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Don H
11-24-2010, 13:24
Here's my gear list for a Mid March start at Springer, let me know what you think.


ITEM WEIGHT in Ozs.
Pack - ULA Circuit with trash compactor liner 35
Tent - Tarptent Rainbow with ground cloth 38
Sleeping Bag - Feathered Fiends Swallow 20* (1) 33
Sleeping Bag - Thermarest Neo, regular 14
Bear Baging - Granite Gear Airbag #2 with cord 02
Stove/Cooking - alc stove, Ti cup, spoon, fuel bottle etc. 06
Water Storage 2- 1.8L Platy with 1 hose 05
Water Treatment Aquamira 2 oz. 03
Rain wear - Marmot Precip jacket and pants (2) 26
Repair Kit 02
First Aid 03
Head Lamp Petzel Tikka 03
Camera 06
Cell Phone with charger 09
Clothes, packed:
2 pair underwear, Terramar brief 04
2 pair Smartwool socks 05
Wind Shirt, Patagonia Houdini 04
Thermal bottoms, Capiline 06
Jacket, Thermawrap 11
Crocs 11
Knit cap 02
Gloves 02
BASE WT. 230 oz. or 14.4 lbs

Items worn:
1 pair underwear, Terramar brief 02
Long sleeve, Capiline mid-weight crew 07
Socks, SMartwool 03
Ball Cap 03
Money, credit card, med card 01
Watch, Citizen 02
Knife, Leatherman Squirt 02
Shoes, Brook Adrenalin with Super Feet 29
Hiking Poles, Black Diamond 19
Pants - North Face Conv 18
Total Carried 86 oz. or 5.4 lbs

Spokes
11-24-2010, 13:30
Looks good but I'd swap the knit cap for a fleece cap. Is the Granite Gear Airbag waterproof? I used the sea-to-summit dry sack for a food bag with great results last year. Where's your "dry" camp shirt?

Luddite
11-24-2010, 13:31
Looks good. Do you own all of it already?

I don't think you're going to need 2 1.8L Platys, maybe one and a couple of 320z Gatordade bottles.

Don H
11-24-2010, 13:33
Also I can add these items if I think I will need them for the early spring weather:
Thermawrap pants
1/4" GG pad to put on top of the Neo
Fleece jacket

Some things I change change out or send home once he weather warms:
Monte Bell 50* bag
Send home long underwear, hat, gloves,



Undecided: Guidebook (probably AWOLS)
Rain wear: Also have Dri Ducks
Pack option: Also have a Granite Gear Nimbus Ozone, heavier but probably more comfortable for loads over 25 lbs.

Don H
11-24-2010, 13:34
Yea, I have all of this. I'm a gear junky!

Luddite
11-24-2010, 13:39
1/4" GG pad to put on top of the Neo - That might be a good idea

Undecided: Guidebook (probably AWOLS) - Awol and MCaw are putting out a guide book together.
Rain wear: Also have Dri Ducks - That would be my choice, much lighter and more breathable.
Pack option: Also have a Granite Gear Nimbus Ozone, heavier but probably more comfortable for loads over 25 lbs.Circuit.

Switching your 20 degree for the 50 when the weather changes isn't a bad idea. How much weight would you save? The Swallow is pretty light.

Don H
11-24-2010, 13:57
Spokes,
Left off the Smartwool lightweight long sleeve shirt.
The Airbag is not waterproof, I have used a S to S Dri Sack, they are difficult to hook onto the steel bear bagging poles though.

Don H
11-24-2010, 13:59
Save 1 pound on the sleeping bag switch

Don H
11-24-2010, 14:03
Changing to the Nimbus would add a pound so unless I start carrying a lot of food I'll stick with the Circuit. It has the alum. stay in it.
In the past I've used the Dri DUcks but thought something a little thicker might be better for colder weather.

BrianLe
11-24-2010, 15:34
This strikes me as quite an intelligent and well thought out list, and I appreciate you giving key background data (i.e., NOBO mid-march AT start).

Your list looks at first blush at least, to be a bit on the short side --- perhaps you just carry way less stuff than I do, or perhaps you summarize sub-items more. Or perhaps your list isn't complete --- it would help a lot in reviewing to know whether you consider that list to be your absolutely complete gear list, or if you expect there are things you anticipate carrying that aren't yet listed. For example, tooth brush, toilet paper (and purell) ... that sort of thing.

You might consider a thinlight pad to put UNDER the neo-air. I certainly haven't done any extensive "both ways" testing, but my sense is that this (along with good daily care) reduces the odds of a leaky pad. I used the same "regular" neo-air for the entire AT this year with nary a leak, plan to use the same pad (and thinlight under it) on my next long trip in 2011.

This is just me personally perhaps, but I liked using the new Ursack Minor on the AT --- it's rodent proof and light, so I just slept with my food next to me in shelters. Nice for a midnight snack (you might well find yourself wanting those).

Some more details would help in giving feedback, for example, "gloves 02". What kind of gloves? For a mid-march start I would suggest (thick) mittens over gloves, and possibly some sort of light mitten shell as well.
I also suggest you try liner socks in combination with smartwool, though preferences here vary of course.
I really liked my earbags for the start of the trip (I started in late Feb). When a cold wind is blowing but you're too warm to wear a synthetic or wool hat, a baseball hat and earbags were great for me.

For your particular "intelligently lean" list, the crocs kind of stand out for me; again, individual preference, but I was happy with no camp shoes. Exception: for the first month or so I carried feathered friend down booties which come with an eVent overboot, I did use those in camp. I really liked the down booties, both for in-camp in general and for sleeping, until I got to Pearisburg.

Similarly, I too used a thermawrap jacket, but not until Pearisburg; I had a down parka until then, combined with a 20F bag, and was darned glad to have all of that. You're starting about 3 weeks or so later than I did, and this year the south was particularly hammered with snow and so forth, so maybe you'll be fine, but ... dunno. Maybe not, too.

burntoutphilosopher
11-24-2010, 16:00
^^BrianLE had the exact thought i did;

11 ounces for crocs? i brought crocs originally on my PCT hike and found them to be a waste of weight and space.

you must be of tiny frame and huge feet that your circuit weighs only 35 ounces and your crocs 11.
my circuit i weighed in at 37 ounces before the trash compactor and that's size medium. my crocs weigh 8.5 ounces for the clog style.

so far as the neo air, i'm careful with my gear but mine haven't leaked yet. i have not used any sort of under-padding.

AM i the only one who doesn't like fleece beanies? my smartwool beanie is plenty warm and has held up to daily use at work for 2 winters now. it's the only smartwool item i've had that really held up well... maybe just my luck. feels nice on my skin / ears. the fleece ones have irritated me personally.

Whats in your first aid kit at only 3 ounces? does that include toothbrush or whatnots?
what kind of camera did you choose?


what are you doing for trail food ? boil in a bag stuffs?

all in all you have it dialed in really nicely.

Don H
11-24-2010, 18:16
Thanks for the input everyone. Some background on me, I've hiked about 800 miles of the AT from Waynesboro, VA to Dalton, MA. Most of my gear is tested and well used. What I'm not sure about is what I need for the weather in GA in mid March since most of my hiking was 100 mile sections done in the May and October farther north.

To answer some questions:
Gloves - I have some Mt. Hardwear gloves, they're thin, I might look for something a little thicker or maybe a waterproof shell.
Sock Liners - They have never worked for me, I rarely get blisters with Smartwool socks.
Crocs: A must have for me. After walking all day, even in trail runners I still enjoy the cushy feeling. Plus it makes things easier when I have to visit a nearby tree at 3AM! My pair of size 9-10s weigh 10.5oz.
First Aid Kit: Consists of Neosporin, BandAids, Leukotape (for blisters), Motrin and a safety pin.
Toothbrush, tooth paste, TP, a small container (1 oz.) of Bonners soap. included but inadvertently omitted.
Camera: I have an Olympic Stylus, waterproof, dust proof, shock proof. I've had it for years and it has taken a beating. I have 2 extra batteries and 1 extra memory chip. I plan on mailing them home and swapping them out as needed.
Food: I plan on doing freezer bag type cooking.