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TheTwanger
03-14-2011, 18:55
I'm having quite a bit of trouble finding any good information on the AZ trail as it runs through the south Kaibab National Forest...Hopefully somebody on the WB can help me out! Are there views from the Grand Canyon rim? and how closely does it parallel the rim? Are there reliable water sources?... As much as I would like to take a trip below the rim of the Grand Canyon, I am on a tight budget trying to see as much as I can of this country while minimally being screwed out of an arm and a leg for back-country camping, which usually is and should be free! :rolleyes:.... Any other advice on experiencing Arizona or the southwest in general on my way through will be greatly appreciated!

Namaste
03-14-2011, 19:16
Are you talking about the South Kaibab trail in the Grand Canyon or somewhere outside the GC? I hiked a trail of that name into the GC back in 1982 and camped down there at a few different spots over 3 days. Hiked in from the south rim. All I remember is before hiking down in we had to sit through some lecture the day before about safety, etc (dangers and cost of rescue), then they gave us a permit to hike in. I had absolutely NO money so I can't imagine it costing a lot.

SweetAss03
03-14-2011, 19:44
I had the same question. I am guessing they are talking about in the GC. If that is the case...$20 permit, no longer any class that I know of. I hiked down a couple of years ago and spent two nights. Phantom Ranch and Indian Gardens. If you are in the area, travel over to Havisu (spelling) Falls. I think it was $20 but an amazing place!

Desert Reprobate
03-14-2011, 21:51
Kaibab Trail to the bottom. Camp near Phantom Ranch. No water til the bottom. Hike back up the Bright Angel Trail. Spend a night at Indian Gardens. Two day hike out. Great trip. Best done before it gets too hot. When there is snow on the rim, it is shorts weather at the bottom. Great fishing down there too.

digger51
03-15-2011, 01:38
Try www.aztrail.org (http://www.aztrail.org). Thats the official homepage for the arizona trail.

Marnee
03-15-2011, 02:46
Hike Arizona always has lots of really good information and the Trip Logs are usually helpful. Also there is a pretty active discussion forum where I'm sure you can find what you are looking for:

Here is the overview on the South Kaibab section:
http://hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=2449

garlic08
03-15-2011, 21:32
The official AZT route does not follow the Rim. It heads west at the Grandview tower and stays outside the Park into the town of Tusayan. Some hikers ignore the official route and walk 11 miles on the Rim road to the South Rim Village. That's what I did. To me it was preferable over the route through Tusayan, but it is road walking. You do not have canyon views all the way, just mainly at a few vehicle pullouts.

By far the best hiking in the area is in the Canyon, and it would be a shame to miss it. You can do some excellent and challenging day hiking there without permits.

There are no reliable water sources in the area north of Russell Tank (about 10 miles or so south of Grandview tower. It's very dry country and 30+ mile water carries are not uncommon. Water source information is available on the AZT website mentioned above.

Erin
03-16-2011, 21:58
Ditto Desert Reprobate. I have done the same hike. In October. South Kaibab is absolutely beautiful. Stunning. No water. Take a gallon and electrolyte powder. Better to carry heavy than run out. Nice big floppy hat for sun cover. Even in October it was in the 30s at the top before dawn almost 100 degrees at the bottom and hot hot by the noon stop. The sun is blazing and the cover is basically big rocks I would lean into for a water break. And even if you camp at the bottom, you can get a cold one at Phantom ranch.

Shutterbug
03-16-2011, 22:49
I had the same question. I am guessing they are talking about in the GC. If that is the case...$20 permit, no longer any class that I know of. I hiked down a couple of years ago and spent two nights. Phantom Ranch and Indian Gardens. If you are in the area, travel over to Havisu (spelling) Falls. I think it was $20 but an amazing place!

It is a great recommendation to hike to Havasu Falls, but there is a note on the official web site of the Havasu Tribe:

Due to severe flood damages that occured on October 3, 5 & 6, 2010,Havasu Canyon is CLOSED TO VISITORS until rehabilitation work is completed and flood mitigation measures are in place. TRESPASSERS WILL BE PROSECUTED.ALL RESERVATIONS ARE CANCELLED and the Havasupai Tourism Office will not be taking reservations. Please contact Havasupai Tourism Office by email [email protected] ([email protected]).

Komuso
03-22-2011, 14:56
The Supai people are planning on re-opening the trail to Havasupai canyon/falls on May 1st. If you are in the area then you really should check out the falls... I'll be out on my thru of the AT, however friends here locally have recently confirmed their reservations for the first week of May, and were told it should be accessible and to plan on coming down. It's well worth the hike.

sonic
03-22-2011, 15:30
I agree with Komuso, the trip to the falls is well worth the effort. I did it with my son and friend several years ago and would love to go back. Unbelievable, breathtaking views. Not sure this is the trail you are speaking of, but it is the greatest.:banana

DuctTape
03-31-2011, 18:57
Just want to clarify fees for hiking in the National Park - $10 initial fee plus $5 per night per person - so one person two nights $20, two people 3 nights $40, etc.

Havasu Falls is on the Indian reservation and much more expensive, but amazing and definitely worth the time and effort to visit.

I live and work at the South Rim - the Canyon is a spectacular and obsessive place to hike!

maybe clem
03-31-2011, 21:45
And if you want to camp overnight in the canyon you have to apply for a permit, usually months in advance.

camojack
04-01-2011, 04:13
I'm having quite a bit of trouble finding any good information on the AZ trail as it runs through the south Kaibab National Forest...Hopefully somebody on the WB can help me out! Are there views from the Grand Canyon rim? and how closely does it parallel the rim? Are there reliable water sources?... As much as I would like to take a trip below the rim of the Grand Canyon, I am on a tight budget trying to see as much as I can of this country while minimally being screwed out of an arm and a leg for back-country camping, which usually is and should be free! :rolleyes:.... Any other advice on experiencing Arizona or the southwest in general on my way through will be greatly appreciated!
7 miles rim to river. I did it both ways one day. It doesn't follow the rim; it dives right in. Water in the Colorado River at the bottom, polluted...bring plenty of your own, and some way to treat the river water if you want to use that.

"They" recommend one gallon per person making the ascent, and an estimated time of 4-6 hours. I did it in 3, and was damned lucky it was a full moon, 'cause that was after dark.

And it gets really dark down in the canyon after the sun goes down... :sun

Shutterbug
04-01-2011, 10:53
7 miles rim to river. I did it both ways one day. It doesn't follow the rim; it dives right in. Water in the Colorado River at the bottom, polluted...bring plenty of your own, and some way to treat the river water if you want to use that.

"They" recommend one gallon per person making the ascent, and an estimated time of 4-6 hours. I did it in 3, and was damned lucky it was a full moon, 'cause that was after dark.

And it gets really dark down in the canyon after the sun goes down... :sun

It isn't necessary to drink water from the river. There is potable water available at the Boat Beach which is only 100 yards from the Black Bridge where the South Kaibab Trail reaches the Colorado River.

Land_Shark
04-01-2011, 11:54
Most of you have never been on that trail by the sounds of it. Do not ever step below the rim unless you are well prepaired. The GC is a place of beauty but why you are looking around and walking DOWN it may be to your doom. Take the donkeys or drive the extra day and go to the North Rim way cooler and less people.

Shutterbug
04-01-2011, 13:09
Most of you have never been on that trail by the sounds of it. Do not ever step below the rim unless you are well prepaired. The GC is a place of beauty but why you are looking around and walking DOWN it may be to your doom. Take the donkeys or drive the extra day and go to the North Rim way cooler and less people.

Land Shark

In my opinion, viewing the Grand Canyon from the rim or even riding a mule to the bottom don't compare favorably to a hike. While I agree with your suggestion that one should be prepared, there is nothing about a Grand Canyon hike that should scare a healthy hiker.

I have done 13 hikes below the rim in the past six years. My wife and I enjoy it so much that we do the hike several times a year. We were there last week.

One option that hasn't been mentioned in this thread is the duffle service. Xanterra, the contractor who manages Phantom Ranch, will send your pack to the bottom and back up again on a mule for about $125 round trip. It is money well spent.

My favorite trail from the South Rim is the Bright Angel, but the South Kaibab is interesting too. The South Kaibab is a lot shorter and steeper. Neither is to be feared.

While it is true that a lot of people are rescued out of the Grand Canyon each year, the percentage of hikers who have trouble is probably no higher than on other trails. Most people who hike down from the South Rim have no problem at all.

jbwood5
04-01-2011, 13:23
Just want to clarify fees for hiking in the National Park - $10 initial fee plus $5 per night per person - so one person two nights $20, two people 3 nights $40, etc.

Havasu Falls is on the Indian reservation and much more expensive, but amazing and definitely worth the time and effort to visit.

I live and work at the South Rim - the Canyon is a spectacular and obsessive place to hike!

DuctTape, I plan to hike from the S Rim to the N Rim this Fall. I have a NPS cabin reserved on the N Rim already. The next day I plan to hike back to the S Rim. Do you know if I'll need a permit for these day hikes?

BTW, I'm in good enough shape to do this, especially with a light pack, but your post makes me wonder if I need a permit. I appreciate your feedback.

Shutterbug
04-01-2011, 20:45
I am not Ducktape, but I can answer your question. You need a permit only if you stay below the rim over night.

I met a guy last year who was doing exactly what you plan. I talked to him on the way to the north rim and again at Phantom Ranch on his way back. He said that my 5 day plan for the rim to rim to rim was a lot smarter. He said that he wasn't having fun.

camojack
04-02-2011, 01:33
It isn't necessary to drink water from the river. There is potable water available at the Boat Beach which is only 100 yards from the Black Bridge where the South Kaibab Trail reaches the Colorado River.

I wish I'd known that when I was there; I made it out on less than a quart...which was all I had left. :eek:

Hoot
04-02-2011, 08:37
Kaibab Trail to the bottom. Camp near Phantom Ranch. No water til the bottom. Hike back up the Bright Angel Trail. Spend a night at Indian Gardens. Two day hike out. Great trip. Best done before it gets too hot. When there is snow on the rim, it is shorts weather at the bottom. Great fishing down there too.

did this hike back in january, though we did no fishing (a issue that will be corrected next january) a mile out of the gardens hit the snow and ice and till we got back up on the rim and out of the canyon it was slow going. was in 60's during the days so the weather was fantastic. Beer at the phantom ranch just seems to taste better.

Shutterbug
04-02-2011, 11:22
DuctTape, I plan to hike from the S Rim to the N Rim this Fall. I have a NPS cabin reserved on the N Rim already. The next day I plan to hike back to the S Rim. Do you know if I'll need a permit for these day hikes?

BTW, I'm in good enough shape to do this, especially with a light pack, but your post makes me wonder if I need a permit. I appreciate your feedback.

I am not DuctTape, but I can answer your question. No permit is needed unless you stay below the rim overnight.

Last year, I met three people who were attempting exactly the same hike you are planning. I visited with all three while they were on their way north, then visited with the one who made it on the way back south. His two partners dropped out on the North Rim and took the shuttle back to the South Rim. He was at Phantom Ranch on his way back to the South Rim on the second day.

Clearly, the two day rim to rim to rim can be done. For me, the big question is "why?" The guy I talked to confessed that he wasn't having fun. His partners dropped out after the first day. He said he would never do the two day rim to rim to rim again. My wife and I were having a ball on our five day rim to rim to rim. We go back several times a year and enjoy it every time.

I wish you well on your hike. Perhaps I will see you on the trail.

english
05-01-2011, 22:05
i'm waiting patiently for my nps bc permit to arrive, my question (totally unrelated to the OP) is there anywhere to hammock or should i just take my tarp & pad? I'm hoping to go down the hermit trail (staying at hermits creek & hermit rapids). cheers. i'm going in mid may

Dogwood
05-02-2011, 15:19
I'm having quite a bit of trouble finding any good information on the AZ trail as it runs through the south Kaibab National Forest...Hopefully somebody on the WB can help me out! Are there views from the Grand Canyon rim? and how closely does it parallel the rim? Are there reliable water sources?... As much as I would like to take a trip below the rim of the Grand Canyon, I am on a tight budget trying to see as much as I can of this country while minimally being screwed out of an arm and a leg for back-country camping, which usually is and should be free! :rolleyes:.... Any other advice on experiencing Arizona or the southwest in general on my way through will be greatly appreciated!

You are 20, on a limited budget, are from TN, and want to check some neat stuff out near/at the Grand Canyon in AZ possibly doing some short sections of trail(s). Keep it focused on that for the time being!

AZ is too big of an area to discuss generalities here. Southwest - forget it! Buy some books. Do some searches. Come back. Possibly can help with more specific ideas.

You'll be better off in many ways when you lose the "someone's trying to screw you'" idea and that hiking down to the Colorado River iin GC NP has to be expensive! DOES NOT HAVE TO BE! Duct Tape has provided rates. As stated Havasu Falls is scenically phemomenal but means more money, a car, or possibly long hitch., and possibly tighter to get needed reservations.


In my opinion, viewing the Grand Canyon from the rim or even riding a mule to the bottom don't compare favorably to a hike. While I agree with your suggestion that one should be prepared, there is nothing about a Grand Canyon hike that should scare a healthy hiker.
- Shutterbug

AMEN! Ditto! ABSOLUTELY! Of all the different NPs I've been I would have to say GC NP CAN NOT! CAN NOT! be experienced with a fly by night walk to the rim for an hour attitude.

If you are up to some serious hiking and scenery strongly consider a rim to rim OR rim to rim to rim multi(2 - 4 days) day trek involving Bright Angel Trail, S and N Kaibab Trails and the various camping areas on or near those trails. Dude, it's classic and memorable! If up for smething shorter I like Desert Reprobate's recs.

To each their own, but, IMO, the AZT in south Kaibab NF(NOT the same as the Kaibab Trail down to Colorado River and back up in GC NP!), while having merits(solitude, open camping, possible dirt road access, some other things) IS NOT at the top of a piriotized list I would recommend to someone desiring to experience the BEST of AZ on a AZ roadtrip with limited time, limited budget, and little or no previous AZ experience.

And if you want to camp overnight in the canyon you have to apply for a permit, usually months in advance. - Maybe Clem

This is NOT NECESSARILY true! Depends on several factors. some of which are: when you camp, where you camp, if you are in the NP, etc!

Lots of folks get reservations well in advance That's advised by the Nat Park Service. That's good planning, especially when dealing with limited time and inflexible agendas. But I have always(in 8 trips), by getting to BC Offices FIRST thing in the morning, by being flexible, having alternate campsites/hiking agendas, AND BEING AWARE OF OPEN CAMPING AREAS!, have gotten places to legally camp in GC NP for the next day below the rim! Some sites are reserved for walk ups!

By asking questions out of the norm you will find some amazing possibilities and opportunities that present themselves in GC NP and elsewhere!

English, some scrubby trees at the Hermit Crk. campsite area, and along Hermit Creek down to the CR but not so sure about hammocking opps. Might be iffy, but can't say for sure. Maybe some cams to lock into rock cracks for hanging could help! There are 1 or 2 campsite at H Crk under partial overhanging ledges. Nice swimming pool practically adjacent to the camping area. It's a pleasant day hike from H Crk camp sites to the CR along Hermit Cr. and back up to H Crk campsites. Scenic! Has a narrow gorge like effect in places. Hermit Rapids on the CR has a few beach camping areas near/in willows. Might experience rafters camping in that area. H Crk camping area has DETERMINED HUNGRY SMART mice. They climb, crawl, walk tight ropes, untie rope, leap tall buildings in a single bound, etc AND, as I sad, are HUNGRY for a n easy meal!

english
05-02-2011, 23:56
Dogwood, thanks for the heads up on the mice at hermit creek :) I just spoke with the park and been informed no hammocking is allowed if it means attaching to the tree's. thats fine, i'll take two pads instead. is it realistic to get to the hermit creek campground in 4-5 hours from the rim? I'm in good shape with a 24 lb pack.

Dogwood
05-03-2011, 03:21
.....is it realistic to get to the hermit creek campground in 4-5 hours from the rim? I'm in good shape with a 24 lb pack. -English


It's about 8 miles all downhill from Hermit TH to Hermit Creek campsites. Allowing about 5 hrs is right. Based on this and what you said YES! t's rocky though in a few spots. Obvious route. No where as maintained as the Kaibab or Bright Angel Corridor Trails. Stop off at shaded Santa Maria spring for a seat and drink! It's always been flowing when I've been there. It's just a trickle. Check on the latest H20 availability of SM S at the BC Office. Might help if you don't want to haul too much water from Hermits Rest the entire 8 miles to H Crk campsites.



You can take the free shuttle right to Hermits Rest when it's running. Doesn't run in the winter, all the way to H TH, I think. Check out the big fireplace. Get some H20 before heading off from here. This is a much prefered route( MUCH LESS people!) for branching off on the Tonto Trail towards Elves Chasm or in the other direction towards the Phantom Ranch area or beyond. According to NP ranger statistics, less than 5 % of the visitiors to GC NP get below the rim. Of those that do get below the rim about 75 % stay on corridor trails. I like this route down to the Tonto on this side of BA T. Very often it's part of my GC treks. It might not seem it now but hermit Camp, you'll be passing it in the way to your H Crk campsite has a lot of history. Pick up a Hermit Trail flier at the BC Office

english
05-06-2011, 15:18
Dogwood, thanks for the heads up & advise, much appreciated. English. I can't wait :)

Shutterbug
05-06-2011, 15:54
Dogwood, thanks for the heads up & advise, much appreciated. English. I can't wait :)

English, you said you will be in the Grand Canyon in "mid May." Perhaps I will see you there. I am hiking to Clear Creek starting on May 17.

I was at Phantom Ranch last week. The temperatures were ideal. April and May are great times to hike the Grand Canyon.

Dogwood
05-06-2011, 16:41
Shutterbug, are you hiking up to Cheyava Falls upstream along Clear Creek? Might be flowing nicely in mid May!

weary
05-06-2011, 17:03
Land Shark

In my opinion, viewing the Grand Canyon from the rim or even riding a mule to the bottom don't compare favorably to a hike. While I agree with your suggestion that one should be prepared, there is nothing about a Grand Canyon hike that should scare a healthy hiker.

I have done 13 hikes below the rim in the past six years. My wife and I enjoy it so much that we do the hike several times a year. We were there last week.

One option that hasn't been mentioned in this thread is the duffle service. Xanterra, the contractor who manages Phantom Ranch, will send your pack to the bottom and back up again on a mule for about $125 round trip. It is money well spent.

My favorite trail from the South Rim is the Bright Angel, but the South Kaibab is interesting too. The South Kaibab is a lot shorter and steeper. Neither is to be feared.

While it is true that a lot of people are rescued out of the Grand Canyon each year, the percentage of hikers who have trouble is probably no higher than on other trails. Most people who hike down from the South Rim have no problem at all.














I'm not an expert, but I walked to the bottom of GC via the South Kaibab trail, camped two nights, enjoyed a couple of beers at Phantom Ranch, and spent two days walking out via the Bright Angel Trail.

Both trails are relatively easy. We took our time because I like to explore ancient places. The remains of an Indian Village at the bottom was fascinating. There was a water fountain at the bottom with water piped from above the rim I believe.

I strongly recommend a slow walk to the bottom. It's an "easy" excursion that you'll never forget. Just use a bit of care following the South Kaibab trail.

Shutterbug
05-06-2011, 17:07
Shutterbug, are you hiking up to Cheyava Falls upstream along Clear Creek? Might be flowing nicely in mid May!

My permit is for only one night at Clear Creek, so I won't make it ot Cheyava Falls this time. The last time I hiked to Clear Creek, my camera broke, so my primary motivation for this trip is to get some of the outstanding photos available from the Clear Creek trail. I will be taking a lot of stops along the trail for pictures.

Shutterbug
05-06-2011, 17:19
I'm not an expert, but I walked to the bottom of GC via the South Kaibab trail, camped two nights, enjoyed a couple of beers at Phantom Ranch, and spent two days walking out via the Bright Angel Trail.

Both trails are relatively easy. We took our time because I like to explore ancient places. The remains of an Indian Village at the bottom was fascinating. There was a water fountain at the bottom with water piped from above the rim I believe.

I strongly recommend a slow walk to the bottom. It's an "easy" excursion that you'll never forget. Just use a bit of care following the South Kaibab trail.

Weary, I have done the hike you describe several times. It never gets old.

You mentioned that you thought the water was piped from above the rim. Actually, all of the water used on the South rim and along the North Kaibab and Bright Angel Trails comes from Roaring Springs which is on the North Kaibab Trail. The water flows from Roaring Springs by gravity to Indian Garden. A pump house at Indian Garden pumps the water to the South Rim.

english
05-06-2011, 18:25
my permit was denied, all campgrounds full :( any advise? I know there are a few "walk in" permits handed out but I'm not arriving there until late Friday afternoon so unlikely I'll get one of those. I'm actually delivering product to the Grand Canyon Assoc. which is the reason why I applied so late.

Dogwood
05-06-2011, 20:00
Did you completely fill out the Backcountry Permit Request Form, including campsite alternate choices 2 and 3? All alternate choices were also denied? Would you be willing to head down the Boucher Trail? Are you opposed to open camping areas for camping? Did you try alternate days, maybe 1-2 days either side of your initial date for a particular desired campsite location/area? What is you allotted time frame for hiking at the GC?


It seems you are going to be at the GC anyhow for a delivery, correct? I assume you mentioned the 4-5 hrs hike time in a previous post because that's the anticipated amount of daylight time you will have for hiking after you complete your delivery, correct? You had not originally planned for staying anywhere on the S Rim therefore you had no reservations made there, correct? Are you going to have camping gear(tent, shelter, etc) with you on fri? and be ready to go, if necessary? Would you be willing to stay on the S Rim for one night, possibly staying at Mather campground or at a lodge if you could get a reservation?



Ok mid May is getting busy for mail in ahead campsite/backcountry overnight reservations! One possible scenario that could work for you! Get to the BC Office located near Maswik Cafeteria(that can be a good eat and think about it/planning place!, there's a bar there too if no permit scenarios work! LOL!) on friday before they close. ASK in person WHAT'S POSSIBLE based on your goals, timeframe, possible hiking agendas(have alternate agendas planned ahead of time before entering the BC Office!), etc. Make yourself known! You might surprisingly find what occurs by phone/mail is different than what can occur in person when you start asking questions!!! Different dynamic develops face to face! and when you ask NICELY? and when you ask questions outside-of-the-box! and when you get personal attention! and when the Ranger you are communicating with isn't hurried for time with many vistors at the same time handing out pat answers! and when you have a good informed idea of what you want! and when you have some flexibility in your plans! ASK about what you have to do to have your BEST possible shot at getting a campsite at Hermit Crk the first thing the next morning!!! Of course, they will probably tell you nothing is guaranteed. They are right! Have one or more possible alternate hiking agendas for the following morning too, IF NEED BE!



This is part of the campsite lottery process! Don't yet be dismayed! Work the process! I know it's can be a bit intimidating and insecure without set reservations but consider you are going to be there anyway!


I'm going to tell you ahead of time, if you do what I've said, and you follow the Ranger's advice, you will probably get a walk up reservation for the following day so you'll be able to hike to Herrmit Crk at a more gingerly hiking pace and have some explore time on Day 1 of the hike! A bit further is Monument Valley camping area too which is quite nice too!


Be at the BC Office BEFORE they open on Sat with your most desired hiking agenda(campsites) and some alternates! The earlier you get outside the door usually the better! Bring a cup a Joe from Maswik, a book, and some tanning lotion!

HAVE A GREAT HIKE!

Shutterbug
05-07-2011, 13:01
my permit was denied, all campgrounds full :( any advise? I know there are a few "walk in" permits handed out but I'm not arriving there until late Friday afternoon so unlikely I'll get one of those. I'm actually delivering product to the Grand Canyon Assoc. which is the reason why I applied so late.

Since you will be going to the Grand Canyon anyway, you can walk-in to the backcountry office. They are very accomodating (depending on which ranger you get).

If every campsite is taken, perhaps you can talk someone who already has a permit to add you to theirs. The NPS allows up to six hikers on each permit.

english
05-07-2011, 20:59
Dogwood & Shutterbug, thanks for all the suggestions guys, I just booked 2 nights at Mathers CG. I'm arriving into Pheonix Fri 13th & gotta leave early Mon 16th May. It was a last minute thing, next year, I'll apply months in advance :) I heard the BC office do walk ins but I don't think they open until 8 am, and I could have been in the canyon for 2 hours by that point. I'll hammock it at mathers, up at 5 am for sunrise at Yaki Point before hitting the SK Trail. Sunday, I'll probably leave early again and hit hermit trail. Thanks again for the advise guys. English

Dogwood
05-07-2011, 22:41
Glad you figured things out English.


For what it's worth though, with 2 days float time, I'll bet my Neo Air that I could get a reservation as a walk in at Hermit Crk camping area!


That would have been a big first day anyhow - fly into Phoenix(Sky Harbor?), get to GCNP(it's not exactly right around the corner from Sky Harbor either!), do delivery?, hike 8 miles to Hermit crk? Whew! That's the kind of stuff I've been known to do!


You could: On fri May 13 chow down, gear prep, see sunset from the S Rim, take stroll along S Rim, spend night at Mather CG on fri May 13, take first shuttle over to BC Off. first thing Mon May 14. GET PERMIT for H Crk, jump on shuttle over to Hermits Rest/H TH. Hike 8 miles to H Crk camping area. So far no problema! You actually got some flex time in there! No stress! If you don't get the permit for H Crk go to your SK plan. If (when) you get the H Crk permit spend Sat May 14 at H Crk or continue on doing a longer day of about 11 miles total virtually 100 % downhill/level to Hermit Rapids on the CR. Stay at Hermit Rapids on the CR on sat May 14. Not really a big deal considering you were ready to hike 8 miles in 4-5 hrs! May 15 reverse it all! Hike 11 miles virtually all uphill. You aren't going to die! No problema leaving early May 16. If you are a manly kinda man hike back to Hermit Crk camping area that first day on May 14 doing 14 miles total and stay at H Crk making May 15 a shorter 8 mile up hill! You'll catch a shuttle to Maswik in the afternoon on May 15 where you'll drink yourself silly thinking to yourself "I did it!" You'll feel that noticeable but pleasant burn in your quads. Then, you'll happily but wearily wander over to Mather for your last night before an early departure on sun May 16, of course not before chowing down b-fast at Maswik. YEAH, all doable! Not a pie-in-the-sky agenda!

It will re-inforce the mindset: 'advance confidently in the direction of your dreams and endeavor to live the life you have imagined. The future is not just some place you are going to, but is a place you are creating, and the paths to it are not always found, they are made. Follow yoiur passion as long as you live, and on this you will reach success.'


S Rim, BA and SK trails in mid May, decent weather, weekend, it's going to be busy! Be ready for bumper cars! Better views coming up S Kaibab than coming up BA but its steeper but a little shorter.

english
05-17-2011, 23:44
I'm back in MD but going back to the GC again as soon as my wife will let me :) landed in Phoenix 9:00 am Friday, picked car, arrived at GC NP, made delivery, booked into Mathers CG all by 3 pm. Walked the rim trail from CG to SK TH to watch sunset. Sat, up at 4 am, drove car to just outside SK TH and began descent to the river, lemonade at Phantom Ranch, changed socks, applied moleskins to hotspots, back up BA to reach rim by 4 pm. Sunday 8 am, walked down the Grandview trail to Page Springs (Page puddle?), back up to Horseshoe Mesa, and along to the Cave of the Domes, back up to TH by 4 pm again with just enough to watch the sunset on Hermits Rest. Left park at 9 pm sunday to catch 6 am flight Monday. No blisters. Not even a hotspot. Though I didn't cycle to work Tuesday :) Next week I'll be applying months in advance for a BC permit

skoolbyrd
05-18-2011, 00:02
Last time I was there a group of 4 adults in their late 40's? from Telluride were on the way back up to the South Rim on Bright Angel from leaving the hotel on the North Rim at 4am. They were in sandals (tevas, chacos). I couldn't believe it but they were fine. I wished we had gone all the way to the river and back up also - once we were back on the rim, of course.

Dogwood
05-18-2011, 02:46
You da man English! Time well used! Nice job!

Thanks for coming back letting us know how it went.

GC NP is addictive. I love it there! Every trip is a bit diffeent for me! You stirred the pot English.

Thanks!