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hungryhowie
02-15-2005, 17:16
Edit: More questions added. Please see http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?p=87205&posted=1#post87205

Hi gang,

Im trying to see how hammock users feel about the complexity or lack of complexity regarding deploying their hammocks, and whether one type or brand of hammock is inherently easier to setup than another. Id really appreciate it if you find time to answer the following short questions. If you frequently use more than one type of hammock, Id also appreciate your feedback on all hammocks that you use/ have used.

What brand and model hammock do you use?

How long does it take for you to set up your hammock and rain fly?

Note: this is from the time you pull your hammock out of your pack to the time it is suspended and the rain fly is staked down. Please do not include any additional variables such as attaching an under quilt.

Have you ever wished there was an easier and quicker method of deploying your hammock?

Thanks, gang!

Jeremy Padgett
Hungry Howie & The New Sushi

Footslogger
02-15-2005, 17:32
I made a modification a long time ago to my Hennessy Hammock to simplify set up and take down. I can have it fully up and ready to use in 3 - 4 minutes.

I don't fuss with the knots any more, which was (at least for me) the most time consuming part of the process. I found two long 1" wide nylon straps with plastic buckles at the ends and slid metal (250 lbs test) rings over them. The line from the hammock is tied (and stays tied) to those rings. I find 2 suitable trees and attach the straps ...loosely at first. Then I adjust the tension of the straps at both ends until I get it centered and tight. In the morning all I do is lift up on the buckle tabs and take the straps off the trees.

'Slogger
AT 2003

UCONNMike
02-15-2005, 17:55
I would love to see a few pics of this rig you set up for you hennessey hammock, ive been practicing setting it up, but your way seems much easier.

Kerosene
02-15-2005, 18:13
I find 2 suitable trees...This is by far the most time-consuming part of setup!

flyfisher
02-15-2005, 18:27
Hi gang,

Im trying to see how hammock users feel about the complexity or lack of complexity regarding deploying their hammocks, and whether one type or brand of hammock is inherently easier to setup than another. Id really appreciate it if you find time to answer the following short questions. If you frequently use more than one type of hammock, Id also appreciate your feedback on all hammocks that you use/ have used.

What brand and model hammock do you use?

How long does it take for you to set up your hammock and rain fly?

Note: this is from the time you pull your hammock out of your pack to the time it is suspended and the rain fly is staked down. Please do not include any additional variables such as attaching an under quilt.

Have you ever wished there was an easier and quicker method of deploying your hammock?

Thanks, gang!

Jeremy Padgett
Hungry Howie & The New Sushi

It's been a couple months since I tried, and I have never timed myself before.

Homemade ZHammock, with 1 inch web straps. Fly is 5x10 ft silnylon, held down at 8 points by 4 stakes. Fly guidelines are pulse cord.

1 min 45 sec (without running or rushing) from pack to hammock suspended and rain fly staked down.

Details: Weather: 10 mph breeze that whipped the fly around a fair amount. Hammock and rain fly started in separate hammock tubes. Hammock and fly tied to trees with modified Speer 4 wrap knot.

Teardown (both items in hammock tubes and in pack) took 1 min 30 seconds.

Footslogger
02-15-2005, 18:27
This is by far the most time-consuming part of setup!==================================
With the longer nylon straps I don't have to be quite as picky when it comes to trees ...but yeah, that is definitely the challenge at times.

'Slogger

Footslogger
02-15-2005, 18:28
I would love to see a few pics of this rig you set up for you hennessey hammock, ive been practicing setting it up, but your way seems much easier.=================================
Don't have any pics at the moment but I'll see what I can do.

'Slogger

SGT Rock
02-15-2005, 21:12
I had an e-mail from some scouts that were having contests to set Hennessy Hammocks up, I think some had got it down below 30 seconds for an un-modified hammock.

WhiteMtns
02-15-2005, 22:08
My Hennessy, standard diamond tarp, two tie outs, usually two and a half to three minutes.

But unless there's a sudden squall...I have all the time in the world to complete it, so I can't say how much faster I'd be if I was rushing.

I have an Idea I want to try on my homemade hammock that should make set up in the 30 seconds to a minute range...but that's yet to be seen. It requires the purchase of a piece of climbing gear that will do away with any knots or wrapping the suspension line at all. That's that most time consuming part...

UCONNMike
02-15-2005, 22:46
This is by far the most time-consuming part of setup!
I hear that, when i first got my hammock i went outside to set it up, and i walked around in the woods behind my house and searched for two trees that were strong enough and the right distance apart. I just hope this isn't a problem when I'm out on the AT.

SGT Rock
02-15-2005, 22:51
It won't be. You get real good at spotting them. 5 to 6 paces is my standard pace to get some good trees, but I have gone a little closer and sometimes even a little further apart.

UCONNMike
02-15-2005, 23:01
It won't be. You get real good at spotting them. 5 to 6 paces is my standard pace to get some good trees, but I have gone a little closer and sometimes even a little further apart.
hey Sgt. how do yo uset your's up? with the knot they show on the HH site or do you have a rig set up to get it set up faster, cause i have a feeling i'm gonna get real sick of doing that knot every nite...and suggestions

orangebug
02-15-2005, 23:04
You will get so used to that knot that you will throw it with your eyes shut. It doesn't matter which brand of hammock you use, it gets to be an embedded skill. At least that was my sectioning experience after a few nights.

SGT Rock
02-16-2005, 02:57
I agree with Orangebug. The knot was a bogger to get especially with the description on the bag, but once you understand how it works it is like trying your shoelaces.

rpettit
02-16-2005, 08:13
It takes me about 10 minutes to set the hammock correctly. I use a line level on the hinge line and space the hammock evenly end to end. Then lay it it for a few minutes and move around, which pulls slack out of the lashings and tree huggers, then after double checking the level and spacing, re-tension on one side. If I attach my 10X12 tarp, thats another 10 minutes. Why is time such and issue? Relax, lay back and enjoy it.

orangebug
02-16-2005, 08:27
It's raining cats and dogs! You wanna get everything wet?

peter_pan
02-16-2005, 08:43
Routinely takes about 3 minutes to set my hennessy up but I 'm picky...can do it in under two if I hustle....Like other said, it can be done virtually witheyes closed once you are experienced...this includes deploying the Nest under quilt which stays attached and is rolled up with the hammock in the Python Skins.

rpettit
02-16-2005, 09:46
No, I don't want to get everything wet. If it were raining, I would set my tarp first. Which would provide ample rain protection, then hang my hammock. It actually took me 30 minutes to set my hammock once. I laid back in it to test the position, my brother-in-law woke me up 30 minutes later.

SGT Rock
02-16-2005, 09:52
Well my set up style has the tarp not inside the snakeskins. When it rains Ijust put up the ridgeline with the snakeskins still over the hammock and then spread the tarpout while the hammock stays in the skins. When I am ready for bed I open up the hammock. Tear down is basically a reversal, I pack my backpack up then close up the hammock under the tarp, finally I'll finish by taking down the tarp and packing the coiled snakeskins inside my pack and the tarp in an mesh pouch outside the pack so the hammock itself is never exposed to the rain.

flyfisher
02-16-2005, 09:59
It won't be. You get real good at spotting them. 5 to 6 paces is my standard pace to get some good trees, but I have gone a little closer and sometimes even a little further apart.

I've also taken to using Ray Garlington's method of holding my hiking sticks out to my sides. If I can touch the trees with the ends of the poles, they are close enough. If I can touch one tree with the end of a pole and the other with my hand, they are almost too close.

Youngblood
02-16-2005, 10:46
I've also taken to using Ray Garlington's method of holding my hiking sticks out to my sides. If I can touch the trees with the ends of the poles, they are close enough. If I can touch one tree with the end of a pole and the other with my hand, they are almost too close.
Me too, it's about 12 feet between the tips of the outstretched poles.

How long it takes me depends on lots of things... how tired I am, the slope I'm on, the type of forest I'm in, the weather, the time of year/what insulation I'm using, whether I'm in a hurry, etc... and then there are the times when I messed up estimating the distance between trees and have to retie a knot or two. Now, if you're talking about in my back yard between my favorite hammock hanging trees when I don't need the tarp or bugnet or insulation... I'm so fast that I'm done before I look down at my watch to see how long it took. :banana

But what Howie is asking is how long it takes to set up in between trees where you know the distance, are using your tarp and the terrain is flat with no impediments... the shortest possible time, not counting isulation placement and such. I haven't measured mine but would guess it is in the three minute range since I use a seperate tarp that requires six stakes.

Youngblood

SGT Rock
02-16-2005, 10:52
I will go out this weekend and try it at three speeds: normal, lesiurly, and in a hurry and see what I get.

Footslogger
02-16-2005, 11:19
Just for the record ...the time indicated in my earlier post was in summer (not raining) and did not include locating of trees. I do things a bit different when it's raining and not sure if that has a big impact on time. If raining when I set up I tie out the fly between the trees first (at about shoulder height) and then stake it out. With the overhead protection I next attach the straps to the two trees and adjust the tension.

'Slogger
AT 2003

Youngblood
02-16-2005, 11:23
I will go out this weekend and try it at three speeds: normal, lesiurly, and in a hurry and see what I get.
Sarge,

I'll be on the Benton MacKaye Trail... come on down and we'll time it before a toast after the first toast, after the second toast, etc.

Youngblood

bearbag hanger
02-16-2005, 11:53
I use the Hennessy Hammock UL Backpacker model.

When I first got it, it took me about 10 to 15 minutes to set up, 90% of that tying the hammock lines to the tree saver webbing. I have since remove the lines on the hammock and attached 1 inch webbing to the hammock directly. Now it only takes a minute or two. Generally, I set it up, sit in it, retighten the webbing lines one more time and them I'm good for the night. If it's raining, will set up the canopy before removing the JacksRBetter python skins. Highly recommend the python skins or Hennessy's snake skins.

You didn't ask, but everyone seems to be commenting on it - I look for two trees about four and half to six paces apart. Five paces is better than six. I've hung it on trees much further than that, but you have to tie the attachment points much higher.

Kerosene
02-16-2005, 12:38
I look for two trees about four and half to six paces apart. Five paces is better than six. I've hung it on trees much further than that, but you have to tie the attachment points much higher.You also have to make sure that the two trees you pick are the right width, are ideally still alive and don't have any "widow makers" up above, and there isn't too much undergrowth that will scrape the bottom of your hammock all night and drive you crazy!

hungryhowie
02-16-2005, 17:36
Thanks for the feedback so far, everyone. Keep it coming!

As for myself, I use a Hennessy ultralight backpacker most of the time (I actually prefer the non-Asym version...and it's lighter). I thought it took me about 3-4 minutes to set up until I actually timed it once: 5.5 minutes. And this was at a spot that I set up at routinely, so I knew my location and all of the little knobs on the tree that I had to deal with.

Its a little quicker now with Hennessys newer and stiffer jacketed ropes (The original ultralight backpacker ropes are bare spectra, which is more difficult to load through the webbing loops), but those knots are time consuming no matter how you look at them.

Not only that, but if you set up the first side so that the hammock is too close to the tree and your ropes wont sufficiently reach the other tree, youve got to completely redo the first knot to make it all work.

Granted, 5 minutes still isn't a too much time to spend setting up a shelter, it takes me that long, maybe even longer, to deploy my trusty silshelter of 5 years when I dwell on the ground.

That said, I prefer to maximize my time in the hammock rather than time spent setting it up, and a faster method of deployment, especially one that eliminates having to "reset" the first knot to increase the line length, encourages me to use my hammock more frequently, even for quick afternoon naps.

Think about it this way. A lunch break or afternoon siesta is often 30-45 minutes. If it takes you 5 minutes to set up and 5 minutes to tear down, that's either 22-33% of your entire break time, or an additional 10 minutes of your time outside of your break that you're not doing anything productive.

What if you could set your hammock up in less than 1 minute without rushing?
What if it was literally almost as simple and quick as walking between two trees?
Would it increase your enjoyment of hammocking?

Jeremy Padgett
Hungry Howie & The New Sushi

Footslogger
02-16-2005, 17:41
Truthfully, I don't think 5 minutes is excessive to set up a shelter ...of any sort. That said, I too got tired of futzing with those knots, regardless of how long it took me to tie them. That's exactly why I came up with the little adaptation I mentioned in an earlier post. And yes, since working out that change I do enjoy my hammock more ...of course I'm only a "fair weather" tree dweller. Tried the winter hammock thing with all the suggested modifications/additions and just couldn't get comfortable.

'Slogger
AT 2003

WhiteMtns
02-16-2005, 19:20
My homemade hammock might have something like this.

http://www.clamcleat.com/line-lok.htm

Just a pass through the webbing loop and lock in place...can be retensioned in seconds after sitting in the hammock a while.

I think I'd have to tie and untie the little overhand knot each time to work the device...but no problem.

Use their strongest one on 3/16 spectra core?


I've been looking for something with the finctionality of those little plastic guideline tensioners you see on cheap tents. This is as close as I've found.

But I'd think it could make setup 30 seconds.

Footslogger
02-16-2005, 19:49
My homemade hammock might have something like this.

http://www.clamcleat.com/line-lok.htm

Just a pass through the webbing loop and lock in place...can be retensioned in seconds after sitting in the hammock a while.
.============================================
They look like they'd work quite well. Do you know how much those clamcleats cost ??

Thanks,

'Slogger

The Hammocker
02-16-2005, 20:33
============================================
They look like they'd work quite well. Do you know how much those clamcleats cost ??

Thanks,

'SloggerI don't use any of the fancy rope locks, but then again I'm a boyscout and would probably get frowned upon for it any way. I set up pretty fast with normal knots though.

Footslogger
02-16-2005, 20:59
I don't use any of the fancy rope locks, but then again I'm a boyscout and would probably get frowned upon for it any way. I set up pretty fast with normal knots though.===============
Im a old boy scout too Shane ...and I know my knots and can tie most of them with ease and speed. But knots have their time and place.

Others can frown all they want. All that frowning is about them ...not you and/or me. If I can come up with a simpler, smarter and faster way to do something I'm gonna do it.

'Slogger
AT 2003

WhiteMtns
02-16-2005, 21:50
I haven't found them retail, so I'm not sure what they cost. I'm still looking for something like this, or some other tensioner, that makes hanging a cinch.


I completely understand anybody thinking that I'm just that lazy...but I am intrigued by gadgets like that. I also have to get over that contradiction of a personal philosophy -- not packing anything that does not have multiple uses. After all, why buy a gadget that takes up space and adds weight, when a knot is free and weightless (already part of the rope.)

Call me insane, but if I can get my hands on something like this...I just gotta try it. Anybody find something like this, please let me know. I've been investigating climbing devices, as well as ship rigging. Think "anyone who uses more rope than a hammock hanger." Of course, this does not help those who use webbing exclusively. But for my Homemade...thin, strong rope is integral and cannot be avoided in my design.

Footslogger
02-16-2005, 22:00
I haven't found them retail, so I'm not sure what they cost. =======================================
Well ...if you do locate them and need to buy them in quantity let me know. I'll chip in on the purchase to get my hands a few.

Thanks,

'Slogger

WhiteMtns
02-16-2005, 22:23
on this page...

http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/store/hardware/cleats.htm

the CL260 line-lok appears to be $.85 that's as it...less than a buck.

The company's web site describes this model as being able to hold up to 200 lbs I think. One on each end of a hammock...sharing half the load...?

They ahve another...the CL 223...that appears to be much stronger.

I'm still looking.

P.S. sorry if these couple of posts somewhat got off topic on the speed of hanging a hammock...

...but then these wouldn't be that far off topic after all.

Roland
02-16-2005, 22:25
My homemade hammock might have something like this.

http://www.clamcleat.com/line-lok.htm

Just a pass through the webbing loop and lock in place...can be retensioned in seconds after sitting in the hammock a while.

I think I'd have to tie and untie the little overhand knot each time to work the device... WhiteMtns,

Let me preface this by saying I have no experience with hammocks. I have, however, used clamcleats extensively on sailboats. I don't know how useful they would be with your hammock system, but offer these comments for your evaluation.

On sailboats, clamcleats can hold a tremendous load. However, several factors are critical to their function:

1. Constant Load
These devices hold well when there is a load on the line, however, when the load is eased, the cleat loses its "bite". Until you load the hammock, this cleat may not perform as well as you'd like.

2. Direction of Pull
In order for a clamcleat to hold, the direction of pull is critical. Depending how you rig the clamcleat, this may or may not be an issue. If you loop your line around the tree, and back to the cleat, the girth of the tree may not allow the line to pull at the proper angle for a secure lock. If you used a web choker around the tree, you could probably get a fair lead to the cleat.

My preference would be to use knots to secure a hammock. Simpler is better. Just my opinion.

Roland

WhiteMtns
02-16-2005, 22:40
OK

one last find on this subject.

http://us.binnacle.com/online/product.asp?dept%5Fid=15020&pf%5Fid=23571

$3.95 each

Could hold up to 600 lbs. Takes up to 1/4" rope (1/4 inch spectra core has a tensile strength of 2500 lbs...some brands much higher)

Measures 2 1/16" by 11/16"

and Weighs .7oz

now if it works...slip free under tension...I could sacrifice 1.4 ounces for the convenience. It'll be a while before I reach that stage of experimentation...I have a couple of projects to finish before I get to my hammock.

WhiteMtns
02-16-2005, 22:42
My preference would be to use knots to secure a hammock. Simpler is better. Just my opinion.

RolandThanks Roland...you're probably right of course...but when I get a crazy idea in my head...

My idea is to have the rope pass trough a loop in webbing that has been looped around a tree...giving a parallel return to the lock. Same on the other end. I hope to rig the thin rope very tight, clothesline-like, as the rope is the ridgeline for my tarp. Setting up the tarp first, without the hammock, for rainy day cooking, etc.

There will be two dropper loops already tied in this line that my hammock will clip to via gated clips or biners when it's time to hit the sack...now it's tarp support, ridgeline, and hammock suspension. So if all goes right, the rope should be under constant tension, just a little more so once I'm in bed. And I'm still using only the one line.

Thanks again.

Roland
02-16-2005, 23:00
Thanks Roland...you're probably right of course...but when I get a crazy idea in my head...

Thanks again. WhiteMtns,

Just because I am an "old dog" doesn't mean a "new trick" wouldn't work for you. Don't give up on the idea, if it makes sense to you. That's what innovation is all about!

I've taken a look at the link you posted above. I found this information on the same device: http://www.clamcleat.com/midaircleat.htm

That clamcleat, with its built-in fairlead, may ensure the proper direction of pull. This could work. Give it a try.

Roland

Footslogger
02-17-2005, 00:07
Just because I am an "old dog" doesn't mean a "new trick" wouldn't work for you. Don't give up on the idea, if it makes sense to you. That's what innovation is all about!
Roland==========================
I don't have much to offer this dialogue but I am very interested in the outcome.

'Slogger

bogey
02-17-2005, 03:38
Roland,

I can see the experience and wisdom in your description of the possible drawbacks. That said, I still want some, I'll just have to find other places to use 'em because...I never met a tool I didn't need!

Roland
02-17-2005, 06:10
Roland,

I can see the experience and wisdom in your description of the possible drawbacks. That said, I still want some, I'll just have to find other places to use 'em because...I never met a tool I didn't need! Bogey,

That's reason enough to buy some!!

Roland, the recovering tool-fool. :D

oldfivetango
02-17-2005, 09:18
Just for the record ...the time indicated in my earlier post was in summer (not raining) and did not include locating of trees. I do things a bit different when it's raining and not sure if that has a big impact on time. If raining when I set up I tie out the fly between the trees first (at about shoulder height) and then stake it out. With the overhead protection I next attach the straps to the two trees and adjust the tension.

'Slogger
AT 2003 With the fly tied out separately from the hammock i would think you can
get up the next morning-even if its still raining and wet-take down the hammock in comfort and have a nice DRY place under that fly to have breakfast and pack up your stuff.Sounds like a plan to me.
Cheers,
Oldfivetango:bse

Footslogger
02-17-2005, 09:53
With the fly tied out separately from the hammock i would think you can
get up the next morning-even if its still raining and wet-take down the hammock in comfort and have a nice DRY place under that fly to have breakfast and pack up your stuff.Sounds like a plan to me.
Cheers,
Oldfivetango:bse================================== ==
YUP ...exactly why I did it. The fly on my Hennessy Hammock was designed to clip onto hooks that are attached to the main tie out lines. Thus, the fly was typically the LAST thing attached and the FIRST thing removed during set-up and take down. I just added a piece of lightweight line to each end of the fly and tie it out to the trees separately from the hammock assembly. To keep the fly centered and still at night I still clip the ends onto the main tie out lines. Another option that gives me is to use the fly alone as a tarp-shelter and just tie it to the trees a bit lower to the ground.

'Slogger
AT 2003

treetrunks
02-17-2005, 10:20
I have set up my spear hammock several times with cam buckles. I used the type of straps that you use for roof racks. The Spear has webbing instead of rope and these cam buckles will only work on webbing. It leaves smash marks on the webbing that came with the hammock; I'm not sure if it is damaging the webbing (probably). It doesn't leave marks on the roof rack webbing. The drawback is the cam buckles are steal and would add some weight, don't know how much. These are the type of straps that I am talking about:

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product_list.asp?deptid=1188

oruoja
02-17-2005, 11:18
Does anyone have any experience with the large Hennessey hex fly (10x12) and/or comments vs using the standard fly that comes with the hammock? I too like to set the fly first especially in bad weather and am wondering how the hex fly with its shape works with the hammock or even using as a tarp without the hammock.

Footslogger
02-17-2005, 11:28
Does anyone have any experience with the large Hennessey hex fly (10x12) and/or comments vs using the standard fly that comes with the hammock? I too like to set the fly first especially in bad weather and am wondering how the hex fly with its shape works with the hammock or even using as a tarp without the hammock.=======================
Don't have one but from what I understand in talking with Tom Hennessy is that the major difference (other than overall size) is that there are 2 tie outs on each side instead of the single one on the standard fly.

'Slogger

hungryhowie
02-17-2005, 14:22
My homemade hammock might have something like this.

http://www.clamcleat.com/line-lok.htm



WhiteMtns,

I said earlier that we were both on the same track and I was correct. I'm actually in negotiations right now with a company that manufactures sailing cleats to manufacture a custom design that would attach the the tree hugger webbing.

30 seconds, I think, is a bit ambitious unless you're running from tree to tree, but 1 minute barier is easily broken via this method.

To reduce the number of adjustments needed for setup, I use a cleat only on one end of the line, and attach the other end with a small but strong carabiner and a fixed-length rope. Actually the fixed-length rope has two separate lengths, one that allows the hammock to be set up right next to the tree (for tree-distances that are as close as your hammock will allow), and another that is a more comforable 5 feet away from the tree.

I would urge you not to use something with a holding strength of only 200 pounds, as the force that is applied in a hammock is considerably more than the vertical force. One of my requirements for the project is that it have at least a 350 pounds safe working load, which is approximately a 3500 pound total holding strength. Still, the cleat should weigh considerably less than 1 ounce.

Footslogger
02-17-2005, 14:40
WhiteMtns,

I'm actually in negotiations right now with a company that manufactures sailing cleats to manufacture a custom design that would attach the the tree hugger webbing.========================================== =======
Any chance that this company would manufacture 2 cleats ...one for webbing and one for line ??

Thanks,

'Slogger

hungryhowie
02-17-2005, 17:40
After re-reading my post, I realize how that could have been confusing. The cleat will be made to hold a 3-5mm line, but will attach to the webbing tree hugger straps.

Envision a piece of webbing. One end is threaded through an attachment on the cleat and sewn back on itself. The other end of the webbing is sewn with a big loop so that the cleat can be pulled through it. Wrap the webbing around the tree, pull the cleat through the webbing loop created on the other side, and tighten it around the tree. Thread the 3-5mm suspension line for the hammock around the cleat, tension, and lock down with a simple half hitch.

-howie

Footslogger
02-17-2005, 18:18
After re-reading my post, I realize how that could have been confusing. The cleat will be made to hold a 3-5mm line, but will attach to the webbing tree hugger straps.==========================================
Thanks Howie ...that's similar to what I'm doing now except that I am using high weight load steel loops on the webbing rather than the cleat. I like the cleat idea better because I still have to secure my line to the metal loops using a knot. Only difference is that I make the tension adjustment using the webbing and not the line. With the cleat approach I will be able to adjust tension using the main lines from the hammock.

'Slogger

WhiteMtns
02-17-2005, 19:01
Great HHowie...

The one store I found clamcleats at retail has a minimun purchase of $40...

...I only need to buy $10 worth of stuff...

I know a guy who runs a marina in Mass...maybe I can get him to order some wholesale...



:sun
Recieved my Hammock body Material today. Seems like nice stuff.

I've got 1.9 oz 40 D mini ripstop (1/8" grid) Polyester in a charcoal grey. The online seller has my every cofidence...secure pay with paypal and received it in three days, nice.

I've read of folks having success with 1.9oz in a single layer...and I think the HH Racers are 1.1oz in a single layer. I was initially thinking of doubling it up because it's so thin...but If y'all come back saying single layer works just fine...I'll go with that. It'll be really light then...and I'll have material for the insulation pocket I want to put under it.

hungryhowie
02-17-2005, 19:07
I've read of folks having success with 1.9oz in a single layer...and I think the HH Racers are 1.1oz in a single layer. I was thinking of doubling it up because it's so thin...but If y'all come back saying single layer works just fine...I'll go with that. It'll be really light then.

It depends on your weight. If you weigh less than 200 pounds, I would think a single layer would be just fine. I'm at 155lbs and have made hammocks out of a single layer of 1.1oz without failure, though they've mainly been single-night prototypes.

I've got some 1.9 that I'm planning on making a single layer bottom out of for my every night shelter (I prefer sleeping in a hammock in the woods across the street to my house :D ), but plan to make my backpacking version out of a single layer 1.1oz.

-howie

WhiteMtns
02-17-2005, 19:35
Yeah, the 1.9 polyester is going to be my every trip backpacking hammock.

It still feels thin...but has no stretch, feels stronger then hell...

If you can get away with 1.1 (that air thin stuff on my quilts) more power to you. I'm extremely thin 5'10" and 127...so the 1.9 shouldn't have a problem with me.


now who is gonna try it with the .8oz? Anybody? Bueller? Anybody?

SGT Rock
02-17-2005, 21:23
Sarge,

I'll be on the Benton MacKaye Trail... come on down and we'll time it before a toast after the first toast, after the second toast, etc.

Youngblood

I WISH! I am in Mississippi for the next few weeks. I figure there has got to be some trail somewhere around here. BTW, I am in Hattiesburg, anyone hike around here?

NECKBONE
02-18-2005, 11:54
for winter use, with my expedition i use a compression sack and leave everything except the fly attached (that includes the complete super shelter setup; overcoat, pad, undercoat, & emer. blanket). it will compress to a size less than half that of a sleeping bag. if you make sure that the air is not trapped inside the hammock, you will not have any problems. one rope goes into the bag first & the other in last, that way the ropes will come out correctly. with this i can put up a complete winter HH (including fly) in less than 4 mins.
as for the clam cleats it looks like you will still have to tie an overhand knot after passing the rope back through the cleat. according to the add. on the website it also looks like you will have to buy by bulk. NECKBONE

The Hammocker
03-01-2005, 19:07
This is by far the most time-consuming part of setup!I'ts even harder when you have to stay inside a little campsit w/ a scout troop
so annoying:datz

titanium_hiker
03-02-2005, 17:56
hey WhiteMtns an under insulation pocket is really nice. TIP: have it open on both the right and left side of the hammock. I changed from a 3 sew in the titanium_2 hammock to a 2 sew in the titanium_3 hammock.

titanium_hiker

WhiteMtns
03-02-2005, 18:31
TIP: have it open on both the right and left side of the hammock. I changed from a 3 sew in the titanium_2 hammock to a 2 sew in the titanium_3 hammock.

titanium_hikerOK...

sounds good, but what main advantage? Other than access from either side, and not having to determine which is head or tail when setting up.

I'm still trying to determine just how big to make the insulation pocket. I'd sure like it to be only 30 inches wide, but 72 inches long. That way two yards of 1" Primaloft or so, usually 60 inches wide, could be split down the middle to make 2" of under insulation...matching my over quilt. But with the wrap around of the hammock, I sometimes think I should go wider...but that's more expensive as far a buying insul is concerned.

I have scraps of 3D that I could put into plastic tubes and make something like self inflating ribs. Spacing those head, hip, and foot, might allow me to buy only two yards of primaloft after all...to fill in the rest.

Thinking out loud...

Have any pictures of your rig?

I got sidetracked with an ultralight daypack and a second quilt...and the three feet of snow...so I haven't gotten started on my Hammock yet.

titanium_hiker
03-02-2005, 19:32
Sadly no pics as yet. I will I will... as soon as I can.
I bought 5 metres of my fabric, cut a 1.5m piece for the fabric. I did the two openings because I got really frustrated with it being on one side, and I was lazy. :)

SGT Rock
03-02-2005, 21:27
Howie, set up slow took 4:30, set up normal took 3:00, set up fast also took 3:00, seems like "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" applies to a hammock set up too.

erichlf
03-03-2005, 01:24
The very first time I set my hammock up was this last weekend, and it took 4 mins or so. I set it up a few times to get the hang of it. I think after some practive 2 min setup will be no problem. I am however glad that I found a video showing how to do the not. The instructions were terrible. Pretty much how one ties up a ship in the Navy, besides the 2 half hitches at the end.

The Hammocker
03-17-2005, 20:59
The very first time I set my hammock up was this last weekend, and it took 4 mins or so. I set it up a few times to get the hang of it. I think after some practive 2 min setup will be no problem. I am however glad that I found a video showing how to do the not. The instructions were terrible. Pretty much how one ties up a ship in the Navy, besides the 2 half hitches at the end. The "not", do you mean knot or am I just dumb and you saying something different?

schrochem
03-31-2005, 19:12
WhiteMtns,

I said earlier that we were both on the same track and I was correct. I'm actually in negotiations right now with a company that manufactures sailing cleats to manufacture a custom design that would attach the the tree hugger webbing.

30 seconds, I think, is a bit ambitious unless you're running from tree to tree, but 1 minute barier is easily broken via this method.

To reduce the number of adjustments needed for setup, I use a cleat only on one end of the line, and attach the other end with a small but strong carabiner and a fixed-length rope. Actually the fixed-length rope has two separate lengths, one that allows the hammock to be set up right next to the tree (for tree-distances that are as close as your hammock will allow), and another that is a more comforable 5 feet away from the tree.

I would urge you not to use something with a holding strength of only 200 pounds, as the force that is applied in a hammock is considerably more than the vertical force. One of my requirements for the project is that it have at least a 350 pounds safe working load, which is approximately a 3500 pound total holding strength. Still, the cleat should weigh considerably less than 1 ounce.

Howie,
This sounds very interesting. I also have the problem of going back and forth so I would be interested in having an easier, quicker system.
Status?

Scott