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lkaluzi
09-12-2011, 15:42
I'm planning on starting my 2012 thru hike in early March. I currently have an ultralite hennessey backpacker asymetrical hammock and a 15 degree sleeping bag. What should I do for insulation? Would a good sleeping pad and sleeping pad liner work or do I need an underquilt or overquilt?
Thanks for your help!

scope
09-12-2011, 16:13
Have you slept in it before? What did you do for insulation? Your title makes it sound like you're asking what to do in March, but keep in mind that there are very few days where you won't need at least some insulation.

The best advice is for you to invest in an underquilt. Pads can work just fine, but you do need side insulation, which typically means using a wider pad or what's called a Speer Pad Extender.

Raul Perez
09-12-2011, 16:13
My recommendation... try a pad out this early winter/late fall for the temps you expect to see. Test to see how low that pad will get you. If it fails the test... Underquilt it like a champ.

Kerosene
09-12-2011, 16:46
I've tried the pad route. It can work, but a pad of sufficient size is very bulky and tough to keep in place (I probably move around too much). I'd definitely look into under insulation, which might allow you to use a lighter quilt.

Monkeywrench
09-12-2011, 17:08
I started my thru-hike on MArch 18, 2009. I used my Hennessey with the Hennessey underpad and undercover, along with a mylar heat sheet as recommended by Hennessey. When the temps dropped down near or below freeing overnight, I added my down jacket below the underpad in the area below my torso.

ClayTurner
09-12-2011, 18:39
I would advise you to invest in an underquilt, pads are good but underquilts rock.

Fiddleback
09-13-2011, 10:40
I'm planning on starting my 2012 thru hike in early March. I currently have an ultralite hennessey backpacker asymetrical hammock and a 15 degree sleeping bag. What should I do for insulation? Would a good sleeping pad and sleeping pad liner work or do I need an underquilt or overquilt?
Thanks for your help!

Hmmm...sitting here at 3600' (in a slightly different region;)), our March temps ranged from lows of 14 to highs of 57. What's your March temps going to be..?

FB

paradoxb3
09-13-2011, 12:50
I'd tried foam pads too and they worked ok enough down to just a few degrees below freezing, but were a huge hassle since you cant do much with them aside from strap them outside your backpack, plus they move around, and bend and create uncomfortable ridges under you. And as always your level of cool comfort may vary from mine, as I tend to be a very warm sleeper.

Before my thru-hike last year I ended up making my own underquilt. I was on a slight budget, and it wasnt all that difficult if you can operate a sewing machine even at a 9th grade home-ec skill level, so if you're up for it: It ended up costing me around $120-130 to make and weighed in at exactly 16oz (1lb) I used 6oz of 800+ down, a silnylon outer shell, a breathable nylon inner shell, and bug netting for baffles as well as some elastic to keep it tight against the hammock. It was sort of football shaped and i attached it at the sides with a few buttons. I used it in rainy/damp environments the whole way and never had any problems with it getting wet, and it was always toasty even when well below freezing outside.

Anyway, my vote goes for underquilt regardless of if you make or buy it.

kotaro24
09-14-2011, 12:54
My brother and I hike in the fall, and use Hennessey tents with the Hennessey underquilt, pad, and a space blanket in the underquilt. We also carry a second space blanket which can be hung over the ridgeline to provide a dead air space when the temperatures go below 40 F. Adds about 10 degrees to the interior of the tent, for less than 2 ounces.