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Tuckahoe
01-25-2011, 19:53
Ok, I am finding that dehydrating meat is just not working out. The process of dehydrating works fine and all, but I dont care for the texture and taste. Even rehydrated its still a little hard/chewy and I imagine this is what a mummy would probably taste like if one were so inclined. Pastas, veggies and sauces are fine, I just dont like what the meat becomes. Any thoughts?

Otherwise what I am considering is leaving out the meat when I prepare my dishes and once dehydrated, I would add in either freeze dried ground beef from Mountian House or TVP from Harmony House.

Appalachian Tater
01-25-2011, 20:10
Use the TVP crumbles. You can get them from co-ops and bulk bins at some grocery stores. By the time you cook them in sauce there's not much difference between the soy and meat.

hikingshoes
01-25-2011, 20:11
:-?
Ok, I am finding that dehydrating meat is just not working out. The process of dehydrating works fine and all, but I dont care for the texture and taste. Even rehydrated its still a little hard/chewy and I imagine this is what a mummy would probably taste like if one were so inclined. Pastas, veggies and sauces are fine, I just dont like what the meat becomes. Any thoughts?

Otherwise what I am considering is leaving out the meat when I prepare my dishes and once dehydrated, I would add in either freeze dried ground beef from Mountian House or TVP from Harmony House.

Im new to dehydrating anything more less meat...lol,anyway,i wanted to dehyd.some ground Beef.I cook it up,poured all the grease out of it(didnt dry it off)and put it in the dehyd.after about 4-5hrs things was going pretty good,i could still see some grease,just alittle so i just left it in there alittle longer.After all said and done,i wanted to see how it would taste so i add alittle water and let is sit for 30-45mins.It look good,but it wasnt any good at all.So what did i do wrong?HS

Miner
01-25-2011, 20:33
When I do ground beef, I use the only 8% fat meat (as fat is the enemy for keeping meat). After cooking, I soak up the excess fat in paper towels and then throw it on my dehydrator trays. I never thought of it as being chewy or being somehow weird when rehydrated in with whatever diner I was making on the trail. Maybe my taster is different?

skinewmexico
01-25-2011, 20:35
I gave up and went to TVP

Pedaling Fool
01-25-2011, 20:55
The chew is what makes jerky good. Steaks that melt in your mouth is only in town or special nights on the trail.

Doesn't anyone like roughin' it anymore:confused:



TVP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textured_vegetable_protein Not for me....



:(

T-Dubs
01-25-2011, 21:14
Ok, I am finding that dehydrating meat is just not working out.

YouTube always has the answer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywBwUiq5v4o

Boothill
01-25-2011, 21:22
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-meat.html

boot

Skidsteer
01-25-2011, 21:28
Ok, I am finding that dehydrating meat is just not working out. The process of dehydrating works fine and all, but I dont care for the texture and taste. Even rehydrated its still a little hard/chewy and I imagine this is what a mummy would probably taste like if one were so inclined. Pastas, veggies and sauces are fine, I just dont like what the meat becomes. Any thoughts?

RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS

1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.

2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.

3. Place in your dehydrator on the "meat" temp setting, or:

4. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves or freezer.

Using this method, I have never had a problem with texture.

Tuckahoe
01-26-2011, 09:16
John I am with you. Jerky is great stuff and I like making jerky, but dehydrated hamburger isnt beef jerky. But I have to ask too, what does wanting food that you can look forward to eating have to do with roughing it?

Boothill thanks for the link and I may try that out.

Skid, I find that the process is not the issue but that once made and ready for use, the stuff is just unappealing and nasty. Like I said in the OP its what I imagine trying to eat a mummy would be like. Even rehydrated its dry and old.

Roots
01-26-2011, 09:55
RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS

1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.

2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.

3. Place in your dehydrator on the "meat" temp setting, or:

4. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves or freezer.

Using this method, I have never had a problem with texture.

you forgot to add that this process must be done wearing an alpaca sweater...jeezzz....;):D

hikingshoes
01-26-2011, 09:56
The chew is what makes jerky good. Steaks that melt in your mouth is only in town or special nights on the trail.

Doesn't anyone like roughin' it anymore:confused:



TVP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textured_vegetable_protein Not for me....



:(

I think you can have a enjoyable meal on the trail without roughing it.After MRE's for 22yrs in the Army Res.,Im going to have a good meal.lol,I had to eat what the Army had,but this is on MY time now,so Im going to take my time eay what i like and enjoy it.HS

Blissful
01-26-2011, 10:04
I really like how our dehydrated meat came out. We found a good recipe to take a good cut of beef, boil it with soy sauce until tender, puree it and dry it on a cookie sheet in the oven. Added good protein and flavor to recipes. And drying canned chicken worked great for couscous and addition to the rice mixes.

Pedaling Fool
01-26-2011, 10:54
John I am with you. Jerky is great stuff and I like making jerky, but dehydrated hamburger isnt beef jerky. But I have to ask too, what does wanting food that you can look forward to eating have to do with roughing it?

Boothill thanks for the link and I may try that out.

Skid, I find that the process is not the issue but that once made and ready for use, the stuff is just unappealing and nasty. Like I said in the OP its what I imagine trying to eat a mummy would be like. Even rehydrated its dry and old.
Yeah, when I read your OP I just saw "meat", not just ground beef. I should have read all the other posts, because they seemed to have gotten it:o

Personally, I've never done ground beef because of all the fat mixed in, makes you wonder if they even attempt to cut away any fat before grounding the beef.

If I were to ever to dehydrate the stuff I'd use skid's method.

Skidsteer
01-26-2011, 11:14
If I were to ever to dehydrate the stuff I'd use skid's method.

My favorite trick is to mix the five lbs of hamburger with a jar of salsa right before I dehydrate it. Good stuff.

Wise Old Owl
01-26-2011, 12:10
youtube always has the answer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywbwuiq5v4o

awesome find t-dubs thanks - i enjoyed watching that.


Here is Mongolian Borts...meat served as tea.

http://www.mongolfood.info/en/recipes/borts.html

Blissful
01-26-2011, 12:19
My favorite trick is to mix the five lbs of hamburger with a jar of salsa right before I dehydrate it. Good stuff.


Hmmm good idea. Need to give that a whirl. Hubby would love it.

Tuckahoe
01-26-2011, 12:34
Yeah, when I read your OP I just saw "meat", not just ground beef. I should have read all the other posts, because they seemed to have gotten it:o

Personally, I've never done ground beef because of all the fat mixed in, makes you wonder if they even attempt to cut away any fat before grounding the beef.

If I were to ever to dehydrate the stuff I'd use skid's method.

I should have framed things more clearly as I was thinking along the lines of both hamburger and italian sausage.

Buffalo Skipper
01-26-2011, 12:40
I have only twice tried to dehydrate meat. The first was a round steak, cut into very small slices, marinated in a salt brine and dried in an oven (on lowest temp setting on cookie sheet with the door open). I used it for a beef stroganoff recipe. It turned out extrordinary. :D

I also have made dried ground beef (7% fat ground sirlion). It was suggested (by Wise Old Owl?) that 1/2 cup of bread crumbs be mixed up with before cooking. It took some getting used to in the browning process, but it went well. I used it in a Ramen shephard pie (freezer bag meal) and was absolutely delicious! :cool:

I only have a simple borrowed dehydrator now (Ronco?), but I look forward to getting a nicer one soon.

The Weasel
01-26-2011, 13:04
RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS

1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.

2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.

3. Place in your dehydrator on the "meat" temp setting, or:

4. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves or freezer.

Using this method, I have never had a problem with texture.

Skidsteer's process is excellent. Three further suggestions:

(1) Adding 1 tsp. of ground black pepper per pound during cooking will aid in preserving the dried burger. I also often add a modest amount of onion powder and garlic powder for further preservation and seasoning, although these are optional.

(2) I don't have, or use, a dehydrator. After cooking the meat, I spread the crumbles on a cookie sheet (aluminum foil covered) and dry 4-6 hours in my oven, set at 200, door wedged open 1".

(3) Immediately after removing from the oven, I put the meat in small ("snack") Ziploc bags and put the open bags in the now-cooling oven for 15 minutes. This eliminates any residual water vapor from the bag/crumbles. Seal immediately and freeze.

Done this way, hamburger has kept and been rehydrated for 3 months easily (once, by accident, 12 months and fully satisfactory) without becoming rancid.

Wise Old Owl
01-26-2011, 13:18
Keep in mind use the fruit trays to spread gravy out and dry that out add the "gravy roll up" to the meat for rehydration. This will add flavor and smooth out the texture.

file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/WINDOW%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-5.pnghttp://www.campbellsoup.com/gravies.asp