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View Full Version : Remember BPA? Wow learn about Brominated GATORADE! You are going to love this!



Wise Old Owl
07-20-2011, 21:10
http://us.bc.yahoo.com/b?P=Uwxr6EwNBq6Er.zqTRAa8ww1rTHTkE4neyMAB4BW&T=18kp86ijc%2fX%3d1311210275%2fE%3d2143467267%2fR% 3dacont%2fK%3d5%2fV%3d8.1%2fW%3d0%2fY%3dYAHOO%2fF% 3d3660438602%2fH%3dcG49ImFjb250IiBzZXJ2ZUlkPSJVd3h yNkV3TkJxNkVyLnpxVFJBYTh3dzFyVEhUa0U0bmV5TUFCNEJXI iBzaXRlSWQ9IjQ4MTMwNTEiIHRTdG1wPSIxMzExMjEwMjc1NDk yOTI5IiA-%2fQ%3d-1%2fI%3d1%2fS%3d1%2fJ%3d6F060D4C&U=12bih7l8q%2fN%3dEShsMEwNPGw-%2fC%3d-1%2fD%3dNT1%2fB%3d-1%2fV%3d0
The Dangers of the Additive Brominated Vegetable Oil in Drinks Do You Know Exactly What is in Your Favorite Beverage? http://i.acdn.us/user/A6766/67665/40_67665-1.jpg (http://contributor.yahoo.com/user/67665/melanie_neer.html) Melanie Neer (http://contributor.yahoo.com/user/67665/melanie_neer.html),









I can almost thank my lucky stars, that I've never been much of a soda drinker, in fact, I haven't consumed any in years. First, I find them way too sickeningly sweet, for the regular types. I also never cared for the diet type as I just didn't care for the taste, and in consideration that there are now warnings about the health hazards of the added artificial sweetener, aspartame, I would think anyone would steer clear of diet drinks in general.
Now I've come across information, of yet another dangerous additive that is found in the citrus flavored type sodas or drinks, such as Mountain Dew, Fresca, Fanta, and is even found in the power drinks, such as the familiar Gatorade, and that is the additive of Brominated Vegetable Oil or BVO. The real kicker in all this is that BVO has actually been banned in over 100 countries, and even the FDA considers this additive as unsafe, yet, so far, no measures have been taken to ban it's usage here in this country.

Brominated Vegetable Oil, has as it's composition the element of bromine in which, believe it or not, the vapors of bromine are considered both corrosive and toxic...in other words can outrightly be considered a poisonous chemical. The chemical bromine is used for a number of products, from one of the chemicals that treat surfaces for light-sensitive photographic printing papers, as an additive for gasoline, to agricultural fumigants. At one time, bromine was even used to make sedatives, but then the FDA banned its usage around 1975, as it was found to trigger a whole host of psychiatric disorders.

HiKen2011
07-20-2011, 21:15
Spooky.........I think????????

aaronthebugbuffet
07-20-2011, 22:39
There were already plenty of reasons not to drink those beverages anyway.

rowdyredMTSU
07-20-2011, 22:59
I work in a pool store and the majority of my days consist of testing pool water chemistry. People often bring in water with substantial traces of chlorine straight form the tap. Bromine is a similar sanitation chemical more often used for hot tubs. Unless you have well water you are more than likely ingesting a sanitation chemical every time you drink water from the faucet, take a shower, etc..

Pollen
07-20-2011, 23:15
Look up the history of margarine if you want something else to give you nightmares. So sad...What does the FDA stand for?

bobqzzi
07-20-2011, 23:16
Any credible sources with a real scientific analysis? After all, she is a photogropher and seems to have a penchant for believing all sorts of evil chemicals are in food. BTW- I've never seen any credible evidence that aspartame has any negative effects on people (other than phenylketonurics)

Wise Old Owl
07-20-2011, 23:33
Bobqzzi

Bromide - when we say is a fumigant in small enclosed spaces and in small quantities is used in HIGH end pest control, never around the house, as a gas to kill everything in terms of spiders to all bugs. (Its a concern)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bromide
Methyl bromide is a broad spectrum pesticide used in the control of pest insects, nematodes, weeds, pathogens, and rodents. In the U.S., methyl bromide is used in agriculture, primarily for soil fumigation, as well as for commodity and quarantine treatment, and structural fumigation.
The chemical name (IUPAC, CAS) for methyl bromide is bromomethane, and it is classified as an alkyl bromide. It is a colorless and odorless gas at normal temperatures and pressures, but the liquefied gas can be handled as a liquid (14.4 lb/gal) under moderate pressure. The specific gravity at 0C and 760 mm Hg is 1.732, with a vapor density of ~3.27, boiling point of 3.6C (38.5F), vapor pressure at 20C of 1400 mm/Hg (at 40C it is 2600 mm/Hg), and the viscosity is 0.22 centistokes at 0C. Methyl bromide is readily soluble in lower alcohols, ethers, esters, ketones, halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and carbon disulfide.

Methyl Bromide is manufactured from naturally occurring bromide salts which are either contained in underground brine deposits, or in highly concentrated above ground sources like the Dead Sea. Ocean water does contain bromine salts, but at such low concentrations that it is very energy intensive to use as a source in the manufacture of methyl bromide. Methyl bromide is often produced as a by-product of other bromide manufacturing processes.

Methyl bromide is a toxic material. Exposure to this chemical will affect not only the target pests it is used against, but non-target organisms as well. Because methyl bromide dissipates so rapidly to the atmosphere, it is most dangerous at the actual fumigation site itself. Human exposure to high concentrations of methyl bromide can result in central nervous system and respiratory system failure, as well as specific and severe deleterious actions on the lungs, eyes, and skin. Additional information on the health effects of methyl bromide exposure is available from EPA's site.

bobqzzi
07-20-2011, 23:48
What does that have to do with Additive Brominated Vegetable Oil in Drinks?

Trailbender
07-20-2011, 23:54
What does that have to do with Additive Brominated Vegetable Oil in Drinks?

Nothing, aromatics are chemicals like benzine, with ring structures.

Sounds like a bunch of snake oil horsesh1t, personally.

peakbagger
07-21-2011, 05:56
Using this approach, table salt is a dangerous poison as it contains sodium and chlorine.

mudhead
07-21-2011, 13:07
Using this approach, table salt is a dangerous poison as it contains sodium and chlorine.

The Maine blueberry industry used this in the 80's to get a herbicide OK'ded. Vapam if I recall.

hikerboy57
07-21-2011, 14:13
regarding the OP-- Is it safe or not?I've already had to stop breathing due to NY pollution, and my precip melted from acid rain.will someone please tell me when its okay to inhale again? and can you recommend an acid rain tarp?
Does Powerade use this stuff too?

Nutbrown
07-21-2011, 15:36
That's why we should only dring beer and wine. Very sanitary too.

Pedaling Fool
07-21-2011, 15:42
"Remember BPA?"

No, I can't say that I do. Can you help me here, what is BPA?

sbhikes
07-21-2011, 18:17
I read warnings about BVO back in the 70s. Does anyone really need scary stories about the individual chemicals to know that a can of soda isn't food?

Trailbender
07-21-2011, 18:22
"Remember BPA?"

No, I can't say that I do. Can you help me here, what is BPA?

Bisphenol-A, its a double phenyl group bonded to an Ethyl, used in making polycarbonate plastics, the same thing "bulletproof" glass is made out of, well, the plastic layer. It is also used in shatterproof applications such as sunglasses. It was used in the old nalgene containers, and would supposedly leach out when you poured boiling water into it.

Use a gatorade jug, it is made of polyethylene, and is nonreactive. People don't need stainless water bottles or any of that other fancy stuff. Just make sure your bottle is stamped 1 or 2 recycling code and you are good.

AaronMB
07-21-2011, 20:15
Regarding BPA and the supposed(?) risks, this is an interesting read: http://www.bisphenol-a.org/human/polyplastics.html

(http://www.bisphenol-a.org/human/polyplastics.html)There is also a link there to their study of BPA and can liners (ie F/H keg cans).

Bronk
07-22-2011, 02:31
Nearly all beverages sold in the United States, and even ground source water have been contaminated with dihydrogen monoxide since before colonial times. And we all get along just fine.

Trailbender
07-22-2011, 03:31
Nearly all beverages sold in the United States, and even ground source water have been contaminated with dihydrogen monoxide since before colonial times. And we all get along just fine.

Yeah, heard that one a billion times in my chem courses in college.

moytoy
07-22-2011, 08:36
I think anyone who doesn't consume large quantities of bromine will live a long and fruitful life.

Jay_NJ
07-22-2011, 21:27
Yeah, heard that one a billion times in my chem courses in college.

second this! haha

cavediver256
07-22-2011, 21:50
Ah, eat right, exercise, die anyway.....

moytoy
07-23-2011, 05:14
Nearly all beverages sold in the United States, and even ground source water have been contaminated with dihydrogen monoxide since before colonial times. And we all get along just fine.

You could say way way way before colonial times since dihydrogen monoxide IS water.

gunner76
07-23-2011, 19:19
We should also bann dihydrogen monoxide, its kills a lot more people each year than brominated vegetable oil.

Rasty
07-25-2011, 20:07
Also ban vinegar. We regularly consume vinegar with a 2 to 4% acidity level. 50% vinegar would kill you.

Wise Old Owl
07-27-2011, 00:05
weird where this thread went...

Oh John - Here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A


Its was a ingredient in all the Nagalene bottles.