html

Forever North
10-19-2010, 00:00
I see some very cheap 6-in-1 thermometer/barometer/altimeter etc. in a compact size so hopefully also light. Does anyone know if these things will last more than a week?

http://www.ambientweather.com/amws108.html

http://www.goldengadgets.com/gadgets/compact-6-in-1-altimeter-barometer-thermometer-compass-weather.html

http://www.goldengadgets.com/6-in-1-altimeter-barometer-thermometer-compass-weather.html


I really can't say how long they would last, I myself have never used one before but I have seen others use them. 25 dollars is two and a half days worth of food to me. The trail can be hard on your gear but, if you took care of it I'd say they would last a thru-hike. Even if it didn't last the whole way it's not like your spending 100 bucks on the thing. If I had the extra I would buy one just for the barometer and thermometer. I was going to buy thermometer from Campmor for 5 bucks but I havn't even done that yet.

leaftye
10-19-2010, 00:13
I don't think those types of devices are worth it, at least not for me. I already have a gps that has a compass and barometer/altimeter built in. My thermometer is part of my whistle.

The main reason I wouldn't get the devices you linked to is because none of them use AA batteries. I also dislike that even though they have a clock, none of them have alarms.

Panzer1
10-19-2010, 00:26
It doesn't say how much it weights but its probably not too heavy.

If the price of $25 is not too much for you, I think it would be useful.

Panzer

Toolshed
10-19-2010, 07:45
LOL,
I can only save you $25 here. I read this somewhere once and thought it was useful...
Walk outside in your long johns and stand for 2 minutes:
nothing cold - over 50.
fingers cold under 50
ears cold - under 40
arms cold - under 30
legs cold - under 20
all cold - below 0
:)

lustreking
10-19-2010, 10:00
I have this one (http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.25903). That I bought at Walmart for less than $20. It's a nice, light multi-use piece of kit, but I don't think I'd rely on anything electronic for navigation (my hiking partner carries the real compass). I mostly just use it for the clock and thermometer.

My only real complaint is that the backlight is a little anemic, though maybe it needs a new battery.

Dealextreme lists the weight as 2.5oz, but I think it weighs less than that. If you're curious, I can weigh mine.

Bags4266
10-19-2010, 10:42
Well I have the pathfinder watch with all these functions and more. I have to say I like knowing when a front is moving in or clearing out. Also the alt. knowing how much further up or where you might be on the topo. And for $25. bucks. Hell thats an afternoon at the bar you have to cut out.

Wise Old Owl
10-19-2010, 10:58
Walmart has pocket digitals with low and high storage near the lawn and garden for $10 so you can look up how cold it was last night.

lustreking
10-19-2010, 19:07
Dealextreme lists the weight as 2.5oz, but I think it weighs less than that. If you're curious, I can weigh mine.

I was curious (and had to go in my gear box for something else), and mine weighs 1.74 oz without the lanyard.

alverhootzt
10-19-2010, 23:28
I didn't notice that. Something to consider.


Alright, alright. Point taken. But I think it would be useful to know the temperature for a while at least. I switched to a hammock and knowing how well a certain pad/UQ is doing in a certain condition is useful.

The dealextreme one looks a little large for me. I was looking for a watch size more than handheld, although at 1.74 it may not matter so much.

I think I'll check w-m again. Thanks y'all.

TheYoungOne
10-22-2010, 22:11
I have this one (http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.25903). That I bought at Walmart for less than $20. It's a nice, light multi-use piece of kit, but I don't think I'd rely on anything electronic for navigation (my hiking partner carries the real compass). I mostly just use it for the clock and thermometer.

My only real complaint is that the backlight is a little anemic, though maybe it needs a new battery.

Dealextreme lists the weight as 2.5oz, but I think it weighs less than that. If you're curious, I can weigh mine.

I got the same one, The compass it almost useless, but like you I use it for the temp, time, and altimeter. The Barometer is a cute feature, but I never checked to see if it can accurately warn you a storm is coming in.

alverhootzt
10-22-2010, 22:26
I didn't notice that. Something to consider.


Alright, alright. Point taken. But I think it would be useful to know the temperature for a while at least. I switched to a hammock and knowing how well a certain pad/UQ is doing in a certain condition is useful.

The dealextreme one looks a little large for me. I was looking for a watch size more than handheld, although at 1.74 it may not matter so much.

I think I'll check w-m again. Thanks y'all.

thought i was quoting last time, of course.

camper10469
10-25-2010, 23:04
My small Campmor thermometer hanging on my pack works great, it says it's 40F all the time, my kind of weather.

Wise Old Owl
10-25-2010, 23:47
Some digital's also include a relative Humidity and I find that very helpful. On one occation the night was a cool 70 degrees but the humidity was uncomfortable and I thought it was hotter.

Franco
10-26-2010, 18:30
relative humidity and temperature
true..
Found this example on the net :
" For example, if the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius) and the relative humidity is zero percent, the air temperature feels like 69 degrees Fahrenheit (21 C) to our bodies. If the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 C) and the relative humidity is 100 percent, we feel like it's 80 degrees (27 C) out. "
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/meteorological-terms/question651.htm (http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/meteorological-terms/question651.htm)

Something to keep in mind when discussing sleeping bag or "warm" clothing performance
Franco

StubbleJumper
10-26-2010, 19:24
Well, there may be some entertainment value from one of those multipurpose weather/altitude devices, but I haven't found a burning need during my hike. There's nothing that you can really do about the weather or altitude anyway.

If it's raining, it's raining. You're going to get wet.

If you can see your breath, it's probably 50 degrees or cooler, which means you can't stop long if you're hiking in shorts. Knowing the precise temperature doesn't really help.

If it's hotter than hades, well it's hotter than hades. Doesn't much matter whether it's 80 or 85, it's too damned hot in either case.

If your at 3000' while climbing a 4000' mountain, it doesn't really matter, because you need to get to the top anyway. Do you really care whether there's another half hour to go? Makes no difference, you have to do the miles either which way.

But, it's probably a good conversation piece, and it might be worth it's weight just for the entertainment value, and the satisfaction of knowing that last night was 35 degrees. Personally, I'll skip those 2 ounces....

Franco
10-26-2010, 19:34
Some ( or so i have heard...) use data to build experience.
It means that you will get better at "guessing" what to take (shelter/clothing/food) for the expected temperature and humidity level.
To have an instrument warning you that the barometric pressure is changing it gives you a bit more time to take the necessary steps.
Not that useful ,maybe, in the bush but it is in exposed areas.
Franco

Franco
10-26-2010, 19:44
BTW, real climbers do go ahead or turn around often based on what their instruments tell them.
Irvine and Mallory used one. My guess is that they died for not having taken too much notice of it...
(too eager to get to the top)
Franco

alverhootzt
10-26-2010, 22:24
Well, that's kind of what I had in mind - learning what works as far as a hammock setup in certain weather so I can better prepare for a future trip.

I spent a night in the high 40's with little to no wind and a clear night and was quite toasty with just my walmart blue pad and a kid's 20F rated sleeping bag on top of me. Less than a month later I spent a night in probably about the same temperature or a little warmer (the night before at roughly same elevation I hadn't even used a pad), but it was the night that leftover tropical storm mixed with another big one here in the midatlantic states and we got 6" or 7" of rain and big winds and that pad felt like it wasn't even there, the cold was so immediate. So it got me thinking...which factors mattered the most, you know?

alverhootzt
11-10-2010, 23:27
Just a follow-up in case anyone else was looking. I just got a clearance item at Radio Shack tonight called the Pocket Weather Station. A thermometer w/ hi/lo memory, barometer, altimeter, hygrometer, calendar and clock w/ alarm (with snooze button!) for $2.99. It even came with a battery and only weighs 1.4 ounces. If it broke tomorrow I think I'd still be happy. :banana