PDA

View Full Version : It all adds up, doesn't it?



Silverstone
07-29-2011, 12:37
I've been trying to keep meticulous records while planning my 2013 thru-hike, and I'm amazed at all the 'little' things that add up as I gear-up. Granted, a year ago, all I had was car-camping gear, and believe me, I can load up my pickup truck and live pretty well for three or four days at a local state park. But I sure as hell ain't taking a cast-iron Dutch oven or a Coleman lantern on the AT with me.

Now that I've caught the backpacking bug, I've started to notice where all the money goes (I guess that's the price I pay for using a spreadsheet to track everything).

I'm not talking about the big, expected, expenses like a tent, pack, boots, etc, but just stuff like--

50 ft. of paracord
a bottle of Dr Bronner's soap
a wide-mouth roll-up 'canteen'
titanium spork
a dry sack
other storage sacks
compression straps
moleskin
bandana
duct tape
deet
other stuff for the first-aid kit
a few dehydrated meal packs
and on and on--

Suddenly, I've spent another $60 in one quick shopping trip... :eek:

Not that I'm complaining, too much--I mean, I've got a decent job and can afford to feed my new hobby, but I guess my point is, I am a little surprised at all of the little things I didn't expect that have found their way into my wallet.

Of course, half this shiat's probably gonna get sent home once I get to Mountain Crossings... Heh. :D

Hooch
07-29-2011, 12:53
Now that I've caught the backpacking bug, I've started to notice where all the money goes (I guess that's the price I pay for using a spreadsheet to track everything).

I'm not talking about the big, expected, expenses like a tent, pack, boots, etc, but just stuff like--

50 ft. of paracord (Know someone in the Army or Marines? They can probably get you more than you'll ever need for free)
a bottle of Dr Bronner's soap
a wide-mouth roll-up 'canteen' (No need for fancy stuff, get a couple 1L Gatorade bottles. Cheap and they come already filled)
titanium spork (Don't need titanium, one that is aluminum is probably half the pice. One that is Lexan plastic is probably about half the price of that. Weight difference is probably negligible at best)
a dry sack (You can get these at Wal-Mart)
other storage sacks (Got a sewing machine and some ripstop nylon or know someone who does? You can make these for next to nothing)
compression straps
moleskin (Don't need this, use duct tape instead)
bandana
duct tape (Why buy extra? You or someone you know probably has a whole roll sitting around collecting dust that you can get a few feet from)
deet (Car camper, right? you've probably got some of this sitting around, too. No need to buy more if you've already got it)
other stuff for the first-aid kit (You can probably put this together from the supplies in your medicine cabinet at home or an extra first aid kit somewhere)
a few dehydrated meal packs (Expensive! Freezer bag cooking is your friend)
and on and on--

Suddenly, I've spent another $60 in one quick shopping trip... :eek:

Give this http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?15329-Cheap-Gear--How-to-Dirt-Bag-and-Deal-Shop-Like-a-Professional&p=206678old article by SGT Rock a good read. It's a little dated, but has a ton of good advice in it that can still be used.

As far as some of the things you're listed go, take a look at my responses in bold. Might help a little, might not.

Silverstone
07-29-2011, 14:09
As far as some of the things you're listed go, take a look at my responses in bold. Might help a little, might not.

I'm going with not, since I wasn't really asking for advice. Just an observation, but it seems that a lot of posts in these forums get answered with too much unsolicited advice. I know that lots of folks here have plenty of great knowledge to share, but nothing is more tedious than listening to them offer up that info when it's not asked, and especially when it's chock-full of assumptions.

But if you're going to make assumptions and offer unsolicited advice, please--like Jules Winfield so famously said--allow me to retort.



No, I don't know anyone in the military nearby, and even if I did, I wouldn't ask them to lift some paracord for me.
The Gatorade bottle subject has been beaten to death. Yes, I am aware of Gatorade bottles. I already have nalgene bottles that I carry--I bought the roll-up canteen to carry around empty, and would use it at night to bring extra water from the nearest source back to camp. You're just making assumptions that I need to somehow carry water, and that your way is better. Please, just stop.
Titanium? You're right. I don't NEED anything. In fact, the spork wasn't for me anyways. I carry the Sea-to-Summit anodized aluminum flatware. Light as a feather, cheaper than titanium, and won't break like Lexan. But another person in my sphere of influence said that they wanted a titanium spork, so while I was out shopping for gear, I purchased a little pre-trail magic.
I am fully aware of the products and services available at Walmart. It's a veritable cornucopia of Chinese-made consumer goods. You're assuming that I didn't get one there.
No I don't have a sewing machine or a load of rip-stop nylon. It may be next to nothing to make them, except when you consider the time it takes. Right now, my time is more valuable to me than than the satisfaction that comes from being able to brag about how I was able to make my own gear.
I prefer to use moleskin *and* duct tape when I hike my own hike
While I can appreciate 'dirt bagging' and scrounging, I'm not to the point where I need to bum duct tape off of my friends. And if I ever get to that point, I have bigger problems than just wondering how much out-of-pocket a thru-hike is going to end up costing me.
There you go assuming again with the deet. Because I'm a car camper, and usually go with a group, I have large cans of deep-woods OFF in the storage tote. Not travel-sized tubes of deet. And seriously, if I had some already, do you think I would've made a point of posting that I had to buy more? I mean, when you took the time to tell me to look in the gear I already have, did you think a light bulb would go off over my head, the heavens would part, the angels would sing, and I'd say "Oh yeah--I do have some of that lying around..."
First aid kit. Yes, I can raid the supplies in the medicine cabinet to supplement it. But those supplies have to come from somewhere, they don't just magically appear there. (See previous discussion about Walmart for further clarification)
Yep, dehydrated meals can be expensive. But what some folks consider expensive, others may not. Besides, food is a very subjective topic, and--I know it may be a stretch wrap your head around--but maybe, just maybe, my tastes are different than yours.

Now, I don't want to sound like a complete callous smartass (well, maybe a little, but not complete), but if you read my original post carefully, I wasn't looking for a way out of this burdensome nickel-and-diming. I was just pointing out that I was surprised by the things I hadn't considered at first--you know, commiserating here on White Blaze while I spent my extra day off futzing around with my backpacking gear, wishing I were someplace with lots of trees, clean cold water, and a good view.

Also, the glaringly obvious point is that I've already spent the money on this stuff. Coming back afterwards and telling me what I should've done, especially when I never asked, smacks of I-told-you-so smugness and is off-putting.

Maybe that's what triggered my snarky response. I believe that if somebody actually wants advice, they'll ask for it, especially in a forum like this where they have hundreds of people with more experience to draw on. But to offer it up un-asked-for, man, that just drives me nuts. So when it landed on me, well, this here is the result.

Peace out, y'all... ;)

Slo-go'en
07-29-2011, 14:52
I hear ya Silvertone! We can be nickel'ed and dime'd to death without realising how much it all costs. Happens to me all the time. I can't remember buying anything special, but where did all that cash disapper to anyway?

mister krabs
07-29-2011, 15:04
Well, in light of your response, I'd say, "Only if you let it."

ekeverette
07-29-2011, 15:21
it all adds up, doesn't it?... that's your question.... yes it does..... there's your answer!

Sir-Packs-Alot
07-29-2011, 15:25
Between the "everything adds up" (money wise) factor - being a gadget guy (although I many times revert back to tried and true) - and the great return policy at REI - my relationship with that store is twofold. One = my wife hates that store. Two = when they hold their "scratch & dent" sales (big annual sale on returned items) I don't even bother attending ... because I'd be buying back a lot of the stuff that was formerly mine ...

With experience comes a know-how that our postings, lists and wise-cracks can't give you - ie; what YOU can live with and what YOU cannot. With that in mind, don't forget the cappuccino machine (just kidding).

Hooch
07-29-2011, 15:41
I'm going with not, since I wasn't really asking for advice. Just an observation, but it seems that a lot of posts in these forums get answered with too much unsolicited advice. I know that lots of folks here have plenty of great knowledge to share, but nothing is more tedious than listening to them offer up that info when it's not asked, and especially when it's chock-full of assumptions.

But if you're going to make assumptions and offer unsolicited advice, please--like Jules Winfield so famously said--allow me to retort.


No, I don't know anyone in the military nearby, and even if I did, I wouldn't ask them to lift some paracord for me.
The Gatorade bottle subject has been beaten to death. Yes, I am aware of Gatorade bottles. I already have nalgene bottles that I carry--I bought the roll-up canteen to carry around empty, and would use it at night to bring extra water from the nearest source back to camp. You're just making assumptions that I need to somehow carry water, and that your way is better. Please, just stop.
Titanium? You're right. I don't NEED anything. In fact, the spork wasn't for me anyways. I carry the Sea-to-Summit anodized aluminum flatware. Light as a feather, cheaper than titanium, and won't break like Lexan. But another person in my sphere of influence said that they wanted a titanium spork, so while I was out shopping for gear, I purchased a little pre-trail magic.
I am fully aware of the products and services available at Walmart. It's a veritable cornucopia of Chinese-made consumer goods. You're assuming that I didn't get one there.
No I don't have a sewing machine or a load of rip-stop nylon. It may be next to nothing to make them, except when you consider the time it takes. Right now, my time is more valuable to me than than the satisfaction that comes from being able to brag about how I was able to make my own gear.
I prefer to use moleskin *and* duct tape when I hike my own hike
While I can appreciate 'dirt bagging' and scrounging, I'm not to the point where I need to bum duct tape off of my friends. And if I ever get to that point, I have bigger problems than just wondering how much out-of-pocket a thru-hike is going to end up costing me.
There you go assuming again with the deet. Because I'm a car camper, and usually go with a group, I have large cans of deep-woods OFF in the storage tote. Not travel-sized tubes of deet. And seriously, if I had some already, do you think I would've made a point of posting that I had to buy more? I mean, when you took the time to tell me to look in the gear I already have, did you think a light bulb would go off over my head, the heavens would part, the angels would sing, and I'd say "Oh yeah--I do have some of that lying around..."
First aid kit. Yes, I can raid the supplies in the medicine cabinet to supplement it. But those supplies have to come from somewhere, they don't just magically appear there. (See previous discussion about Walmart for further clarification)
Yep, dehydrated meals can be expensive. But what some folks consider expensive, others may not. Besides, food is a very subjective topic, and--I know it may be a stretch wrap your head around--but maybe, just maybe, my tastes are different than yours.
Now, I don't want to sound like a complete callous smartass (well, maybe a little, but not complete), but if you read my original post carefully, I wasn't looking for a way out of this burdensome nickel-and-diming. I was just pointing out that I was surprised by the things I hadn't considered at first--you know, commiserating here on White Blaze while I spent my extra day off futzing around with my backpacking gear, wishing I were someplace with lots of trees, clean cold water, and a good view.

Also, the glaringly obvious point is that I've already spent the money on this stuff. Coming back afterwards and telling me what I should've done, especially when I never asked, smacks of I-told-you-so smugness and is off-putting.

Maybe that's what triggered my snarky response. I believe that if somebody actually wants advice, they'll ask for it, especially in a forum like this where they have hundreds of people with more experience to draw on. But to offer it up un-asked-for, man, that just drives me nuts. So when it landed on me, well, this here is the result.

Peace out, y'all... ;)Wow. Incredible. A smartass and ungrateful. You're welcome.

hikerboy57
07-29-2011, 15:44
Ivre accumulated enough gear over the last 25 years , that I need a whole room to store it in. and yet, everytime I plan a trip, I feel the need to go shopping to "fill in " on items I might deem necessary.So I shop, buy some stuff, and when I start laying everything out for packing, I find I dont need the new purchases. You learn to find items that can have more than one use, and you learn , hike after hike, what you dont absolutely have to have with you.If theres a high pressure system in place for the next week over the area I intend to travel, why am I bringing rain gear? I bought a small coffee press several years ago, because I love my java, but found on the trail, it was almost impossible to keep clean, as well as having to pack out the used wet grinds, so i switched to starbucks via.you learn from every hike to find ways to lessen the load, but the swan song of "new gear" always appeals to me when im in the planning stages.

Trailbender
07-29-2011, 15:57
No, I don't know anyone in the military nearby, and even if I did, I wouldn't ask them to lift some paracord for me.

Paracord is fairly cheap anyways, good stuff. I use it for shoelaces, repairs, all kinds of stuff. Ebay is a decent place to get it.


The Gatorade bottle subject has been beaten to death. Yes, I am aware of Gatorade bottles. I already have nalgene bottles that I carry--I bought the roll-up canteen to carry around empty, and would use it at night to bring extra water from the nearest source back to camp. You're just making assumptions that I need to somehow carry water, and that your way is better. Please, just stop.

That's because Gatorade bottles are better than nalgene bottles, ect. Why would you pay 10 bucks for a plastic water bottle when you can get one for a dollar, with a drink? I carry a rolled up platy for camp water as well.


Titanium? You're right. I don't NEED anything. In fact, the spork wasn't for me anyways. I carry the Sea-to-Summit anodized aluminum flatware. Light as a feather, cheaper than titanium, and won't break like Lexan. But another person in my sphere of influence said that they wanted a titanium spork, so while I was out shopping for gear, I purchased a little pre-trail magic.

25 cent wal mart teaspoon with half the handle cut off.


I am fully aware of the products and services available at Walmart. It's a veritable cornucopia of Chinese-made consumer goods. You're assuming that I didn't get one there.
No I don't have a sewing machine or a load of rip-stop nylon. It may be next to nothing to make them, except when you consider the time it takes. Right now, my time is more valuable to me than than the satisfaction that comes from being able to brag about how I was able to make my own gear.

Don't even need a sewing machine. Also, I'd put my home made gear up against anything commercially available for durability, ect.


I prefer to use moleskin *and* duct tape when I hike my own hike

Moleskin falls off easily. Duct tape is better.


While I can appreciate 'dirt bagging' and scrounging, I'm not to the point where I need to bum duct tape off of my friends. And if I ever get to that point, I have bigger problems than just wondering how much out-of-pocket a thru-hike is going to end up costing me.

Every penny you save is another step towards freedom.


There you go assuming again with the deet. Because I'm a car camper, and usually go with a group, I have large cans of deep-woods OFF in the storage tote. Not travel-sized tubes of deet. And seriously, if I had some already, do you think I would've made a point of posting that I had to buy more? I mean, when you took the time to tell me to look in the gear I already have, did you think a light bulb would go off over my head, the heavens would part, the angels would sing, and I'd say "Oh yeah--I do have some of that lying around..."

I have never found bug spray to be particularly effective. I get bit just as much with or without it, stopped carrying it years ago.


First aid kit. Yes, I can raid the supplies in the medicine cabinet to supplement it. But those supplies have to come from somewhere, they don't just magically appear there. (See previous discussion about Walmart for further clarification)

Don't need a first aid kit either, too small to handle major injuries, anything that can be treated with it can be treated with duct tape and toilet paper band aids.


Yep, dehydrated meals can be expensive. But what some folks consider expensive, others may not. Besides, food is a very subjective topic, and--I know it may be a stretch wrap your head around--but maybe, just maybe, my tastes are different than yours.

Just get grocery store food.



Some more suggestions, from a 2010 thru hiker.

Hooch
07-29-2011, 16:01
Some more suggestions, from a 2010 thru hiker.Oh lawdy, don't het him started again. He's gonna pop a gasket this time. :rolleyes:

Trailbender
07-29-2011, 16:05
Ivre accumulated enough gear over the last 25 years , that I need a whole room to store it in. and yet, everytime I plan a trip, I feel the need to go shopping to "fill in " on items I might deem necessary.So I shop, buy some stuff, and when I start laying everything out for packing, I find I dont need the new purchases. You learn to find items that can have more than one use, and you learn , hike after hike, what you dont absolutely have to have with you.If theres a high pressure system in place for the next week over the area I intend to travel, why am I bringing rain gear? I bought a small coffee press several years ago, because I love my java, but found on the trail, it was almost impossible to keep clean, as well as having to pack out the used wet grinds, so i switched to starbucks via.you learn from every hike to find ways to lessen the load, but the swan song of "new gear" always appeals to me when im in the planning stages.

It's easy to get sucked into the consumerist brainwashing that affects the rest of society. I keep one set of gear that I hike with, can't stand having a bunch of stuff, even hiking gear. I have found after years of looking around, that I can probably modify and existing piece of kit, make it myself, or do without. I always carry rain gear, it is also part of my thermal system, though. If I do replace gear, the old stuff goes in my car kit, gets given to friends, gutted for fabric and parts, or tossed. I haven't had to throw anything away yet.

I sleep cold, so I hike year round with a 0 degree bag I converted to a quilt. My pad is a winter thermarest CCF, so my gear is capable of being used year round. If it is too hot, I just don't use the bag. I did my whole thru with a 0 degree down bag, and had no issues. I did try a survival blanket for awhile, but it wasn't comfortable below mid 50's.

Trailbender
07-29-2011, 16:06
Oh lawdy, don't het him started again. He's gonna pop a gasket this time. :rolleyes:

Kind of why I did it, but all my advice was tried and true. If people have bad ideas, I will make suggestions.

Hooch
07-29-2011, 16:12
. If people have bad ideas, I will make suggestions.Couldn't have said it better myself. You're my new hero. Ok, not really, but I like how you think.

hikerboy57
07-29-2011, 16:16
It's easy to get sucked into the consumerist brainwashing that affects the rest of society. I keep one set of gear that I hike with, can't stand having a bunch of stuff, even hiking gear. I have found after years of looking around, that I can probably modify and existing piece of kit, make it myself, or do without. I always carry rain gear, it is also part of my thermal system, though. If I do replace gear, the old stuff goes in my car kit, gets given to friends, gutted for fabric and parts, or tossed. I haven't had to throw anything away yet.

I sleep cold, so I hike year round with a 0 degree bag I converted to a quilt. My pad is a winter thermarest CCF, so my gear is capable of being used year round. If it is too hot, I just don't use the bag. I did my whole thru with a 0 degree down bag, and had no issues. I did try a survival blanket for awhile, but it wasn't comfortable below mid 50's. I was pleased yesterday, when I found myself again in EMS to see if there was anything I needed. I recently bought a pair of moab ventilators for my section hike from springer to dwg next year. Ive already broken them ina bit and theyre much lighter than the Keens that i replaced. But then i read an article in Backpacker about some trailrunners, so I actually asked to try on a few pair, and none seemed to work, but I still found myself trying to justiofy buying them. I finally left without buying anything, and have no withdrawal symptoms.:)Except for the gear I currently use, most of the stuff in my storage room hasnt been used in years. I just keep it in case I need to indoctrinate a novice into the addiction.

paistes5
07-29-2011, 16:26
I gotta say having only been on here for a few months and being a noob, I gotta say Silverstone hit the nail on the head. Was is "snarky", sure but he was just making an observation.

Sure we could all do it dirt cheap, mooch off of others, sleep miserably and eat ramen for five months. Hey, if that's your thing, great.

As for a few comments of my own, I personally like the nalgene bottles over Gatorade bottles, I like moleskin AND ductape together, I like a little insect repellent while at camp but not while hiking and I think a Mountainhouse meal every so often is a nice treat for a tough day on the trail.

Instead of always saying HYOH, how about doing it?

Just saying...

4Bears
07-29-2011, 16:34
Ivre accumulated enough gear over the last 25 years , that I need a whole room to store it in....... I and most everyone else who has been involved with this hobby/sport can relate.
I feel the need to go shopping to "fill in " on items I might deem necessary.So I shop, buy some stuff, and when I start laying everything out for packing, I find I dont need the new purchases...... Wished I had all that money back, heck I bought items I was sure I had but was sure I couldn't find at home.
I bought a small coffee press several years ago, because I love my java, but found on the trail, it was almost impossible to keep clean, as well as having to pack out the used wet grinds. ........ I like coffee too but found it a hassle on the trail and never found an instant that tasted good including those Folgers bags so i switched to making tea in the woods and have coffee when I can.
you learn from every hike to find ways to lessen the load, but the swan song of "new gear" always appeals to me when im in the planning stages..........Yes myself from 65lbs on my first wilderness hike to 45lbs the next to 25lbs and so on have my base in the high teens now and working on lowering more. I think they call it evolving, but I'm ok with the learning curve, getting there is fun.

Trailbender
07-29-2011, 17:40
I gotta say having only been on here for a few months and being a noob, I gotta say Silverstone hit the nail on the head. Was is "snarky", sure but he was just making an observation.

Sure we could all do it dirt cheap, mooch off of others, sleep miserably and eat ramen for five months. Hey, if that's your thing, great.

As for a few comments of my own, I personally like the nalgene bottles over Gatorade bottles, I like moleskin AND ductape together, I like a little insect repellent while at camp but not while hiking and I think a Mountainhouse meal every so often is a nice treat for a tough day on the trail.

Instead of always saying HYOH, how about doing it?

Just saying...

I did it dirt cheap, and didn't mooch or eat ramens. In fact, I hate ramens, and ate maybe 7 packs my entire thru. I also sleep very cozy in my tent, so I had no desire to go to a hostel. You can still be cheap and totally enjoy yourself, in direct contradiction to the billions advertisers spend to make you think otherwise. Happiness doesn't come from buying or owning things. So, I will use the cheapest gear that is durable enough to get the job done. I won't pay triple for something when I can get the exact same thing for cheaper. And, I sacrifice nothing. Mountain House is ok, but I wouldn't consider it tasty enough to be a luxury.

My total cost for my thru was $2300, including the greyhound home from maine to TN. That also included some random gear I was testing out, as well. I did not feel deprived, and I actually felt like I splurged several times.

I also ate pretty well. That is a common misconception from a lot of people, that being cheap means depriving yourself.


..........Yes myself from 65lbs on my first wilderness hike to 45lbs the next to 25lbs and so on have my base in the high teens now and working on lowering more. I think they call it evolving, but I'm ok with the learning curve, getting there is fun.

Yeah, lowered pack weight comes from experience, you learn what you can leave behind, and what you actually need. Very little, it turns out.

paistes5
07-29-2011, 17:47
Trailbender, let me clarify. I'm not calling you out or anybody out for that matter personally. I don't know you but I imagine you're a fairly likable fellow.

My observation was simply stating I can understand the OP's reply. I had no idea you thru'd and surely didn't know how much you spent or what on.

topshelf
07-29-2011, 17:51
Buying gear can be expensive.

This is how I think about it, take it for what it's worth.

If it's what I need to make my hiking experience better, I don't care about the money. Do I need a $400 tent to better my hiking experience better? Nope
Do I need something better than a cheap, leaky, heavy, walmart tent? Yes.

The enjoyment I get out of it in the end is more than worth it.

Silverstone
07-29-2011, 17:53
Wow. Incredible. A smartass and ungrateful. You're welcome.

Dang. I missed that day in class where we learned to be grateful for unsolicited advice.

Seriously--I *do* appreciate the knowledge base found here on the forum, but not everything people post on here is a cry for help from more experienced hikers. Yet it seems that some people are batting a thousand when it comes to completely missing the point of a post and offering up 'a better way'.

I'm sure you can hike circles around me and spend less while you do it, and god bless you for it, but if you would've put half as much effort into reading comprehension as you did into telling what I'm doing wrong, we could've had an entertaining thread about silly gadgets that sometimes find their way into the noobie's backpacks, which would've probably been a whole lot more fun for everyone involved.

Contrary to popular belief, not every thread is an advice thread.

paistes5
07-29-2011, 17:56
Silly gadget in my pack was a five and a half pound anchor disguised as a tent. Never again.

hikerboy57
07-29-2011, 17:58
anyone wanna buy a slightly used coffee press?

Hooch
07-29-2011, 18:09
Dang. I missed that day in class where we learned to be grateful for unsolicited advice.

Seriously--I *do* appreciate the knowledge base found here on the forum, but not everything people post on here is a cry for help from more experienced hikers. Yet it seems that some people are batting a thousand when it comes to completely missing the point of a post and offering up 'a better way'.

I'm sure you can hike circles around me and spend less while you do it, and god bless you for it, but if you would've put half as much effort into reading comprehension as you did into telling what I'm doing wrong, we could've had an entertaining thread about silly gadgets that sometimes find their way into the noobie's backpacks, which would've probably been a whole lot more fun for everyone involved.

Contrary to popular belief, not every thread is an advice thread.Yes, Alex, I'll take "People Who Take The Internet Way Too Seriously" for $1000, please. :rolleyes:
13342

DLANOIE
07-29-2011, 18:10
anyone wanna buy a slightly used coffee press?

How easy is it to clean on the trail???:p

japhyryder
07-29-2011, 18:13
I'm going with not, since I wasn't really asking for advice. Just an observation, but it seems that a lot of posts in these forums get answered with too much unsolicited advice. I know that lots of folks here have plenty of great knowledge to share, but nothing is more tedious than listening to them offer up that info when it's not asked, and especially when it's chock-full of assumptions.

But if you're going to make assumptions and offer unsolicited advice, please--like Jules Winfield so famously said--allow me to retort.



No, I don't know anyone in the military nearby, and even if I did, I wouldn't ask them to lift some paracord for me.
The Gatorade bottle subject has been beaten to death. Yes, I am aware of Gatorade bottles. I already have nalgene bottles that I carry--I bought the roll-up canteen to carry around empty, and would use it at night to bring extra water from the nearest source back to camp. You're just making assumptions that I need to somehow carry water, and that your way is better. Please, just stop.
Titanium? You're right. I don't NEED anything. In fact, the spork wasn't for me anyways. I carry the Sea-to-Summit anodized aluminum flatware. Light as a feather, cheaper than titanium, and won't break like Lexan. But another person in my sphere of influence said that they wanted a titanium spork, so while I was out shopping for gear, I purchased a little pre-trail magic.
I am fully aware of the products and services available at Walmart. It's a veritable cornucopia of Chinese-made consumer goods. You're assuming that I didn't get one there.
No I don't have a sewing machine or a load of rip-stop nylon. It may be next to nothing to make them, except when you consider the time it takes. Right now, my time is more valuable to me than than the satisfaction that comes from being able to brag about how I was able to make my own gear.
I prefer to use moleskin *and* duct tape when I hike my own hike
While I can appreciate 'dirt bagging' and scrounging, I'm not to the point where I need to bum duct tape off of my friends. And if I ever get to that point, I have bigger problems than just wondering how much out-of-pocket a thru-hike is going to end up costing me.
There you go assuming again with the deet. Because I'm a car camper, and usually go with a group, I have large cans of deep-woods OFF in the storage tote. Not travel-sized tubes of deet. And seriously, if I had some already, do you think I would've made a point of posting that I had to buy more? I mean, when you took the time to tell me to look in the gear I already have, did you think a light bulb would go off over my head, the heavens would part, the angels would sing, and I'd say "Oh yeah--I do have some of that lying around..."
First aid kit. Yes, I can raid the supplies in the medicine cabinet to supplement it. But those supplies have to come from somewhere, they don't just magically appear there. (See previous discussion about Walmart for further clarification)
Yep, dehydrated meals can be expensive. But what some folks consider expensive, others may not. Besides, food is a very subjective topic, and--I know it may be a stretch wrap your head around--but maybe, just maybe, my tastes are different than yours.

Now, I don't want to sound like a complete callous smartass (well, maybe a little, but not complete), but if you read my original post carefully, I wasn't looking for a way out of this burdensome nickel-and-diming. I was just pointing out that I was surprised by the things I hadn't considered at first--you know, commiserating here on White Blaze while I spent my extra day off futzing around with my backpacking gear, wishing I were someplace with lots of trees, clean cold water, and a good view.

Also, the glaringly obvious point is that I've already spent the money on this stuff. Coming back afterwards and telling me what I should've done, especially when I never asked, smacks of I-told-you-so smugness and is off-putting.

Maybe that's what triggered my snarky response. I believe that if somebody actually wants advice, they'll ask for it, especially in a forum like this where they have hundreds of people with more experience to draw on. But to offer it up un-asked-for, man, that just drives me nuts. So when it landed on me, well, this here is the result.

Peace out, y'all... ;)

Nothing eats at me more than someone who is rude and ungrateful .
To answer your question, 1+1=2 i could be wrong u may want to check it out on the spreadsheet and than have the fellows in the office double check it

DavidNH
07-29-2011, 18:17
The universal law of hiking gear which I just made up: You never have everything you need until you have left the car and are on the trail. Once you are on the trail what you don't have you don't have so you don't need it. Whilst you are still at home and planning your adventure.. there is always some nifty gadget that you don't have that would make things easier or nicer. Happens to me all the time!

hikerboy57
07-30-2011, 07:32
How easy is it to clean on the trail???:pnot very easy, but with enogh water to rinse, its okay. I found it to be too much trouble, so Ive switched to starbucks via. its not perfect, but no fuss, no muss. its made by GSI.(http://www.rei.com/product/784620/gsi-outdoors-personal-java-press-coffee-maker#reviews )if you want mine, just send me a PM with your address and Ill send it to you.

Rocketman
07-30-2011, 09:07
I'm going with not, since I wasn't really asking for advice. Just an observation, but it seems that a lot of posts in these forums get answered with too much unsolicited advice. I know that lots of folks here have plenty of great knowledge to share, but nothing is more tedious than listening to them offer up that info when it's not asked, and especially when it's chock-full of assumptions.
Also, the glaringly obvious point is that I've already spent the money on this stuff. Coming back afterwards and telling me what I should've done, especially when I never asked, smacks of I-told-you-so smugness and is off-putting. .....

Maybe that's what triggered my snarky response. I believe that if somebody actually wants advice, they'll ask for it, especially in a forum like this where they have hundreds of people with more experience to draw on. But to offer it up un-asked-for, man, that just drives me nuts. So when it landed on me, well, this here is the result.

Peace out, y'all... ;)


I second the motion!

hike500
08-01-2011, 02:10
I've been trying to keep meticulous records while planning my 2013 thru-hike, and I'm amazed at all the 'little' things that add up as I gear-up. Granted, a year ago, all I had was car-camping gear, and believe me, I can load up my pickup truck and live pretty well for three or four days at a local state park. But I sure as hell ain't taking a cast-iron Dutch oven or a Coleman lantern on the AT with me.

Now that I've caught the backpacking bug, I've started to notice where all the money goes (I guess that's the price I pay for using a spreadsheet to track everything).

I'm not talking about the big, expected, expenses like a tent, pack, boots, etc, but just stuff like--

50 ft. of paracord
a bottle of Dr Bronner's soap
a wide-mouth roll-up 'canteen'
titanium spork
a dry sack
other storage sacks
compression straps
moleskin
bandana
duct tape
deet
other stuff for the first-aid kit
a few dehydrated meal packs
and on and on--

Suddenly, I've spent another $60 in one quick shopping trip... :eek:

Not that I'm complaining, too much--I mean, I've got a decent job and can afford to feed my new hobby, but I guess my point is, I am a little surprised at all of the little things I didn't expect that have found their way into my wallet.

Of course, half this shiat's probably gonna get sent home once I get to Mountain Crossings... Heh. :D

Now I know why he needs the wide mouthed canteen, thanks for telling us you have a good job then complaining about buying para cord. I know you didn't specifically ask for advice but Hooch probably thought you were implying. You know how many people are out of work right now and you post a thread above complaining about 60.00 in hiking equipment! you also just clearly pointed out that you know nothing about backpacking!

JaxHiker
08-01-2011, 09:28
Maybe that's what triggered my snarky response. I believe that if somebody actually wants advice, they'll ask for it, especially in a forum like this where they have hundreds of people with more experience to draw on. But to offer it up un-asked-for, man, that just drives me nuts. So when it landed on me, well, this here is the result.
I'm sorry you feel that way. I don't think it's any reason to be an ass, though. How hard is it to simply say, "Thanks" and move on? With an attitude like yours you might be lucky to get some help in the future when you DO want it.

Hooch
08-01-2011, 09:36
. . . .thanks for telling us you have a good job then complaining about buying para cord. . . .you also just clearly pointed out that you know nothing about backpacking!Really! Everyone knows that Lash-It or Zing-It is a lot better than paracord. :rolleyes: :banana

58starter
08-01-2011, 09:46
half to fun of hiking is planning and getting ready to hike. I too have more equipment than I need. As a result of this it has been easier to get my friend to hike with me as I have enough gear for them to go with me if they have clothes and boots.
Happy hiking to all.

hobby
08-01-2011, 09:58
a hobby is not worth having unless it costs at least $1000.00 to get into!