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Panzer1
06-08-2011, 11:28
I glad I'm not on the trail today. Its just too hot to hike.

I remember back in 2001 I was on the trail during a heat wave where is was 95 or above for 3 days. It made me feel like I was hiking for a week. It just washed me out. Even the young people i met found excuses to get off the trail.

Its supposed to be close to 100 today and tomorrow. yikes. :eek:

Panzer
ps I just measured the temperature of my black shingle roof to be 175 degrees in the full sun.

lazy river road
06-08-2011, 11:33
Yeah I hear that and agree, This makes me missing winter trekking. I have a small section planned in PA for next Wednesday and I am hoping the heat dies down by then.

wcgornto
06-08-2011, 11:34
Another reason why I am happy to be in Alaska. today's high in Anchorage - around 66 degrees F.

Lone Wolf
06-08-2011, 11:42
another reason to go SOBO

Carbo
06-08-2011, 11:45
Bumping up against 100 here also.

I find once you get soaked in sweat it isn't too bad. Frequent rests, lots of water to the point of peeing every so often, and mineral replacement works. Worst part is stopping for the night and it's still 80+ degrees with bugs biting. Joys of summer hiking!

Rick500
06-08-2011, 11:47
Too hot for me too. I just don't enjoy it above low 80s or so, especially if it's humid.

WingedMonkey
06-08-2011, 11:56
It gets too hot you people move to Florida, it snows too much you move to Florida.
Announcement: Florida is CLOSED.

:sun

Spirit Walker
06-08-2011, 12:11
The nice thing about the eastern mountains though - after a few days, a front usually moves through that cools things off. Plus there is usually a bit of a breeze, even on the hottest days. In the east there is shade, which helps too. You can start early, then sit under a tree or next to a stream during the hottest hours, then hike until just before dark.

Blissful
06-08-2011, 12:17
another reason to go SOBO


It was 90 last summer in the 100 mile wilderness in July when we hiked through. One of the hottest summers there

:(

emerald
06-08-2011, 13:12
At Carl Spatz Field/Reading Regional Airport just before noon, the air temperature was 87F and the relative humidity was 51% with a wind speed of 12 mph.

When summer arrives, it will get much hotter and more humid than what we are experiencing today.

It won't be above 90F for more than a few hours. Hikers should adjust to the conditions and become more crepuscular when summer arrives just as other animals do.

sbhikes
06-08-2011, 13:23
Another freezing "summer" day in Santa Barbara. Fog has rolled in. It's 60 right now. Brr.

Carl in FL
06-08-2011, 13:57
It gets too hot you people move to Florida, it snows too much you move to Florida.
Announcement: Florida is CLOSED.

Wait - we got some empty houses we need to fill yet.
Up here it's like 1 in 3.

leaftye
06-08-2011, 14:13
It's nice here right now, but when it comes to hiking, I prefer the temperature to be in the low 40's.

Namaste
06-08-2011, 15:34
It's too hot to hike.....too hot to do anything outside except swim and drink icy cold beer! I'm a cold-weather hiker.

WingedMonkey
06-08-2011, 16:38
Wait - we got some empty houses we need to fill yet.
Up here it's like 1 in 3.

LOL, Yeah and you know where 90% of the folks that lost their houses in St Lucie came from. ;)
Just think of it as 33% less water being wasted during what is again another South Florida drought. Plenty of green water in all those abandoned swimming pools.
It's only 87 now, gonna pack a snack and go bike 20 miles (stopping at Publix for some cold beer) before the real heat gets here. If it rains this weekend, I'm going hiking, just to see what rain looks like again.

Panzer1
06-08-2011, 16:39
its 98.8 here right now. :sun

Panzer

CowHead
06-08-2011, 16:47
Hike at night sleep in the shade

Egads
06-08-2011, 18:09
It never gets hot on the AT, just ask Mountain Shuttler

Panzer1
06-08-2011, 18:30
My wife complained that when she opened the front door from the outside it was way to hot to hold. I measured the door knob at 125 degrees in the sun. (at 6pm)

Panzer

camojack
06-08-2011, 18:39
Another reason why I am happy to be in Alaska. today's high in Anchorage - around 66 degrees F.
Definitely; which is why I like going to Alaska in the Summer. I'll be back up there in a few weeks... :)

Panzer1
06-08-2011, 18:49
Its so hot that there isn't any children playing outside.

Panzer

Tipi Walter
06-08-2011, 19:05
I glad I'm not on the trail today. Its just too hot to hike.

I remember back in 2001 I was on the trail during a heat wave where is was 95 or above for 3 days. It made me feel like I was hiking for a week. It just washed me out. Even the young people i met found excuses to get off the trail.

And then they find excuses to get off in January when there's a foot of snow at 10F. I consider myself to be an avid winter backpacker but you have to take all four seasons in stride and not bug out when things get a little serious. Go slow, carry more water, wear a headnet, camp near water and swim often---and just keep getting your bag nights.

I just got back from a long trip in the Cohuttas and gotta say it's a buggy piney scrub jungle down there and in 11 days it only rained once and so the whole backcountry is oven-baked and dry but it's okay to carry a gallon of water for a dry overnighter and whatever you do, never complain.

Cookerhiker
06-08-2011, 19:11
Bumping up against 100 here also.

....Worst part is stopping for the night and it's still 80+ degrees with bugs biting. Joys of summer hiking!

You got that right! Been there, done that.

At least I only havea few more weeks to put up with this. Heading to the High Sierra July 4 for 2 weeks, then it's on to the Colorado Trail.

Carl in FL
06-08-2011, 19:27
And then they find excuses to get off in January when there's a foot of snow at 10F.



Ummm .... no need to go looking for excuses, that one sounds like a winner.

I was born and raised in Berks County, PA but moved to Florida in 1989.
Anything less than 60F is sweater weather. 10F is not even on the charts.

Namaste
06-08-2011, 19:55
And then they find excuses to get off in January when there's a foot of snow at 10F. I consider myself to be an avid winter backpacker but you have to take all four seasons in stride and not bug out when things get a little serious. Go slow, carry more water, wear a headnet, camp near water and swim often---and just keep getting your bag nights.

I just got back from a long trip in the Cohuttas and gotta say it's a buggy piney scrub jungle down there and in 11 days it only rained once and so the whole backcountry is oven-baked and dry but it's okay to carry a gallon of water for a dry overnighter and whatever you do, never complain.

I remember seeing your reports complete with great photos of your winter camping adventures and being SO envious. I would take that weather anytime over the heat and buggy conditions.

I was hoping to spend a week hiking thru PA in July going as far as I could. Maybe I should head up to Vermont instead. I love the icy cold caves on the LT on a hot day.:sun

Sierra Echo
06-08-2011, 20:07
The heat doesn't bother me at all. I would hike tomorrow if I could.

Tipi Walter
06-08-2011, 20:24
I was hoping to spend a week hiking thru PA in July going as far as I could. Maybe I should head up to Vermont instead. I love the icy cold caves on the LT on a hot day.:sun

You've got the right idea. My next trip, God willing and the creeks don't rise, is to head north to Virginia for some decent high elevation weeks in the Mt Rogers National Recreation Area. I've seen enough virginia pines down here to last a lifetime.

harryfred
06-08-2011, 21:50
I have hiked in 103 deg humid weather in Va. and will do it again tomorrow if i could. I've hiked in thunder storms and torrential rain, I have hiked in sub 0 and snow. I am hiking this weekend and I don't care what the weather is.:banana

Panzer1
06-08-2011, 21:53
Go slow, carry more water, wear a headnet, camp near water and swim often---and just keep getting your bag nights.

you still need to make it to the next water source/resupply. That could be a long way down the trail. Some water sources may be dried up. You may not be able to go slow.

Panzer

Tipi Walter
06-09-2011, 08:27
you still need to make it to the next water source/resupply. That could be a long way down the trail. Some water sources may be dried up. You may not be able to go slow.

Panzer

This is why it's important to have the necessary water bags/containers so when you find water in the morning of an all day hike, you load up the hateful weight of a gallon or more and spend all day hiking to a dry campsite that night. The next day you should have at least a liter left for another long day of dry hiking until most certainly reaching some kind of water source towards the end of the next day.

New backpacking places require carrying more water, while old familiar places where you have a lot of experience are easier to deal water-wise since you pretty much know the condition of the springs and can carry only what you need to get to the next known source.

hikerboy57
06-09-2011, 08:58
I had my first day off in 2 weeks yesterday. In spite of the forecast, got up early with the intention of dayhiking in Minnewaska state park, went outside with my coffee, watched 2 birds burst into flames, and decided maybe it was a beach day after all.

Raul Perez
06-09-2011, 10:16
My hikes are usually few and far between so I hike in anything in any season.

Lyle
06-09-2011, 10:22
Heat's fine. Slow down, drink plenty of water. Take multi-hour lunch breaks in the shade and near water. Do your hiking between 5:30AM - 10AM and 5PM-9PM (or overnight if you've a mind to). Wet your shirt, put a wet bandanna around your neck. Problem solved.

Tipi Walter
06-09-2011, 10:39
Heat's fine. Slow down, drink plenty of water. Take multi-hour lunch breaks in the shade and near water. Do your hiking between 5:30AM - 10AM and 5PM-9PM (or overnight if you've a mind to). Wet your shirt, put a wet bandanna around your neck. Problem solved.

Totally agree with early morning humpage. In the winter, of course, it's a real bee-atch to get up at 5 or 6am and begin packing and moving, but in this hot weather there's nothing more simple or easy. Nighthiking a new place, on the other hand, can be a real challenge and is best left to Army Rangers or to those who have access to a boulevard trail like the AT. Most of the places I backpack would be nearly impossible at night unless you've spent years walking and learning the same trails during the day.

When I go to a new place like the Cohuttas or into Pisgah by Harpers Creek or up to Mt Rogers NRA, I would rarely even consider doing a nighthike until I become a "master" of their trails.

Rain Man
06-09-2011, 11:32
"If you give a monkey a gun and he shoots someone, you don't blame the monkey"

LOVE that signature line! :D


... watched 2 birds burst into flames, and decided maybe it was a beach day after all.

YIKES!!! I'd say so!!! :eek:


I have hiked in 103 deg humid weather in Va. and will do it again tomorrow if i could. I've hiked in thunder storms and torrential rain, I have hiked in sub 0 and snow. I am hiking this weekend and I don't care what the weather is.:banana

AMEN! I can't understand an attitude of wanting to avoid icky nature and want backpacking to be glorious climate-controlled, moving-sidewalk comfort.

Rain:sunMan

.

Panzer1
06-09-2011, 14:01
its so hot that I can't see any birds outside or any squirrels or other animals.
No dogs either. Children are playing inside today. No one, not even the animals are outside.

Panzer
its 105 on my back deck in the sun. :sun

Mountain Shuttler
06-09-2011, 14:26
It never gets hot on the AT, just ask Mountain Shuttler
That's right city boy! At least not as hot as most places! Highs the last few days ACTUALLY ON THE AT HERE IN GA have been in the 70's to low 80's. Maybe you should spend more time up here in the hills like me. If I had to deal with the smog,heat,traffic,crime,etc. of Atlanta I reckon I'd be bitter too!

Rick500
06-09-2011, 14:44
It gets too hot you people move to Florida, it snows too much you move to Florida.
Announcement: Florida is CLOSED.

:sun

I moved away from Florida after 29 years and I'm not going back, so I'm part of the solution, not part of the problem. :D

Mountain Shuttler
06-09-2011, 14:50
Just got off the phone with Pirate up at Neel Gap where it's a STIFLING 80 DEGREES! I ACTUALLY HIKED UP BIG CEDAR OUT OF WOODY GAP THIS MORNING. It was all of 72 DEGREES AROUND 10:30 AM. Don't know how I survived such OPPRESSIVE HEAT & BUGS,but I did!

emerald
06-09-2011, 16:19
http://www.weather.gov/data/obhistory/KRDG.html (http://www.weather.gov/data/obhistory/KRDG.html)

If the environmental lapse rate holds, it would be 3.5F less what was recorded at Carl Spaatz Field above PGC's Service Road on SGL 110. I'd expect it to be cooler beneath the forest canopy on Weiser State Forest.

I'm not surprised to learn it's cooler on Chattahoochee National Forest. Many do not understand how hot and humid it can be in Pennsylvania's Piedmont.

Panzer1
06-09-2011, 17:27
Heat's fine. Slow down, drink plenty of water. Take multi-hour lunch breaks in the shade and near water. Do your hiking between 5:30AM - 10AM and 5PM-9PM (or overnight if you've a mind to). Wet your shirt, put a wet bandanna around your neck. Problem solved.

At 5pm its 99 degrees here in the Phila suburbs.
It was already quite hot this morning at 9 am. in the 90's

I still say you can't slow down. you still have to make it to the next water source and you may actually have to speed up to make it, not slow down.

You can't take it easy either. You have the weight of extra water, maybe a gallon or more in your pack and you still have to hike up hill with all that weight.

nite time hiking has its own dangers.

All the things you suggest will help some but it will not solve the problem of excessive heat.

The heat will exhaust you. especially after 3 days of it.

The heat is not just uncomfortable, its dangerous. that's no BS either.

Panzer

Namaste
06-09-2011, 17:27
AMEN! I can't understand an attitude of wanting to avoid icky nature and want backpacking to be glorious climate-controlled, moving-sidewalk comfort.

Rain:sunMan

.

I love hiking no matter what the conditions but for me it's just hard to hike in weather so hot I can barely breathe....great for triggering an asthma attack...where's the fun in that!:eek: I've hiked in 113 degrees in the Grand Canyon and -20 degrees in the Nepal Himalayas and will take the cold anytime.

Slo-go'en
06-09-2011, 18:19
In '08 I left the DWG going north at the start of an 11 day heat wave. It was brutal.

The trick is to get up before dawn and do as many miles as possible before 11 AM, then slow down to a crowl for the rest of the day. I never seem to be in a good spot to take a long break in the afternoon, so I just keep going - very slowly.

Panzer1
06-09-2011, 18:39
one thing I noticed was if it got cool at night while I was sleeping it seemed that my body was able to recover from the heat over night. But if I was hot and sweaty all night long then the next day I would wake up still feeling worn down.

Panzer

Sierra Echo
06-09-2011, 18:42
You should get one of those ice pack banadanas that keep your neck cool. That might help some.

Lyle
06-09-2011, 19:00
At 5pm its 99 degrees here in the Phila suburbs.
It was already quite hot this morning at 9 am. in the 90's

I still say you can't slow down. you still have to make it to the next water source and you may actually have to speed up to make it, not slow down.

You can't take it easy either. You have the weight of extra water, maybe a gallon or more in your pack and you still have to hike up hill with all that weight.

nite time hiking has its own dangers.

All the things you suggest will help some but it will not solve the problem of excessive heat.

The heat will exhaust you. especially after 3 days of it.

The heat is not just uncomfortable, its dangerous. that's no BS either.

Panzer


WOW! Guess I'm still out west in the desert. I thought I made it home all those years ago by doing these things. Either I'm still out west, or I must still be in PA, sitting at Bake Oven Knob waiting for the springs to start running again and the 98 degree temps to moderate.

I could have sworn that those things worked for me and that I had made it through relatively unscathed. Guess I was wrong, sure glad I found that out.

I'll never hike in the summer again. It's impossible.

Beachcomber
06-09-2011, 19:20
A lot of things that work in the desert -- where low humidity allows evaporation to cool you -- don't work in the high humidity typical of Southeastern summers. Simple example: You see spray cooling systems all over the place in Phoenix, Palm Springs, etc. Not in Florida, Georgia, or NC. When your sweat doesn't evaporate, it doesn't cool you, and there is a very real danger to your system if you aren't careful.

hikerboy57
06-09-2011, 19:53
water, water water water. need water.when its hot AND humid, your body can no longer regulate heat, heat exhaustion and heat stroke become a distinct possibility when you realize that its 100 degrees and you've stopped sweating.get out early, nap during the middle of the day, finish at night, and water, water, water.

Cookerhiker
06-09-2011, 19:58
Yes, you have drink lots of water but watch out for over-hydration which I experienced while hiking in hot humid weather in NY. Make sure you get some electrolytes. I always bring salted dry-roasted peanuts and banana chips (the latter for potassium), especially in hot weather.

Lyle
06-09-2011, 22:43
A lot of things that work in the desert -- where low humidity allows evaporation to cool you -- don't work in the high humidity typical of Southeastern summers. Simple example: You see spray cooling systems all over the place in Phoenix, Palm Springs, etc. Not in Florida, Georgia, or NC. When your sweat doesn't evaporate, it doesn't cool you, and there is a very real danger to your system if you aren't careful.


Hence the additional comment about PA.

I'm from the Midwest. I hike a lot in the East - all year. Grew up on a dairy farm, worked all summer, all temps. Try stacking hay in a mow on a 90 degree day if you want HOT and HUMID. Some on here are acting like life comes to a halt when it gets hot out. Maybe some city folks have that option, but a whole lot of us just keep doing what we do, taking appropriate precautions and making appropriate modifications to our routines. We don't have the option of hiding in an air conditioned box all day.

Before air conditioning, people traveled to the Mountains to escape the summer heat, because it was a pleasant place to spend your time. I agree.

ChinMusic
06-09-2011, 22:54
The heat is one thing that gives me a lot of trouble. I don't know how I would respond on a thru. I would hope that I would get in early miles and take it easy during the heat of the day. Give me cold ANY day, hence my plan for an early start, although a hot June would catch me anyway.

I HATE not being able to sleep from being hot. To me that is worse than being hot during the day.

Tipi Walter
06-09-2011, 23:56
The heat is one thing that gives me a lot of trouble. I don't know how I would respond on a thru. I would hope that I would get in early miles and take it easy during the heat of the day. Give me cold ANY day, hence my plan for an early start, although a hot June would catch me anyway.

I HATE not being able to sleep from being hot. To me that is worse than being hot during the day.

I was bedroll camping last night in the backyard trying to get a few more bag nights and you're totally right, I hate not being able to sleep with the heat. The main problem was the noseeums biting me all over and if I covered myself with anything I roasted. A bivy bag would've killed me. Here's where a tent comes in very handy although it does nothing to relieve the heat.

moytoy
06-10-2011, 08:11
I sleep a lot outside in hot weather.
1. Use a tent with lots of bugnet square footage.
2. Pitch it in an open space where you can see the sky above you.
3. Pitch it where you catch the most breeze.
4. strip and lay down on your side or back on a natural fiber sheet.
5. Most important is think cool. Imagine being in a cool breeze.
6. Relax, relax....zzzzz

Cookerhiker
06-10-2011, 09:05
The heat is one thing that gives me a lot of trouble. I don't know how I would respond on a thru. I would hope that I would get in early miles and take it easy during the heat of the day. Give me cold ANY day, hence my plan for an early start, although a hot June would catch me anyway.

I HATE not being able to sleep from being hot. To me that is worse than being hot during the day.

My sentiments exactly. The biggest "con" for me doing a NOBO thruhike would be arriving at low elevations of the Mid-Atlantic during summer heat & humidity. You can pace yourself during the day, stay in shade, drink a lot, etc. but sweating all night long in your tent (where you have to stay because of mosquitos) ain't fun.


I sleep a lot outside in hot weather.
1. Use a tent with lots of bugnet square footage.
2. Pitch it in an open space where you can see the sky above you.
3. Pitch it where you catch the most breeze.
4. strip and lay down on your side or back on a natural fiber sheet.
5. Most important is think cool. Imagine being in a cool breeze.
6. Relax, relax....zzzzz

Good tips - thanks.

Pedaling Fool
06-10-2011, 09:20
http://www.weather.gov/data/obhistory/KRDG.html (http://www.weather.gov/data/obhistory/KRDG.html)

If the environmental lapse rate holds, it would be 3.5F less what was recorded at Carl Spaatz Field above PGC's Service Road on SGL 110. I'd expect it to be cooler beneath the forest canopy on Weiser State Forest.

I'm not surprised to learn it's cooler on Chattahoochee National Forest. Many do not understand how hot and humid it can be in Pennsylvania's Piedmont.
I was there that time of year in 2006; I understand how hot it can get. I also ride a bike on shadeless sun-beaten roads, I know heat. It sucks, but not as bad as all the media reports you hear when reporting on a given "heat wave". It's like anything else, you get use to it.

I can't help to think that if nearly universal AC has made us (as a whole) wimps for the heat; add to this all the media hype about the heat. And there is something to be said for urban-heat island effect (UHI). I'm curious how much of an effect it is away from the urban environment. I know when I sit under my shade tree if feels nice, but if the wind blows just right I can feel the heat from the pavement.

Phreak
06-10-2011, 10:00
Its never too hot to hike. Just have to adjust your mileage, pace, water intake, etc.

Panzer1
06-10-2011, 11:31
In really hot weather like we've had for the last few days, I will start my hiking very early in the morning to beat the heat. However, when the heat of the day does arrives, I don't stop hiking. (except for my usual short rest breaks) That's because there is usually no good place to stop, its still hot when you stop, your still consuming water, and the mosquitoes and other bugs will zero in on you. I would rather just keep hiking until I get to camp and water.

Panzer

Egads
06-11-2011, 09:22
That's right city boy! At least not as hot as most places! Highs the last few days ACTUALLY ON THE AT HERE IN GA have been in the 70's to low 80's. Maybe you should spend more time up here in the hills like me. If I had to deal with the smog,heat,traffic,crime,etc. of Atlanta I reckon I'd be bitter too!

Oh I get it... like sarcasm... but different.

ChinMusic
07-01-2011, 18:02
Man, is it hot in Illinois today. I couldn't imagine hiking/sleeping in this weather. I got up early to seal my deck this morning. By 1pm I was starting to feel sick. Glad I had an cool house to jump into.

johnnybgood
07-01-2011, 18:15
Man, is it hot in Illinois today. I couldn't imagine hiking/sleeping in this weather..
Go take a hike in the mountains. Umm , well ... You do have mini mountains there in Illinois don't you ??

ChinMusic
07-01-2011, 18:30
Go take a hike in the mountains. Umm , well ... You do have mini mountains there in Illinois don't you ??

A few hours from here might have a couple hunderd feet hills. In my county the contour lines are in centimeters.

txag
07-02-2011, 18:00
All of the forests in New Mexico were closed early last week due to drought. Last Sunday we thought we had a line that Bandelier National Monument (at Los Alamos) was going to close Sunday night. After our 2 hour drive there found it was closed on the Friday before. We pretended to hike on the closed loop ruins trail but it was to hot, dry and dusty to be fun. Left through the Valle Caldera for what was a normal trip. Wake up Monday to find the labs closed and Bandelier evacuated due to the fire. Although the fire 11 years ago helped by burning previous "deadfall", the town was saved yesterday just like last time - only because the wind direction changed.

I read that a 1 acre fire (started and contained today) at the National Labs was caused by a squirrel. Don't know whether he was smoking or playing with fireworks but I suspect an electrical transformer was involved. It was also reported that the fate of the squirrel is unknown.

I hear thunder in the nearby Sandia mountains but with out rain that is not good. Also every 15 minutes a water tanker flies over my house to LA. My summer has been put on hold for a while....

BradMT
07-02-2011, 20:28
I glad I'm not on the trail today. Its just too hot to hike.

I remember back in 2001 I was on the trail during a heat wave where is was 95 or above for 3 days. It made me feel like I was hiking for a week. It just washed me out. Even the young people i met found excuses to get off the trail.

Its supposed to be close to 100 today and tomorrow. yikes. :eek:

Panzer
ps I just measured the temperature of my black shingle roof to be 175 degrees in the full sun.


I started at Springer Mountain in June of 1977 and hiked North all summer... was one of the hottest recorded summers and also included a drought. 90* temps would have been a blessing.

Panzer1
07-12-2011, 16:10
another day I'm glad I'm not on the trail. The heat index was about 105 today. I'm at home with the A/C set to 74 degrees. Its actually a little cold here. ha ha ha suckers

Panzer

Feral Nature
07-12-2011, 19:37
It's so hot here in Texas that we make campfires to cool off!

It is usually 100 -110 degrees here in the summer, heat does not bother me, I just keep drinking water and rest in the shade as I can.

Now cold? I am quite whimpy in the cold! I guess I have never owed a real coat in my life (not really cold here) so I need to toughen up huh?

Del Q
07-12-2011, 19:52
I prefer early spring and fall, no bugs is big for me, was in SW Virginia at the James River for the 1st HOT day of last year, 96 degrees, miles and miles of uphill hiking, about killed me after little sleep, 7 hours of driving, too much caffeine, took breaks mid afternoon, ate late, hiked until near-dark. Hot weather hiking is tough, water is a serious issue that has to be paid attention to.

couscous
07-12-2011, 20:38
another day I'm glad I'm not on the trail. The heat index was about 105 today. I'm at home with the A/C set to 74 degrees. Its actually a little cold here. ha ha ha suckers

Panzer

Agreed, the heat just saps the energy. Too hot to hang comfortably in a hammock with a bug net tonight at the Antietam Shelter.

HiKen2011
07-12-2011, 20:43
Heat index 110 here today,checked Blood MTN wilderness weather and heat index there was 105, brutal. Had a mild sunstroke when I was young and don't do well in the heat, especially direct sunlight. Stay safe and cool my friends!

Erin
07-12-2011, 20:50
It is cooking here in the midwest and so dry. I did go kayaking in Kansas last Saturday and wore a huge brim hat and sunscreen galore. Since I am in the middle of work, I go out every evening and walk and it is just brutal. I really feel for anyone backpacking in this heat. Take care

birchy
07-12-2011, 20:59
I glad I'm not on the trail today. Its just too hot to hike.

I remember back in 2001 I was on the trail during a heat wave where is was 95 or above for 3 days. It made me feel like I was hiking for a week. It just washed me out. Even the young people i met found excuses to get off the trail.

Its supposed to be close to 100 today and tomorrow. yikes. :eek:

Panzer
ps I just measured the temperature of my black shingle roof to be 175 degrees in the full sun.


PANZER, I hear you only hike like 5 miles in a day. You should be able to do that before the sun even gets over the trees in the morning...lol In any event, I had a great time camped next to you at the Billville feed. I enjoyed your company. Hope you can come up to my place when the fall comes for some COOL WEATHER hiking.....

ChinMusic
07-12-2011, 21:23
It's like 110 heat index today here in Illinois. Heading to Yosemite on Friday. Will probably be shaking ice off my tent on Saturday morning..................CAN............NOT....... ........WAIT

HiKen2011
07-12-2011, 21:49
It's like 110 heat index today here in Illinois. Heading to Yosemite on Friday. Will probably be shaking ice off my tent on Saturday morning..................CAN............NOT....... ........WAIT

Sounds great! Have a fun and safe trip!

Panzer1
07-12-2011, 21:52
PANZER, I hear you only hike like 5 miles in a day. You should be able to do that before the sun even gets over the trees in the morning...lol In any event, I had a great time camped next to you at the Billville feed. I enjoyed your company. Hope you can come up to my place when the fall comes for some COOL WEATHER hiking.....

Well, I did a 13 mile day the last time I went out with HarryFred and Bad Andy. Although, I do like short days better. I like to maximize my camp time.

Panzer

harryfred
07-12-2011, 21:57
another day I'm glad I'm not on the trail. The heat index was about 105 today. I'm at home with the A/C set to 74 degrees. Its actually a little cold here. ha ha ha suckers

Panzer


PANZER, I hear you only hike like 5 miles in a day. You should be able to do that before the sun even gets over the trees in the morning...lol In any event, I had a great time camped next to you at the Billville feed. I enjoyed your company. Hope you can come up to my place when the fall comes for some COOL WEATHER hiking.....

I hiked with Wren 19 miles yesterday. We were going to try for 27 then 20. We got to ******* ******* and both said enough. She is zeroing with a friends parents in ******* till the heat and chance of thunder storms goes away. I worked all day in the tire shop so yeah I'd still hike, at least I'd be out side.

I'm up for a cold weather hike or even camping trip. couple of nice trails even around Long Pine Run off the AT if you don't mind pitching a tent just in the trees.

birchy
07-12-2011, 21:59
I hiked with Wren 19 miles yesterday. We were going to try for 27 then 20. We got to ******* ******* and both said enough. She is zeroing with a friends parents in ******* till the heat and chance of thunder storms goes away. I worked all day in the tire shop so yeah I'd still hike, at least I'd be out side.

I'm up for a cold weather hike or even camping trip. couple of nice trails even around Long Pine Run off the AT if you don't mind pitching a tent just in the trees.

COUNT ME IN the ROCKY KNOB TRAIL is great

nathan2
07-12-2011, 22:06
Almost 95 in Brooklyn today. The city feels so claustrophobic when it's this hot. Trying to imagine how I'll feel this time next year if I'm able to thru.

harryfred
07-12-2011, 22:26
COUNT ME IN the ROCKY KNOB TRAIL is great
Yes it is it's just a day trail but I've tented back there a time or two and I know you have also since you like to fish. I like that waking up in the middle of the woods feeling by a lake.

Panzer1
07-13-2011, 02:45
The first 12 days of this month had 9 days of 89 degrees or higher, so I am told.

Panzer

vamelungeon
07-13-2011, 07:11
I was SUPPOSED to go up to Mt Rogers NRA this AM but I'm going to be a couch potato instead. I got heat exhaustion earlier this summer working outside here at home, and it was a very unpleasant experience. No way I want to experience it out in the woods. I can wait for the weather to cool down.

Wise Old Owl
07-13-2011, 18:12
its 98.8 here right now. :sunPanzerPanzer when its hot at home, the green AT miles at the top are about 10 degrees cooler its when you come down into town its hot.

johnnybgood
07-13-2011, 18:30
Calling for 70's this weekend in higher elevations of Virginia. Should be great time to get out and hike.

harryfred
07-13-2011, 18:58
That's where I want the temps to be in Sept when I am down there, with just chilly nights.

Del Q
07-13-2011, 19:14
My experience, over 50 degrees in a tee shirt = sweating. HOT? Start early, chill for hours in the afternoon, eat, hydrate, hike till dark, sleep commando

Panzer1
07-20-2011, 10:48
its so hot that your meds will go bad. They are not supposed to be stored at 100 degrees....

example:

Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium): Store at controlled room temperature
Toprol (metroprolol succinate): Store at controlled room temperature. Excursions permitted to 59 to 86 F (15 to 30 C).
Norvasc (amlodipine besylate): Store bottles at controlled room temperature.
Synthroid (levothyroxine): Store at controlled room temperature; excursions permitted to 59 - 86 F (15 - 30 C)


Panzer

Mrs Baggins
07-20-2011, 19:12
Please. Wimps and wienies. 8 middle-aged women went hiking yesterday here in Maryland, when it was 86 at 9 am and rising rapidly. We had a great time and no one complained. The same people that bitch and moan about the heat will be back here bitching and moaning about the cold come winter. It's summer. It's supposed to be hot. It's not unusual. It's not climate change. It's normal. I've lived in Phoenix, the deep south, camped in Death Valley in July, traveled to Key West and the TX gulf shore in summer. I know what heat is. Dress light, take enough water and get outside.

Panzer1
07-20-2011, 19:25
Please. Wimps and wienies.



http://news.yahoo.com/prolonged-heat-wave-heads-east-blamed-22-deaths-173225653.html

Nearly two dozen dead as heat wave moves east
CHICAGO (Reuters) - A heat wave baking the central and southern United States was blamed on Wednesday for at least 22 deaths this week as forecasters warned that the abnormally hot weather could last into August as it moves east.

Pedaling Fool
07-20-2011, 19:27
Global warming:D:D

harryfred
07-20-2011, 19:30
Hiking this weekend Little Gap to Port Clinton.

Mrs Baggins
07-20-2011, 19:30
Did they not have a shower or bathtub to get into??? Every southerner knows to get in a cool shower or bath when it gets that hot. Run cold water over your wrists. Put a cold wet towel around your neck. Sorry but there are ways not to die in the heat. Go to a shelter. Go sit in an air conditioned McDonald's and drink cheap "senior" coffee. Go to an air conditioned mall and just sit on a bench.

Ewker
07-20-2011, 19:54
no hiking this weekend but next weekend we may go kayaking and camp on some islands

Second Half
07-20-2011, 20:38
Hiking this weekend Little Gap to Port Clinton.

You'll be sweatin' your nuts off.

Have fun!!!

Namaste
07-20-2011, 21:04
I prefer to backpack in winter or at least cooler weather but I made it out yesterday for a short hike between Wind Gap and the Leroy Smith shelter and ran into many NOBOs. Plenty of shade hiking along that section of PA so it wasn't too bad but I was glad to finish up when I did.

Panzer1
07-20-2011, 22:01
You'll be sweatin' your nuts off.

Have fun!!!

ha ha ha ha

yea, that's for sure. Tomorrow (Thursday) its going to be 98 degrees.
Friday its supposed to be 102 degrees here in pa.
Saturday its only going to be 97 degrees.
That's a heat wave.
Panzer

stars in her eyes
07-20-2011, 23:04
Heat or high water -- I'm going on an overnight down here in sweltering, sunny, buggy Florida next week. I can't take it anymore -- I need to get outside! Maybe I'll night hike and chill (ha!) through the afternoon. I'll call it an "overday." Yeah.

Trailbender
07-21-2011, 00:04
Please. Wimps and wienies. 8 middle-aged women went hiking yesterday here in Maryland, when it was 86 at 9 am and rising rapidly. We had a great time and no one complained. The same people that bitch and moan about the heat will be back here bitching and moaning about the cold come winter. It's summer. It's supposed to be hot. It's not unusual. It's not climate change. It's normal. I've lived in Phoenix, the deep south, camped in Death Valley in July, traveled to Key West and the TX gulf shore in summer. I know what heat is. Dress light, take enough water and get outside.

Yeah, but that is a dry heat, much easier than dealing with humidity and heat as well.

double d
07-21-2011, 00:10
"Its soooooooooo hot out that.................."

BadAndy
07-21-2011, 00:19
You'll be sweatin' your nuts off.

And we'll be smiling the whole way!

vamelungeon
07-21-2011, 05:16
I had basic training in San Antonio at Lackland AFB. They made us drink several glasses of water at every meal, and there was a guy in our flight who was from the local area that ridiculed drinking the water and ridiculed the rest of us as wimps who couldn't take the heat that he claimed didn't bother him. He figured out some way to avoid chugging all that water. A couple of weeks into training he collapsed and spend a couple of days in the hospital.

Heat can be dangerous and should be taken seriously. Hyperthermia is just as dangerous as hypothermia.

Tipi Walter
07-21-2011, 05:51
I had basic training in San Antonio at Lackland AFB. They made us drink several glasses of water at every meal, and there was a guy in our flight who was from the local area that ridiculed drinking the water and ridiculed the rest of us as wimps who couldn't take the heat that he claimed didn't bother him. He figured out some way to avoid chugging all that water. A couple of weeks into training he collapsed and spend a couple of days in the hospital.

Heat can be dangerous and should be taken seriously. Hyperthermia is just as dangerous as hypothermia.

This is nothing new. My home town of Wichita Falls, Texas recorded 117 degrees on a nice summer day in 1967. (BTW, I did basic at Lackland too, but started in October to December).

vamelungeon
07-21-2011, 06:56
I wish I had done it in winter!

Mrs Baggins
07-21-2011, 07:02
Yeah, but that is a dry heat, much easier than dealing with humidity and heat as well.

It's not a dry heat in Georgia, Florida, South Carolina - all of which I've lived in, and certainly not dry heat in New Orleans, Key West or TX - all of which we vacationed in in July. :)

Mrs Baggins
07-21-2011, 07:05
You're right Tipi Walter - it's not new. We lived in Sacramento CA in the late 70's early 80s and triple digit temps in summer were the norm. We had one window a/c in our very poorly insulated 60 year old house.

Yukon
07-21-2011, 07:15
I had basic at Lackland starting around the first of August, there were some BRUTAL days. They actually black flagged it one day and wouldn't let us march or anything, spent most of the day in the barracks.

lemon b
07-21-2011, 07:43
I take it a day at a time. Sunday I'm doing 10 miles in Ma. First hot one of the year. Pack is lighter and so am I. Water seems to be the key.

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 07:51
Support you local coal mining company and Big Coal in general.

Get inside, crank up the AC and be afraid, be very afraid of the HEAT

:sun

vamelungeon
07-21-2011, 08:12
I'm not saying to be AFRAID of the heat, but it can be dangerous.

DamnYankee
07-21-2011, 09:03
I had basic at Lackland starting around the first of August, there were some BRUTAL days. They actually black flagged it one day and wouldn't let us march or anything, spent most of the day in the barracks.

Was never happier than when I PCS'd out of San Antonio, the heat was freaking brutal for the three 1/2 years I was stationed at Ft Sam Houston. When we had black flag days in basic training, we would get smoked in the barracks, PT never stops lol

Tipi Walter
07-21-2011, 09:11
Was never happier than when I PCS'd out of San Antonio, the heat was freaking brutal for the three 1/2 years I was stationed at Ft Sam Houston. When we had black flag days in basic training, we would get smoked in the barracks, PT never stops lol

When I did USAF basic in '69, we still were in the old wooden barracks. Do they still use the salt-pill dispensers on the walls?

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 09:25
Was never happier than when I PCS'd out of San Antonio, the heat was freaking brutal for the three 1/2 years I was stationed at Ft Sam Houston. When we had black flag days in basic training, we would get smoked in the barracks, PT never stops lol
After 23 years in the navy I still don't know the break-down of them stupid colored flags, other than the Black Flag means you will die if exposed to the heat for 20 minutes:rolleyes: Yes, I'm being sarcastic, but the point is that the military can't follow these stupid heat stress rules that are set by whoever. I've worked in environments in which once you stepped in it sweat immediately started pouring out of my sweat glands. I continually broke the rules and forced my guys to break the rules, had to or nothing would get done. Another rule they had was that we must get at least 6 hours of sleep per 24-hour period...yeah, right:rolleyes:

Bottom line it can be dangerous or you could get use to it, it's all a frame of mind -- to a point, but that point is way too low thanks to all the whinners.

vamelungeon
07-21-2011, 12:45
I was stationed in San Angelo TX at Goodfellow AFB. The temperature was frequently 100 degrees F or greater, and when you first arrived you were restricted in physical activity like PT and marching until you were "seasoned" to the heat. After certain set periods of time you were gradually allowed to do more and eventually you were right back doing PT normally.
I had heat exhaustion this year. I had never had any problems with heat in the past, but it made me sick as hell, weak and disoriented. I was working outside all day in my own backyard, and after getting inside in the AC and being able to drink lots of water I improved pretty quickly and was fine the next day. I might have not been hydrated enough, I might have not been "seasoned' to the heat and humidity but I wouldn't wish the experience on anyone. If urging caution makes me a "whiner" then so be it. I wouldn't want to have that same experience in the woods on a trail. It's NOT just "all a frame of mind."

Tipi Walter
07-21-2011, 13:02
For backpackers, one good thing about the heat are all the campsites we can choose next to water and creeks---and there's nothing much better than jumping in after a hot day of humpage. The worst for me is pumping nylon up a mountain in the heat and I'm going so slow with my 65+lbs that I come to a crawl on another nutbuster climb and then I break out of some shade and have to do a hundred yards in the sun. The pack is hot behind my back and there's really no where to run and it's too hot to stop and throw off the load.

There's a great scene in the movie Born On The Fourth Of July which is relevant here: A black Marine is humping a machine gun over his shoulder in the afternoon heat of Vietnam and he says to himself: "It's so hot out in this m.....f....., this must be hell! Or purgatory. Where's the m.....f..... devil at?" I always think of this scene when I'm out in the "boonies" under load and under a pissed-off Sun.

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 14:21
I'm guessing you will see some hikers with heat stroke by sunday. Becuase today with the temp is 98, tomorrow 101 and saturday at 98.
Thats all it takes. 3 days in a row over 98 degrees. If they are actually hiking 3 full days, someone will get heat stroke.

Its sunny today and tomorrow as well. Hikers that have to cross long open spaces where there is no shade are the most at danger.

Panzer

hikerboy57
07-21-2011, 14:30
Hot weather tip- cotton t shirts are fine and will keep you cooler.(as long as you can change into another shirt, should the temp drop).

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 14:52
things that melt at 100 degrees:
1) chocolate, foods with chololate in it
2) ointments like neosporin, vasoline
3) glues like on mole skin

johnnybgood
07-21-2011, 14:57
With the heat index approaching 115 today and 120 tomorrow it is dangerous to be doing much of anything outdoors.
There are plenty days later this summer and this fall to hike so just take it easy if you can.

For all you thru hikers on the trail here are a couple reminders about staying safe in this heat.

** Make sure you drink enough water and take more water breaks than you do normally.

**Every chance you get wet a bandanna or wash towel with cool water and wrap it around your neck.

** Hike early till 10 am then set up camp and literally chill out . Hit the trail again after 5 pm and hike till you reach your days destination.

** Take it slow . Stop hiking any time that something doesn't right i.e. lightheadness , headache , rapid heart beat , etc.

HiKen2011
07-21-2011, 15:01
I was stationed in San Angelo TX at Goodfellow AFB. The temperature was frequently 100 degrees F or greater, and when you first arrived you were restricted in physical activity like PT and marching until you were "seasoned" to the heat. After certain set periods of time you were gradually allowed to do more and eventually you were right back doing PT normally.
I had heat exhaustion this year. I had never had any problems with heat in the past, but it made me sick as hell, weak and disoriented. I was working outside all day in my own backyard, and after getting inside in the AC and being able to drink lots of water I improved pretty quickly and was fine the next day. I might have not been hydrated enough, I might have not been "seasoned' to the heat and humidity but I wouldn't wish the experience on anyone. If urging caution makes me a "whiner" then so be it. I wouldn't want to have that same experience in the woods on a trail. It's NOT just "all a frame of mind."

To ME you're not whinning, I to have had heat exhaustion, not pleasant at all. And the heat can be very dangerous! It's funny really how so many people on here talk about hypothermia like if you go out in freezing temps you'll die and call people whiners for doing the same thing with heat! My guess is (and it's only a guess) that more people die from the heat and heat related issues than hypothermia???????

Sir-Packs-Alot
07-21-2011, 15:26
Hike at night sleep in the shade Good idea when it gets too hot! Most don't like it but the trail is beautiful at night ...especially green tunnel areas where you have no daytime views to miss!

hikerboy57
07-21-2011, 15:29
Good idea when it gets too hot! Most don't like it but the trail is beautiful at night ...especially green tunnel areas where you have no daytime views to miss!better be careful in snake country, rattlers do hunt at night.

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 15:32
To ME you're not whinning,...
Same here.

I never responded to your post, nor did I really pay much attention to it. When I say "whinners" I'm talking about people I've seen use heat as an excuse to get out of work and those in the media that super-hype this issue.

Also when I say, "it's all a frame of mind" I'm not saying that in the same sense of "mind over matter" or "just do it". I'm saying that heat can be a problem, but you can acclimate yourself to withstand the effects much better...far better.... than some of the stupid guidelines that I've been subjected to and some of the precautions preached in the media.

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 15:35
My guess is (and it's only a guess) that more people die from the heat and heat related issues than hypothermia???????
Not true....

Slo-go'en
07-21-2011, 15:54
The mid west heat wave finally made it's way to the White Mountians today - well in the low 90's, muggy and hazzy.

Thankfully, it isn't suppost to last long and will be back to more relatively mild temp by the weekend. Still, it will be a couple more weeks before I consider it cool enough to start hiking again! It's a lot easier to stay warm when its cold, then it is to stay cool when it hot.

HiKen2011
07-21-2011, 15:55
Not true....

Thanks for the info!!!!!!!!!!!

HiKen2011
07-21-2011, 16:02
Not true....

John, just did a search and 4 times as many people die from the cold than from the heat! That's surprising to me.

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 16:43
John, just did a search and 4 times as many people die from the cold than from the heat! That's surprising to me.

that's because your normal body temp is 98.6. Its has to get hotter tan that to die from heat..

Freezing is easy.

Panzer

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 18:02
winers

Some hikers have to hike reguardless of weather just to prove themselves to themselve. I think it gives them a false sense of mental toughtness.

If your a hiker your already tough. You don't have to prove your not a wimp. We already know your not a wimp.

Panzer

DamnYankee
07-21-2011, 18:15
When I did USAF basic in '69, we still were in the old wooden barracks. Do they still use the salt-pill dispensers on the walls?

Thank you for your service Tipi, and The last time I saw salt pills issued was when I was at Camp Pendleton in 89 going to School with the Marines. I started as a Navy Corpsman 89-92, then joined the Army in 98 to present

Feral Nature
07-21-2011, 18:17
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or yankees don't have proper air condishioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air condishioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.

hikerboy57
07-21-2011, 18:21
when its this hot, I dont need to prove to myself that heat can kill. I got heat exhaustion 2 yrs ago, and it taught me to be a little more prudent in the heat as far as how far I can hike, to err on the side of caution.I also switched to a 3L bladder, 'caus I dont have to fill it, but you cant put 3L in a 2L bladder.another tip I learned was when I found myself getting crazy over the heat, Id try to find some spot out of the sun, and simply breathe deeply for a few minutes, this would relx me somewhat, and Id immediately feel a bit cooler.A lot of dealing with the heat is mental, but it can also be dangerous.slow down,stay hydrated, take it easy, and leave midday for naptime.
when its this hot, Id rather just watch "Trek"again with the AC going full blast.

DamnYankee
07-21-2011, 18:22
After 23 years in the navy I still don't know the break-down of them stupid colored flags, other than the Black Flag means you will die if exposed to the heat for 20 minutes:rolleyes: Yes, I'm being sarcastic, but the point is that the military can't follow these stupid heat stress rules that are set by whoever. I've worked in environments in which once you stepped in it sweat immediately started pouring out of my sweat glands. I continually broke the rules and forced my guys to break the rules, had to or nothing would get done. Another rule they had was that we must get at least 6 hours of sleep per 24-hour period...yeah, right:rolleyes:

Bottom line it can be dangerous or you could get use to it, it's all a frame of mind -- to a point, but that point is way too low thanks to all the whinners.

John I totally understand what you mean about break the rules or nothing gets done, with the work rest cycles and temps over 90-95 degrees, unless you have a major manpower pool you cant get anything done. So on a black flag hiking day temps over 100 degrees, would anyone recommend hiking 10 minutes and resting 50, that's the standard manual labor work/rest cycle for the Army, well guidelines anyway. Acclimatization is extremely important, the more you are used to it the more you can withstand, with proper hydration and nutrition of course.

DamnYankee
07-21-2011, 18:29
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or yankees don't have proper air condishioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air condishioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.

The typical age group that dies during heat waves are the elderly, often unable to afford the ridiculous prices incurred with "air conditioning" units that usually aren't needed during a normal temperature range, your comments are ignorant and offensive, do some research.

Feral Nature
07-21-2011, 18:33
when its this hot, I dont need to prove to myself that heat can kill. I got heat exhaustion 2 yrs ago, and it taught me to be a little more prudent in the heat as far as how far I can hike, to err on the side of caution.I also switched to a 3L bladder, 'caus I dont have to fill it, but you cant put 3L in a 2L bladder.another tip I learned was when I found myself getting crazy over the heat, Id try to find some spot out of the sun, and simply breathe deeply for a few minutes, this would relx me somewhat, and Id immediately feel a bit cooler.A lot of dealing with the heat is mental, but it can also be dangerous.slow down,stay hydrated, take it easy, and leave midday for naptime.
when its this hot, Id rather just watch "Trek"again with the AC going full blast.

Midday is NOT the hottest time of day. Here, about 5 pm or so is the hottest time of day. What I do is get up and do things in the morning and then finish well before the late afternoon. Even at dark here it is still in the 90s so they evening is still too hot, even after dark. I would do my hike the same way.

hikerboy57
07-21-2011, 18:42
Midday is NOT the hottest time of day. Here, about 5 pm or so is the hottest time of day. What I do is get up and do things in the morning and then finish well before the late afternoon. Even at dark here it is still in the 90s so they evening is still too hot, even after dark. I would do my hike the same way.
Sorry, you're right, I didnt mean it literally. This time of year, the hottest part of the day is usually between 3 and sundown.The earth retains the heat its been soaking in all day, so you get the radiant heat on top of the actual air temp.Thanks for pointing it out.

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 18:54
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or yankees don't have proper air condishioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air condishioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.

Yea, well us yankees can say the same kinds of things about you southerners when it snows.. LOL LOL


Panzer

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 19:00
On a hot day when you come out of the woods and its 100 degrees hot and have to walk down a blacktop road it can be even hotter than that on the road. If its 100 in the woods how hot do you think it is when you start walking that 2 miles down the blacktop road into town in the full sun. The blacktop has to be scolding hot. It will melt your feet.

Panzer

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 19:13
When the blacktop gets too hot I have to drop a few pounds from my tires, especially when carrying weight.:sun

I'm gimpy
07-21-2011, 19:13
Yea, well us yankees can say the same kinds of things about you southerners when it snows.. LOL LOL


Panzer

Good old Virginia gets the best (or worst) of both seasons. It hit 100 degrees or so here today, with the heat index at 110. I hate hot days, but the humidity is what makes it rough. Yesterday I had to work in the attic. This time of year you get temps in the 120's-130's in an attic. Yesterday was 143! Needless to say, I can't stand that for very long. Fall can't get here soon enough.

vamelungeon
07-21-2011, 19:15
I got the tops of my feet burned standing in formation in those black GI shoes down there in Texas. I went from San Angelo TX to Montgomery AL and even though it was hotter in TX, Alabama was more uncomfortable because of the humidity. I guess the sweat evaporated more quickly in the drier climate and kept you cooler. The best weather I've experienced was in Monterey, CA. It stays pretty much 55-60 degrees there, great weather for outdoor activities.

Tipi Walter
07-21-2011, 19:52
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or yankees don't have proper air condishioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air condishioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.

I was raised in Oklahoma and Texas and you may be old enough to remember the old car coolers that hooked above the door and fed cool air into the car when the thing was filled with ice. They were a common sight on the roads back in the midwest in the 50's. See below--- I remember as a kid we would watch TV and wait for the weatherman to tell us what city had the highest temperature in the nation. My hometown competed with Needles, California and we often got first place. You know when it's hot when you can't get in your car cuz the seats are too hot.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/52/Thermador_Car_Cooler.JPG/800px-Thermador_Car_Cooler.JPG

Panzer1
07-21-2011, 23:39
Things hikers do to beat the heat that don't work:
#1 hiking at night. This dosen't work because it means you have to sleep during the day in your tent that is hotter on the inside that the outside. If its so hot, how are you supposed to get any sleep. Also, how can you sleep during the day anyhow. How is that any fun.

Panzer

Panzer1
07-22-2011, 00:00
Please. Wimps and wienies. 8 middle-aged women went hiking yesterday here in Maryland, when it was 86 at 9 am and rising rapidly.

Looks like you were just out for a day hike. Not the same thing that people coming up from Springer are having to deal with. They been on the trail for months, not hours.

Panzer

Wise Old Owl
07-22-2011, 00:04
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is Yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or Yankees don't have proper air conditioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air conditioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.
Yea you are pardoned....

Wow! am I glad you are here to dis-spell the myth about Texans who never need to drink water... They just hydrate at night. - Southerners......



Oh and before you post about me being a Yankee you would be mistaken. - I just live here.

Wise Old Owl
07-22-2011, 00:08
Its so hot that there isn't any children playing outside.

Panzer

They weren't playing outside to begin with..

Here were the options - Wii, Xbox, Playstation, or Angry Birds on the smart phone.... More fun than a trail video and a treadmill - Yea I know....

Panzer1
07-22-2011, 10:17
Yea, I see the kids come outside but they run right over to their friends house and go inside to play where it is air conditioned. There arn't any kids outside right now. Its 101 on our back deck in the full sun right now at 10:20 am.

Panzer

Pedaling Fool
07-22-2011, 10:57
Yea, I see the kids come outside but they run right over to their friends house and go inside to play where it is air conditioned. There arn't any kids outside right now. Its 101 on our back deck in the full sun right now at 10:20 am.

Panzer
Everyone thinks of evolution as something that happened in the past, but that's wrong it's always happening. Everyone is running from the heat and the cold and many other discomforts we use to have to survive through.

It really makes one wonder how this will affect our evolution. We are getting to a point where we don't need such a robust body any longer.

http://www.hauntersdepot.com/2007NEWTEMPLATES/MiscellaneousStuff/GrayColoredAlienBody.jpg

TheRaven
07-22-2011, 14:08
I am a Texan and it is very hot. It is always over 100 for weeks and weeks in the summer, sometimes over 105 or 110. But down here, we have enough sense to drink enough water and stay indoors during the afternoon and early evening. If you watch the news, it seems that it is yankees that are dropping dead in less heat than we have here. I hear that they aren't used to the heat or yankees don't have proper air condishioning or they don't have enough ventilation. Well, why can't they just learn to drink water and stay indoors or in the shade like we do down here? And with modern times, why is there not enough air condishioning and so forth. I see where people here think 89 degrees is hot or where 95 degrees is hot. Really??? That is a cool front down here! I tend all the livestock on my farm in the Texas summers and I am a older woman and it is fine by me. I'm sorry, but this topic really gets to me. Pardon my rant.

Oh get over yourself, I live in a yurt in Maine..read NO AC. Yes it's hot, I wear light clothes, move slow and drink a lot. God damn blanket statements. If you want one of those I could say that anyone south of the Mason Dixon Line can't drive for crap in any sort of snow. It flurries and they are in the median. Let see them drive in the 1-2 average feet per week of snow we get in Maine.........

WingedMonkey
07-22-2011, 14:35
It's 95 now at 2:20 pm. Heat index of 107. A normal July day in South Florida. Gonna shower (I can handle sweat as long as it's clean sweat) and bike to the store and then the park to get some miles in.
It's the same as hiking in many ways. My important stuff will be in ziplocks because if I'm lucky it will rain and cool me off. But just like hiking after the rain the humidity will just be worst.
The good part is I will be able to bike my 20 miles in loops around the park because none of the apartment living dog owners will be taking up the path, neither will the stroller pushing cell phone talking deaf people. (they must be deaf, they never seem to see or hear me coming).
Do I like the heat? Hell no. But It's there and I got things to do.
I can feel empathy for those in areas not use to it. On my 95 hike I even drank out of the spring above Lehigh Gap "Metallica Spring" ignoring the EPA warning posted next to it. Hey how much heavy metal can one man drink?

Heat on the trail in Pennsylvania just ain't like normal heat.

:sun

paistes5
07-22-2011, 14:52
I went for a 7 mile day hike last week and about killed myself with the heat. I drank 6 liters of water and still didn't have enough in my body.

Yeah, for me it was too hot to hike. Gonna go out tomorrow morning for another hike since it will only be 90.

Chubbs4U
07-22-2011, 18:03
Wanted to go hiking tonight through the weekend but a heat index of 114 will stop me. Not sure I can carry enough to hike.

One-8T
07-22-2011, 21:08
I'm guessing you will see some hikers with heat stroke by sunday. Becuase today with the temp is 98, tomorrow 101 and saturday at 98.
Thats all it takes. 3 days in a row over 98 degrees. If they are actually hiking 3 full days, someone will get heat stroke.

Its sunny today and tomorrow as well. Hikers that have to cross long open spaces where there is no shade are the most at danger.

Panzer


I definitely agree about the open spaces being incredibly hot. I just got back home about an hour ago after finishing Unicoi Gap to N.O.C over the last 8 days. It was very hot the first 5 days from Unicoi to Winding Stair Gap, but the last 2.5 days from there to N.O.C. over Siler, Wayah and Wesser were just brutal. I was only drinking about 4 liters a day for the first 56 miles, but ended up averaging 8-9 liters a day the last 28 miles. There were a couple of occasions that I started to feel light headed and I just had to sit down by a spring and filter straight into my mouth for 20 to 30 minutes and then rest for a while longer. Very thankful for the great trail guides and spring markings. Not too hot to hike, but damn close.

ONE-8T and Sir Trips-A-Lot (formerly Trippy Einstein)

Panzer1
07-23-2011, 01:07
Another freezing "summer" day in Santa Barbara. Fog has rolled in. It's 60 right now. Brr.

We hate you.. lol lol lol

Panzer

Panzer1
07-23-2011, 08:33
The heat index at Atlantic City yesterday was 120 degrees. yikes.

Panzer

Panzer1
07-23-2011, 12:49
I'm guessing you will see some hikers with heat stroke by sunday. Becuase today with the temp is 98, tomorrow 101 and saturday at 98.
Thats all it takes. 3 days in a row over 98 degrees. If they are actually hiking 3 full days, someone will get heat stroke.

Its sunny today and tomorrow as well. Hikers that have to cross long open spaces where there is no shade are the most at danger.

Panzer

sorry to have to post this:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43864697/ns/weather/t/-year-old-among-dead-heat-wave-continues/


18-year-old among dead as heat wave continues

It emerged that an 18-year-old landscaper who died Thursday night, had a temperature of 110, according to a coroner said, and there were claims he was not given medical treatment when he was first taken to a care center.

You can die from heat stroke even at 18.
panzer

our condolances to his family.

Panzer1
07-24-2011, 10:50
dozens of new heat records have been set during this heat wave. The heat appears to be backing off by 10 degrees or more this coming week. Good news for hikers.
Atlantic City made it to 105 and Newark 108.
Panzer

Slo-go'en
07-24-2011, 13:08
Cooled down considerably here in the Whites overnight, and more importantly, the humidity dropped significantly. Wow, what a relief! I'm tempeted to go out for a little walk this afternoon. Would be a real nice day to be on a summit. We only had to suffer for 2-3 days, I pitty those who have had to deal with it for a month now.

Carbo
07-24-2011, 14:03
In this heat a wicking shirt seems to work well when soaked in sweat, plus a wet bandana on the neck. About a half liter of water per hour is the minimum for me. Also, at least one electrolyte/vitamin replacement drink per day does the trick. It took about 10 days to get fully accustomed to the worst of the heat. Common sense, taking it slow, stay hydrated... all by the book will keep you hiking if all else is ok with your body.

BTW- NJ is going a bit chilly today, only 92 right now!

Teatime
07-26-2011, 07:50
I had basic training in San Antonio at Lackland AFB. They made us drink several glasses of water at every meal, and there was a guy in our flight who was from the local area that ridiculed drinking the water and ridiculed the rest of us as wimps who couldn't take the heat that he claimed didn't bother him. He figured out some way to avoid chugging all that water. A couple of weeks into training he collapsed and spend a couple of days in the hospital.

Heat can be dangerous and should be taken seriously. Hyperthermia is just as dangerous as hypothermia.


"Road guards in and road guards out" LOL. Yep, I remember HAVING to drink 2 full glasses of water before every meal while at Lackland in 1985. I lost 14 pounds in 6 weeks of basic training.

vamelungeon
07-26-2011, 07:52
"Road guards in and road guards out" LOL. Yep, I remember HAVING to drink 2 full glasses of water before every meal while at Lackland in 1985. I lost 14 pounds in 6 weeks of basic training.
I went through in '84. That water would just about make you gag sometimes but it worked. I got to be a "road guard" for a while...LOL

Panzer1
07-26-2011, 10:40
OK, heat wave over.. get out there and hike..

Panzer

WingedMonkey
08-01-2011, 13:57
OK, heat wave over.. get out there and hike..

Panzer

Still 94 here with a heat index of 106. Wist I was in some mountains.

Panzer1
08-02-2011, 12:26
13475

6th heat wave of the year.

Panzer

Pedaling Fool
08-02-2011, 17:18
Parked my bike outside in the sun for about an hour and when I got on it the computer (which has a thermometer) read 126 deg, granted the sun was beating down directly on it. Pretty freakin' hot today

WalksInDark
08-07-2011, 10:03
Did a short (5 day) NOBO PA section ending July 31st. Heat index one day was 120, not much cooler any of the other days. Between the fact that it rained (which caused wide spread ground fog type conditions) 4 out of 5 nights, making hiking at night a risky proposition; and daytime temps were so high that it was hard to cool down enough to even sleep; I averaged less than half of my normal daily hike mileage and at times drank more than three times as much water as normal. The only thing that seemed to work at all was to be on the trail shortly before the sun came up...and be finished hiking before midday.

By the time I got to Duncannon, PA all I wanted to do was sit in the Doyle hotel drinking soft drinks and sucking down air conditioning.

I should note that several young, thin, fit through hikers from GA hiked quickly through the heat with no apparent ill effects.

As with so many things, the heat had a big negative impact on me; but might not be so bad for you.

daddytwosticks
08-07-2011, 13:58
Yesterday was a relatively cool day around these parts. Took a dayhike from Standing Indian campground to the top of Standing Indian mountain via the Kimsey Creek trail and the AT. When I got back to the car around 2ish, it was 75 degrees. Driving back through Hayesville, NC, it was 88 degrees. Altitude does matter. However, the humidity made the hike seem jungle-like! Can't wait until the fall and cooler weather. :)

johnnybgood
08-07-2011, 19:16
Jerseydave and I did intersecting loops via the AT last Saturday. Humidity played a more crucial role than the actual air temperature itself.
Temperature in nearly 3k elevation was low 80's but adding the humidity factor added another 5-9 degrees to our hike.

Feral Nature
08-08-2011, 19:02
Here in central Texas, we have had 23 days in a row over 100 degrees. It has been running about 106-108 everyday for weeks. I am not worried about hiking in the heat. I am more worried about hiking in the snow as I know nothing about cold weather really.

ChinMusic
08-08-2011, 20:50
Here in central Texas, we have had 23 days in a row over 100 degrees. It has been running about 106-108 everyday for weeks. I am not worried about hiking in the heat. I am more worried about hiking in the snow as I know nothing about cold weather really.
I'm the opposite. I know how to, and the clothes/bag to bring, to keep myself warm. Some of the best days ever are days where the temps don't get over freezing. On a sunny day just above freezing I'll prob just be hiking in a T shirt til I get to camp.

I think I would die a horrible death hiking in 100 heat.

Slo-go'en
08-08-2011, 21:12
I think I would die a horrible death hiking in 100 heat.

Dido on that! It's a lot easier to get and stay warm when its cold then it is to get and stay cool when its hot!

Although not nearly as bad as some places, its been a bit on the warm and muggy side up here in the Whites most of the summer. Just now starting to get into cooler days and chilly nights - about time!

ChinMusic
08-08-2011, 21:22
Dido on that! It's a lot easier to get and stay warm when its cold then it is to get and stay cool when its hot!

Although not nearly as bad as some places, its been a bit on the warm and muggy side up here in the Whites most of the summer. Just now starting to get into cooler days and chilly nights - about time!

My only solace is that hundreds seem to make it through the heat every year on a thru. If they can do it, I can too, or so I keep telling myself........

Slo-go'en
08-09-2011, 07:51
My only solace is that hundreds seem to make it through the heat every year on a thru. If they can do it, I can too, or so I keep telling myself........

OTOH, many more drop out because of the heat. The heat really takes a toll on us older guys. I do all my serious hiking in the spring and fall.

Feral Nature
08-09-2011, 12:25
I'm the opposite. I know how to, and the clothes/bag to bring, to keep myself warm. Some of the best days ever are days where the temps don't get over freezing. On a sunny day just above freezing I'll prob just be hiking in a T shirt til I get to camp.

I think I would die a horrible death hiking in 100 heat.

Keeping warm in real cold is new to me. Some winters, it does not even get to below freezing, and if it does, it is very briefly. I am cold at 50ish degrees. Also, since I live down here, I don't even have a real coat, many people do not. Actually, I am excited at the idea of maybe being in snow at the beginning of a spring thru-hike. It is so rare here and when it does snow, it is maybe 1-2 inches and melts right away. On the other hand, I actually do quite well in the heat, it gets very hot here. It was 106 yesterday, actual temp.

MkBibble
08-11-2011, 11:17
Keeping warm in real cold is new to me. Some winters, it does not even get to below freezing, and if it does, it is very briefly. I am cold at 50ish degrees. Also, since I live down here, I don't even have a real coat, many people do not. Actually, I am excited at the idea of maybe being in snow at the beginning of a spring thru-hike. It is so rare here and when it does snow, it is maybe 1-2 inches and melts right away. On the other hand, I actually do quite well in the heat, it gets very hot here. It was 106 yesterday, actual temp.

Central Texas here too (College Station). I'm getting ready for a late september section in North Carolina, so I've been walking a 4 mile loop every night - usually after 9:00. I started last night at 9:15 and it was still 90 degrees! There was a pretty good breeze, but it felt nore like a blow drier...

Last October on the AT, in the rain, the temps dropped below 50; I thought I was going to freeze to death at night. ;) But, it sure was nice hiking in that cool weather!