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Limeman
05-15-2011, 16:27
Hi all,

I had a chance to set up and look over the new Nemo Obi 1P tent on Saturday, so I thought I'd take a few pix and make some backyard setup observations, especially in light of the Obi 2P I reviewed a while back. (FYI, I did not have a tent-specific footprint, so in the pix I just used a Kelty footprint I had lying around).

The over-all design and execution are, as to be expected, very similar to the Obi 2P, with a few exceptions: one door and vestibule, vs. two, the ability to fully peel back both sections of the door side vestibule for excellent ventilation in clear and/or hot weather, and no zipper fly venting option, like in the 2P. Instead, you get an always open side vent in place of the second door/vestibule of the 2P. You cannot access this area from inside the tent, but due to the high cut-out of the fly, it would most likely provide little weather protection for gear, so it is a mute point. The design seems a reasonable compromise to keep cool air flowing through the tent.

The 1P has similar internal pockets as the 2P, (including the ceiling pocket with the light dispersing material), as well as snaps and loops for the optional pawprint and gear caddy. The 1P also shares the 2P's ability to attach the sides of the tent to the fly to increase internal volume. In the 1P, however, Nemo chose to include only one clip, on the left side of the fly, to volumize the tent. Fortunately, they provided a tie out on the door side of the tent body so you can employ a guyline/stake to fully increase the internal volume. This makes a huge difference in the internal volume, even more so than in the 2P, due to the very narrow tapering of the walls in the 1-person configuration. I do wish Nemo had included a clip on the door side of the fly, but at least you have the option to use a guyline/stake.

The vestibule in the 1P appears much larger than a single vestibule in the 2P. This appears to be due to the tent body being much narrower and also longer than that of the 2P. Needless to say, you'll have more than enough room for your pack, boots, cooking etc. I think you might even be able to pull in another person in an emergency. Good stuff.

So here is how the 1P measured out:

Trail weight: 2lbs, 8.2 oz (Nemo specs 2lbs, 8oz)

All internal tape measure readings approx but reasonably accurate:

Internal floor length, 88" as spec'd by Nemo
Internal floor width at the head of tent, 39"
Internal floor width at shoulder zone, 36"
Internal floor width at mid-point, 32"
Internal floor width at foot, 29'
Side walls, mid-point, fully volumized, shoulder level, 29"
Internal height, mid point, 39

Overall, the internal space is very nice for one person, with plenty of length for a 6' + person, and enough room to sit up, jockey around and not feel like you're in a coffin. But if you don't volumize, then you'll feel pretty cramped.

Now some picks...

In the 2P, the main wall at the head of the tent body has a loop along with a clip at the fly, that when connected and used with a guyline on the fly, helps against wind deflection across that large expanse of fabric. Interestingly, the Nemo 1P has the loop on the tent body and a loop on the fly, but no clip to connect them. If you really wanted/needed, you could always rig up a solution with a bit of guyline, but as the size of the tent wall on the 1P is smaller than that of the 2P, I think that wind deflection is less of an issue. I bring this up, however, because one feature that Nemo left out from the 1P was not providing loops at the bottom mid-point of each side of the tent body, like they did in the 2P. This helped to further increase the volume of the tent and allowed for easy one-hand operation of the doors, but more importantly, kept the walls taut against wind deflection at the mid-point of the tent body. Not having them in the 1P seems like a real over-site, as wind deflection on the side walls is exaggerated due to the narrower dimensions of a 1-person tent. I would much rather see Nemo forgo the loop on the tent body head wall all together, and then add it and one more at each of the the lower mid-point side walls like in the 2P. Small over site, but in really windy weather, could make a huge difference.

Those two complaints aside, Id say Nemo hit the nail on the head with the Obi 1P. It packs small, sets up quick and taut, weighs just 2lbs, 8oz trail weight, has a large vestibule, more than enough room to comfortably protect one person and overall seems buttoned down for both good and bad weather alike. I like it, surprisingly more than the 2-person version. Sure the Obi 2P has larger internal dimensions, 2 doors/vestibules and more elaborate venting options (dual zipper vents), and seems a better deal, especially when you get this extra space and features for for just $40 more and a mere 6 oz penalty. But the Obi 1P actually does what it is designed to do in the pure sense of the word. It will hold 1-person comfortably, with little to no compromise. Period. I cannot say the same about the Obi 2P, which to me is too small internally for two people to comfortably co-exist, and thus misses the 2-person tent ideal. In that context, the 1P seems the better tent. I just wish it was priced at about $299, because at $349, it just might be too expensive to justify over the Obi 2P, regardless of its better over-all execution, and it might also have a hard time competing against the identically priced, but larger and lighter Big Agnes Fly Creek 2P, especially when used as a single person shelter.

Cheers!

BradMT
05-15-2011, 18:16
Thanks for such a thorough review. I've been interested in the Obi1P, and especially the "Elite" version. I've been debating this tent vs. the Big Agnes Copper Creek UL1.

I find the guyline to increase internal volume on the Vestibule side a disappointment... really takes away from the usability of the vestibule from the looks of it... you say the tent body "could" be clipped to the rainfly if a clip were provided?

Is the clip something Nemo can offer after sale?

How, volume-wise, do you think it compares to an MSR Hubba... ie, does the Obi1P feel as tight as the Hubba?

Thanks.

BradMT
05-15-2011, 18:30
This makes far more sense to me:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/brad300wsm/Obi2Psideclip.jpg

Limeman
05-15-2011, 21:05
@Bradmt...

Your pic above is how the fly clip on the non door side attaches to the tent body to increase volume. Clean. But the fly does not have this cable/clip system on the door side of the Obi 1P (the 2P does). You must use a guyline/stake as show in my pix to increase the volume on both sides of the tent body. While a bit of a disappointment, I think that using a guyline and stake really isn't that big of a drawback. You can still easily put packs and boots in the vestibule while doing so and it is not in a place where you're apt to trip over it. No biggie. You can't really add a clip to the fly, unless you are good at sewing and are willing to void Nemo's lifetime warranty. ;)

As far as the Hubba is concerned, I believe that Nemo has done a better job at making their Obi 1P feel roomy and non-claustrophobic than the MSR. Part of this has to do with the over-all floor plan shape of the Obi 1P, which is wider at the head, narrowing to the foot, while the Hubba is basically a simple rectangle. And while the walls on the Hubba are essentially vertical, I believe the Obi 1P has more width at the elbow and shoulder area, due to the wider floor plan and the ability to volumize as mentioned in my review above. Certainly, the Obi 1P specs at 21 sq ft. vs. the Hubba's 17 sq ft., but of course costs about $100 more. If you have a need for a 1P and have the money, you should certainly check on out and see if it meets your needs.

Limeman
05-15-2011, 21:12
What I meant to say is, you must use a guyline/stake on the door side of the tent if you wish to increase the volume on both sides of the tent body. The non-door side has the built in fly clip to attach to the tent body. If you look at picture 9, you can see it through the mesh side-wall.

Limeman
05-15-2011, 22:40
Actually, now that I'm really thinking about it, it is clear the reason Nemo chose not to add a clip to the door side fly/vestibule is due to the Obi 1P's ability to fully tie back both sides of the fly (see pic 10 above) for increased ventilation options (or star gazing on clear, calm nights).

As the design edict of the Obi series is, in their own words, to have "not an ounce of wasted material, with every feature and detail driven by purpose and strategy", I'd say eliminating this feature on the door side fly/vestibule makes sense, especially since you can easily utilize a short bit of guyline and a stake with the door tie out loops to do the same thing. Again, in no way a deal breaker in my mind and seems a smart design choice.

BradMT
05-16-2011, 08:36
it is clear the reason Nemo chose not to add a clip to the door side fly/vestibule is due to the Obi 1P's ability to fully tie back both sides of the fly

That's what I was thinking when I first saw it. Unfortunately I find it a poor design idea and it is a deal breaker for me. It essentially renders useless a good portion of the vestibule's space. I can see a lot of potential problems with the design.

I "get" why they're using side pullouts to add internal volume rather than a cross-strut like the Copper Spur... But I'd rather have had the two-ish ounce weight penalty of a cross strut that accomplishes the same but without guys. In a way, the tent is not a true free-standing tent with such critical reliance on pull-outs for volume.

Will add, the other thing that has had me on the fence about all NEMO tents is the super-vibrant color. Back in the 70's when I started backpacking that sort of color was the norm. I find intense colors unsettling to live in. Subtle, gentler colors are more soothing to live in and have become more the norm in recent years, which for me is a good thing.

As a marketing scheme, it's obviously a smart thing for NEMO tents to stand-out visually (including the big, goofy logo). But as a customer I'm happy not to pay for their advertising and suffer a color that bugs me.

While I appreciate the many excellent design ideas on this tent, it has enough mitigations for me to pass. But we all have different limits as to what we will accept and reject mitigation-wise, eh?

Again, I can't thank you enough for such a thorough and objective review... it made my mind up.

Kindest Regards,

Brad

BradMT
05-16-2011, 08:37
PS, I'm a bit harsh on the logo and that likely is unwarranted... BUT it could be smaller. :D

Limeman
05-16-2011, 12:28
To be clear again, Nemo deploys the cross strut on the non-door vesibule (left side) of the tent. As the door-side (right) vestibule appears to be quite large and long (especially in comparison to the Obi 2P), unless you plan to stuff more than just your gear (such as a friends pack, boots, and more, you will not run into issues by having deployed a guyline/stake to further volumize the tent from the right side. I will see if I can get the tent again and setup so I can take some pix with gear in the vestibule to show what I mean, but you can easily pass your pack, etc. underneath the deployed guyline, so the space is not really impacted. Further, the volume of the tent might be satisfactory to you with just the left-side strut deployed? I would say check the Obi out if you can before you let my pix and description dissuade you. I'll see what I can do to get the tent back for more pix. Oh... the color is not garish in person. If you want that, look to the new TNF tents!

BradMT
05-16-2011, 18:13
I'm perfectly clear on the system... the Obi doesn't use a "cross strut"... it uses an internal guying system to "volumize" it. The one opposite the door attaches to the fly via a clip, the one on the door side is essentially a typical staked guy. I'm just not impressed.

As to color, I'm never said anything about garish or non-garish, I'm talking about an "oppressive" internal (not external) atmosphere created by a very vibrant color. I prefer a subtler color to live in, especially if cooped up during inclement weather. Everyone is different as anyone's interior house paints will tell you...

Limeman
05-16-2011, 18:24
Got it. All good. :)

Anyway.. saw this today and thought you might be interested:

http://www.backcountry.com/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-ultralight-tent-1-person-3-season

Copper Spur UL1 for $315...

Cheers!

FamilyGuy
05-16-2011, 18:43
Packed weight is 3lbs, 3oz?

One thing I do NOT like about these designs is the single walled portion of the inner tent as it will collect condensation. If I had to deal with this, I would look at a true single walled design that is considerably lighter. Not into these hybrid double walled shelters. Okay at most things, master of none.

FamilyGuy
05-16-2011, 18:43
Thanks for posting the pics, BTW.

BradMT
05-17-2011, 08:22
Got it. All good. :)

Anyway.. saw this today and thought you might be interested:

http://www.backcountry.com/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-ultralight-tent-1-person-3-season

Copper Spur UL1 for $315...

Cheers!

Limeman, again thanks for the excellent review.

BradMT
05-17-2011, 08:26
Packed weight is 3lbs, 3oz?

One thing I do NOT like about these designs is the single walled portion of the inner tent as it will collect condensation. If I had to deal with this, I would look at a true single walled design that is considerably lighter. Not into these hybrid double walled shelters. Okay at most things, master of none.

FG, all double wall tents, with or without mesh ceiling, will collect condensation... depending on the variables.

I have a "true" single wall tent... Black Diamond Firstlight. In the right conditions it will have condensation, but generally it's quite breathable. However, it weighs 3lbs and has no vestibule. I miss a good vestibule which is what got my looking for a new 1P tent. I also prefer a side-entry door.

At the end of the day I may just get a TT Rainbow... not freestanding, but doesn't claim to be either.

Tinker
05-17-2011, 10:26
I wear bicycle clothing the color of that tent so I won't get hit by a car. I can't see Nemo's reasoning behind their color choice (other than not being like everyone else). Hey, it's not a Kawasaki motorcycle. :)

Handschin
05-17-2011, 11:19
I have the NEMO Asashi four person tent, and like all NEMO products it is bomb proof.

My two cents ;)

FamilyGuy
05-17-2011, 11:40
FG, all double wall tents, with or without mesh ceiling, will collect condensation... depending on the variables.

I have a "true" single wall tent... Black Diamond Firstlight. In the right conditions it will have condensation, but generally it's quite breathable. However, it weighs 3lbs and has no vestibule. I miss a good vestibule which is what got my looking for a new 1P tent. I also prefer a side-entry door.

At the end of the day I may just get a TT Rainbow... not freestanding, but doesn't claim to be either.

Hey Brad - what I was referring to was the exposed single walled portion of the inner tent. Because it is the only line of defence against the dew point, it will collect condensation that may wet your bag (maybe). With something like, say the Hubba (only as an example), there is the extra protection of the double mesh wall. In this case the fly takes the hit from condensation.

I know why Nemo did it - to save weight. But you know me: If I need to 'deal' with the foot and head end of the Nemo, then I would want the Elite version to save the most weight.

Now get your check book out and order one already.:banana

Limeman
05-17-2011, 12:20
At the end of the day I may just get a TT Rainbow... not freestanding, but doesn't claim to be either.

I believe you can make the TT Rainbow freestanding with your trekking poles, which is a nice option.

ChinMusic
05-17-2011, 12:54
I know this is the 1P thread but I have done two trips with the 2P so far. I'll be adding to that thread soon.

At 5-10 I find the 2P just too short for my tastes. The sloped walls in the foot box make it feel even shorter, especially if you had two people in there. If a solo, you could center yourself to avoid the sloping. I see the 1P is 3 inches longer (87 vs 84 inches). IMO, that is a big deal. I never thought at 5-10 that the length of a tent would be an issue. The whole world is designed around 5-10.

I had the pleasure of chatting with Connie and Suzanne at Trail Days. I am now leaning towards the Losi 2p or even 3p as a shelter for myself and my daughter. I'll just eat the weight difference as I don't consider such trips as light weight anyway.

Limeman
05-17-2011, 13:06
Hey Brad - what I was referring to was the exposed single walled portion of the inner tent. Because it is the only line of defence against the dew point, it will collect condensation that may wet your bag (maybe). With something like, say the Hubba (only as an example), there is the extra protection of the double mesh wall. In this case the fly takes the hit from condensation.

The exposed single-wall portion of the Obi series is a concern of mine as well. In a perfect world (and at the price point) Nemo would make this large exposed wall at the head of the tent body out of their waterproof/breathable fabric. I believe that Nemo's counter to the potential for condensation on this section of the tent is the fact that the design promotes an increased amount of ventilation over the wall, thus in theory (and most likely "in practice" for most conditions) negates the need for breathable fabric.

Like all tent designs, there are always a series of compromises and tradeoffs that we must consider. But hey, with so many options and interesting designs out there these days (and no shortage of info on the net to help decide ;)), it really is fun to find the shelter that suits your individual needs and preferences, at least IMHO.

Oh... one last comment about the tent color. I enhance the contrast and brightness in all the tent photos I post online so that details are easier to see. This can cause colors to become either mildly or strongly exaggerated in some cases. Attached is an unaltered pic of the Obi fly and a basic leaf from my backyard, taken indoors with light from a incandescent bulb (oh the horrors, right? :rolleyes:). Clearly, color choice is a personal preference, but the Nemo tents I have owned and/or used have always (at least to me) blended in nicely in the back country.

Limeman
05-17-2011, 15:25
@Bradmt...

I was able to get the bi 1P again today but unfortunately, it has been raining out, so I took some time to look it over carefully and set it up inside. And look what I found... a tab on the door-side fly/vestibule that I missed during my original posting (see first pic). So, it looks like all you'd need is a bit of guyline (I used a short bit of triptease I had lying round, and bam... tent fully volumuized on both sides without the need for a stake, or impacting the vestibule area as had concerned you.

I aslo stuffed up a REI Flash 65 4000 cu inch pack with pillows and tossed in a pair of Asolo boots (size 8.5 mens) and took some shots to give an idea of the vestibule space (albeit not properly staked out). The pack and boots take up only the back portion of the vestibule (and there is actually space still available behind the back) and leaves the passageway to the door completely clear for entrance/exit as well as cooking, etc. Having found that tab on the fly is really nice, but it begs the question as to why Nemo didn't just add the clip like they did on the non-door side and be done with it?

Either way, a nice surprise. :)

BradMT
05-17-2011, 20:20
the Nemo tents I have owned and/or used have always (at least to me) blended in nicely in the back country.

I'll say it for the 3RD TIME :D

My dislike of the NEMO color has nothing to do with external aesthetics (as you say, "blending in nicely in the back country").

My dislike of the color is the internal atmosphere such a saturated color creates... I've been at this long enough to know I'm not going to be happy with their color choice living in the tent.

BradMT
05-17-2011, 20:22
@Bradmt...

I was able to get the bi 1P again today but unfortunately, it has been raining out, so I took some time to look it over carefully and set it up inside. And look what I found... a tab on the door-side fly/vestibule that I missed during my original posting (see first pic). So, it looks like all you'd need is a bit of guyline (I used a short bit of triptease I had lying round, and bam... tent fully volumuized on both sides without the need for a stake, or impacting the vestibule area as had concerned you.

I aslo stuffed up a REI Flash 65 4000 cu inch pack with pillows and tossed in a pair of Asolo boots (size 8.5 mens) and took some shots to give an idea of the vestibule space (albeit not properly staked out). The pack and boots take up only the back portion of the vestibule (and there is actually space still available behind the back) and leaves the passageway to the door completely clear for entrance/exit as well as cooking, etc. Having found that tab on the fly is really nice, but it begs the question as to why Nemo didn't just add the clip like they did on the non-door side and be done with it?

Either way, a nice surprise. :)

Thanks for those photos... makes sense the tab was there! If I get an Obi1P it will be the Elite model with the slightly more liveable color (for me) and lighter weight.

But I'm still on the fence... Tarptent is beckoning.

BradMT
05-17-2011, 20:25
I know why Nemo did it - to save weight. But you know me: If I need to 'deal' with the foot and head end of the Nemo, then I would want the Elite version to save the most weight.

Now get your check book out and order one already.:banana

Yes I do know you (grin).

Am with you, since the internal volume of the NEMO1P is already compromised unless guyed (it's not a true freestanding in the purest sense), I may as well save more weight with the Elite version.

According to the email I got from NEMO, they'll be available in July.

tuswm
05-17-2011, 20:41
So what included in trail weight? whats left out? stuff sack? tent pegs? foot print?extra guy lines? tent peg stuff sack? poles? if things are left out what is the total weight.

2 8 # is awesome for a solid tent.

also about the wind comment TT R and TT DR are both awesome in the wind.

Tinker
05-17-2011, 22:14
So what included in trail weight? whats left out? stuff sack? tent pegs? foot print?extra guy lines? tent peg stuff sack? poles?

That's the general idea, kinda like bicycles that cost thousands of dollars but don't come with pedals (I sell them and, yes, I realize that people have their favorite pedal/shoe combination). I also used to sell camping gear at REI. The "base" weight includes only the tent itself and the necessary poles. You get to choose the stakes, guylines, etc.

tuswm
05-17-2011, 22:25
<<<< Has too many bikes

Tinker
05-17-2011, 22:31
<<<< Has too many bikes

Not really, all of my personal bicycles are over 20 years old (though they have been updated a few times ;)).

I have two jobs at bicycle shops. At one I am strictly a mechanic. At the other I do quick repairs and sell bikes and accessories. I've been doing this for over 30 years and I still don't hate it :D.

Limeman
05-17-2011, 23:08
So what included in trail weight? whats left out? stuff sack? tent pegs? foot print?extra guy lines? tent peg stuff sack? poles? if things are left out what is the total weight.

2 8 # is awesome for a solid tent.

also about the wind comment TT R and TT DR are both awesome in the wind.

I measured trail weight of the Obi 1P (tent, fly and poles) as 2lbs, 8.2 oz.

Here is the breakdown:

* Tent, Fly, poles - 2lbs, 8.2 oz
* Included stakes w/stuff sack, 2 guylines, tent repair kit and tent pole repair sleeve - 4 oz. (6 stakes alone are 2.5 oz)
* Nemo tent sack (a nice roll-top dry bag) - 3 oz
* Pole sack - 0.8 oz

I'd say full packaged weight of the Obi 1P I have in possession is right at 3lbs.

For me, I only use trail weight as a gauge, because I always carry tent stakes and guyline no matter what (even if I'm not carrying a tent), as they always come in handy. Additionally, I have my favorite stakes and guyline and rarely use those that come with tents.

Speaking of... the included guyline with the Obi 1P, while very nice and reflective (2 lines at roughly 5' each) weigh in at a surprisingly portly 1/2 ounce. Now I'm not that much of a gram counter to go crazy on this, but I can carry 25' of Kelty Triptease for the same weight. Further, the Nemo tent bag, while really fancy and certainly useful if you'll be packing in a lot of rain or possibly rafting, etc, is just too heavy. I can easily fit the tent into a sil-nylon sack that weighs 2.5 oz less, and Nemo's footprints, while very nice and surely durable, are in no-way lightweight (the Obi 1P's with storage sack is about 8 oz). This brings up what appears to be an over-all design philosophy of Nemo's tents: They build bomb-proof, well-engineered, first-rate quality gear, but do not go crazy light with anything (although the Obi Elite might be their fist foray into this type of "weight is everything" tent?). In comparison, tents like the BA Fly Creek series uses fabrics, guylines, footprints, components and stuff sacks that are quite a bit lighter (and possibly more fragile) than Nemo. It think the buye of these two series of tents are different people.

And like many have stated, there are always great and often lighter-weight solutions from smaller builders like TT and SMD.

tuswm
05-18-2011, 00:22
I all ways enjoyed working in bike shops. I love gadgets

Limeman
05-22-2011, 02:33
Hey ChinMusic,

I really like the Obi 1P. Of course it is smaller inside but it seems to bulls-eye more of the targets than the 2P - IMHO of course. If you get a chance, you might want to check one out (if you haven't already). I'd like to know your thoughts if you do.

Cheers!

ChinMusic
05-22-2011, 12:21
Hey ChinMusic,

I really like the Obi 1P. Of course it is smaller inside but it seems to bulls-eye more of the targets than the 2P - IMHO of course. If you get a chance, you might want to check one out (if you haven't already). I'd like to know your thoughts if you do.

Cheers!
For my larger tent needs (trips with daughter) I have decided the Obi 2P is just too short and I am only 5-10. The sloped walls just bother my toes when I am using just one side of the tent. If the walls were not so sloped or a few inches longer it would be good. It would be fine if just using as a solo. The 2P is shorter than the 1P by 3 inches. The 1P might be fine for solo needs with that extra 3 inches. For solo needs I would lean towards the Lightheart Solo (Cuben). Saw it at Trail Days and was WOWWED. The Lightheart is not freestanding but has amazing views when rolled up.

For my larger tent needs I'm going "palace" and comfort and screw the weight. I don't do long days on these trips anyway. For trips with my daughter, comfort is the lead criterion. I have decided on the NEMO Losi 3P. My daughter will appreciate the extra room. I considered the Losi 2P but for one additional pound I could have a palace.

stranger
05-24-2011, 20:26
Actually, now that I'm really thinking about it, it is clear the reason Nemo chose not to add a clip to the door side fly/vestibule is due to the Obi 1P's ability to fully tie back both sides of the fly (see pic 10 above) for increased ventilation options (or star gazing on clear, calm nights).

As the design edict of the Obi series is, in their own words, to have "not an ounce of wasted material, with every feature and detail driven by purpose and strategy", I'd say eliminating this feature on the door side fly/vestibule makes sense, especially since you can easily utilize a short bit of guyline and a stake with the door tie out loops to do the same thing. Again, in no way a deal breaker in my mind and seems a smart design choice.


Having the zipper extend all the way up to the top of the tent is a very bad design and certainly wasted material, zippers leak, having one above your sleeping area is a tad of an issue for me

That aside, it looks pretty good, but I wouldn't buy it for that single reason, but I think I have a thing with zippers!

Limeman
06-02-2011, 02:17
Hi Stranger... the zipper is protected by a rain fly that is held down nicely via tension and two well placed Velcro tabs. I don't think water is getting in. Additionally, the zipper does not hang over the tent body (or your head), but rather only over the vestibule, so that should not be a concern. My only complaint (minor as it is) regarding the zipper is that Nemo chose not to include a dual zipper, like on the Obi 2P. Nemo obviously feel confident in the quality of the zipper. Time will tell, but so far, mine works like a champ and gives me no reason to think otherwise.

Limeman
06-02-2011, 02:18
Sorry... meant to say the zipper is protected by a rain flap! :rolleyes:

Grits
06-02-2011, 07:08
Great conversation, I have a Big Sky Revolution 2P and it is great. Easy to set up two doors lots of space for two, good headroom height good vestibules and my favorite you can set it up in the rain without getting the inside wet and 3 lbs.
http://bigskyproducts.com/Big-Sky-Revolution-2P-shelter.aspx

BradMT
06-02-2011, 08:21
Great conversation, I have a Big Sky Revolution 2P and it is great. Easy to set up two doors lots of space for two, good headroom height good vestibules and my favorite you can set it up in the rain without getting the inside wet and 3 lbs.
http://bigskyproducts.com/Big-Sky-Revolution-2P-shelter.aspx

Figuring out potential weights and optinons from the bigsky website is an exercise in frustration for sure... their website fairly sucks, though I don know they build a quality, albeit expensive, product.

Limeman
07-14-2011, 02:02
Obi 1P update: Hi everyone. I've had a chance to put many days of use into my Obi 1P tent and the more I use it, the more I love it. What a great single person shelter! I ditched Nemo's nice but heavy dry bag storage sack and used a simple silnylon sack to carry it - and saved 2.5 oz in trail weight. I purchased a footprint, but left it at home - and after plenty of use, he tent floor is still pristine. I do choose my sites well, and clear them of debris before deploying (if possible), but so far no punctures or damage/wear of any kind to the floor.

The Obi 1P goes up easy and fast, is taut and stable with minimal fuss, packs down extremely small, held up great in some pretty bad storms and wind, keeping me happy and dry and proved a very hospitable 1P tent to exist in. The vestibule is quite large for the weight of the tent (2lbs, 8oz trail weight) and this is greatly appreciated when you need to cook and/or shuffle around in your pack for gear during a rain storm. Ventilation with the vestibule fully closed is excellent. Pitching the foot-end of the tent into the headwind is the best policy. The ability to tie back both sides of the door-side vestibule proved a real plus on hot, buggy nights. The 39" floor width at the head of the tent (decreasing down to a still roomy 36" at the shoulder zone when lying down) makes the Obi 1P feel significantly more roomy and hospitable than in the coffin shapes of most double-wall 1P tents. Not only does give you some extra room to jostle about, but you have additional space in the corners to stow your jacket, water bottles, etc., without feeling cramped or knocking into things every time you move. The tent walls, while not vertical like in some 1P designs, still provide a sense of space and "air" that belies the specs. This seems to be due to the extra width from the shoulders down over most 1P designs and really does makes the tent feel very livable.

I am 5' 9" tall and found the length to be just about perfect for me in my 6' sleeping bag, even when laying on a 2.5" air pad. Speaking of, while I love the new air pads, they all have a negative effect on many modern tent designs: due to the increased height as which you lay on them, the actual usable tent length is greatly reduced due to most designs aggressively inward-sloping walls at the head and foot of the tent. The Obi 1P fares well in this regard (with one basic design caveat - see negatives below), and I believe than anyone 6' and under should have limited to no issues with the length of this tent.

Negatives are few, but include the following:

1. The vestibule does not allow for venting via the door zipper like in the Obi 2P tent. This was only a real issue when I found myself wanting to boil water with the vestibule closed during a rain storm. Would have been nice to open up the vestibule at the top to allow the steam to escape. Not a huge deal, but this brings up a concern. The zipper on the Obi 1P fly is a single, one-way zipper. Now, I'm sure Nemo did tests and determined that the zipper will never fail, but in all honesty, I would like to have seen a two-way zipper setup, which would allow you to fully close the vestibule door even if one zipper fails. Could be pretty important out in the back country. Having said that, I've had no issues with the zipper so far.

2. Wind has a tendency to deflect the main head wall inwards, which compromises internal volume. In the Obi 2P, this wall has a loop along with a clip on the fly, that when connected and used with a guy line on the fly, was designed to help against wind deflection of both the fly and the tent body across the large expanse of fabric. It works effectively for the fly, but just OK for the tent wall, which still deflects inward. Interestingly, the Nemo 1P has a loop on the tent body and a loop on the fly, but no clip to connect them - further compromising this design. If you really wanted/needed, you could always rig up a solution with a bit of guy line and some fancy knots, but as much as I tried, I could never get this work-around to function well. A better solution for all the Obi tents would be to move the loop down from where the tent body and mesh meet to the dead-center middle of the wall, where a guy line could provide a significantly more effective defense against wind deflection. Hint to Nemo: Move the Nemo label up to this mid-center position and attach a guy loop like you do on the Meta 1P. With such a setup, you could easily utilize just one stake for both the tent body and fly guy lines, and along with providing a real defense against wind deflection, it would provide additional internal volume right where you need it - at the head of the tent, which would be especially noticeable when youre lying down. Those taller than 6' would also fit in the tent easier!

3. The final issue also has to do with this large exposed tent wall: It in effect creates a single-wall component to the tent. Sure it helps the Obi 1P have a lighter weight for by reducing the size of the fly, and increasing ventilation, but it also presents the tents user with the potential condensation issues associated with single-wall designs. Combine that with the tendency for this wall to deflect inward in windy conditions, and this becomes the an issue I experienced, admittedly only one time so far - waking up to a damp sleeping bag hood and a wall behind me that had more condensation than I would have liked. Clearly in the right conditions, any tent will have condensation, but when those conditions exist, the Obi tents have limited fly coverage on this large expanse of wall to help minimize the problem. Hopefully Nemo will address this issue, as mentioned above, by simply relocating the loop at the head of the tent body to the center of the wall as suggested above. Nemo - please do this. It will make the Obi 1P just about perfect for a user's needs in a 1P shelter.

Ok... that is it so far. I'm digging this tent quite a bit and can highly recommend anyone in the market for a light-weight, easy to pitch, taut and stable 1P shelter give it a good look. Ping me if you have any questions.

Cheers!

goalieboy3
09-01-2011, 22:00
Thanks for such a thorough review. I've been interested in the Obi1P, and especially the "Elite" version. I've been debating this tent vs. the Big Agnes Copper Creek UL1.

I find the guyline to increase internal volume on the Vestibule side a disappointment... really takes away from the usability of the vestibule from the looks of it... you say the tent body "could" be clipped to the rainfly if a clip were provided?

Is the clip something Nemo can offer after sale?

How, volume-wise, do you think it compares to an MSR Hubba... ie, does the Obi1P feel as tight as the Hubba?

Thanks.

no way. the hubba is the same width the whole way down, so it is basically a coffin.

Limeman
09-02-2011, 14:43
Indeed. One of the great things about the Nemo Obi 1P is that it DOES NOT feel like a coffin. It is very spacious for a 1P, double-wall design, especially in the shoulder/arm/elbow region while sitting. Makes the Hubba feel like a sardine can in comparison.

pmack
10-09-2011, 08:43
Obi 1P update: Hi everyone. I've had a chance to put many days of use into my Obi 1P tent and the more I use it, the more I love it. What a great single person shelter! I ditched Nemo's nice but heavy dry bag storage sack and used a simple silnylon sack to carry it - and saved 2.5 oz in trail weight. I purchased a footprint, but left it at home - and after plenty of use, he tent floor is still pristine. I do choose my sites well, and clear them of debris before deploying (if possible), but so far no punctures or damage/wear of any kind to the floor.


heavy? 3oz (85g) seems pretty light for a semi compression dry sack. it's a little bit shorter than a small sea to summit compression dry sack which weighs 129g.
I'm actually thinking about getting a medium sized compression dry sack, and putting this tent and my sleeping back in it. this would make it easier to strap to the outside of my backpack, leaving more room for other items.

I actually got this tent a few days ago, and set it up today. very impressed.
I'm 6'2, and find the length to be ok. I also found enough room to fit a small camera bag inside the tent.
If i was desperate to put my main back inside due to heavy rain or security reasons, i suppose you could but you'd effectively have to have it against your body.

i found an interesting way to open up the roof to see the sky.
though at my height, the non meshed section of the inner tent is a little bit in the way.
there's actually a loop on the left side of the head end, not sure if it's to tie the fly like i've done it, i don't think it worked.
but not sure why else it is there.

pmack
10-09-2011, 08:47
.. continued (having trouble posting here for some reason)

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y284/surfphotoac/PA092793.jpg


i was a little confused as to what to do with the supplied guy lines. for one i don't know how to tie the other end, but also there didn't seem to be anywhere that needed it.
I don't really need much of a guy rope to volumise the vestibule side of the tent. think i'll put a little hook on the end of some rope for that, like nemo have for the other side.
can't see much need to put a guyline on the head end of the fly like you have done. i'd have to not use one of the pegs on the corners, though they aren't all that important anyway i've decided.

Franco
10-10-2011, 17:28
I'm actually thinking about getting a medium sized compression dry sack, and putting this tent and my sleeping back in it

Not a good idea. The first time you will set up your tent under rain you will figure out why.
(keeping in mind that your tent is inner pitch first, you don't want to have the sleeping bag out as you pitch your inner and then put the fly on and of course you don't want to store an sb inside a bag with a wet/dirty tent ...)
Counterintuitively , a stuff sack with heavy compression does not work as well as a slightly loose one. That is because you end up with bowling balls inside your pack and no way to fill those gaps.
Besides a compression sack usually is heavier than a non compression type.
Franco

Franco
10-10-2011, 17:30
If you meant your sleeping mat, that still applies but to a lesser degree.
Franco

ChinMusic
10-10-2011, 17:45
i was a little confused as to what to do with the supplied guy lines.

I have the NEMO Losi 3p and found the guy lines useful when camping on rock (Yosemite). I used the extra lines in the corners to wrap around rocks.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b186/ChinMusicIHSS/Backpacking/Yosemite%202011/Yosemite2011_2228_29_30_tonemapped.jpg

pmack
10-11-2011, 05:41
I'm actually thinking about getting a medium sized compression dry sack, and putting this tent and my sleeping back in it

Not a good idea. The first time you will set up your tent under rain you will figure out why.
(keeping in mind that your tent is inner pitch first, you don't want to have the sleeping bag out as you pitch your inner and then put the fly on and of course you don't want to store an sb inside a bag with a wet/dirty tent ...)
Counterintuitively , a stuff sack with heavy compression does not work as well as a slightly loose one. That is because you end up with bowling balls inside your pack and no way to fill those gaps.
Besides a compression sack usually is heavier than a non compression type.
Franco

hmmm very good points. i did think about the rain when unpacking, and so thought you could get around that by putting the sleeping bag in first, so that you can keep it in the sack when pitching your tent. though putting a wet tent back in i didn't think about. hmmm not sure now!

pmack
10-17-2011, 06:45
guys how are you supposed to set up the footprint and the outerfly without the inner?
because the jakes feet are on the inner fly, how's it possible to secure the ends of the poles without the jakes feet?

moytoy
10-17-2011, 08:05
guys how are you supposed to set up the footprint and the outerfly without the inner?
because the jakes feet are on the inner fly, how's it possible to secure the ends of the poles without the jakes feet?
The jakes feet come off of the inner fly (tent) on my OBi 1p. Although I have never tried it the jakes feet clip to the footprint and should then hold the poles in place.

pmack
10-17-2011, 16:44
ahhh ok, i did check that, but the tabs on the footprint look far weaker as does the stitching, not sure i'd trust it like that, plus a little fiddley.