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jpm1628
01-25-2011, 20:31
So I'm in the market for a stove that can last. what opinions does anyone have on choices for stoves?? I'm looking to get into liquid fueled stoves and maybe looking for a multi- fuel capable one. Any ideas?

skinewmexico
01-25-2011, 20:43
Liquid fueled stoves are extremely heavy and unnecessary, unless you're melting snow or in a 3rd world country. Seems like the natural progession is liquid - canister - alchohol. And then sometimes to a Caldera Cone. Or wood.

Serial 07
01-25-2011, 21:15
liquid fuel stoves are way heavy....depending on how much you have to spend, jetboils are EASY and the titanium model is coming out soon...9 ounces is a great weight for that...you can always make a pepsi can stove if you ever want to go the alcohol route...i also have the Primus Ti 2.5 that i use with everything, including my jetboil cup...stick with canister or alcohol fueled stoves, IMO...

runnergirl
01-25-2011, 21:53
I have a jetboil and love it. I cooked for three people out of it; I used the canister for my dish and my dad and brother brought their own bowls. The fuel lasts a long time-we were out a week and still have half a canister left! A very light-weight and durable option; very compact as well!

Lone Wolf
01-25-2011, 22:01
So I'm in the market for a stove that can last. what opinions does anyone have on choices for stoves?? I'm looking to get into liquid fueled stoves and maybe looking for a multi- fuel capable one. Any ideas?

Pocket Rocket canister stove

Feral Bill
01-25-2011, 22:08
A reliable stove that burns cheap Coleman fuel and can do real cooking is worth the weight. My SVEA stove is in it's forties, still going strong. I have bought two on Ebay recently for my kids. Consider one.

FB

Trailbender
01-25-2011, 22:18
A bent piece of sheet metal with esbit tabs. 7oz for 24 burns.

Mountain Wildman
01-25-2011, 22:29
I concur with the SVEA, Although I don't have one, yet, I have read much good and no bad, The MSR Dragonfly is also a good liquid multi-fuel stove that has been around for many years.

SassyWindsor
01-25-2011, 22:31
After a "short learning how to use" curve, I always depend on a solid fuel (wood) stove. I have a couple but I usually use my titanium Zip. My brothers have started building us all 2-AAA(in parallel) battery box's and switch's, due to the fact our LED headlights runs on these, when the battery's will no longer run the fan on the zip it will still run the LED's for quite a long time.

Camping Dave
01-25-2011, 22:37
So I'm in the market for a stove that can last. what opinions does anyone have on choices for stoves?? I'm looking to get into liquid fueled stoves and maybe looking for a multi- fuel capable one. Any ideas?

The Primus OmniFuel is an awesome multifuel stove. It comes with 3 jets: one for diesel and kerosene, one for white gas and gasoline, and one for butane canisters. The burner hose has a lindal valve so you can connect it to standard isbutane canisters.

If by multifuel you mean white gas and gasoline, there are dozens of good stoves out there. The Svea, for example, is very reliable and retro cool.

mweinstone
01-25-2011, 22:46
msr xgk constitutes the final line of defence against all of uncookery
the ability to place your life in the hands of a stove constitutes the dividing line between recreational and professional battelfeild anticold tacti.

Mags
01-26-2011, 10:58
As you can see, there are many different choices...and none is the best.

It is the best for you and your situation.

You'll notice many experienced outdoor people sometimes (not always) have different stoves depending on their activity, time of the year and style of being outside.

Here's my biased take on stoves:
http://www.pmags.com/stove-comparison-real-world-use

(Everyone's view is biased after all. :sun)

Perhaps the most important info about stoves, though:

Remember…it is just a stove at the end of the day. Gear is the least important part of backpacking. No matter stove you use, the mountain ranges are awesome, the sunsets are grand and those wildflower blooms will be gorgeous. Take what works and enjoy! http://www.pmags.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_smile.gif

4eyedbuzzard
01-26-2011, 11:09
Most all of them will last. I've got a feeling the old fashioned Primus and Optimus ones will outlive most of us. I had an Optimus 8R for over 30 years and it never failed. I've gone to canisters and esbit depending on how long I'm out and where I'll be.

Multi-fuel usually brings up expedition type stoves with a few standard choices: The MSR XGK, the Primus Multifuel, and the Optimus Nova Plus. The reviews on the Nova Plus seem to run towards getting the older model - the one with the valve on the stove itself not the hose.

They are all "relatively" heavy. But they are pretty bombproof. HYOH. PYOS (pick yer own stove).

goody5534
01-26-2011, 14:38
Soto MicroStove is da bomb, small powerful and light as a feather, fuel is the only weight concern, but proper mgt and re-supply is best, I assume...

Leanthree
01-27-2011, 22:07
I would add it depends on how many people you want to be able to cook for at once. If you are looking at a stove to last you many years I find for my needs alcohol is best for 1 or 2 people, which is why they are popular for thru-hikers. canister gets a bit shaky with the high center of gravity with larger portions and I'd hate to spill someone else's dinner when I am normally the one introducing them to the world of backpacking.

I "own" alcohol (to the extent anyone can "own" a cat food can with holes punched in it) and a MSR Whisperlite. Alcohol for when it is me and one other, whisperlite for when I am out with friends. Can spread its excessive weight among the group and it has great heat output for the group. I've never had a problem with it in ~8 years of use.

MisterChris
01-28-2011, 01:18
I "own" alcohol (to the extent anyone can "own" a cat food can with holes punched in it)

Built it?!.. as seen in the various "youtube" videos?

- How long will they last, from like say the cat-food tin?!
- Is it at all bad for you?(Seems too good to be true)

topshelf
01-28-2011, 01:28
Built it?!.. as seen in the various "youtube" videos?

- How long will they last, from like say the cat-food tin?!
- Is it at all bad for you?(Seems too good to be true)


they are easy to make with the right tools. its a fun project, and the beauty of these or pop can stoves is that they dont have to be durable because they are so easy to replace. I can make a beer can stove in about the time it takes me to drink the beer in the cans, which is no time at all.

Gipsy
01-28-2011, 02:03
I'm sure you will get a million opinions on this so here is my opinion and reasoning. I plan to hike with a buddy. We tossed around all the options. Our decision..... One will take an esbit and the other will take an alcohol stove. Either way if we get to a resupply point and they are out of one or the other fuel, we still have a back up to rely on. Alcohol/solid/wood.

They all have benefits and drawbacks.
Esbit leaves residue on your pot
Alcohol can spill
$$$ canister stoves have moving parts and O-rings both of which can malfunction.

try out a few, form your own opinion, and go with it. We all learn by trial and error.

Croft
01-28-2011, 05:10
Alcohol for when it is me and one other, whisperlite for when I am out with friends.

Ditto for me. Also I use the Whisperlite in the cold weather months.

Camping Dave
01-28-2011, 07:46
Built it?!.. as seen in the various "youtube" videos?

- How long will they last, from like say the cat-food tin?!
- Is it at all bad for you?(Seems too good to be true)

Last a long time. Not bad for you at all.

Build one yourself; it's easy. Test it in the kitchen where it's warm and there's no wind. Take it outside where it's cold and windy and test it again (be sure your alcohol is outside long enough to be really cold). Decide if you want to rely on it.

leaftye
01-28-2011, 07:53
Don't all new liquid fuel MSR stoves use the new cheap fuel pump? If so, that's not going to last, so that rules out anything new by MSR.

You want multi fuel? Get the appropriate Caldera Cone. Wood, alcohol and esbit.

Farr Away
01-28-2011, 11:12
Built it?!.. as seen in the various "youtube" videos?

- How long will they last, from like say the cat-food tin?!
- Is it at all bad for you?(Seems too good to be true)

I made one in July 2006. It's kind of rusty, and I think I'll replace it this season, but it's still useable.

I followed the directions posted on Sgt Rock's Hiking HQ website.

-FA

icemanat95
01-28-2011, 11:37
I know I'm a bit of an antique myself, but it's real hard to beat the old MSR Whisperlite International for multi-fuel capability. Sure it's not as light as an alcohol stove, but an alcohol stove can't burn kerosene, diesel fuel, stoddard solvent, paint thinner, auto gas, white gas, naptha, etc.

Weight isn't the only consideration. Not everything is a thru-hike in the warmer months, and if you shave weight in a lot of other places, the extra few ounces of a multi-fuel stive like the MSR, isn't that big a deal. I remember a time, lon ger ago than I care to admit, when the MSR was THE stove to have because it was durable, burnt damned near any kind of petro fuel and did it well. You could start your stove, boil your water and shut the damned thing down long before an alcohol stove even got up to heat.

All that said, my primary three season stove is a Jetboil now, and I also have alcohol stoves, and am buying a wood stove in the near future. But the Whisperlite is my go-to stove for tough conditions.

Trailbender
01-28-2011, 12:15
I know I'm a bit of an antique myself, but it's real hard to beat the old MSR Whisperlite International for multi-fuel capability. Sure it's not as light as an alcohol stove, but an alcohol stove can't burn kerosene, diesel fuel, stoddard solvent, paint thinner, auto gas, white gas, naptha, etc.

Weight isn't the only consideration. Not everything is a thru-hike in the warmer months, and if you shave weight in a lot of other places, the extra few ounces of a multi-fuel stive like the MSR, isn't that big a deal. I remember a time, lon ger ago than I care to admit, when the MSR was THE stove to have because it was durable, burnt damned near any kind of petro fuel and did it well. You could start your stove, boil your water and shut the damned thing down long before an alcohol stove even got up to heat.

All that said, my primary three season stove is a Jetboil now, and I also have alcohol stoves, and am buying a wood stove in the near future. But the Whisperlite is my go-to stove for tough conditions.

I would like the Whisperlite for a post apocalyptic zombie scenario, but otherwise it is too heavy and clunky. I get my gear and make it based not just on ultralite, but how utterly simple it is. My stove is a bent piece of sheet metal with esbit tabs. There isn't really much that can go wrong to make that stove fail. I use a 4 season ridgerest ccf pad, I don't have to worry about getting holes in it, or it getting wet, or just about anything else.

Snowleopard
01-28-2011, 13:36
For really cold weather use (0F), when you have to melt snow for water, and for third world travel, a multifuel stove is best -- I have an Optimus Nova, MSR xgk and some Primus stoves are good choices. In some parts of the world, kerosene is way easier to get than anything else.

For most other uses, it's a matter of preference and cooking style. I like to actually cook and need simmering capability, so I'll use my Optimus Nova in cold weather and a canister stove in warm weather. For summer meals that only require boiling water I'd consider an alcohol stove.

Svea 123: pluses are: it simmers well, it's super reliable and contains its own tank. Minuses: for anything except a short trip you need to carry a separate fuel tank and the weight starts adding up. If it runs out of fuel you have to let it cool off before you refill it, kind of inconvenient in the middle of a meal.
Priming it can be an exciting experience (shock and awe type fireballs). I hated the thing until I discovered priming paste -- carry priming paste or a little bottle of alcohol for priming. If I could find the darn thing I'd still use it sometimes.

Berserker
01-28-2011, 13:51
Liquid fueled stoves are extremely heavy and unnecessary, unless you're melting snow or in a 3rd world country. Seems like the natural progession is liquid - canister - alchohol. And then sometimes to a Caldera Cone. Or wood.
Man, ain't this the truth. Started off with a MSR Dragonfly many years ago, went to canister stoves (MSR Pocket Rocket and Snowpeak Giga), have dabbled in alcohol (penny stove and cat stove) and wood (Bushbuddy), and just order a Caldera Cone (Ti-Tri with inferno insert and floor).

For me personally I like the Snowpeak Giga for convenience, and alcohol for more versatility (can tailor the amount of fuel carried). I'm still trying to learn to cook with wood as a fuel source, and with the CC I'm going to finally try esbit.

IceAge
01-28-2011, 17:55
...Alcohol can spill...

Not with a StarLyte!

try out a few, form your own opinion, and go with it. We all learn by trial and error.Good advice

bfayer
01-28-2011, 18:29
I saw a video from the outdoor retailer show about a new Primus stove that might work for you.
Primus ExpressLander



New for spring 2011
Weight: 6.2 oz
Dimensions: Folds down to 3.25" x 2"
Output: 5,200 BTUs per hour
Boil time: Boils a liter of water in about 4.5 minutes
MSRP: $96

I really like pump on the Primus better then the one on my MSR. It looks a lot stronger. The stove is lighter too.

Something to look into anyway.

Trailbender
01-28-2011, 18:50
For really cold weather use (0F), when you have to melt snow for water, and for third world travel, a multifuel stove is best

Actually, that is when I build a fire.

The Cleaner
01-28-2011, 19:12
A reliable stove that burns cheap Coleman fuel and can do real cooking is worth the weight. My SVEA stove is in it's forties, still going strong. I have bought two on Ebay recently for my kids. Consider one.

FB My first Svea 123 lasted 26 years with no maintenance,or about 3800 trail miles.Finally the pressure relief valve blew and I just bought another one.The price was almost 3X of the '76 model.I like to cook real food sometimes and a stove w/adjustable control is a must.Wonder how long a Jetboil lasts?....:-?

shelterbuilder
01-29-2011, 18:01
As you can see from the multitude of posts...there is no ONE best stove. It depends on what you (as the user) want from it. Lightweight? Alcohol. Convenient? Cannister. "Real" cooking? Gas/multi-fuel. Don't mind sooty pots? Wood.

And then there are the equipment freaks...like me! :D I started back in the 70's with one of the original butane cannister stoves, moved up to an Optimus 99 (similar to the 8R, but with an aluminum body), tried a ZipStove, a Whisperlite, a Svea, alcohol, a home made wood stove, and a newer version cannister stove. My favorite? Well, it depends....

I, too, like to be able to "cook", as opposed to just heating water, so I really like something that can simmer. The cannister is quick and easy, even if I have to carry an extra cannister. But in wintertime, give me the Optimus 99 or the Svea - I still love the sound of those stoves, and they are SO reliable. So what if I have to carry an extra fuel bottle....

HYOH.

spindle
01-29-2011, 18:14
Another vote for the Pocket Rocket. It's my fav 3 season stove.

mikecordes
01-29-2011, 18:23
Pocket rocket since 2003...

bfayer
01-29-2011, 18:54
As you can see from the multitude of posts...there is no ONE best stove. It depends on what you (as the user) want from it. Lightweight? Alcohol. Convenient? Cannister. "Real" cooking? Gas/multi-fuel. Don't mind sooty pots? Wood.

And then there are the equipment freaks...like me! :D I started back in the 70's with one of the original butane cannister stoves, moved up to an Optimus 99 (similar to the 8R, but with an aluminum body), tried a ZipStove, a Whisperlite, a Svea, alcohol, a home made wood stove, and a newer version cannister stove. My favorite? Well, it depends....

HYOH.

I loved my Optimus 99. I regret getting rid of it when I got my Whisperlight back in the 80s. I would buy a used one on Ebay but the collectors drive the prices up to much. It was a cool stove, but it's just a stove not a piece of art :)

Which stove is the best depends on the conditions it will be used in. I will say I believe the need for a multi-fuel stove is over rated as long as you are not traveling overseas. I have yet to not be able to find white gas for my whisperlight and that is from Alaska to Key West.

If it makes a difference in your choice of stoves. Just last month I called MSR about my whisperlight. There was nothing wrong with it, it was just over 20 years old and the hose was starting to worry me. They told me to send it in and they would take care of it. I asked what the cost would be and they basically said "what part of a lifetime guarantee do you not understand" :) a week later I had a rebuilt stove including a new pump. I kind of feel guilty because I have used the crap out of it in the last 20+ years.

These day if it's not too cold out I use my Jetboil. As a matter of fact last week one of our Scout Patrols used it to cook a hot dog lunch after their white gas stove started leaking. It was a 20 F out that day. So don't buy into "the canister stoves only work over 40 F" stuff. I can state for a fact that both the MSR and Jetboil canisters will work well into the 20s.

Slack-jawed Trog
02-01-2011, 23:10
If it makes a difference in your choice of stoves. Just last month I called MSR about my whisperlight. There was nothing wrong with it, it was just over 20 years old and the hose was starting to worry me. They told me to send it in and they would take care of it. I asked what the cost would be and they basically said "what part of a lifetime guarantee do you not understand" :) a week later I had a rebuilt stove including a new pump. I kind of feel guilty because I have used the crap out of it in the last 20+ years.

^+1
I bought my WhisperLite and it's (still unused) rebuild kit in the '80s, and it served ably and admirably until the red/gray pump imploded in Jan. '09. I replaced it without calling Cascade Designs/MSR.

A few months later the fuel line went south. When I contacted Cascade Designs for a replacement fuel line, they required that I send the stove in for repair...lawyers. I received a brandy spankin' new shaker-jet stove 6 wks later. :D

After using that old stove for so many years I did NOT expect a new stove, just a repair or condemnation. The "new" stove performed flawlessly this past weekend in VT.

OTOH, there is a learning curve for lighting it...YMMV :banana

Tipi Walter
02-01-2011, 23:44
I concur with the SVEA, Although I don't have one, yet, I have read much good and no bad,

The Svea 123 has several negatories:
** As Snowleopard mentions below, the built-in fuel tank is small and it often happens that you run out of fuel midway thru cooking. It's a hassle to wait for the stove to cool and then refill. God forbid you refill it too soon and re-prime---fireball. And often when refilling the small tank you let a little bit spill over as it reaches the top---more wasted fuel.

** All priming and sometimes refilling results in spilled gas and wasted gas unless you take an eye dropper or a sufficient fuel bottle pour spout. It's hard to get the priming fuel exactly in the little trough below the burner. And who carries special paste?

** The blasted key with the attaching chain always seems to get hung up in the circular brass housing.

** And this housing often gets dinged and bent and difficult to attach and remove.

** With frequent usage the three pot support prongs can come out and are easily lost. I've made replacements with bent nails and these too are quickly lost.

** And yes, the emergency release valve can fail at any time, resulting in a blowtorch---it happened to me once in '84.






Svea 123: pluses are: it simmers well, it's super reliable and contains its own tank. Minuses: for anything except a short trip you need to carry a separate fuel tank and the weight starts adding up. If it runs out of fuel you have to let it cool off before you refill it, kind of inconvenient in the middle of a meal.
Priming it can be an exciting experience (shock and awe type fireballs). I hated the thing until I discovered priming paste -- carry priming paste or a little bottle of alcohol for priming. If I could find the darn thing I'd still use it sometimes.

My stove of choice for twenty years was the Svea, then I upgraded to a Whisperlite, and presently use a Simmerlite. I routinely go around 17 days with a 22 oz bottle of fuel, around 10 days in the winter. But all white gas stoves can be finicky, so when I head out on a long trip I always "bury" an emergency Thermarest cache at the trailhead and in it I have an extra stove and an extra MSR stove pump.

Another thing: The MSR white gas stoves require regular cleaning and lubricating, expecially the throttle cable and the fuel pump rubber plunger. It's a hassle, but the cable should be removed every couple of months and cleaned with gas.

Grampie
02-02-2011, 11:35
I started my thru with a MRS Wisperlite. It worked fine and fule was easy to come by. Later in my hike I decided to lighten up so I sent my MRS home and switched to a alcohal stove made from a beer can. It worked well and I had no problem getting fuel. I could boil 16 oz of water on 1oz. of fuel.
The problem I have seen with the stoved that burn wood is that they create a lot of smoke. This could cause a problem with others at a crowded camp area.:-?

Mags
02-02-2011, 14:33
Listen to TipiWalter. He probably has more real world winter backpacking on this list than anyone...

It is easy to stay warm in winter..it is staying cool that is hard!

Different Socks
02-05-2011, 15:46
You folks that keep saying a liquid/gas stove is "waaaaay" heavy must be the ones that count there ounces. I'll be laughing at you while you eat your boiled water in a bag dinner and i am baking brownies with my MSR Whisperlite.

Different Socks
02-05-2011, 15:51
^+1
I bought my WhisperLite and it's (still unused) rebuild kit in the '80s, and it served ably and admirably until the red/gray pump imploded in Jan. '09. I replaced it without calling Cascade Designs/MSR.

A few months later the fuel line went south. When I contacted Cascade Designs for a replacement fuel line, they required that I send the stove in for repair...lawyers. I received a brandy spankin' new shaker-jet stove 6 wks later. :D

After using that old stove for so many years I did NOT expect a new stove, just a repair or condemnation. The "new" stove performed flawlessly this past weekend in VT.

OTOH, there is a learning curve for lighting it...YMMV :banana

Same happened with my MSR. After many years and 1000's of miles of use, she was having some problems. I sent it in and Cascade not only rehabbed the burner, but also gave me one of their newly redesigned pumps.
I have tried alky stoves and found them to be susceptible to any kind of breeze. I'll pit my MSR against anybodies Alky stove, any day.

mkmangold
02-05-2011, 16:00
So I'm in the market for a stove that can last. what opinions does anyone have on choices for stoves?? I'm looking to get into liquid fueled stoves and maybe looking for a multi- fuel capable one. Any ideas?

This one is sturdy and lasts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aOsuCLtJGc

Will you be hiking alone? If not, then do like we do and carry different types of stoves. My oldest boy (18) has a Jetboil and loves it. He also doesn't mind carrying the cartridges. My youngest son (9) uses an esbit stove. My preference is a Pocket Rocket but I also nest a Starlyte into a Fancee Feast.

jima59
02-11-2011, 22:43
love the svea, had one about 30 years ago. To me they are worth the weight. Easy to prime.

JohnEbner
02-12-2011, 23:07
Started with alcohol and changed to the Coleman F1 UL canister stove. I recently tried going back to alcohol for solo use and think I will stick with that. I'll stay with the canister stove for anything other than solo though.

leaftye
02-12-2011, 23:22
The new Soto liquid fuel stove looks nice. They say they use as much metal as possible in the pump, which should make it better than the weak plastic pump that MSR sells.

SassyWindsor
02-13-2011, 01:22
At first, I purchased a zip solid fuel(wood) stove to alleviate problems with air travel, never would have thought I'd never go back to a petrol burner. It happened, I realized I didn't need to get off trail to search for fuel, Changed my menu to things I prepare at home, such as uncooked rice, grilled steak, etc etc. I eat as good on the trail as I do at home. Melt ice and boil all the water I require. All because the fuel is just lying on the ground. After a learning curve and experimentation you'll not go back to a petrol stove. If you're an occasional or section type hiker I guess it really doesn't matter what kind of stove you use.

leaftye
02-13-2011, 04:23
The stove I'm interested in is in the Soto OD-1NP Muka Stove. It's a multi-fuel stove that weighs 11.2 ounces for the stove and fuel canister. Bomber. Multi-fuel. Simmers.

But I'm more interested in the Boilerwerks (www.theboilerwerks.com)wood burning kettle. I'm normally not interested cooking, but this provides a fairly light and compact way to be able to boil unlimited amounts of water.

jima59
02-26-2011, 18:03
My only extended trip I used a svea from Springer to Damascus. Lost all my gear the next year when my VW broke down and got towed, never recovered anything. Know my next stove will be a svea again, worth the extra weight for reliability even in the wind.

JaxHiker
02-28-2011, 10:29
The Svea is a great stove if you don't mind the weight.