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goody5534
03-28-2011, 20:50
I want to buy a hammock sik of my cold ass tent, but I am 320lbs any advice for me on where and from who to buy!!

couscous
03-28-2011, 21:17
I would consider the WBBB DL 1.7 - Warbonnet Blackbird Double Layer 1.7
http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/blackbirds.php

dragoro
03-28-2011, 21:18
Hennessy hammocks makes the safari deluxe that's strong enough for ya.

http://hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.html

dragoro
03-28-2011, 21:24
And check out hammockforums.net for all kinds of hammocking info.

gunner76
03-28-2011, 21:28
I would consider the WBBB DL 1.7 - Warbonnet Blackbird Double Layer 1.7

American made and is suports my 290 lbs with no problem. Plus it has a built in bug net and a storage self.

Get it with the adjustable webbing suspension, add some Dutch Clips and you can be hanging in a minute

dragoro
03-28-2011, 21:38
That particular warbonnet is on backorder according to their website.

RWK
03-28-2011, 21:40
The 1.7sl is on back order not the 1.7dl.

dragoro
03-28-2011, 21:43
Ah my fault.

Ender
03-28-2011, 21:47
I want to buy a hammock sik of my cold ass tent, but I am 320lbs any advice for me on where and from who to buy!!

All great suggestions so far from others about hammocks. I do want to say though, that if your tent is cold, the hammock is going to be colder. Just something to consider.

goody5534
03-29-2011, 00:34
I assumed that because I would be off the ground that I would be able to garner some more warmth from my bag.. a Hog Park from big anges??? explain why this is not true, I am not knowlegdable...

Hooch
03-29-2011, 01:20
You'll be losing heat by convection. Regardless of if you're in a tent of hammock, you'll be crushing the insulation under you in your sleeping bag, renedering it ineffective at keeping your backside warm. This why tenters use pads on the ground. You'll acutally be colder in a hammock than in a tent, unless you have the proper insulation. Definitely check out Hammock Forums.

dragoro
03-29-2011, 08:31
Heap need to use some kind of under insulation attached to the bottom of the hammock. Some people do ok with just using a sleeping pad and bag inside the hammock itself. You really should check out hammockforums.net.

Buffalo Skipper
03-29-2011, 16:18
Another + on checking out hammockforums.net. But don't get discouraged yet. I have had my hammock out in the cold, and I have done fine down to 21. But it takes practice and the right equipment. Easy way is to use a thick pad, but that can defeat some of the comfort and benefits of a hammock, but it is light and relatively inexpensive. The best way is to use an under-quilt (UQ). I use a down UQ rated accurately to 20. By adding a foam pad and a space blanket, I would probably be warm down to 10 or prehaps lower (haven't been there, yet).

To be honest, UQs are not cheap; in fact they are quite pricy. But considering the level of comfort I achieve in my hammock, I will never go back to the ground again, if I can avoid it.

YMMV.

kayak karl
03-29-2011, 16:28
All great suggestions so far from others about hammocks. I do want to say though, that if your tent is cold, the hammock is going to be colder. Just something to consider.
WHY? i watched people leave the trail right and left with tents because they were cold. i've been to -5 without a problem. "Hammocking is an Art"

Ender
03-29-2011, 17:05
WHY? i watched people leave the trail right and left with tents because they were cold. i've been to -5 without a problem. "Hammocking is an Art"

Yes, but you were hammocking correctly, and they were tenting incorrectly.

Hammocking for sure is an art, and one that takes skill and practice to get into cold temperatures with. I've been to below freezing in my hammock and been fine. But it requires extra gear to do so.

Take the same pad he was using in his tent and throw it into a hammock, and he would be even colder than he was in the tent. Like Hooch said, the extra air circulating beneath you makes you lose even more heat through convection.

kayak karl
03-29-2011, 17:25
i don't read what hooch types:rolleyes:. missed that. is there a weight limit on pads? i think there should be. a heavier person, like myself, would compress it more an limit its effectiveness.

dragoro
03-29-2011, 17:30
Yes, but you were hammocking correctly, and they were tenting incorrectly.

Hammocking for sure is an art, and one that takes skill and practice to get into cold temperatures with. I've been to below freezing in my hammock and been fine. But it requires extra gear to do so.

Take the same pad he was using in his tent and throw it into a hammock, and he would be even colder than he was in the tent. Like Hooch said, the extra air circulating beneath you makes you lose even more heat through convection.

That depends on the pad. Some act as vapor barriers, which should be fine to use.

johnhump
03-29-2011, 17:34
i can tell you from experience how miserable it is to be in a hammock in the cold. when i first got my hennessy i couldnt wait you use it. took at for a two nighter. weather got down to 38ish and i was very cold. never tried it with a pad inside though. besides that hammocks are very light and comfortable

johnhump
03-29-2011, 17:35
sorry for the spelling

Ender
03-29-2011, 23:31
That depends on the pad. Some act as vapor barriers, which should be fine to use.

Maybe, but then they would be fine to use on the ground. Since his isn't fine on the ground, then for sure it won't work in the hammock.

I should say though, once you do get your technique for hammocking down, chances are you'll have a very comfortable night's sleep.

dragoro
03-30-2011, 09:08
Maybe, but then they would be fine to use on the ground. Since his isn't fine on the ground, then for sure it won't work in the hammock.

I should say though, once you do get your technique for hammocking down, chances are you'll have a very comfortable night's sleep.

Well I'm definitely no expert, not by a long shot, so I'll have to defer to you.