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View Full Version : Injury Prevention... training and planned practice



Stearman
12-10-2010, 02:03
I saw that many of you have already gotten your flu shot and I am wondering what else you may be doing to prevent injury/illness on the trail.

I have recently started studying some basic yoga, in attempt to have an easy AM and PM stretching routine to do on the trail. I am also doing specific weight training to strengthen my leg muscles and prevent and ankle &/or knee injuries.

I am also looking at bringing multivitamins and mostly vegetarian food.

What are you planning?

MotherShip
12-10-2010, 02:26
I started day hiking on mt rogers, at least 3 days a week (8-10 mile days). That's my trnging. Wishing March were here.

Turtle Feet
12-10-2010, 02:38
Hi Stearman - sounds like we'll be starting around the same time, so maybe see you on the trail! Sounds like you pretty much have your bases covered. I've been putting some miles under my belt with my pack. Other than that, my P90X covers the bases for me.

I take a multivitamin now, in addition to rx additional Vit D (and some other meds). so with all my rx's I'm not really going to have room for the m.v. so I'll probably leave those at home - and yes, I've had my flu shot. ;)

About the yoga - it's probably more important than most people would guess. Flexibility is a key factor in preventing injury, not just in muscle memory issues (preventing strains), but even something as critical as a fall. With good flexibility and balance a fall could be prevented, or at least minimized. Good for you, and see you on the trail!

tf

Turtle Feet
12-10-2010, 02:39
Hi Stearman - sounds like we'll be starting around the same time, so maybe see you on the trail! Sounds like you pretty much have your bases covered. I've been putting some miles under my belt with my pack. Other than that, my P90X covers the bases for me.

I take a multivitamin now, in addition to rx additional Vit D (and some other meds). so with all my rx's I'm not really going to have room for the m.v. so I'll probably leave those at home - and yes, I've had my flu shot. ;)

About the yoga - it's probably more important than most people would guess. Flexibility is a key factor in preventing injury, not just in muscle memory issues (preventing strains), but even something as critical as a fall. With good flexibility and balance a fall could be prevented, or at least minimized. Good for you, and see you on the trail!

tf

Praha4
12-10-2010, 02:39
hill repeats are great with a full pack, and the stretching is good too, and aerobic base building.

common injuries that affilict AT hikers are Illotibial band syndrome, plantar fascitis, and foot blisters.

good luck

TheChop
12-10-2010, 02:39
I am also looking at bringing multivitamins and mostly vegetarian food.


If you're going veg for moral/etc. reasons then that's fine but if you're going veg for health reasons I'd say getting protein is more important.

That said I'm hitting my elliptical pretty hard and going to try and lose ten to twenty pounds before the hike.

nitewalker
12-10-2010, 06:37
I saw that many of you have already gotten your flu shot and I am wondering what else you may be doing to prevent injury/illness on the trail.

I have recently started studying some basic yoga, in attempt to have an easy AM and PM stretching routine to do on the trail. I am also doing specific weight training to strengthen my leg muscles and prevent and ankle &/or knee injuries.

I am also looking at bringing multivitamins and mostly vegetarian food.

What are you planning?


never had a flu shot and never had the flu. i know several people who had the flu shot and still get ungodly colds and flus. its all about keeping a good diet and staying away from sick people. hand sanitzer is good to use especially if your always touching things with your hands that others are always touching.

weight training, yoga and aerobic exercise are all good things to help with your fitness level before a hike. the best way to get in shape for a hike is to stay in shape when not hiking but to most people this isnt the case. as for the vitamins, if you already have a good diet then vitamins are not really needed. your just going to overload your system. if your diet is not so good then vitamins will be fine. just remember to chop the vitamin in half and take half in the am and take the rest somewhere after lunch. your body can absorb the vitamin better this way. on the trail it will not matter because your body will consume everything u put into it....no carbs in vegan food!!!

muttly
12-10-2010, 09:25
Hi guys, new to the forum. I have been told that a popular place to train for the AT in my area (Burke Co.) was South Mountains State Park. Are there areas near you that have the same reputation?

Ken

bigcranky
12-10-2010, 09:33
Doing some very easy yoga poses at the end of the day helps keep me from getting leg cramps at night. In addition to sun salutations, I find Chair pose to do a great job of stretching out my quads.

Grampie
12-10-2010, 11:36
Most hikers will have some foot problems before too long. My advise is to toughen up your feet by walking bare foot as much as posiable the weeks and months before you start. Happy trails.:)

Kerosene
12-10-2010, 12:06
Here's an earlier thread on training for a thru-hike: http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=21234

You might also think about strengthening your ankles, especially if you're prone to tendonitis or sprains. This regimen (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showpost.php?p=60323&postcount=8) also helps with proprioception (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proprioception), which can help avoid on-trail sprains by forcing your brain to keep in mind where your feet are relative to obstacles.

dgaf169
12-10-2010, 12:13
IMO the best way to train is put on a pack, lace up you boots and go for a walk. Hilly terrain would be best but if theres nothing but flat terrain near your house that will work too. Combine that with some cardio and you should be fine. On the other hand i met several people that did absolutly nothing to prepare and they managed just fine. I would say though the better shape you are in to start out the more enjoyable the trail will be.

As far as vitamins go i took GNC Joint Vita-Pack it had a multi vitamin, glucosamine and chondriton, and i believe a vitamin D. they seemed to work pretty well but when all else fails just reach for the good ol vitamin I.

Stearman
12-10-2010, 15:48
If you're going veg for moral/etc. reasons then that's fine but if you're going veg for health reasons I'd say getting protein is more important.

That said I'm hitting my elliptical pretty hard and going to try and lose ten to twenty pounds before the hike.

I physically cannot eat a lot of meat. Wish I could bring a hen with me. Fresh eggs for breakfast!

Women/Men Once a Day (respectively) is a great MV. The Vit D lovers may find it beneficial to know that they will be getting way more natural D from the sun, than their vit D pills. Also taking half of the MV at breakfast and dinner is a good recommendation.

topshelf
12-10-2010, 16:00
All this planning means nothing if you don't use your noggin on the trail.

You know you'll be working out all day, every day. Workout a lot beforehand, and yes the best way to prepare for hiking is hiking itself. And don't use the first 2 weeks of thru-hiking as your get in shape period.

Pay attention to your body. If you feel tired slow down or take a break. Stretch. If you start to suspect an injury, treat it.

If you don't feel as good as you should, like you're getting sick, then take care of yourself. Take a day off and stay warm. Wear a hat.

Don't do things that might cause you to sprain your ankle. Be cautious on slippery rocks and areas.

Eat to get the nutrients you need. If you can't get them all then take multivitamins, although vitamins in food is best.

Use your brain, take preventive measures not reactive ones. It'll stop a lot of illnesses and injuries.

Luddite
12-10-2010, 16:04
no carbs in vegan food!!!

Bread, oats, wheat pasta, rice, grains.

nitewalker
12-10-2010, 16:08
Bread, oats, wheat pasta, rice, grains.

yep you are correct. maybe i will put the carbs back and take out the protien. that may be better!;)

Luddite
12-10-2010, 16:29
yep you are correct. maybe i will put the carbs back and take out the protien. that may be better!;)

You don't know what you're talking about.

10-K
12-10-2010, 18:30
Go to the dentist for a cleaning and get your teeth checked.

nitewalker
12-10-2010, 19:32
You don't know what you're talking about.

rip, chop, chop, rip, chop, chop it was a joke. my first post was at 5:30 am still half asleep. maybe i should have said it is slightly harder to take in larger amounts of protien thru a vegan diet as opposed to a meat eaters diet. vegans get 12 to 14% of their calories thru protien and meat eaters get 14 to 18% of calories thru protien. so this must result in it being slightly harder for a vegan to ingest protein for muscle mass and stay fit as oppsed to someone who can chuck a peice of meat down their gizzard. i suppose supplements will work..

TheChop
12-10-2010, 20:39
rip, chop, chop, rip, chop, chop it was a joke.

What does this have to do with me and who the hell is rip?

Blissful
12-10-2010, 21:14
I saw that many of you have already gotten your flu shot and I am wondering what else you may be doing to prevent injury/illness on the trail.


I am also looking at bringing multivitamins and mostly vegetarian food.

What are you planning?

I would argue that going vegetarian doesn't mean you won't get injured. it has nothing to do with it. If anything, you must supplement the diet so that you are ingesting enough protein to heal the delicate muscle fibers that get torn every day by the sheer force of hiking day in and day out. And I have seen more than one hiker start as veggies and eat a burger in the town after a few months.

There is no way to really avoid injury. The fact of the matter is, it WILL happen. It just matters how severe the innjury is and if you are eating well enough and doing what must be done on the trail to heal it

But to avoid overuse injuries, esp at the onset, start slow, carry less and use common sense. its not a race

RichardD
12-10-2010, 21:17
I am beginning to get concerned that what I am doing might jeopardize rather than help my thru hike.
Skiing is my other passion and I am skiing pretty much every day. Today, after 9 consecutive days of skiing, 15 total I am getting some knee pain, right in front of my kneecap. I used supports on my knees today, the kind you get at WalMart and I am not sure they help much. I have never had treatment for any knee problems but after about 8 or so days of skiing this seems to occur. It does not seem to harm my walking. I have hiked up to 500 miles on trails on each of a couple of Summers with no knee problems.
Does anyone know what I can do to minimize this problem, are there any knee supports out there that would likely be beneficial.
So far I skied 6 days straight, ten days off, this time 21 days straight followed by 10 days off. After Christmas 74 days straight followed by a couple of weeks off then the AT. Of course the 74 days straight might change if I hurt too much or the pass closes.
Abandoning the skiing would be akin to abandoning the AT so please noone say stop skiing!!!
I take glucosamine and I really think it helps although a study in England says I would do just as well with a sugar pill.
Suggestions anyone?

Blissful
12-10-2010, 21:23
Forget those kinds of knee braces. They stink, imo. The Cho pat duo brace is great. I used it my entire SOBO hike on one knee. And make sure the Glucosmine is sulfate, not HCL and you are taking enough of it. AND I wholeheartedly disagree with some English study...:)

4eyedbuzzard
12-11-2010, 01:56
...Today, after 9 consecutive days of skiing, 15 total I am getting some knee pain, right in front of my kneecap.... Suggestions anyone?
Hmm, you're 63 years old according to your profile, and you're getting "some" knee pain after 9 consecutive days of skiing, and 15 total (likely in 16 days I'm assuming) :-? I'm thinking you're done. :rolleyes:

Your knees likely hurt due to some soft tissue injury from the repetitive stress and strain you've been subjecting them to without allowing them time to heal and repair. Ibuprofen or another anti-inflammatory like Aleve plus rest just might help them heal. If they still hurt after a week of rest, see an Orthopaedist that deals with both seniors AND sports injuries. There's all sorts of soft tissue in the knee that can get injured and cause anterior pain, and then there's always good old fashioned arthritis that occasionally affects some of us who were alive when guys like Truman and Ike were running things. ;)

Mizirlou
12-11-2010, 09:45
Go to the dentist for a cleaning and get your teeth checked.

. . . and if you have any caps on your teeth, get a packet of ZONE (temporary cement) from your dentist to carry while hiking. Very tiny 2-part mixable packet. I came down hard on a rock once, my jaw snapped closed & popped one off. I had to quit smiling so the missing fang didnít show.

Chillfactor
12-11-2010, 13:46
I add powdered protein like Muscle Milk to my oatmeal and put a scoopful in a bottle of water to drink in mid-day. Also TVP, powdered vegetable protein, is a good additive to ramen, mashed potatoes, and rice
This seems to limit sore legs. I do take Glucosamine/Chondroitin as well as a multivitamin and stretch at the end of the day.

RichardD
12-11-2010, 21:04
4eyedbuzzard, I hope you are wrong but I am rather afraid you are right. I will likely quit earlier in the afternoon rather than sking first to last lift.
I will have 10 days off at Christmas so I will see what that does.
I have not used any Ibuprophen as yet, I definitely do not want to mask pain and thus do damage, however anti inflamitory properties would likely be good.