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hikemikehike
04-21-2011, 17:19
doing an E2E in august, what temperature rating should my bag be? thanks

NorthCountryWoods
04-21-2011, 17:54
Depends. Everybody has different sleeping bag preferences not to mention the variation in bag temp ratings, but if the duration of your hike is in August you won't have many nights below 50 degrees.

My wife and I get by with just bag liners only and wear fleeces for cold nights.

double d
04-21-2011, 17:54
Vermont/LT in August is great place to be! I would suggest a 20 degree down bag, such as a Campmor model (which is what I use on the LT in the summer time).

Praha4
04-21-2011, 18:07
last year I hiked on the LT the last 2 weeks of August, coldest night was in low 30s. Most nights were 40s-50s. I used a Marmot Hydrogen 30 degree bag and it was plenty warm. You could probably get by with a 34 or 40 degree bag and wear a fleece top if you needed it on colder nites.

Papa D
04-23-2011, 09:17
I did it in July with a 40 degree bag - do remember that bag ratings (with a few exceptions) are "survival" ratings - add about 15 degrees to be comfortable. I was never cold with the 40 deg. and I would probably use it for a August hike, but might also might pair it with a bag liner or a light down sweater. For September, I'd use a 20 deg bag.

maxpower88
04-24-2011, 09:54
I leave for my E2E on 6/1 and I am bringing a Western Mountaineering Summerlite 32 degree bag. I also am bringing the Western Mountaineering hooded flash jacket, I think it should be sufficient.

Papa D
04-24-2011, 10:48
Maxpower, sounds like you might find yourself a little hot - that WM stuff is wonderful but the only time I got chilled in July was in a cold rain at Emily Proctor Shelter and again in another cold rain at Puffer Shelter - both were short lived and my 40 degree bag and some hot tea fixed things right up - the LT can be really wet - I love my down, but you should be EXTRA careful with that western bag - put it in a plastic bag -INSIDE - a good dry bag - only take it out in your tent or in a dry spot in the shelters.

maxpower88
04-24-2011, 11:17
Maxpower, sounds like you might find yourself a little hot - that WM stuff is wonderful but the only time I got chilled in July was in a cold rain at Emily Proctor Shelter and again in another cold rain at Puffer Shelter - both were short lived and my 40 degree bag and some hot tea fixed things right up - the LT can be really wet - I love my down, but you should be EXTRA careful with that western bag - put it in a plastic bag -INSIDE - a good dry bag - only take it out in your tent or in a dry spot in the shelters.
Sounds like some good advice, I hail from VT but live in Southern CA and didnít get into backpacking until I moved out here so I am not familiar with hiking in weather, except sunshine! I chose the WM 32 because I am a cold sleeper, I use the WM Versalite 10 degree on the PCT and a lot of people think it is overkill as well but I am in pretty good shape and donít mind the extra OZís. I am rocking a 13lb base weight so being a little warmer at night suits me just fine but the wetness does concern me, I use a compacter bag for my sleeping bag, extra clothes and as my pack cover so hopefully I can keep things relatively dry but with a 6/1/11 start date I am sure things are going to get wet and muddy.

Either way I am super excited to be spending the month of June hiking in VT & NH, it should be an adventure for sure. Thanx again

Peace. MP88

stranger
04-25-2011, 08:45
I hiked the LT starting 10 July and finished on 5 August.

I took a cheap, synthetic 50 deg bag that worked fine for my trip. The only chilly nights I remember were just below Killington and our last night below Jay Peak, and the bag was fine.

Sleeping bag ratings are just that...ratings. In many parts of the world bag manufacturers don't even use them, they simply put the amount of down in the bag and it's the person's responsibility to make the correct assessment.

In addition to ratings, one should also consider:
- body weight
- circulation
- age
- gender
- ground insulation
- draft/wind (tent, shelter, tarp, etc)
- full stomach or empty
- wool/down hat or no hat?

For an August thru of the Long Trail, assuming you are starting in early Aug, I would recommend taking a bag that will keep you warm in temps around mid 40's most nights, with the possibility of dropping into the 30's and climbing into the 50's.

Jeff
04-25-2011, 09:03
Sounds like some good advice, I hail from VT but live in Southern CA and didnít get into backpacking until I moved out here so I am not familiar with hiking in weather, except sunshine!

You are about to begin a new life experience. Embrace the wetness !!! :D

pedxing
04-26-2011, 17:40
My 35 F bag (Western Mountaineering Caribou) has been about perfect for the LT in August and July over about 60 nights total - I do use a liner as well though. Some nights the liner is all I need, some nights I add the bag as a blanket as it cools off. Very rarely have I needed to zip my self in completely. Once (only once) I wore my knit cap and a layer of clothes in addition to the liner and the bag in order to be comfortable on a windy night when the wind was blowing into open side of a 3 walled shelter.

stranger
04-26-2011, 18:15
Personally speaking...I think the best overall bag I know of for this type of trip would be a Western Mountaineering Mightylite

1lb, 10 ounces, semi rectangular, no silly hood, opens as quilt, rated to 40, I have the heaver and warmer Syncamore and love it, I will never return to mummy bags again!

The best trick is sleeping with your feet outside the bag, that's when you are living large, can do that with a mummy!

Also, being semi-rectangular and able open up completely, much easier to shift down for those cold nights.

The Mightylite goes for about $210 I think

Papa D
04-26-2011, 19:59
Yeah - the bag I carried on the LT is a North Face Propel 40 - you can un-zip your feet from the foot box which is really comfortable - I'm planning on hiking 1/2 of the CO trail this July (my family gives me a month) and I'll probably carry it again. Not a big North Face company fan, but this is a really good bag.

Cookerhiker
04-26-2011, 20:12
On my 2007 E2E (http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=6248)from mid-August to mid-September, I had a 45 degree Kelty down bag which served me well. There was, surprisingly to me, a lot of warm nights. Halfway through the hike, I purchased a 15 degree Sea-to-Summit liner but only needed it on my last night.

NorthCountryWoods
04-27-2011, 12:47
Haven't been out many nights in August below 50 degrees. September is a different story. Spent more than one September night on the LT in the 20s only to have it hit the 80s the next day.

"Prepare for the worst and hope for the best" is my motto for LT hiking, mud, bugs, water, weather, etc.

sharky
04-27-2011, 22:11
I will be starting the first week in September this year. I have an REI SubKilo 20 degree bag. Is that sufficient?

NorthCountryWoods
04-28-2011, 15:04
I will be starting the first week in September this year. I have an REI SubKilo 20 degree bag. Is that sufficient?

A decent 20 degree should be fine. I have a 30 degree Northface I use for September, but I'm a hot sleeper and carry base layers and fleece to wear if necessary.

Comet Omega
04-28-2011, 18:34
I've been leaning towards my WM Caribou. Starting end of Aug/beginning of Sept. Have a Helium too. Figure I can layer in the bag and cover the temps and save some weight.

Tinker
04-28-2011, 18:44
If you have a tent (and use it) which isn't completely mosquito netting, which has a rainfly with good coverage you should be able to do it with a 40 degree bag which you can supplement with clothing (like a down or fleece vest). Remember that the pad provides a lot of warmth, too, which can be a double-edged sword in the summer. On cool nights it will keep you warm and on warm nights it will keep you, well, warmer. Without a tent to break the wind (no, your partner won't help :p) you might need a warmer bag.
Above posters have already alluded to the variables. If you are a cold sleeper, get a high quality bag rated to 40 degrees. If you want to save money, get a less expensive bag rated to 30 degrees. It will be heavier but likely just as warm (not likely any warmer).

stranger
04-28-2011, 23:16
I think the key point of this thread is that you cannot simply trust a sleeping bag 'rating'...it's not that simple.

So for me, I believe a REI 20 deg down bag would be fine, if not overkill...but that doesn't mean it will be the same for you.

Generally speaking, a 20 deg down bag is going to work well for 'most' people in temperatures ranging from 30-50 deg

Think of ratings as suggestions or guidelines for the average, typical person...nothing more than that.

sharky
04-29-2011, 23:16
It weighs 2lbs and compacts very small is why I carry it. I was also a little unclear of how cold it would get going nobo starting the first week in Sept. I have lightweight wool base layers and a Big Agnes Insulated Air Core as a pad so I think I will be fine.

Canute600
05-04-2011, 08:37
I hiked in 2009 from in July and August and had a 35 deg synthetic bag. It was good for the most part, but on top of Glastenbury Mtn, I wished I had a warmer bag. I would encourage you to err on the side of caution. 2009 was a cooler and wetter year than typical though.


I hiked the LT starting 10 July and finished on 5 August.


That's wild man, I started and finished the LT on the exact same dates in 2009!